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& LAWN N E D GARSUE IS

Tasty tomatoes Tips to perish pests, fight fungus, root out rot and green up your thumb

CHANGEOUT

SC SCE NE

MARCH 2020

The antidote to urban sprawl SC RECIPE

French cooking made easy


THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS VOLUME 74 • NUMBER 3 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 600,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033 Tel: (803) 926‑3175 Fax: (803) 796‑6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop

2020 | march LAW GARDN & ISSUEEN

16 Keeping it green With more than 2,100 acres of forests, fields, lakes and trails, Fort Mill’s iconic Anne Springs Close Greenway holds urban sprawl at bay.

EDITOR

Keith Phillips Tel: (803) 739‑3040 Email: Keith.Phillips@ecsc.org FIELD EDITORS

Walter Allread, Josh Crotzer PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

22 Tasty homegrown

tomatoes

Travis Ward ART DIRECTOR

Sharri Harris Wolfgang

Step up to the challenge of growing better-tasting tomatoes this season with expert advice from Clemson University Extension Agent Chase Smoak.

DESIGNER

Susan Collins PRODUCTION

Andrew Chapman

16

WEB EDITOR

Chase Toler COPY EDITORS

Trevor Bauknight, Jennifer Jas

4 CO-OP NEWS

Updates from your cooperative

CONTRIBUTORS

April Coker Blake, Mike Couick, Andrew Haworth, Tim Hanson, Jan A. Igoe, Patrick Keegan, David Novak, Sydney Patterson, Belinda Smith-Sullivan, Chase Smoak, Brad Thiessen, Amy Trainum, Paul Wesslund PUBLISHER

Lou Green

6 AGENDA

Learn how the race to build better batteries for electric vehicles may benefit home electricity consumers.

10 DIALOGUE Questioning deregulation Lawmakers will need to ask some hard questions before attempting to alter South Carolina’s electricity market.

ADVERTISING

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739‑5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

American MainStreet Publications Tel: (800) 626‑1181 Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor. ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send to your

12 ENERGY Q&A Your efficiency upgrades checklist Follow this six-step checklist if you plan to make efficiency improvements to your home this spring.

Put your best gardening foot forward this season with electric lawn and garden tools.

local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above. Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices. © COPYRIGHT 2020. The Electric Cooperatives

21 STORIES Garden guru Spend some time with Amanda McNulty, host of SCETV’s Making It Grow.

of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor. is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

$5.72 members,

28

RECIPE

A fantastic French dinner Good news: Chef Belinda Smith-Sullivan’s latest recipes prove French cooking is not as difficult or as complicated as you might think.

30

$8 nonmembers

28

TRAVELS

Mystery at the museum The game is afoot at the S.C. State Museum’s new International Exhibition of Sherlock Holmes.

Member of the AMP network reaching more than 9 million homes and businesses

34 36 38

MARKETPLACE

& LAWN GARDEN ISSUE

Tasty tomatoes

CALENDAR

Tips to perish pests, fight fungus, root out rot and green up your thumb

HUMOR ME

Smash now and forever hold your peace According to our humor columnist, paying good money to bludgeon inanimate objects with a sledgehammer is all the rage. FRO M TO P: A M Y TR A I N U M; DAV I D C L A RK ; G I N A M OO RE

SC SCE NE

The antidote to urban sprawl MARCH 2020

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS:

22

14 SMART CHOICE Lawn and order

SC RECIPE

French cooking made easy

Our gardening tips can help you harvest a bumper crop of the tastiest tomatoes you’ve ever tried. Illustration by David Clark.


SC | agenda How batteries could change our energy future

Timing for the best price:

The cost of the electricity

N REC A

Businesses around the world are betting big on batteries for electric cars, and in a roundabout way, this trend could change how electricity is delivered to your home. Over the past eight years, global battery production capacity has grown eight times to supply the expanding market for electric vehicles. New manufacturing plants under construction in the United States, Europe and Asia could increase capacity another five times in the next eight years. As battery production increases, consumers can expect improved performance and lower prices, says Jan Ahlen, the director of energy solutions for the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA). The benefit for home ­electricity consumers is that these better and cheaper ­batteries can be connected to make large “­utility-scale” ­batteries with multiple applications. Here are three ways ­batteries could change the ­future of electricity.

This 13-megawatt Tesla solar field, which is coupled with a 52-megawatt-hour battery storage system, is owned by Kaua’i Island Utility Co-op and allows the cooperative to store solar power during the day and dispatch it over a four-hour period during the evening when energy demand is high.

varies with seasons and even the time of day as demand for electricity fluctuates. If your cooperative can buy electricity and store it in a battery when the price is lowest, then draw from the battery when market prices are highest, members may benefit from lower rates. Helping renewable energy:

There’s no solar power at night or wind energy in calm weather. Utility-scale batteries could change that, storing electricity during peak production, and making it available when needed. Outage management:

Utility-scale batteries are an important part of microgrids, a new concept for handling widespread power outages. Microgrids use independent

Placing hot food in the refrigerator makes the appliance work harder than necessary, using more energy. Allow food to cool down before you place it in the fridge. 6

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MARCH 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

power sources, like batteries, to keep electricity flowing to highpriority facilities like hospitals, storm shelters and gas stations until service can be restored for the entire community. “Batteries are becoming better, faster and cheaper,” says Ahlen. He adds that they are a trend that’s “opening up many new opportunities for

utilities to help provide more affordable and reliable power for their consumers.” writes on consumer and cooperative affairs for the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, the national trade association representing more than 900 local electric cooperatives. PAUL WESSLUND

GONE FISHIN’ The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and ­migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after. Minor

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

MARCH 16 4:16 9:31 — 17 11:16 4:31 — 18 10:01 4:46 1:46 19 10:31 5:01 3:01 20 10:46 5:16 3:46 21 11:16 5:31 4:31 22 11:46 5:46 5:16 23 — 6:01 12:01 24 6:16 12:01 6:31 25 12:31 6:31 7:01 26 12:46 6:46 7:46 27 1:16 7:01 8:31 28 1:46 7:16 9:31 29 2:01 7:31 10:46 30 2:31 7:31 — 31 1:31 7:31 —

Minor

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

APRIL 7:16 8:46 9:31 10:16 10:46 11:16 11:46 5:46 12:31 1:01 1:16 1:46 2:31 3:01 4:01 5:31

1 — 3:01 — 2 9:31 3:31 12:46 3 9:46 4:01 2:31 4 10:16 4:31 3:46 5 10:46 4:46 4:31 6 5:16 11:16 5:31 7 — 5:46 6:16 8 12:16 6:01 7:16 9 1:01 6:31 8:01 10 1:31 7:01 9:01 11 2:01 7:16 10:16 12 2:46 7:46 — 13 12:31 8:01 — 14 — 2:46 — 15 — 3:31 — 16 10:01 3:46 1:31

7:01 8:31 9:31 10:16 11:01 11:46 12:01 12:31 1:16 2:01 2:46 3:46 5:01 6:31 7:46 8:46


Nearly 30,000 Jobs Created $6 Billion In Capital Investment $30 Billion In Total Economic Impact

Powered by South Carolina’s Electric Cooperatives.


|

SC   agenda HIGHLIGHTS ONLY ON

SCLiving.coop

MARCH 15–APRIL 15

SOUTHERN SOUND SERIES MARCH 21

Homemade aioli Aioli is a sauce made with garlic and olive oil that is used widely throughout France and the Mediterranean as a dip and on sandwiches. In this video recipe, Chef Belinda will show you how to make it at home. SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda.

Balsam Range takes the stage for the second to last of the 2020 Southern Sound Series concerts. The North Carolina quintet has earned many awards for their acoustic sound that toes the line between bluegrass and newgrass, according to Rolling Stone. The show begins at 7:30 p.m., but come early to enjoy food trucks and even more music on the McCelvey Center lawn. Ticket prices for the show range from $20–45. chmuseums.org/southernsoundseries

How does your garden grow? Pretty darn well if you follow SC Gardener columnist L.A. Jackson’s advice for gardening in small spaces. He also offers tips on when and how to pick your favorite veggies for peak flavor and freshness at SCLiving.coop/gardener. 8

MARCH 28

South Carolinians know how to strut their stuff, and at no time is that more evident than at the Carolina Cup Steeplechase, where the spectators are almost as much fun to watch as the horses. This daylong affair culminates with the races, but not before attendees enjoy tailgating and showing off colorful spring fashions.

It’s a great day for a parade South Carolina Living and the City of West Columbia are celebrating the 3rd Annual Kinetic Derby Day festival (April 25) featuring whimsical human-powered floats in a Kinetic Sculpture Parade and an old-fashioned Soap Box Derby. Sign up today for our March Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and your chance to win a $100 Visa gift card and a Kinetic Derby Day weekend getaway package. For details and to register online, visit SCLiving.coop/reader-reply. One lucky winner will be drawn at random from all entries received by March 31.

CAROLINA CUP

(803) 432-6513; carolina-cup.org

LOWCOUNTRY CAJUN FESTIVAL APRIL 5

Follow the lively sounds of zydeco music to Charleston County’s James Island Park for the 2020 Lowcountry Cajun Festival and enjoy a taste of Cajun and Creole culture. In addition to the crawfish-eating contest (where else can you see someone eat 37 crawfish in 30 seconds?), guests can enjoy a spread of authentic jambalaya, alligator, etouffee, and, of course, crawfish. Admission to the festival is $15 per person for those over the age of 12. (843) 795-4386; ccprc.com/137/lowcountry-cajun-festival

GET MORE

For more happenings, turn to our Calendar on Page 36, and see expanded festivals and events coverage on SCLiving.coop.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MARCH 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

A NIGHT OF PROMISE APRIL 2

A Night of Promise is also a night of hope for homeless children and their families in Beaufort County. The event—which features a buffet dinner, beer and wine bar, plus live and silent auctions— raises funds to support Beaufort County’s Family Promise shelter program. Proceeds from each $100 ticket will go to renovation of the organization’s day center which provides space for teenagers in the shelter program to learn and congregate together. The nonprofit has assisted more than 500 individuals in the past 12 years. (843) 815-4211; familypromisebeaufortcounty.org/event/a-night-of-promise


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SC   dialogue

Questioning deregulation market was left open, however, and is still managed today by their independent system operator, CAISO. Texas is seen by many as the gold standard of open energy markets, with some of the lowest rates in the nation. It didn’t MY STAFF WILL TELL YOU I ASK THEM A LOT OF QUESTIONS. begin that way. In 1995 the Texas legislature required ­utilities If you’re kind, you might say that I’m an inquisitive person. to provide independent generators access to transmission to Another way of saying it, however, is that my staff is being support wholesale competition. Seven years later, the Texas “Mike-romanaged.” electricity market was opened to retail competition. Even with Either way you look at it, I find asking questions, especially the benefit of lessons learned from California, Texas rate­ the right ones, to be the best start to any new initiative. payers were still saddled with costs associated with the tranThe General Assembly will be asking questions as it considers tasking a joint study committee to look into restrucsition. After Texas securitized the divestment of the utilities’ generation assets, ratepayers were left with $9.5 billion in turing the state’s energy market—a process in which the stranded costs. In the first 10 years, customers in restructured cooperatives plan to participate. Any conclusions drawn from parts of the state faced higher rates than those who were this investigation should start with the crucial questions at a served by regulated utilities (like Texas cooperatives). high level. While we’re up there, let’s look at how other states When Ohio restructured retail elecencountered these questions when they restructured their energy markets. in 1999, it wasn’t just following There is a certain amount tricity the national trend. It was also trying to Deregulation, wholesale or retail? take advantage of low natural gas prices of investment inherent in and the recently deregulated wholesale Generally, a deregulated competitive energy generation and market. The state’s large industrial sector market exists at two levels: wholesale and also pressed for deregulation. The legisretail. The wholesale market includes delivery, and you can’t the bulk purchase and sale of electriclation provided a five-year development compete away the real period that required a residential rate ity among energy producers and energy and freeze. But as that period distributors. That market must exist costs of those investments. reduction came to a close, there were still a limited first within a Regional Transmission number of choices in the market, espeOrganization (RTO) or an Independent Service Operator (ISO) before retail deregulation—­allowing cially in rural areas, and growing concerns that an immediconsumers to choose from whom they want to buy their ate shift to market-based rates would create a sticker shock power—could ever take place. for consumers. A second restructuring bill in 2008 stimulated more choices in the retail market while also making it easier Texas, California and Ohio were three of the first states in for utilities to collect distribution charges. the nation to deregulate their energy markets. They took different approaches initially, but all three found the need to go What factors other than market forces affect back and enact new policies as their experiences yielded new what we pay for power? questions. California deliberated restructuring throughout the As Texas saw in its first 10 years of deregulation, competition 1990s, finally yielding to stakeholder pressure to fully deregwasn’t a magic potion. In the last decade, ratepayers have benefitted from the drop in natural gas prices as well as the ulate (both wholesale and retail) in 1998. Errors in their abundance of wind energy in the state. An argument could market designs and restrictions on pricing and generator conbe made that these advantages have been realized primartracts contributed to a California energy crisis. High demand exceeded energy supply, and prices spiked, costing rate­ ily in the wholesale market and then passed down to retail payers tens of billions of dollars. There were blackouts, and customers. the state’s largest investor-owned utility, Pacific Gas and California focused on resource adequacy, energy efficiency Electric (PG&E), went into bankruptcy. In response, California and decarbonization in responding to its early deregulation re-regulated its retail market in 2001, then later opened comfailures. While that has created some of the highest rates in the nation, it has also reduced the amount of power the petition back up for non-residential consumers and municipal average Californian consumes. In 2016, their average monthly aggregation, which are programs that allow local governments bill was $31.90 less than the average Texan’s. to procure power on behalf of their residents. The wholesale BY MIKE COUICK

President and CEO, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina

10

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MARCH 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP


A DA M N I K LE W ICZ

In South Carolina, cheaper fuel options are limited. We have aging nuclear plants and an abundance of coal-fired ­generation. Because gas is cheaper and cleaner, coal is no longer the preferred source of fuel that it once was. We don’t sit on top of a natural gas shale like Ohio and Pennsylvania do, nor are we anywhere close. A new transmission network would have to be built to get natural gas-fueled energy to the homes and businesses in South Carolina. That could cost more than building new generation. The experiences of other states have yielded this reality: There is a certain amount of investment inherent in energy generation and delivery, and you can’t compete away the real costs of those investments. Someone must pay for them. For example, some states have required utilities to divest generation facilities to participate in the open wholesale market. That creates stranded costs, such as in Texas, and those costs are passed down to the ratepayers. The elements and factors that are the primary ­influencers on our market now may not have the same significance in our near future. New ones inevitably come along and take their place. Everyone in our industry is trying to anticipate the role battery storage will play in the energy economy. Batteries paired with solar-generated energy may be our next game-changer. Shouldn’t a restructuring of the energy market account for that?

What are the goals of restructuring our energy market? The easy answer here is to lower rates, right? But for whom? The move toward deregulation in Texas and Ohio was influenced by their industrial sectors, but it ended up

costing residential ratepayers comparatively. Clean energy and decarbonization? An admirable and perhaps necessary priority, but is it achievable at this stage? The wind doesn’t blow here as it does in the Midwest, and we don’t have the hydropower assets of the Northwest. Renewable energy can and should be a part of our region’s generation mix, but it shouldn’t be debilitating for residential ratepayers. As cooperatives, our priorities have always been safe and reliable power at an affordable price. In the past, meeting the energy demands of our members has meant forecasting loads 30 years in the future and securing generation accordingly. Is that still the world in which we need to live? The most powerful market force is public policy. While the term deregulation seems to step away from government influence, in reality it is just the construction of a new set of rules. Those rules, and the incentives they create, serve the same function in a deregulated market as the regulator serves in a traditionally regulated market. How you structure those rules and the incentives they create in a deregulated market is just as important as picking a regulator who can understand and apply laws in a regulated one. Ultimately, it’s the state legislatures that structure these new markets with new laws. Some have found they needed to step back in to try to fix the situation with more restructuring and more regulation when things didn’t go as planned. That is a particularly inefficient form of micromanagement. And the best way to avoid it is by asking the right questions at the very beginning. The ones posed here are fundamental, but they are not the only ones we need to ask. I’ll have more in next month’s column.

SCLIVING.COOP   | MARCH 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

11


|

SC   energy Q&A

Your efficiency upgrades checklist BY PAT KEEGAN AND BRAD THIESSEN

Q

YOU’LL SAVE IN THE LONG RUN Consulting with a professional energy auditor can help homeowners evaluate efficiency upgrades and prioritize improvements that will show the greatest return on investment.

I recently moved into an older home that’s definitely not as efficient as my last residence. I want to make some upgrades, but I’m not sure how to get started. Can you offer any advice?

STEP 4: Plan your projects.

A

PI EDM O NT E LEC TRIC COO PER ATI V E

Making your home more energy efficient can be a big task, and it’s helpful to have a plan in place before you dive in. Here’s a six-step checklist we’ve compiled to help you get organized.

STEP 1: Set goals and con-

straints. Start by setting your primary goal. Are you mainly looking to save money on your home’s energy bills, make it more comfortable, increase the resale value or help the environment? Then, set a deadline for when you need the project completed. This may affect whether you do some of the work yourself and which contractor you choose. Last but not least, set your budget. How much is it worth to you to live in an energy-efficient home? One way to look at this is to review your annual energy bills. If they’re around $2,000 per year, you might ask yourself how much you’d be willing to spend if you could cut that expense in half. For example, $10,000 spent to save $1,000 each year would be a 10% rate of return on your investment. STEP 2: Educate yourself. Consider the costs and benefits of each potential improvement. There are many helpful lists of small and large energy-efficiency upgrades available online. There are also some great resources like the Department of Energy (energy.gov), the Energy Star program (energystar.gov) and Consumer

12

Now that you have set your budget and priorities and have a sense of the work and costs involved, make a list of the items you want to include in your energy-efficiency upgrades. Some work, like caulking windows or adding weather stripping to doors, can easily be done by the homeowner, especially with the help of online tutorials. Other work, like insulating an attic, can be dangerous and may require special equipment or know-how.

Some work, like caulking windows or adding weather stripping to doors, can easily be done by the homeowner, especially with the help of online tutorials. Reports (consumerreports.org). Your electric co-op may have a home energy advisor on staff or literature that can help. An energy audit will help you prioritize so you can spend your money on the measures that will bring you the most benefit. And an energy auditor can help in other ways. My neighbors hired a contractor to do some major energy-efficiency upgrades. They asked an energy auditor to take a look at the work before they paid for it, and the auditor found it wasn’t even close to the level agreed to in the contract. It took three or four return visits for the contractor to get the work up to the promised level of efficiency. STEP 3: Schedule an energy audit.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MARCH 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

STEP 5: Identify and select contractors.

This can be challenging. You want a contractor who really knows how to do energy-efficiency work. And you may need two or more contractors, such as one for your heating system and another for insulation. Be sure to get several quotes if possible, as well as references from past clients. Create and sign a contract with guaranteed work and completion dates, with payments due only as work is completed and inspected. The quality of the work makes a big difference in the amount of energy savings and added comfort you desire. Keep an eye on the project and don’t be afraid to ask questions—lots of questions. Remember, it’s your home, and you’re the one paying the bills! STEP 6: Oversee the work.

Send questions to Energy Q&A, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033, or email energyqa@scliving.coop.


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SC   smart choice

Lawn and order If you want to put your best gardening foot forward this spring, check out these tools that can make your thumb a little greener. BY DAVID NOVAK

A CUT ABOVE

No gas, no exhaust fumes and no lousy racket. Who doesn’t love an electric push mower for tidying up a lawn until it’s perfectly manicured? The Dewalt 2x20V MAX Brushless Electric Mower takes it up a notch with two batteries that work simultaneously to deliver smooth power to a 20-inch cutting deck. $400. (800) 433‑9258; dewalt.com.

JUST A SPRINKLE

Even sprinkler systems are “smart” now. The Rachio 3 Smart Sprinkler Controller optimizes your in-ground irrigation system by autoadjusting to local weather and soil conditions, ensuring an ultra-healthy landscape while conserving water. $230. (844) 472‑2446; rachio.com.

GONE WITH THE WIND

Say goodbye to lawn debris for good. The Blue Ridge 40V 2.0Ah Cordless Turbine Blower chases away leaves, clippings and pine straw with a 420-cubic-feetper-minute blast of airflow. With adjustable speeds and a featherlight design, switching between driveway cleaning to gutter leaves is a breeze. $100. (833) 259‑2583; blueridgetools.com.

ROBO-LAWN

With the Robomow Royal RS622, you can scratch lawn maintenance off your list. This robotic lawn mower is designed for lots up to a half-acre, runs whisper-quiet, cuts to perfection and can be operated from your phone. $2,200. (844) 762‑6669; usa.robomow.com. HEDGEHOG

SHARK BAIT

The WORX 20V Power Share JawSaw cuts tree branches up to 4 inches in diameter and thins out dead wood from existing trees and bushes. Its shark-like steel teeth that surround the jaws hold wood in place while cutting, and the jaws guard the operator from potential contact with the teeth. $150. (855) 279‑0505; worx.com.

14

Do more than just trim your hedges. The Craftsman 4-Amp Hedge Trimmer features an innovative power saw on the tip, which coupled with a powerful motor, slices through 1.5-inch branches like butter. The 180‑degree rotating handle provides ­comfortable cutting at any angle. $75. (888) 331‑4569; craftsman.com.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MARCH 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

Tech journalist David Novak is editor of GadgetGram.com. Prices and availability are subject to change. Inclusion in this column is not an endorsement by South Carolina Living or any S.C. electric cooperative.


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©2020 Zoysia Farm Nurseries, 3617 Old Taneytown Rd, Taneytown, MD 21787

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green

KEEPING IT Fort Mill’s iconic Anne Springs Close Greenway holds urban sprawl at bay STORY AND PHOTOS BY AMY TRAINUM

some­one had the foresight to preserve thousands of acres of land in Fort Mill to protect it from the urban sprawl that would start to encroach on the area from Charlotte decades later. Hard to believe, that is, until you meet Anne Springs Close, the visionary namesake behind the 2,100-acre Anne Springs Close Greenway. “Development was eating up all the farmland and the forest between Charlotte and Fort Mill. Forests were being cut down and the fields were being paved over,” she says. “My dream was to save some of it, so that my children and grandchildren, and everybody else, would have a place where they could experience being in the woods.” Close, an ardent environmentalist, has led a fascinating life that’s taken her all over the world. It has included a seemingly endless list of extraordinary adventures, such as a ride on the Hindenburg (before its fateful last journey), carrying the Olympic torch in 1996, and climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro, not once, but three times. Even now, at the age of 94, Close’s adventurous spirit and profound love for nature are infectious. She beams when she talks about being outdoors, and about her childhood spent in these

IT’S HARD TO BELIEVE THAT ALMOST 25 YEARS AGO,

Anne Springs Close, a lifelong environmentalist, still enjoys visiting the greenway that her family donated as a public recreation area near Fort Mill.

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“Forests were being cut down and the fields were being paved over. My dream was to save some of it.”

­

—ANNE SPRINGS CLOSE

very forests, fields and lakes learning firsthand the positive impact nature can have on someone’s life. Thanks to her determination, along with the help of her eight children who all donated inherited family land to create the park, Close’s vision of saving natural space in the fastgrowing Fort Mill area is a thriving reality. The park opened in 1995 with two main goals: preserving the natural habitat and making it accessible for people to enjoy. The expansive nature preserve is almost two-and-a-half times the size of New York’s famous Central Park, and from the beginning, the Greenway has been thoughtfully designed to protect and maintain the natural surroundings, explains the Greenway’s director of communications and guest ­services, Elizabeth Bowers. “What’s unique with our conserved land, is that we want people to come and enjoy it. It’s not something that’s just to maintain green space,” she says. “We want people to appreciate it and experience it. It is a preserve, but it’s meant for the public’s enjoyment.” And, there are plenty of ways to enjoy it. The list of outdoor amenities and activities offered on the property is unmatched, making it easy to understand why it’s become a regional destination for people who want to disconnect from urban life and get outdoors. “We provide an excuse for people to put their phones down and just enjoy being outside and not worrying about

the rest of the noise in their lives for a while,” Bowers says. Visitors can easily spend an entire day exploring the unspoiled land on the almost 40 miles of running and mountain biking trails, or they can opt to navigate the property on horseback along the Greenway’s 12 miles of equestrian trails. Each of these well-worn trails leads to points of interest like the beloved swinging bridge, historic cabins that date back to the 1800s, and the 28-acre Lake Haigler, where anglers can cast lines with only the ambient sounds of frogs croaking and the wind rustling through the reeds in the background. This sort of peaceful stillness—a rarity nowadays with the constant construction in the area—can be found almost anywhere on the Greenway. And, it’s this peacefulness that brings visitors like Tega Cay resident Sue Hapner, who has been visiting the Greenway for more than a decade, back time and time again. u

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The Gateway Canteen, an airy cafe in the Greenway Gateway visitors center, makes almost everything in-house using locally sourced ingredients.

“It’s a treasure that offers a getting-back-to-nature feel and calmness in life.” —VISITOR SUE HAPNER

GET THERE

Greenway Gateway

The Anne Springs Close Greenway Lake Haigler entrance is located off of the U.S. Hwy. 21 Bypass at 2573 Lake Haigler Drive in Fort Mill. HOURS: Open seven days a week from 7 a.m. to sunset. The Greenway is closed on Christmas Day. n The Greenway Gateway is open Monday through Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. n The Gateway Canteen is open Monday through Wednesday from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Thursday through Saturday from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. ADMISSION: $5 for non-members; free for children under the age of four; free for members. Yearly memberships are $49 for individuals and $99 for families. DETAILS: For more information, visit ascgreenway.org or call (803) 547-4575. MORE INFO: Along with the many outdoor amenities, the preserve also hosts a myriad of organized recreational activities that range from yoga classes and guided hikes to an introduction to kayaking class and biking clinics. The Greenway’s annual events are also a big draw, and include an Earth Day Celebration, Fall Frolic and summer concert series.

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“It’s a treasure that offers a getting-back-to-nature feel and calmness in life,” Hapner says while taking a break from a hike along one of the trails that’s shaded by a thick tree canopy. Many journeys through the park now begin at Greenway Gateway, a 6,300-square-foot visitors center that serves as a sort of front door to the property. Guests can get ­acclimated with the property, ask questions, and discover all the Green­ way has to offer through interactive map displays, explains John Gordon, the executive director of the Greenway. “We’ve found that 2,100 acres can be kind of intimidating for people. So, they want a little bit of hand-holding at the beginning, and this allows us to do that,” he says. Along with the interactive maps and a small retail space, the center is also home to the Gateway Canteen, a cafe that makes almost everything in-house using locally sourced ingredients. The menu features a variety of items ranging from coffee, wine, and local craft brews to Cuban sandwiches and lettuce wraps. There are also several menu options targeting kids, including hot dogs and grilled cheese. The cafe is open daily, serving breakfast, lunch and dinner, giving visitors even more of a reason to spend time at the Greenway. Close frequently can be found walking along the Green­ way’s hiking trails or grabbing a bite to eat at the canteen, and while you can tell she’s extremely proud of what the property has become, she’s too humble to accept the doting compliments from visitors who make a point to approach her and thank her for providing such a unique destination. “My vision originally was a place for families to come and get back to nature,” says Close, who admits the Greenway has surpassed anything she had ever hoped for two decades ago. “I didn’t realize it was going to attract as many people as it has and become a destination, but I’m delighted.”


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SC   stories

Garden guru When she was a girl, Amanda McNulty, South Carolina’s beloved horticulturalist and public television personality, spent her days playing outdoors in wooded, undeveloped areas of Columbia. But she took relatively little interest in the flowers and plants that would later become her stock in trade. That changed when in her late 20s, she took a gardening course at Clemson University. Almost at once, she realized she had found her true calling, and graduated a few years later with a degree in horticulture. Today, McNulty shares her vast knowledge of plants with viewers of Making It Grow, the popular Emmy Awardwinning television show she has hosted since 2012. Traveling around the state, McNulty and her three-person crew produce more than 40 shows each year. “We have a wonderful time,” McNulty says. “We see many different parts of the state and it is so fun to meet with people.” Fans frequently ask to have their photograph taken with her, and invariably inquire about McNulty’s famous homemade floral hats, which she wears on her show. “My children and I used to like to make flower hats,” she says. “We would weave things we found in the yard and put them on our heads just for fun.” McNulty also writes and narrates about 150 minutelong radio spots each year, and concedes that the relentless challenge of generating compelling topics is probably the most difficult part of her job. And her favorite part of her work? “What I really love most about these shows is going out and interviewing people and learning something new,” she says. “To me, that is even more interesting than horticulture.” —BY TIM HANSON PHOTO BY MILTON MORRIS

Amanda McNulty AGE:

69.

St. Matthews. “I love South Carolina oysters. They are the bomb.” LITTLE-KNOWN FACT: Served for 12 years on the St. Matthews Town Council. FAVORITE PASTIME: Going to movies with friends. HOMETOWN:

FAVORITE FOOD:

TUNE IN Viewers can watch Making It Grow live at 7 p.m. Tuesdays on SCETV or live on Facebook, facebook.com/makingitgrow. Past episodes and McNulty’s radio spots can be found online at mig.org.

SCLIVING.COOP   | MARCH 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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N& LAWD N GAR UEE S IS

BY CHASE SMOAK | ILLUSTRATIONS BY DAVID CLARK

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Tired of losing tomatoes to unwanted garden pests? Worried you’ll need to sacrifice excellent taste for improved yield? Take a deep breath and relax—this year, you can have your tomato and eat it, too. With the help of a few new varieties and fieldproven tactics, you’ll be on your way to growing the best tomato crop yet. Growing tomatoes can be a challenge in the South, especially when folks are new to the game. Heck, even seasoned gardeners are caught off-guard from time to time, and that’s OK as long as we learn in the process. If you want to grow delicious, homegrown tomatoes, simply focus your a­ ttention on these three stages of g­ ardening: planning, p ­ reparing and protecting.

Planning Selecting varieties

Many gardeners claim that if you want great flavor, you’ll need to go heirloom. People selected these landrace tomato varieties long ago for traits such as shape, size and above all else, taste, so the claim has a basis. In their pursuit of a better tomato, however, a significant factor was overlooked— the tomato’s resistance to pest and environmental pressure. If you’ve grown heirlooms in South Carolina, you likely already know how challenging the process can be. This bittersweet truth has left many gardeners wondering if old-timey taste is a thing of the past. Well, there’s good news: It most definitely is not. Consumer demand for a dependable, flavorsome tomato has not fallen on deaf ears. Plant breeders have brought us a number of improved tomato varieties. But with so many options available, how do we find the best choice for our garden? If you’ve ever asked this question, you’re in luck. An organization, coined All-American Selections, or AAS, may have the answer. The group tests new varieties before they hit the market, and their trial notes will tell you everything you need to know. How does it work? Test plots across the country serve as a stage for blind auditions—it’s a little like a version of American Idol for emerging plants, with a slight twist. The performer’s identity is hidden from judges, and success is determined by out-competing the best comparable opponent, like a battle royale between a hopeful new artist and, say, Bruce Springsteen. If the new guy wins, you’re onto something special. Turn the page for a few 2019 AAS winning tomato varieties to consider this season.

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TASTY TOMATOES

Red Torch N AT I O N A L W I N N E R

R E N I A T gardening CON

Lack the space or time for a traditional garden? No worries. You can grow tomatoes in pots, too. Follow these tips.

u Use pots that are at least 6–8 inches deep with holes underneath for drainage. u For ease of movement, use dollies or platforms with wheels to shift plants around. u Use a lightweight potting mix. Packaged mixes are widely available at most garden centers, but be sure to avoid soilless media that lacks the required nutrients.

Chef’s Choice Black REGIONAL WINNER

Southeast, Mountain/Southwest, West/Northwest

weeks before adding more nutrients. When it’s time, use a water-soluble fertilizer at its recommended rate.

Who can resist a giant beefsteak tomato? In trials, Chef’s Choice Black displayed superior disease resistance to some of the South’s worst pathogens: Tomato Mosaic Virus, Fusarium, and Verticillium wilt. On taste, AAS says, “The large fruit, weighing 8–10 ounces, has a full, sweet flavor with a slight Chef’s saltiness that compleChoice ments its overall taste.” Black Gardeners should expect each plant to produce 30 or more fruits throughout the growing season. Plants will ripen early (75 days after transplanting) and grow to a height of 5 feet. Stake or trellis this indeterminate tomato for the best results.

u Choose your variety with care. For containers, I recommend these AAS-tested varieties.

Terenzo. A cherry-type tomato with a trailing growth habit and sweet fruit. Height at maturity is 16–20 inches, making it a great addition to any spot with full sun and easy access.

COU RTESY O F A LL-A M ERIC A N S E LEC TIO NS

Lizzano (shown above). This tasty tomato grows 16–20 inches tall and only 20 inches wide. Lizzano produces a copious amount of fruit, which can be harvested 105 days from seeding or 63 days after transplant. One perk of this variety is its noted resistance to Late Blight, meaning it’ll likely last later into the growing season.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MARCH 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

Mountain Rouge REGIONAL WINNER

Northeast, Southeast, Heartland

Mountain Rouge has proven it’s possible to have old-timey, heirloom taste and excellent disease resistance in one package. Resistance to Late Blight, Root Knot Nematode,

COU RTESY O F A LL-A M ERIC A N S E LEC TIO NS

u When using a potting mix with added fertilizer, wait for 8–10

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COU RTESY O F A LL-A M ERIC A N SE LEC TIO NS

The red-striped, yellow fruit of Red Torch, though small in size, packs a big punch in the taste department. This plant is a prolific early season producer with the capability to provide 100+ tomatoes per plant. AAS trials confirmed this variety’s Red ability to hold up under Torch a multitude of diseases and environmental pressures. Red Torch is an indeterminate variety growing 5–6 feet tall, making stakes or trellising a must. For best results, space plants 24–30 inches apart and separate rows by a minimum of 36 inches. You’ll enjoy ripe fruit 60–70 days after transplanting.


Preparing

Site selection and planting

COU RTESY O F A LL-A M ERIC A N SE LEC TIO NS

Mountain Rouge

The importance of garden location is no big secret. A tomato garden needs access to full sun (6–8 hours a day) and should have good drainage. Tomato plants hate wet feet and often succumb to root rot when left in waterlogged soils. They do, however, need regular watering throughout the growing season, so select a spot with easily accessible water. Irrigating deeply but infrequently strengthens plants and encourages deep, healthy root systems for hot summer days. Avoid using

Verticillium and Fusarium should give this beefsteak tomato an upper hand in hot, humid gardens. The taste of its 12– to 14-ounce pink fruit is described by AAS as a “robust heirloom flavor with a brilliant balance of sweet and acid.” In the garden, separate plants by a minimum of 4 feet and support with stakes or trellises. This variety produced fruit 73 days after transplant and has an average output of 75 tomatoes per plant. All-American Selections serves as a fantastic resource for both new and seasoned gardens alike, and their trials encompass a wide variety of plants ranging from coleus to cucumber. For more information, visit all-americaselections.org.

Blossom-end rot is a severe abiotic disorder that plagues the tomato plants of many home gardeners. It starts with small dark spots on the blossom end of developing fruit, and quickly grows to form a sizable rotten area, ruining the harvest from what appear to be otherwise healthy plants. The most common cause of blossomend rot is a calcium deficiency, often brought on by extreme fluctuations in soil moisture. Here are a few tips to keep blossom-end rot from ruining your tasty tomatoes this season.

Mulch the garden. Spread 2 to 3 inches of mulch around each plant to prevent erratic moisture shifts. Don’t forget to keep the mulch at least 3 to 4 inches away from the

FIGHT THE BLIGHT Blossom-end rot, small dark spots that expand over time to form a sizeable rotten area, is caused by a calcium deficiency in soil. Proper watering and fertilization are the key to preventing this common garden blight.

base of plants. Failing to do so will merely shift rot to another spot on the plant.

Irrigate correctly and add organic matter. Provide tomatoes with a consistent 1 to 1.5 inches of water per week. If your soil is low in organic matter or you are working in raised beds, you’ll need to provide a little extra. Organic matter helps retain moisture

JOE Y W I LLI A MSO N , H G IC , C LEMSO N E X TENS I ON

P O T S nd rot blossom-e

and increases a plant’s ability to uptake calcium. A soil test will help determine the levels of organic matter and calcium in your garden and show you how to augment your tomato patch to provide the best chance for a successful harvest. For advice on soil testing, contact your county extension agent. A list of extension offices can be found at clemson.edu/extension/co.

Fertilize responsibly. Shoot for a pH level between 6.0 and 6.5, and use lime or gypsum to maintain an appropriate calcium supply. Use only the recommended amount of all fertilizers. Too much is, by definition, a bad thing, especially when it comes to nitrogen. Healthy leaves on tomato plants appear light green with no yellowing. Extremely dark green leaves may indicate too much nitrogen is present.

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TASTY TOMATOES

South Carolina gardening regions and planting dates

Piedmont SPRING

May 1–30 FALL

Central

July 10–July 20

SPRING

April 5–April 25 FALL

July 10–July 20

te to the i s a r a p l a i A benefic Name: Brachonid Wasp

SPRING

March 25–April 10 FALL

July 25–July 30

RESCUE

a place where tomatoes, peppers, eggplant and other solanaceous crops have been grown within the past three years. Many pests overwinter in the soil adjacent to plants and will terrorize unsuspecting gardeners. Once you’ve selected the right spot, make sure to test your soil. Tomatoes are nutrient hogs that require a good supply of nutrients from start to finish, so you’ll likely need to fertilize before and during the growing cycle. Adequate moisture is necessary for nutrient uptake. Drip irrigation works well and doesn’t soak leaves, which often leads to disease issues. Another often overlooked source for tomato pests are weeds. After clearing the site of any weeds, spread mulch 3–4 inches deep, and keep it a hand palm’s width from the bases of tomato stems. Planting should only begin after the last frost date for your area. For the majority of South Carolina, this tends to fall between April to May for spring crops and July to August for fall crops. Take a look at the regional map for estimated planting dates in your area.

Target [host]: Tomato/Tobacco Hornworms Method of attack: The brachonid wasp can track chemical compounds released by tomatoes in distress, and the caterpillars attacking them. Upon its arrival and detection of the enemy, the female wasp deposits numerous eggs into the host. Brachonid larvae emerge from the eggs and feed on the living caterpillar until maturity, and kill the pest in the process.

Value: After being attacked, a parasitized hornworm (easily distinguished by the visible mass of white cocoons protruding from its back) ceases to feed. It’s essential to leave these guys on your tomato plants because, soon, they’ll release a new generation of brachonid wasps to repeat the process. You should, however, remove healthy hornworms from your plants by hand. Dropping collected hornworms in a bucket of soapy water makes for quick and efficient dispatch.

JOE Y W I LLI A MSO N , HG IC , C LEMSON E X TENS I ON

LEAVE IT BE A parasitized tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta) is covered in the cocoons of brachonid wasp larvae.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MARCH 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

Protecting Pest management

Imagine being able to predict when and how pests—“pests” refers to both the insects and diseases threatening plants in gardens and landscapes—will affect your tomatoes. This ability could provide not only an upper hand on potential pest problems, but may also save you a lot of time, money and heartache in the long run. Luckily, this form of pest management exists, and it begins with correctly identifying the pests in your garden. Like the rising of the sun, pests are to be expected on some level. These levels, however, can be controlled or even avoided using a process known as Integrated Pest Management, or IPM, a multi-step decision-making process based on common sense.


Monitor and identify: Get to know your garden and what lives in it. Every area has specific pests to watch out for and plants that are more likely to facilitate their needs. Familiarizing yourself with the key pests of tomatoes in your area will speed up the monitoring process. Inspect plants for signs of injury or pest presence. Remember, look out for b ­ eneficial insects along the way and note how many you see. An increase in predator populations often means there is already a large pest population. Beneficial insects work in our favor to keep pest populations in check, and should be protected from harsh chemicals at all costs. Praying mantis and lady beetles are both examples of efficient predators in the garden. Various parasites and diseases also attack pest populations as they increase. Accurately identifying what lives in your yard makes a real difference and helps determine if treatments are warranted. For help identifying insect pests, call your local Clemson Extension agent. They regularly identify a wide variety of garden insects.

JULY 2020 11th Annual Palmetto Tasty Tomato Festival Here’s an event any tomato-lover will enjoy. Bring the family out to Columbia for a fun-filled day of live music, learning, and last but not least, delicious tomatoes. This event is a fantastic opportunity to celebrate local food and the people who provide it. You can even showcase your talent by entering your best tomato in the homegrown tomato contest. Any way you slice it, this day of old-fashioned fun is a must-see for both young and seasoned gardeners alike. For information on activities, the date and location of the 2020 event, visit tastytomatofestival.com.

Make a decision: After spotting a pest or damage on toma-

toes, decide if treatment is necessary. Consider whether or not real harm is being done to the landscape. Despite their annoyance, specific small pest populations can often be tolerated. Set thresholds to guide your treatment decisions. For example: You may decide there’s little benefit to treating a pest problem if there is less than 10% damage to the plant. Choose a treatment: When choosing a treatment, consider

using the least toxic measure first. Cultural methods such as proper watering, plant spacing and fertilization can help prevent or reduce the numbers of pests. Mechanical means are another option that requires the physical removal of pests and can be useful for small populations. For example,

hornworms are easily removable by hand-picking, and aphids are often washed away by a good squirt from a water hose. If attempts using these approaches fail, reach out to your local Clemson Extension agent for advice. Pesticide labels are the law, and many chemicals may be unethical or even illegal to use on fruit-bearing plants. Err on the side of caution and enjoy a safe, fun-filled growing season. For more information on the common tomato pests, see HGIC 2217 and HGIC 2218 on Clemson’s Home and Garden Information Center at Clemson.edu/hgic.

Enjoying the pursuit Gardening should be an enjoyable release from the fastpaced world we live in. It’s an opportunity for us to serve as good stewards of the land, so when the time comes, we pass on something a little better to the next generation. If you really want to experience all that gardening has to offer this summer, focus on using it to produce memories instead of a crop. If you do, you’ll find everything begins to taste a little sweeter along the way. is an urban horticulture agent for Clemson Extension in Sumter, Clarendon and Lee Counties. Contact him at jsmoakj@clemson.edu.

CHASE SMOAK

SCLIVING.COOP   | MARCH 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

27


|

SC   recipe

A fantastic French dinner

GW ÉN A Ë L LE VOT

BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

Good news: not French cooking is licated mp co as as difficult or it’s more ut —b ink as you might th u ever imagined! impressive than yo for your tasty French meal Prepare this very accept ck and graciously guests, then sit ba en Your only chall ge the compliments. perfect wine to will be finding the al. accompany the me

RATATOUILLE SERVES 8

2 small eggplants, cut into ½-inch cubes Kosher salt 4 tablespoons olive oil, divided 2 onions, cut into ½-inch cubes 4 large garlic cloves, minced 1 bunch of fresh basil, tied with butcher’s twine

Pinch, crushed red pepper 2 red bell peppers, sliced 2 zucchinis, sliced into ¼-inch disks 2 large tomatoes, cut into ½-inch cubes Sliced or chopped basil, for garnish

M ICH A E L PH I LLI P S

Ratatouille is a vegetable stew that originates in the Provence area of southern France. It is a great vegetarian option as a main or side dish.

Place eggplant in a colander and sprinkle with salt. Let sit for 30 minutes while all of the excess water is drained. Heat 2 tablespoons oil in a large pot or Dutch oven over medium heat. Dry eggplant with a paper towel or clean kitchen towel and add to pot; cook until golden brown, 8–10 minutes. If eggplant starts to stick, add a little more oil. Remove eggplant to a bowl and set aside.

CHICKEN DIJON (POULET À LA MOUTARDE)

In same pot, add remaining olive oil; add onions and cook for 3–5 minutes until translucent. Add garlic, basil and crushed pepper. Cook for 2 minutes. Stir in peppers and cook for 2 minutes. Stir in zucchini and cook for 2 minutes. Stir in tomatoes; cook for 7 minutes. Finally, stir in eggplant and cook for 10 minutes until all vegetables are soft. Remove basil bundle; taste and adjust salt. To serve, drizzle with a little more olive oil and garnish with basil.

2 tablespoons olive oil 4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, pounded Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper 8 ounces mushrooms, sliced 2 shallots, chopped (about ½ cup) 2 garlic cloves, minced

What’s cooking at SCLiving.coop HOMEMADE AIOLI. Aioli is a sauce made with garlic and olive oil that is often confused with mayonnaise. It is used widely throughout France and the Mediterranean as a dip and on sandwiches. In this video recipe, Chef Belinda will show you how to make it at home. You may never go back to plain mayo again!

SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda 28

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MARCH 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

SERVES 4

Make this dish with boneless chicken breasts or whole cut-up chicken parts—just be sure to adjust cooking times accordingly, since bone-in chicken requires a longer cook time. 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves ¼ cup dry white wine ½ cup unsalted chicken stock ½ cup heavy cream 2 tablespoons Dijon or stone-ground mustard, or combination Thyme leaves, for garnish

In a cast-iron or heavy skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat. Season chicken with salt and pepper. Saute until golden brown on each side, 4–5 minutes per side. Remove from skillet and keep warm. Reduce heat to medium. If necessary, add additional oil to the skillet and cook mushrooms and shallots until all of the liquid is released from the mushrooms and evaporated, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and thyme and cook an additional minute. Add the wine, stock, cream and mustard, and stir. Taste and adjust seasoning. Add chicken back to skillet and bring to a boil; lower heat, cover and simmer until sauce thickens, about 5 minutes. Garnish with thyme leaves and serve from skillet.


POTATO LEEK SOUP SERVES 6

This classic French soup is quick and easy to prepare. It’s another great vegetarian option, and served with a salad, it makes a complete meal. 3 tablespoons unsalted butter 4 leeks, white and pale green parts, halved and sliced and washed 4 garlic cloves, peeled and smashed 2 pounds potatoes, peeled and cubed

6 cups chicken stock 2 bay leaves 1 thyme bundle 1 ½ teaspoons kosher salt ¼ teaspoon white pepper 1 cup heavy cream Chives, chopped, for garnish

In a large pot over medium heat, melt butter. Add leeks and cook, stirring, until soft, about 10 minutes. If starting to brown, lower heat. Add garlic and cook 2 minutes. Add potatoes, stock, bay leaves, thyme, salt and pepper, and bring to a boil. Cover and turn heat down to low. Simmer for 15 minutes until potatoes are soft. Remove thyme bundle and bay leaves. Using an immersion blender, puree the soup. If using a food blender, puree soup in batches. Stir in cream and bring to a simmer, uncovered. Taste and adjust salt. If soup is too thin, simmer until thickened. If too thick, add stock to thin out to desired thickness. To serve, ladle into bowls and garnish with chives. CHEF’S TIP Washing leeks. Leeks are very sandy and

should not be used until they are washed. To prepare, cut off tops and root bottoms; cut in half lengthwise and slice horizontally into half-inch pieces. Put into a colander and rinse with cold water to remove soil. Let drain and dry, then continue with recipe instructions.

RASPBERRY CLAFOUTIS SERVES 6–8

Clafoutis is a French fruit dessert baked in a thick, flan-like batter and dusted with powdered sugar—and it’s delicious. 3 large eggs Zest of one lemon ¼ cup milk 1 ½ pints raspberries (3 cups) Confectioner’s sugar, for dusting

Preheat oven to 350 F. Butter a 9-inch deep-dish pie plate with ½ tablespoon butter. In a medium bowl, whisk flour, sugar and a pinch of salt. Whisk in the eggs, remaining butter and lemon zest until smooth. Add the milk and whisk until light and very smooth, about 3 minutes. Pour the batter into pie dish and fill with raspberries. G I N A MOO RE

I U LI I A N EDRYGA I LOVA

3½ tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and divided ½ cup all-purpose flour ¼ cup sugar Pinch kosher salt

Bake for about 30–35 minutes until set and golden brown. Remove from oven and let cool slightly. Dust with confectioner’s sugar. Cut into wedges and serve at room temperature.

SCLIVING.COOP   | MARCH 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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Mystery

at the museum

S.C. State Museum transformed into Victorian England in The International Exhibition of Sherlock Holmes

IT’S ELEMENTARY Exhibition curator Geoffrey Curley in the “crime scene.” Top: A re-creation of Sherlock Holmes’ sitting room includes meticulous detail, down to books, tools and his ubiquitous magnifying glass.

30

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MARCH 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

S BY OTO D P H O RT H N A RY HAW S TO REW AND

THE ELEVATOR DOORS OPEN to reveal another time and place. Somber violin music drifts out into brick archways, the notes drowned out by a steam locomotive, the footfalls of passers­by, horses clip-clopping on c­ obblestones, and a fog­horn somewhere off in the distance. It takes a moment for your eyes to adjust, but when they do, a skull grins ominously from a pedestal, and ­flickering lighting casts long shadows over a portrait of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the physicianturned-writer who gave us the world’s greatest fictional detective, Sherlock Holmes. The International Exhibition of Sherlock Holmes opened at the S.C. State Museum on Jan. 18, and not only teaches guests about Doyle’s legendary character and the science of the era, but also places them in the role of a detective tasked with solving a murder amid immersive Victorian period set pieces and interactive displays. One of the largest exhibits ever hosted at the museum, the all-ages attraction includes more than 100 objects and artifacts, including original manuscripts, images from the Museum of London Archives, and props and items from


|

SC   travels

“People loved a good mystery during Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s times, and they still do.” —JENNIFER THRAILKILL

more recent Sherlock Holmes movies and television shows, such as the CBS show, Elementary. Interactive stations allow guests to explore detection techniques such as footprint analysis, blood spatter, chemical analysis and more. A re-creation of Holmes’ Baker Street sitting room is accurate down to the smallest of details, from his smoking pipes, to his ubiquitous magnifying glass. “People loved a good mystery during Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s times, and they still do,” says Jennifer Thrailkill, the museum’s director of marketing. “That interest hasn’t gone away.” Walking through the exhibit is a dark, eerie experience. The dim, gaslight-style lighting, grimy brick archways, creaking gates and sounds of the bustling city complete the illusion of the seedier side of London. “Just the scale, the immersion of the exhibit, you really can’t even tell you’re in our blockbuster exhibit gallery,” Thrailkill says. And that was always the intent, ­according to curator Geoffrey Curley, whose St. Paul, Minnesota-based firm developed the exhibition. “It’s really fun to step into another time period, to go to England when you’re actually here in Columbia,” Curley says. The first half of the exhibit focuses on Doyle, and how he

GET THERE The South Carolina State Museum is located at 301 Gervais Street in Columbia. HOURS: Monday, Wednesday–Friday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Tuesday: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday: noon to 5 p.m. The exhibit is scheduled to run through April 19, 2020. ADMISSION: Pricing for The International Exhibition of Sherlock Holmes includes museum general admission. Museum members may use their comp attraction tickets or purchase their discounted tickets online for blockbuster admission. General public: Adult: $17.95, senior (62+): $15.95, child (3–12): $13.95. Members: Adult: $7, senior: $6, child: $5. Group tickets (for 10 or more): Adult: $15.95, senior: $13.95, child: $11.95. DETAILS: For more information, visit scmuseum.org or call (803) 898-4921.

WHODUNIT? Interactive displays teach guests about the technology of Victorian times, such as telegraph communication, the cosmetics of the day, and ballistics, before they are invited beyond the gates to solve a crime.

created the character of Sherlock Holmes, one of the most beloved characters in pop fiction of the era, and one of the first “superheroes,” Curley says. “His superpowers are tangible. He’s not from another planet; he didn’t get it from some myth,” Curley says. “They’re observation and the scientific method. And he was really, really good at it.” Visitors to the exhibit are offered the chance to solve a murder mystery, almost in an escape room style. The mystery is based on a reference in a Holmes tale, and written by award-winning mystery author Daniel Stashower, who is sanctioned by the Doyle estate to write Holmes stories. The mystery involves an American newspaperman in England who is accused of murder. Police believe he was intoxicated by a fume or poison that made him go insane, and he disposed of evidence in the Thames River. Guests follow a trail of clues taking them from a crime scene, through a conservatory and eventually to the riverbank in an effort to learn the truth. Along the way they can examine blood patterns, gunshot marks, burns and other evidence based on forensic science. “You take what you have learned and immediately apply it to solving a crime in a fun, creative way,” Thrailkill says. Designers worked with a Minnesota state homicide investigative agency to ensure accuracy, and Curley warns cracking the case is anything but elementary. “People are appreciative that it’s not simple,” he says.

SCLIVING.COOP   | MARCH 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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WIN A $100 GIFT CARD

It's a great day for a parade South Carolina Living and the City of West Columbia have joined together to celebrate the 3rd Annual Kinetic Derby Day featuring whimsical human-powered floats in the Kinetic Sculpture Parade, an old‑fashioned Soap Box Derby, food vendors and an Artisan Village. Sign up today for our March Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and your chance to win a $100 Visa gift card and a West Columbia Kinetic Derby Day Special Events weekend package, which includes: • 2-night stay at Hilton Garden Inn Columbia Airport, • 4 tickets to Riverbanks Zoo & Gardens, • $50 Black Rooster gift card, • lunch for 2 at Zesto of West Columbia, • $50 gift card to State Street Trading Company, • VIP passes for Friday night Rhythm on the River Concert series and • free registration for either the Sculpture Parade or soap box racing on Kinetic Derby Day (April 25). One lucky winner will be drawn at random from all entries received by March 31st. Register online at

SCLiving.coop/reader-reply or mail in the coupon at right. By entering, you may receive information from these great travel and tourism sponsors: jj West Columbia Kinetic Derby Day jj Alpine Helen/White County, Ga. jj Cheraw Visitors Bureau jj Come See Me Festival jj Discover Upcountry Carolina Association jj Edisto Chamber of Commerce jj South Carolina Living magazine

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Register below, or online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply YES! Enter me in the drawing for the West Columbia Kinetic Derby Day

weekend prize package and a $100 gift card. Name Address City State/ZIP Email* Phone*

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SEND COUPON TO:

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35


|

SC   calendar MAR 13–APR 15

Upstate MARCH

13–15  Terms of Endearment, Spartanburg Little Theatre, Spartanburg. (864) 585‑8278. 20–22  Annie, Jr., Mauldin Cultural Center, Mauldin. (864) 335‑4862. 21  Upstate SC National College Fair, Timmons Arena at Furman University, Greenville. (864) 294‑3267. 27–28  Enchanted Chalice Renaissance Faire, Greenville Unitar­ ian Universalist Fellowship, Greenville. info@theenchantedchalice.com. 27–29  Annie, Jr., Mauldin Cultural Center, Mauldin. (864) 335‑4862.

SCLiving.coop/calendar Our mobile-friendly site lists even more festivals, shows and events. You’ll also find instructions on submitting your event. Please confirm information with the hosting event before attending.

THE ENCHANTED CHALICE APRIL 3–4

Take a moonlight stroll into Greenville’s Enchanted Chalice Renaissance Faire, a unique overnight spectacle featuring fire performances, music, jesters and storytellers all dressed in medieval garb. The fun starts on Friday evening and rolls on through Saturday morning with arts and crafts merchants, turkey legs and mead, plus a royal processional. The festival is held at the Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship. Tickets are $15 for people over the age of 13 and $10 for children 4–12.

APRIL

3–12  1984, Oconee Community

Theatre, Seneca. (864) 882‑1910.

4  Greer Centennial Lions Club Bass

Fishing Tournament, Lake Robinson, Greer. (864) 877‑6956. 4  iMAGINE Upstate STEAM Festival, downtown, Greenville. imaginesteamsc.org. 4–5  Spring Fling 2020, T. Ed Garrison Arena, Pendleton. scuec3@gmail.com. 11  Upstate Heart Walk, downtown, Greenville. (843) 448‑3792. O NG O I N G

Every other Wednesday  Music Sandwiched In, Spartanburg County Public Library, Spartanburg. (864) 948‑9020. Third Thursdays  ArtWalk, downtown cultural district, Spartanburg. (864) 582‑7616. Fridays  Starry Nights, Roper Mountain Science Center, Greenville. (864) 355‑8900. Saturdays and Sundays  Historic Building Tour, Oconee Station State Historic Site, Walhalla. (864) 638‑0079.

Midlands MARCH

20  Lunch and Learn: No Active Warrants, USC-Lancaster Native American Studies Center, Lancaster. (803) 313‑7172. 20–26  15th Annual Native American Studies Week: Humor, Satire and Parody, USC-Lancaster Native American Studies Center, Lancaster. (803) 313‑7172. 21  Laps for Lancers, University of South Carolina–Lancaster, Lancaster. (803) 313‑7008. 21  Spring Dog Show, Rectory Square Park, Camden. (803) 432‑1889. 21  St. Pat’s in Five Points, Five Points, Columbia. (803) 748‑7373.

36

23–27  St. Paul’s Tea Room and

theenchantedchalice.com 21  True to the Brew Trail 10K

Run/Hike, Entrance to Palmetto Trail behind Wilson’s Grocery, Pomaria. mroe@palmettoconservation.org. 25–28  Underexposed Film Festival, Dina’s Place at DiGiorgio Campus Center and York County Public Library, Rock Hill. (803) 328‑2787. 26  Interactive Painting Session, USC-Lancaster Native American Studies Center, Lancaster. (803) 313‑7172. 26–31  Inspire Festival, multiple venues, Sumter. sumterinspirefestival.org/contact. 27–28  Henry Shelor BBQ Cookoff, Sumter American Legion Post 15 Fairgrounds, Sumter. (843) 662‑6306. 27–29  Palmetto Sportsmen’s Classic, State Fairgrounds, Columbia. (803) 734‑4008. 28  Blue Star Blitz Outdoor Recreation Festival, Anne Springs Close Greenway, Fort Mill. (803) 547‑4575. 28  Children’s Day on the Farm, Historic Brattonsville, McConnells. (803) 684‑2327. 28  Lakefest, Santee Town Hall Complex, Santee. (803) 854‑2152.

2–5  Tartan Day South Highland

Games & Celtic Festival, multiple venues, Columbia. (803) 665‑7620. 3  SC Garden Jamboree, Saluda Shoals Park, Columbia. (803) 816‑5055. 4  Sons of Mystro, Sumter Opera House, Sumter. (803) 436‑2616. 4  Theatre for Youth Festival, Saluda River Academy for the Arts, West Columbia. (864) 844‑8111. 4–5  Columbia International Festival, Cantey and Goodman buildings at the State Fairgrounds, Columbia. (803) 799‑3452. 9  Sumter Disabilities Benefit Gala, O’Donnell House, Sumter. (803) 778‑1669. 11  An Evening at the Round Table with Linda Davis, Sumter Opera House, Sumter. (803) 436‑2616. ONGOING

Daily during March  Pamela

Moore Exhibit, Aiken County Visitors Center, Aiken. (803) 642‑7557. Daily during April  Annah Chriswell Exhibit, Aiken County Visitors Center, Aiken. (803) 642‑7557.

APRIL

Lowcountry

1–5  Inspire Festival,

MAR CH

multiple venues, Sumter. sumterinspirefestival.org/contact. 2  Read-In, South Carolina State House, Columbia. acook@statelibrary.sc.gov.

11–April 18  2020 Festival of

Houses and Gardens, multiple venues, Charleston. (843) 722‑3405. 15  Hilton Head Island St. Patrick’s Day Parade, Pope Avenue, Hilton Head Island. (855) 287‑7287.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MARCH 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

16–19  St. Paul’s Tea Room and

Gift Shop, St. Paul’s Summerville, Summerville. (843) 873‑1991. 17  Alice Ravenel Huger Smith and the Charleston Renaissance, Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage, Ridgeland. (843) 284‑9227. 17  Charleston St. Patrick’s Day Parade, King Street, Charleston. (202) 400‑5592. 19  Burning of the Socks, South Carolina Maritime Museum, Georgetown. (843) 520‑0111. 20  WACHH Friday Speaker Series: Henri Barkey, First Presbyterian Church, Hilton Head Island. (843) 384‑6758. 20–21  Garden Open: Bulbapalooza, Moore Farms Botanical Garden, Lake City. (843) 210‑7592. 20–21  Hilton Head Wingfest, Shelter Cove Community Park, Hilton Head Island. (843) 681‑7273. 20–22  Quilt Festival, Hilton Head Beach & Tennis Resort, Hilton Head Island. palmettoquiltguild@gmail.com. 21  Beaufort Twilight Run, Le Chene Circle at Habersham Marketplace, Beaufort. (843) 321‑8309. 21  Pet Fest, Palmetto Islands County Park, Mount Pleasant. (843) 795‑4386. 21  Pipe Major Sandy Jones Invitational and Charleston Indoor Games, Grimsley Hall at The Citadel, Charleston. (843) 469‑5691.

Gift Shop, St. Paul’s Summerville, Summerville. (843) 873‑1991. 24  An Evening with Midori, St. Matthew’s Lutheran Church, Charleston. (843) 763‑4941. 26–28  Garden Club of Charleston House and Garden Tours, multiple venues, Charleston. charlestonhousegardentours@ gmail.com. 28  Pet Fest, Palmetto Islands County Park, Charleston. (843) 795‑4386. 29–30  2020 SC Black Farmers Conference, The Penn Center, Saint Helena Island. (843) 804‑9091. APR IL

1–18  2020 Festival of Houses and

Gardens, multiple venues, Charleston. (843) 722‑3405. 3  2020 Kiawah Art and House Tour, various homes and venues, Kiawah Island. events@kiawahartsetc.org. 3  Lowcountry Butterflies, Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage, Ridgeland. (843) 284‑9227. 3  WACHH Friday Speaker Series: Ambassador Joseph Yun on North Korea, First Presbyterian Church, Hilton Head Island. (843) 384‑6758. 3–5  Flowertown Festival, downtown, Summerville. (843) 871‑9622. 3–5  Prince George Plantation Tours, multiple venues, Georgetown. (843) 241‑2434. 4  Cooper River Bridge Run, Cooper River Bridge, Charleston. (843) 856‑1949. 4  Panting for Paws 5K/10K, Fitness World Gym, Darlington. (843) 598‑1532. 5  iFiveK, Riverfront Park, North Charleston. (843) 579‑7659. 11  The Hat Ladies Easter Promenade, Washington Park, Charleston. (843) 762‑6679. ONGOING

Daily through March 31  There’s

Always a Ketch, Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 852‑4200.

Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays until March 31  Simply

Living: The Charles Towne Edition, Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 852‑4200. Fourth Tuesdays  Wash Day, L.W. Paul Living History Farm, Conway. (843) 365‑3596. Wednesdays  Arts and Crafts Market, Bay Creek Park, Edisto Island. (843) 869‑3867. First Saturdays  History in the Landscape, Hampton Plantation State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 546‑9361.


|

SC   humor me

Smash now and forever hold your peace I WAS JUST READING

about a mom in Florida who directed her teenage daughter to attack a couple of people with a machete. Yeah, a machete. As conflict resolution goes, this strategy isn’t ideal, particularly if you don’t own a machete and have to wait two days for Amazon to deliver one. (Don’t worry. After the assault, you can use it to split coconuts.) Of course, this woman is officially nuts. And she lives in Florida, where there seem to be more nuts per capita than here in the ­pollen-crusted, semi-whacky Carolinas. Still, it would be nice to know what drives your ordinary, cookie-baking mom over sanity’s edge. There should be an early warning system to tell us whose screws are loose before they start screaming obscenities in yoga class. No wait, that’s a thing. They call it Rage Yoga. Some of us aren’t zen enough to blend in a traditional yoga studio, a monastic room where triple-jointed contortionists chant “om” while the head pretzel directs in hushed, reverent tones. They’ll recognize an oddball in their midst before you can say “namaste.” That wasn’t Lindsay Istace’s cup of organic chamomile tea, so she devised Rage Yoga—a style for “other like-minded weirdos,” according to her website, RageYoga.com. When you need a release, feel free to stretch, scream, swear, and sip beer from your water bottle. Let it all hang out. (If your leggings have less than 8% Spandex, it probably will.) I doubt all the yoga in the world would have freed the machete mom 38

Even the most civilized, patient people grow weary of playing nice and taking a timeout when we’d rather pound our chests and bellow like Tarzan. from her demons. Maybe she should have tried a rage room, where you can destroy inanimate enemies without doing jail time. Let’s face it. We live in an annoying world. Even the most civilized, patient people grow weary of playing nice and taking a timeout when we’d rather pound our chests and bellow like Tarzan. We want to swing from the nearest vine, but there are no jungles off I-95, so rage rooms are the next best thing. They’re a safe place for grown-ups to throw a therapeutic tantrum. You can spend 20 minutes destroying dishes with a crowbar or bring your

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MARCH 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

peeps to smash a roomful of TVs and uncooperative printers with baseball bats. They supply the weapons and protective gear; you supply the rage. Some places even offer a post-­ carnage massage. For those who lean more passive than aggressive, a crying room might help. There are hotels in Japan that offer sappy movies, bubble baths, warm blankets and all the tissues a sobbing maiden requires. Japanese people aren’t frivolous with their emotions, so this might be their version of sledgehammering a photo of their ex in a rage room. Americans will probably stick with smashing stuff. For now, we should probably assume that everyone we meet is a walking pressure cooker with a loose lid. It would be nice if their eyes flashed yellow warning lights before the crazy erupts, but you can’t count on that. We should probably charter a bus for the nearest rage room before it’s too late. Before a spouse reloads the dishwasher like it’s an abstract sculpture. Before somebody sends a three-page text in ALL CAPS with no punctuation. Before Harry and Meghan’s next burp goes viral. Before somebody’s kid mistakes you for a coconut. Until the bus comes, breathe deep. Count to 10. And hide the machete. is pretty mellow unless she encounters a pistachio nut that won’t open. Then it’s s­ledgehammer time! You can always vent at HumorMe@SCLiving.com. It’s good for you.

JAN A. IGOE


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Profile for South Carolina Living

South Carolina Living March 2020  

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