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CHANGEOUT

Sold!

Inside the organized chaos of farm equipment auctions

SC RECIPE

Ice cream treats JULY 2019

SC TR AVE LS

Teapot madness


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Forever helping. Forever First.


2019 | july 16 Sold! Explore the organized chaos of farm equipment auctions where anything and everything is up for sale.

EDITOR

FIELD EDITOR

PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

4 CO-OP NEWS

Updates from your cooperative

6 AGENDA

Hurricane season is here. Use these tips and resources to prepare for any storms that might come our way.

ART DIRECTOR DESIGNER

PRODUCTION

10 DIALOGUE Picturing the past

COPY EDITORS

CONTRIBUTORS

PUBLISHER

12 ENERGY Q&A Keeping pets comfortable Our energy-efficiency experts answer three common questions from pet owners.

14 SMART CHOICE Power up your workout Sizzling summer temperatures are no excuse for neglecting health and fitness goals—not when you have these handy tools to keep you on track.

ADVERTISING

NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

21 STORIES Better living through farming Dr. Dan Fox explores the connection between sustainable agriculture and a healthier lifestyle.

22

ADDRESS CHANGES:

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS:

Member of the AMP network reaching more than 9 million homes and businesses

22

TRAVELS

A tea-rific time Make your way to Elloree for a traditional high tea as you explore a fascinating collection of 5,001 teapots.

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© COPYRIGHT 2019.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

16

Electric cooperatives need your help finding historic images of rural South Carolina.

WEB EDITOR

RECIPE

Ice cream treats for the kids Happy National Ice Cream Month! Make it a family affair with these recipes that are almost as much fun to make as they are to eat.

30

CHEF’S CHOICE

Farm-fresh flavor At The Anchorage restaurant in West Greenville, Chef Greg McPhee’s vegetable-centric menu is determined by what’s growing at his very own farm.

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GARDENER

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Planter pointers Our gardening expert shares his simple tricks to keep potted plants alive and well and showing off until the first fall frosts.

34 36 38

MARKETPLACE CALENDAR HUMOR ME

It’s not rocket voodoo Open a bag of your favorite jelly beans and ponder the very weird science of everything from liquid cats to voodoo dolls. FRO M TO P : A N DRE W H AWO RTH; M I LTON MORRIS; I U LI I A N EDRYGA I LOVA

Sold!

Inside the organized chaos of farm equipment auctions

SC RECIPE

Ice cream treats SC TR AVE LS JULY 2019

e t firs er v ore t s r fir ver fore THE MAGAZINE FOR ver COOPERATIVE MEMBERS VOLUME 73 • NUMBER 7 rst (ISSNr 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) e in more than 595,000 homes and businesses and published rev Read monthly in December by t ElectricexceptCooperatives s r fi The r of South Inc. e Carolina, vKnox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033 fore808 rs t r fi Tel: (803) 926‑3175 r e Fax: (803) 796‑6064 ve e Email: letters@scliving.coop r o t f Keith Phillips r eve Tel: (803) 739‑3040 Email: Keith.Phillips@ecsc.org t s fir Walter rAllread e v e or Travist Ward s r firSharrivHarris er Wolfgang e forSusan Collins Andrew Chapman ver Chase Toler st Jennifer Jas r eveL. Kim Welborn tApril CokerHensel, Blake, Mike Couick, Tim Hanson, Jan A. Igoe, L.A. Jackson, firs Hastings r Patrick M. Linda Lee, David Novak, e Keegan, v e Sydney Patterson, Smith-Sullivan, or Brad tThiessen, PaulBelinda Wesslund s r er fiLoueGreen ver r Watts t foMary Tel: (803) 739‑5074 r Email: ads@scliving.coop eve American MainStreet Publications rst Tel: (800) 626‑1181 eradvertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this revPaid t If you encounter a difficulty spublication. with an advertisement, inform the Editor. r fi r ver Please send to your e r local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 o f to Address Change, c/o the address above. rmailingpaidoffices. postage at Columbia, S.C., ve ver Periodicals and additional e r o Electric Cooperatives st f of South Carolina, The Inc. No portion of r South Carolina Living may be reproduced evewithout permission of the Editor. t your member-owned,is brought to you taxpaying, firs bynot-for-profit r electric cooperative e v you about your cooperative,towise oreinform energy use and the faces and places stidentify the Palmetto State. Electric rthat fi are South Carolina’s — and r e cooperatives ve—r largest America’s  utility network. e r t fo $8 nonmembers $5.72 members, ver rs t r e rev t firs er v fore st r er fi ever or st f r eve

Teapot madness

Auctioneer Rick Cox works the crowd for one more bid during a farm equipment auction in North. Photos by Andrew Haworth.


SC | agenda Are you prepared for hurricane season? ATLANTIC HURRICANE SEASON, which runs from June 1 through Nov. 30, is officially here, and forecasters with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predict a “nearnormal” year with nine to 15 named storms packing winds of 39 mph or higher. Meteorologists say as many as four of the storms could become dangerous Category 3, 4 or 5 hurricanes with winds of 111 mph or higher. As the guardians of the state’s largest utility network—more than 75,000 miles of electric distribution lines serving 1.5 million people across all 46 counties—South Carolina’s not-for-profit electric cooperatives have emergency plans in place to deal with violent weather should a hurricane threaten the Palmetto State. Along with the South Carolina Emergency Management Division (SCEMD), co-ops urge all state residents to have their own plans in place to protect friends, family, pets and property. Here are some useful resources:

Hurricane Florence caused massive flooding as it moved across the Carolinas on Sept. 15, 2018.

and resources. To access the guide online, visit scemd.org.

South Carolina Living Storm Center

SC Emergency Manager mobile app Available for free in the Apple App Store and on Google Play, this handy app links users to every SCEMD resource they need before, during and after a storm, including evacuation routes, shelter maps and planning checklists. It even has a useful “tools” function that turns your smartphone into an emergency flashlight, signaling device and GPS locator.

disaster), SCEMD will update the site to provide the best real-time information users need.

2019 South Carolina Hurricane Guide

SCEMD.org No smartphone? No problem. All of the app’s planning resources, maps and links to the latest emergency information are available on SCEMD.org. In the case of a hurricane (or any natural 6

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JULY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

From both the website and the app, you can download SCEMD’s 2019 South Carolina Hurricane Guide, a comprehensive 14-page booklet filled with tips

South Carolina Living’s storm center pages are filled with information to help co-op members prepare for and survive natural disasters. Readers will find useful how-to guides on building a storm kit, where to find SCEMD evacuation routes, evacuating with pets, staying safe when power lines are down, and how to report power outages. There’s even a live, statewide outage map to track storm damage and the status of repairs in co-op-served territories. See all the resources at SCLiving.coop/storm-center.


ONLY ON SCLiving.coop

C L A R I F I C AT I O N The article “New law updates co-op governance” (SCL, June 2019) referred to a Nov. 17, 2018, vote by Tri-County Electric Cooperative members to remove the co-op’s board of trustees. We should have mentioned that two trustees chose to resign from the board prior to the May 17, 2018, annual meeting that launched the initiative and led to a new law requiring more transparency from co-ops. Barry Hutto and Jeff Reeves resigned in protest of the actions taken by the remaining board members leading up to the annual meeting. A third trustee resigned after the annual meeting.

Homemade waffle cones Kitchen do-it-yourselfers will enjoy the simple process of creating homemade waffle cones as demonstrated in this video from Chef Belinda’s kitchen. Watch and learn at SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda.

Win a cool $100 READER POLL

And the winner is … In the May issue of South Carolina Living, we asked readers to vote for their favorite peach dessert recipe from Chef Belinda SmithSullivan’s new cookbook, Just Peachy. Here are the results: Peach upside‑down cake

Oreo-peach cheesecake

18%

35%

To celebrate National Ice Cream Month, South Carolina Living and Clemson’s Best Gourmet Ice Cream are giving away a $100 Visa gift card and Chef’s Choice waffle cone maker. We’ll draw the name of one lucky reader from all eligible entries received by July 31. For your chance to win, register today at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply.

Like us on Facebook If you love living in South Carolina as much as we do, like and follow us on Facebook, where we celebrate all that’s great about the Palmetto State. Join the fun at facebook.com/SouthCarolinaLiving.

GONE FISHIN’ The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and ­migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after. Minor

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

J U LY

Blueberrypeach slump

7%

Raspberrypeach crumble Blackberrypeach buckle

9%

18% Peach-thyme pound cake

13%

See all the delicious recipes and learn more about the book at SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda/everythings-just-peachy.

16 — 5:22 8:22 12:52 17 1:07 6:07 8:52 1:22 18 1:52 6:37 9:22 1:52 19 2:22 7:22 9:37 2:22 20 3:07 7:52 10:07 2:52 21 3:52 8:37 10:37 3:22 22 9:37 4:37 11:07 3:52 23 10:52 5:37 4:22 11:37 24 — 6:52 12:52 12:07 25 — 7:52 6:37 3:07 26 12:52 8:52 8:37 4:37 27 1:52 9:37 9:52 5:22 28 2:52 10:37 10:52 6:07 29 3:52 11:22 11:37 6:52 30 — 4:37 7:22 12:07 31 — 5:37 7:52 12:52

Minor

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

AUGUST 1 1:07 6:22 8:37 1:22 2 1:52 7:07 9:07 2:07 3 2:37 8:07 9:37 2:52 4 3:22 8:52 10:22 3:37 5 10:07 4:22 4:07 10:52 6 11:37 5:37 4:52 11:22 7 — 7:07 2:07 12:07 8 — 8:22 7:37 4:22 9 1:07 9:22 9:22 5:22 10 2:07 10:07 10:37 6:07 11 3:07 10:52 11:22 6:37 12 3:52 11:37 11:52 6:52 13 — 4:52 7:22 12:07 14 — 5:22 7:37 12:37 15 12:52 6:07 8:07 1:07 16 1:22 6:37 8:22 1:37

SCLIVING.COOP   | JULY 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SC   agenda

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Sharp shooting

at serious fun

MAY 2019

SPECIAL RE PORT

What happens next with Santee Cooper? SC RECIPE

Peachy desserts

Having a blast I want to thank you for the story on GRITS—Girls Really Into Shooting—in the May issue of South Carolina Living. The cover picture immediately caught my eye as the women look exactly as I’d want to appear: outdoors, comfortable, laughing. I knew instantly I would fit in. And I did! Going to the website in hopes of finding a local chapter, I discovered the Blue Ridge Grits in North Carolina were having a shoot the coming weekend at Biltmore. I read the article just in time to attend. And I had a blast. Really a great bunch of gals, great company.  Since I have a background in firearms and inherited my father’s shotgun, I now have the way to grow into a sport I’ve wanted to learn for years, with women who teach, support, and make it fun. Thank you so very much for opening a wonderful chapter in my life!  ROBBIE KUBLER, CLEVELAND

On the road We really enjoy South Carolina Living magazine and appreciate the local events section in the back pages. Believe it or not, that’s where we get all our mini-vacation ideas! We just read the magazine, pick out our favorite events and go! Easy peasy!

PH OTOS BY AC L A R A

Southern Carolina GRITS take aim

Sensors, like the Aclara power sensor shown here, allow electric utilities to gain better situational awareness of grid conditions quickly and costeffectively. Unlike more traditional methods for monitoring grid conditions, which require utilities to do extensive planning and turn off power while work is done, power sensors are installed without disrupting operations.

Sensors help create a greener grid IF YOU WANT TO SEE the “green power” revolution at work in America, look up at the power lines. If you spot a little box about the size of a tennis shoe clamped onto one of the wires, you’re looking at something that’s bringing in a whole new era in energy. It’s called a sensor, a container of electronics that collects and sends out information about the wire it’s on, from the voltage inside to the temperature on the outside. Sensors are starting to appear all over the nation’s electric grid, and they are “changing the way we create, transmit and use electricity,” says Venkat Banunarayanan, senior director of integrated grid technologies for the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA). “You install those sensors at different points on the grid and you can get an accurate picture of how the grid is performing,” he says. “The more sensors and real-time information you can get back

to the grid operators, the better they can identify and address any problems.” Sensors also allow utilities to adjust operations in response to the growing popularity of electric vehicles and the on‑again, off-again nature of the electricity produced by wind and solar farms. With these changes to the power infrastructure, utilities need the ability to look at grid performance and plan accordingly throughout every hour of the day and night. For all its cyber-age sophistication, Banunarayanan sees the greener grid as just another stage in the development of electric utilities. “The grid is changing; however, the basic function of the grid is not,” he says. “The grid exists to supply cost-effective, reliable and safe power. It’s just changing to give consumers more options.” —PAUL WESSLUND

STARLETTE MAREK, MONCKS CORNER, MEMBER OF BERKELEY ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE

WRITE US If you have something you want to say about an article in South Carolina Living, let us know by writing to Editor, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033 or using the letters to the editor form at SCLiving.coop/contact-us.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JULY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

When it’s warm out, avoid using the oven. Try cooking on the stove, using the microwave or grilling outside instead. SOURCE: ENERGY.GOV


HIGHLIGHTS JULY 13–AUG. 15

ANTIQUE BIKES ON MAIN JULY 26–28

It’s going to be a loud weekend in downtown Chesnee during Antique Bikes on Main, a three-day celebration of two-wheeled transportation that coincides with the Chesnee City Festival. Motorcycle enthusiasts from near and far gather for the annual swap meet, bike parade, prayer ride and other events that start Friday night and run through Sunday. Live music, carnival rides and fireworks make the weekend fun for the whole family. (864) 590-2141; chesneeclassiccycle.com

THE BIG RED BARN RETREAT SUMMER JAM JULY 19

The Big Red Barn Retreat Center in Blythewood offers therapeutic services for military veterans and their families, all at no cost. Those services are covered thanks to fundraisers like the Big Red Barn Retreat Summer Jam, which this year will feature performances by Tommy DeCarlo, the current lead singer of Boston, and opening act Brendan Roberts. Food vendors, a cash bar, and an assortment of family-friendly activities round out the fun. Tickets are $10 in advance, $12 at the gate, and kids under 12 are admitted free. The show begins at Doko Meadows Park Amphitheater in Blythewood at 7 p.m. and gates open at 6 p.m. (803) 716-9097; thebigredbarnretreat.org/summerjam

CELEBRATE JAMESTOWN JULY 26–28

Founded by former slave Ervin James in 1870, the 100-acre Jamestown farm in what is now Florence County became a refuge for African Americans in the tumultuous years following the Civil War. Descendants of James still own the land and honor their forefather’s legacy with all five senses. The annual Celebrate Jamestown festival features live music, living history performances, arts and crafts, and open-flame cooking—all in the name of keeping their family heritage going through the generations. (843) 661- 5679; jamestownfoundedin1870.org

HUCK’S DEFEAT REENACTMENT JULY 13–14

Watch a historical drama unfold before your eyes as the reenactors of Historic Brattonsville near McConnells portray the Battle of Huck’s Defeat, a pivotal moment in the American Revolution. Between battles, visitors can explore the history of the site and what everyday life was like for colonists in the Upstate. Admission is $8 for adults, $7 for seniors and $5 for kids aged 4–17. Admission is free for kids under 3, active duty military and their families, and members of Culture & Heritage Museums. (803) 684-2327; chmuseums.org/brattonsville

FIESTA FRIDAY AUGUST 2, SEPTEMBER 6, OCTOBER 4

Lake City is getting festive on the first Fridays of the month now through October with Fiesta Friday. The outdoor street party will feature live music, dancing, food trucks and a mobile video-game truck that appeals to kids of all ages. The family and pet-friendly fun kicks off at 6 p.m. on Sauls Street. For full details, see the event’s Facebook page. (843) 374-0534; facebook.com/fiestafridaylakecitysc

GET MORE

For more happenings, turn to our Calendar on Page 36, and see expanded festivals and events coverage on SCLiving.coop.

  | JULY 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SC   dialogue

Picturing the past SOME OF THE MOST ICONIC MOMENTS

in American history have been captured on film. Whether it was driving the golden spike to connect the east and west railroads, or the ticker tape parade celebrating V-E Day, or the launch of Apollo 11, there are certain photographic images that connect A MOMENT IN TIME Can you us to an earlier time and the real help us identify this home and these cooperative lives of people who experienced those leaders, shown at a dedication ceremony for a new “snap on” bathroom made moments firsthand. possible by co-op electricity? Please contact Lyssa Nelson at (803) 739-5080 if you know when and where this photo was taken. Low-cost renovation projects to install modern indoor plumbing—bathtub, toilet, For many of our parents, grand­ lavatory and a hot-water heater—to rural homes were part of Gov. John West’s anti-poverty initiatives from parents or even great-grandparents, 1971–1975. Visit SCLiving.coop/opinion/dialogue for a link to a story on the “privy project.” the moment the lights came on in their homes is one of those iconic American memories. For those of us in the 21st century with our 24/7, a once dark room, or Mom proudly standing next to her new plugged-in lives, it’s hard to imagine how thrilling it was when electric stove, or the triumphant moment the neighborhood rural families first experienced the benefits of electrification. crew hammered the last nail for the new indoor bathroom, But for those who lived with no refrigerators, no radio or TVs, these are the photos that captured history in the making. no air conditioning, no fans and no washing machines, the After 25 years in our facility in Cayce, we recently remodday electricity arrived changed their lives for good. eled our offices. The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina Just picture a life in which washing clothes or taking a bath plans to use our lobby and hallways as a place for story­telling, meant pumping water to fill a tub manually because, withcapturing the spirit of the cooperative movement with a display of meaningful images. Will you help us? out electricity, there was no other way to move water from We seek images—likely old photographs stored in shoethe well and into the house. Or a life that when the sun went down, your only source of light was a lantern or a flickering boxes and albums in your attics and closets—that will help candle. It wasn’t that electricity didn’t exist in those days. Cities provide a narrative of real people affected by real change across America were electrified not too long after the invention brought by the creation of electric cooperatives. of the light bulb. But it would be decades before rural South You may have the next iconic image tucked away someCarolinians began to also reap the benefits of electrification. where that helps tell the story of the change produced With the arrival of electricity, South Carolina’s farm famithrough electric cooperatives. If so, please share it with us. Snap a digital picture of your old photograph or make a highlies in the 1940s could finally experience the modern converesolution scan, then upload it to SCLiving.coop/history. nience of indoor bathrooms, running water for baths, dishes and laundry that city folk had been enjoying for decades. Please be sure to include information on who’s shown in They could finally enjoy time in the evening hours while the picture, when and where it was taken, your name, your reading or sewing in a well-lit room—or gathering around the contact information and the name of your co-op. Readers may also email images to Lyssa.Nelson@ecsc.org, radio and connecting with the wider world. One report estimates that rural American women spent or call (803) 739-5080 for instructions on how to send prints 20 more days each year washing clothes—usually by hand by mail. If we select your photo to hang in our lobby, we’ll send you a $25 Visa gift card. in outdoor tubs heated over a fire—than city women who owned electric washers. And a U.S. Department of Agriculture study reported that pumping and carrying water alone took an average of 10 hours per week per family. For rural South Carolina families, the arrival of electricity was a miraculous moment they would remember for the rest of their lives—and some of them took pictures. Whether it’s MIKE COUICK a snapshot of the family admiring the new bulb illuminating President and CEO, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina 10

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JULY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP


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SC   energy Q&A

Keeping pets comfortable BY PATRICK KEEGAN AND BRAD THIESSEN

Q

We’ve thought about installing a pet door. Will this impact our energy bill?

A

Pet doors are convenient for pet owners and pets, but they can impact energy bills. A pet door that is poorly made or improperly installed will create unwanted drafts that increase energy use and reduce the overall comfort level of your home. The wrong type of door may also be pushed open during high winds. Consider installing a pet door that is certified by the Alliance to Save Energy (ASE) or has a double or triple flap. These types of pet doors can reduce energy loss and make life easier for you and your furry friends. The best solution Consider installing a pet door that is certified by the Alliance to Save Energy (ASE) or has a double or triple flap. These types can may be a high-quality electronic door that is activated by reduce energy loss and make life easier for you and your pets. a chip on your pet’s collar. of insulation for the animals is provided. It’s difficult to undo a pet door instalYour pet’s tolerance really depends on lation, so before taking the leap, we the breed and the thickness of its coat. suggest doing your homework. There A report by the Purdue Center may be other strategies that will give you for Animal Science says that Siberian and your pet some of the convenient huskies can tolerate temperatures below benefits without the downsides. freezing, but some short-haired dogs require temperatures of 59 F or higher. To save energy, we keep our home Older animals may require warmer temcool during winter nights and warm during summer days. How much “hot peratures than younger ones. and cold” can our pup and tabby handle? During summer, cats and dogs handle the heat in different ways. Cats clearly enjoy warmer temperatures than dogs, Cats and dogs can handle the cold and they do a good job of reducing their better than humans. The U.S. activity levels as temperatures climb. But Department of Agriculture (USDA), both cats and dogs can get overheated. which regulates facilities that house The USDA says that room temperatures cats and dogs, requires these facilities in facilities housing dogs or cats should to maintain temperatures above 50 F. not exceed 85 F for more than four Some exceptions are allowed for breeds hours at a time. accustomed to the cold or if some form

Q

A

12

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JULY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

p Pets understand the value of an insulated bed or comfy blanket in cold weather.

Q A

Is it okay if my cat or my dog sleeps in the garage overnight?

USDA rules suggest this should be fine if your garage temperature stays between 50 F and 85 F. Pets might be able to handle a lower temperature if they have a warm, insulated bed. We do not recommend heating or cooling your garage for your pet. This could lead to extremely high energy bills, which makes sense because an uninsulated garage will easily cost more to heat or cool than the rest of your home. A better solution is a heated or climate-­ controlled pet house from companies such as K&H Pet Products (khpet.com) and Aridus Den (aridusden.com). You can also purchase heated beds for cats and dogs. Some beds use as little as 4 watts of electricity, so they won’t drain your energy bill. We hope these tips will be helpful as you work at saving energy while caring for your favorite furry friend. Send questions to Energy Q&A, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033, or email energyqa@scliving.coop.


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SC   smart choice

Power up your workout

HIRED MUSCLE

Overdoing it at the gym can be painful for days. PowerDot 2.0 Uno, the world’s smartest muscle recovery and performance tool, uses electric pulses to stimulate those pipes to help you recover faster and perform better. It connects via Bluetooth to an app that controls 10 stimulation programs. $250. (844) 479‑7368; powerdot.com.

Sizzling summer temperatures are no excuse for skipping out on your health and fitness goals—not when you have these handy tools to keep you on track. BY DAVID NOVAK

SCALE IT DOWN

If you indulge, you bulge. Keep an eye on your girth and get a clearer picture of your health with the Fitbit Aria 2 Smart Scale. It measures weight, body fat percentage and BMI— all in one step. Wirelessly connect to your smartphone to track your progress in easy-to-read charts and graphs. $130. (877) 623‑4997; fitbit.com. 

NOW HEAR THIS

Designed for athletes, the Under Armour JBL True Wireless Flash Earphones allow you to pump up the jams and stay alert to your surroundings during a workout or run. These wireless wonders are tuned to bring out those driving bass lines, but a clever TalkThru function lowers the music when you need to chat with a workout partner and the AmbientAware feature lets you hear your surroundings so you don’t get smacked by a car. They come in an aluminum charging case and the low-profile earbuds run for five hours on a charge. $170. (800) 336‑4525; jbl.com.

ROLL WITH IT

Weekend warriors love foam rollers and claim they help warm up an achy body before a workout, and help muscles recover after it’s done. The Hyperice Vyper 2 adds a new dimension by adding three levels of vibration to increase flexibility, improve circulation and reduce muscle fatigue. $200. (949) 565‑4994; hyperice.com.

MONITOR THE SITUATION

Looking for a new way to track your peak athletic performance? The MightySat Fingertip Pulse Oximeter is a hospital-grade tool that measures oxygen saturation and pulse rate, as well as breathing rate, breathing effort, hydration and other factors that allow you to fine-tune a workout. $300. (800) 326‑4890; masimo.com. 14

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JULY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

CLIMB EVERY MOUNTAIN

Some say fitness is an adventure. Wear that notion on your wrist with the Coros VERTIX GPS Adventure Watch, the perfect climber’s companion. With a superlong-lasting battery and built-in pulse oximeter, you’re ready to scale the highest peaks of your fitness plan. $600. (714) 389‑0269; coros.com. 

Tech journalist David Novak is editor of ­GadgetGram.com. Prices and availability are subject to change. Inclusion in this column is not an endorsement by South Carolina Living or any S.C. electric cooperative.


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S S O A H C D E Z I N A G INSIDE THE OR

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JULY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP


! D L O S ONS I T C U A T N E M P I OF FARM EQU DREW HAWORTH EL | PHOTOS BY AN BY HASTINGS HENS

SCLIVING.COOP   | JULY 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

17


I T ’ S   A U C T I O N   D AY

and from atop a wobbly and rusty flatbed trailer at Dukes Auction Group in North, two “ring men” are working the crowd, trying to entice a buying frenzy for a grab bag of miscellaneous items—everything from oil pumps to organs, chainsaws to Blues Brothers statues. One of the ring men holds up a cardboard box holding a fuel pump. The other ring man beckons, with a come-hither motion of his hand, for the folks huddled around him to nod or wink or reach their hands from their jacket pockets and make a bid. All the while, bursting from the PA system and reverberating throughout the 15-plus acres of barbed-wired enclosed grounds, the voice of the auctioneer fires off numbers in a rapid, hypnotic, bidinducing cadence. At certain intervals along the rambling, nonsensical “filler” of the call, the escalating price emerges if you know what to listen for. “Two pow three, three pow four, THE ACTION AT THE AUCTION (previous spread, clockwise from top left) Scenes from Dukes Auction Group in North this past February: n Potential bidders check out a variety of tractors and farm equipment. n Ringman Al McMillan wrangles bids. n From left, auctioneer Jayme Gandee, clerk Steve Cockrell, and auctioneer Zolton Thornburg take bids for items outdoors. n Attendees escape the damp chill to bid on large equipment shown on monitors. u The time is ripe for life-size statues of Elwood and

Jake, aka The Blues Brothers, to move on.

18

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JULY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

foooour dollar pow, threeeee, three dollar, four, four pow, five! Five pow, five pow dollar, four, four pow dollar, forty-five hundred, now five, fifty-five, puh pow, puh pow, fifty pow, buhbow, fiftyfive, buh bow, five dollar pow, fifty-five hundred …” When one buyer tips the bill of his cap, the ring man raises up his hand as if tossing an imaginary ball in the air and cries, “Hep!” Then his eyes, full of fierce determination, immediately begin surveying the crowd for another bidder, and his hands never stop beckoning. Finally, one of the bidders closes his eyes and makes a throat-slitting gesture as if to say, “I’m done,” and the auctioneer makes the final determination known as the “hammer price.” He points to the winning bidder and cries out in a clear voice, “Sold!”

‘Be there and be ready’ More hyperactive than flea markets and antique malls, equipment auctions like these, which take place in farming communities across South Carolina, seek to establish the fair market value on used goods. A fair price, after all, is only what someone is willing to pay for it. And what’s being bought and sold today—in this coordinated call-andresponse of gestures and signals— seems to be everything under the sun, even if on this Saturday in February there is no sun. The air is cold and misty with ­coffee-cup steam and cigarette smoke. Jackets are zipped up tight. Beanies and hats are pulled low,


‘ T H E S O U N D T H AT S E L L S ’

ORGANIZED CHAOS, SIX TIMES A YEAR (from left): n Ringman Mark Walker works the crowd while wrangling bids. n Both sellers and buyers hope to find satisfaction at the auction. n Ever-vigilant proprietor “Big Don” Dukes, clipboard in hand, combined his love of auctions and farm equipment to establish his dream job. n A vintage John Deere tractor put up for auction by Mid‑Carolina co-op member Billy Wise gets its turn on the block.

close to the eyes. But the motto of Dukes Auction Group is that their auction goes on, rain or shine, every other month, as long as it takes to auction off each piece of equipment. They begin in the morning with the firearms auction— shotguns, rifles, handguns, all calibers and gauges. Then it’s on to the miscellaneous and the non-drivable equipment, before ending with the “drive-thru”—a showcase of tractors, turn mowers, dump trucks, combines, campers and excavators. “I was raised up going to auctions with my dad,” says Donald Dukes, the namesake patriarch and man-in-charge, who on the day of the auction busies himself—clipboard in hand—between calling bids, documenting final sales prices,

“Whether they’re selling or buying, or just here to enjoy the atmosphere, people do enjoy coming.” —DONALD DUKES and making sure the whole operation runs smoothly. “Ever since I was a child, I liked attending auctions. And farming is in my past. My father farmed. My grandfather farmed. We’re generation farmers, so I relate to farm equipment and construction equipment.” It’s clear that, for Dukes (as it is for most of the 600-plus auction attendees), auctions are a time-honored and efficient way of doing business. Auctioneering is said to go back as far as 500 B.C. and enjoyed a particular spike in popularity with the English “candle auctions” of the 17th and 18th centuries, in which bidding ended whenever the wick burned out.

An auctioneer’s call, it might be said, sounds like something swift and short-legged, like a jackrabbit running for its life until it leaps and lands in safety—that moment when the right price has been determined and all bids are finished, and the verdict comes out clear and decisive: “Sold!” For first-timers who struggle to follow the rhythmic patter, auctioneer Donald Dukes has this advice: “Most of the words you hear an auctioneer using are words that don’t mean a lot— they’re called filler. Every auctioneer has a little bit of his own chant. You say it so fast that it sounds more like a song.” The sound is both exciting and mesmerizing—a way to almost enchant people into making a bid—something akin to a catcher yelling, “Hey batter batter, hey batter batter,” or, perhaps, a ticking time bomb. “Auctioneers are making the sounds sound good,” says Dukes. “In other words, I like to think of the auctioneer as the sound that sells.”

But Dukes, whose auction house earns a 10 percent commission on every sale, also sees auctions as a way for farm communities to gather together. “Whether they’re selling or buying, or just here to enjoy the atmosphere, people do enjoy coming,” he says. “They come out and see the neighbors they might only see at places like a church reunion.” Still, he understands the need to make modern accommodations for dedicated buyers and sellers, especially when the weather isn’t nice. There’s an indoor auction shed for larger items where buyers sit in rows of metal foldout chairs as a photo of each item pops up on a TV screen. Bidders can even sit at home, eBay-style, and bid live on the internet through the website proxibid.com for a 2 percent markup on the final price. Eugene McCutchen, who works as a kind of agent for clients back home in Bishopville, is a 30-year veteran of farm auctions and appreciates the changes Dukes has made. Yesterday, he spent the morning standing in the cold rain at an outdoor auction in North Carolina, but rain or shine, he never wants to miss an auction. “I’m coming here to buy and resell. Buy and resell. I’m not limited to anything,” he says. “In other words, it could be farm equipment, lawn and yard equipment, lawn mowers,

SCLIVING.COOP   | JULY 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

19


golf carts. It changes depending on if I have people looking for particular items, and sometimes I come and buy specifically for them.” Grinning like a man in on a secret, he adds, “If you’re here all day, you’re gonna find some bargains. I think people should take advantage of auctions. It’s a golden opportunity. Like I say, ‘Go to them, be there, and be ready.’ ”

HIS FIRST AUCTION Billy Wise, left, of St. Matthews shows Danny Edwards of Neeses one of the two vintage John Deere tractors he hopes to sell after having had no success with online or newspaper advertising.

“It’s a nice tractor. Nothing else made like them,” says one of the men, Harold Boone, who owns 15 John Deere As and Gs, but who like many of the bidders won’t say much more and risk giving away his price point. As it gets nearer to the time when the Deeres will make their drive-thru debut, Wise waits in the wings almost nerSweet spot of compromise vously. There have already been moments when the aucLate in the afternoon as the sun is trying to break free and tioneer has canceled bidding: “Go on and get out of here at warm up the place for the start of the drive-thru auction fea$3,000. No sale!”—and then the sellers hang their heads in defeat. turing tractors, trucks and other motorized equipment, MidBut when the first of Wise’s tractors comes up, there are, if Carolina Electric Cooperative member Billy Wise seeks his not a flurry of activity, several bidders making thumbs-up gesgolden opportunity. He stands with his arms folded, surveying the people checking out his vintage John Deere tractors. tures. And that’s all it takes. As the auctioneer keeps up the It’s his first time at an auction, and he doesn’t know entirely song and the bids reach Wise’s hidden reserve, the smallest what to expect. He’s got a price in mind for each tractor—for trace of a smile begins to cross his lips. And then—bam!—it’s the 1948 John Deere A and for the 1949 John Deere G—and sold, and he’s full-on grinning. The winning bidder is Brian Sturkie, also a Mid-Carolina he would prefer not to go back to St. Matthews with the tracco-op member, who says simply, “It was a good deal. I knew I tors on his trailer. always wanted one. It was a nice tractor that didn’t need any But he doesn’t know what he’ll get. He has set a reserve work.” price, which means that any final bid under that price will When asked if he’ll use the tractor to farm with or just as not enact a sale. Wise decided to try the auction when he had a collectible, Sturkie lets out a hearty laugh no luck selling the vintage machines online and points to the brackets on the front. or through newspaper ­classified ads. Today, GET THERE “See those there?” he asks. “Those are for he’s counting on motivated collectors to be putting up American flags, for when I drive among the bidders. Dukes Auction Group hosts it in the town parade!” When potential buyers come by and ask live auctions every other month at its permanent He and Wise go over to meet each other Wise to fire up one of his tractors, he turns facility on 5526 Savannah and shake hands. They’re both happy and the ignition and the tractor coughs and Highway in North. For smiling. After all, they’re both walking away shoots up a plume of black smoke. The men more information visit with what they want. They’ve both achieved look closer. Some even put their hands on dukesauctiongroup.com or the promise an auction forever makes—to the engine, as if to warm up or just to feel call (803) 247-2776. the purr of an old John Deere. hit upon the sweet spot of compromise. 20

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JULY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP


|

SC   stories

Better living through farming

Dan Fox AGE:

55.

Timmonsville. Hobby farmer who experiments with sustainable aquaculture and agriculture techniques. DAY JOB: Dr. Fox is an anesthesiologist at McLeod Regional Medical Center. COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT: Member of the Timmonsville Church of Christ. AS A YOUTH: Lived for 10 years with missionary parents in Chiang Mai, Thailand. GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: Raise children that honor God and “use the farm and all the assets that He has given us for His honor and glory.” CO-OP AFFILIATION: Member of Pee Dee Electric Cooperative. HOMETOWN:

CLAIM TO FAME:

Dr. Dan Fox tosses a handful of fish pellets into a water tank and the surface momentarily roils with tilapia. Hundreds of the hardy, ubiquitous fish populate two such containers in a greenhouse on Fox’s 123-acre hobby farm near Timmonsville. Outside, 60 head of Devon cows graze quietly on fields planted with peas, clover, rye and sorghum. There are free-range chickens, too. They strut confidently around the property where agriculture is conducted by design in an environment free of pesticides and other chemicals. “We built a house here and gradually grew our way into farming,” says Fox, an anesthesiologist who moved his family to the country to explore a healthier lifestyle. “We are trying to choose a way that is cleaner than traditional farming techniques.” The tilapia, for example, are raised using a symbiotic process known as aquaponics, which circulates water between the fish tanks and adjacent grow beds often filled with tomatoes, okra, cucumbers and onions. The fish produce nutrients for the plants, which in turn help clean the water for the fish. In his pastures, Fox employs a technique called regenerative agriculture to produce nutrient-rich soil that will grow healthy forage for his herd. Fox says he hopes his farm will serve as a model for other people interested in healthier lifestyles. “Our country has such a high rate of cancer, obesity, diabetes and heart disease,” he says. “The key to getting away from those problems is good nutrition. And the key to good nutrition is good farming practices.” —TIM HANSON | PHOTO BY MILTON MORRIS

SCLIVING.COOP  | JULY 2019  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SC   travels

A tea-rific time in Elloree BY APRIL COKER BLAKE | PHOTOS BY MILTON MORRIS

THERE’S AN OTHERWORLDLY FEEL TO

see the teapots, then I started expanding what we offered.” Garrett took over the space in mid2018, and didn’t get going on the museum until 2019. The store and the curious museum sat empty after Julian Boland, owner of Boland’s Pharmacy, passed away in 2014. Boland was an avid teapot collector and started the museum to showcase his collection. He also had the enormous blue teapot installed on the back of the building in 2012. Sadly, as the building sat empty, the roof of the teapot caved in, though it’s still a sight to see from the outside of the building. The teapot is about the size of a two-car garage,

“It’s so well-done, and isn’t

the tree-lined street with stately brick just a bunch of teapots facades and perfectly polished plate glass windows. This is Cleveland Street, sitting in a room, it’s a wellthe main drag in Elloree, and beyond done display I cannot take one of the storefronts is a collection like none other. The only two hints of what’s credit for.” —PENNY GARRETT to come are the bright blue teapot sign in the window that reads “The Tea-rific though its interior is round, of course. Teapot Museum” and the small garden By design, Penny has left the entrance sprouting an array of ceramic teapots. to the museum inconspicuous. Instead, Through the front door into the the eye is drawn to a collection of hats teapot museum yields a fairly regularintended for tea party-goers to wear. The seeming thrift store front. But this is entrance is a plain door in the far corner only the beginning, as proprietor Penny of the store that leads to a darkened Garrett sweeps you inward with her room. As she turns on the lights with a infectiously jolly personality. dramatic flick of her wrist, she It’s not surprising to find eagerly faces the new visitors. that Penny is an animal lover, “People aren’t prepared for which is why she’s here. She the magnitude, so I like to see originally wanted to rent only people’s expressions as they the front of the building to come through the door,” says open a nonprofit thrift store Garrett. to benefit the animal rescue An endless sea of teapots group For All Paws. The (5,001 in total) lines all four building used to be Boland’s walls. Teapots are gathered on Pharmacy, but the owners carts throughout the space, agreed to let her have the teapots are grouped on tables, front of the building with just and teapots shaped like every one caveat. animal in creation are nestled “They wanted me to keep upon an enormous wooden the museum going,” says WHAT A CUPPA In 2012, Julian Boland’s collection obsession reached grand ark in the middle of the room. Garrett. “I didn’t focus on it at proportions with the addition of a large teapot at the rear of the museum. As visitors make their way in, first, but everyone wanted to 22

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JULY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP


RENTAL SPACE WITH A CATCH Penny Garrett runs a nonprofit thrift store benefiting an animal rescue group in a former pharmacy, and has become caretaker for the owners’ teapot museum as well. The collection includes pots acquired on world travels, displayed with the appropriate country’s flag. METHOD TO THE MADNESS Teapots are organized by theme, such as animals on a “Noah’s Ark,” vegetables in a garden plot, and cottages arranged like a village.

they stop every few inches to gawk and exclaim things like, “Wow, it’s a bald eagle teapot!” or “Who in the world would make a teapot shaped like lettuce?” “It’s so well-done, and isn’t just a bunch of teapots sitting in a room, it’s

a well-done display I cannot take credit for,” says Garrett. “Sybil Boland, his wife, did it and she always says it was his dream, and her nightmare!” As people wind through the ­displays, they notice something even more

unbelievable—an additional room even more brimming with teapots than the first. There’s a Christmas corner with dozens of Santa, snowman, candy cane and holly berry adorned teapots. A collection of children’s teapots that look impossibly small, and royal and presidential teapots showcase the more elegant items in the collection. The carts scattered around the rooms hold a handful of teapots each, and each cart includes a flag. Mr. Boland and his children were all missionaries, so they gathered teapots from all around the world during their travels. There are teapots from Greece, Ireland, Japan and dozens more countries. After the tour, visitors who made a reservation can enjoy high tea, which

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SC   travels

PHOTO CREDIT

PHOTO CREDIT

visitaikensc.com

AikenSC_Equestrian_4-6875x4-9375.indd 1

visitaikensc.com

TOPPING OFF THE MOOD Penny Garrett serves a mouthwatering selection of goodies to guests who’ve picked out hats to wear for their high tea. The charge for tea benefits animal rescue efforts.

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#VisitAikenSC | VisitAikenSC.com

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The Tea-rific Teapot Museum is located at 2732 Cleveland Street in downtown Elloree. HOURS: Museum tours are offered from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Reservations required for high tea. ADMISSION: Museum tours $6 per person; tour and tea $12 per person; tour and high tea $30 per person. DETAILS: (803) 983-3210, tearificteapotmuseum.com.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JULY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

consists of a hot tea, an iced tea, three courses, and a selection of sweets at the end to round it out. The three courses include English scones with Devonshire cream, lemon curd and flavored butter; a teacup of soup; and a tiered tray of savories such as chicken salad on a handbaked croissant, mini quiches and the prettiest finger sandwiches. The final round brings mini pies and cakes, chocolate cream puffs, and a selection of decadent chocolate-dipped fruits. The selections vary each day, and Garrett needs to have at least a day’s notice for a high tea reservation. All proceeds from the museum, tea room and thrift store go to support animal rescue efforts. For All Paws divides the profits between programs to help senior citizens keep pets in their homes, an emergency vet fund and needbased grants for local animal rescue groups—a tea-rific cause indeed.


This Summer at the Museum of York County! Exhibit open Tuesday through Saturday June 8 – September 7 Discover the intriguing lives of nocturnal animals in a hands-on, family-friendly exhibit! 4621 Mount Gallant Rd. Rock Hill, SC 29732 803-329-2121 • chmuseums.org Project assisted by City of Rock Hill and York County Accommodations & Hospitality Tax Programs

CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM WITH CLEMSON BLUE CHEESE Servings: 16

5 cups half and half 1 cup Clemson Blue Cheese, crumbled 1 cup honey

2 cups egg yolk 2 ounces dark chocolate, shaved Ice cream maker

In a sauce pot, heat half and half, and honey until simmering. Pour egg yolks into a mixing bowl, and ladle hot cream over them. Stir continuously. Add Clemson Blue Cheese and chill. Pour chilled mixture into an ice cream maker. Churn according to manufacturer’s instructions. When mixture is thick and creamy, add chocolate shavings. Continue freezing for 2 minutes. Pour finished ice cream into a freezerfriendly container and store. TIP: Serve with poached pears.

From Tastes of Clemson Blue Cheese, available on Amazon

REGULAR WEDGE $6.77 while quantities last. Order at clemsonbluecheese.com

SCLIVING.COOP   | JULY 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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Ice cream treats for the kids

Happy e Cream National Ic affair it a family e k a M ! th Mon r ice cream recipes fo e s e th h it w much fun almost as re a t a th ts s as trea ith the kid to make w eat. they are to

BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

ROOT BEER FLOAT MAKES 1

I U LI I A N EDRYGA I LOVA

2–3 scoops vanilla ice cream 6 ounces root beer or cola Whipped cream, optional Chocolate sauce or mini chocolate chips, for garnish

Into a chilled tall glass or mug, add ice cream. Immediately pour in root beer—slowly, allowing the soft drink to foam up and settle down before adding additional. Add whipped cream on top and, if desired, add chocolate sauce or chips. Serve with a straw or long iced-tea spoon.

ICE CREAM AND COOKIE SAMMIES MAKES 6

1 dozen of your favorite 3-inch cookies, store-bought 1  H quarts ice cream, slightly softened Sprinkles or mini chocolate chips

K A REN H ERM A N N

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JULY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

Put one large scoop of softened ice cream on one cookie and cover with another cookie. Gently squeeze the two cookies together until the ice cream spreads all around to the edge of the cookies. Smooth the edges of the ice cream with a knife and dip the edges in the sprinkles or chocolate chips. Repeat until all cookies are used. Wrap individually in parchment paper and return to freezer for at least one hour or until ready to serve.


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SC   recipe

G I N A MOORE

WAFFLE CONE ICE CREAM TACOS MAKES 8

This recipe calls for using a waffle cone maker that is different from a regular waffle iron; the grooves are not as deep. You can use a regular waffle iron, just be sure to make the waffles extra thin. WAFFLE CONE TACO SHELLS

4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted I cup all-purpose flour N cup cocoa powder ½ teaspoon kosher salt G teaspoon cinnamon 2 large eggs ½ cup sugar ½ teaspoon vanilla extract G cup milk, more if needed Cooking spray

Preheat waffle cone maker according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Start with heat setting No. 3 and adjust accordingly, depending on the desired brownness. In a small bowl, melt butter in microwave. Set aside. In another small bowl, whisk together the flour, cocoa powder, salt and cinnamon.

In a medium bowl, whisk together eggs and sugar until the sugar is combined. Add the flour mixture and stir. Add butter, vanilla and milk and stir just until combined. Do not overmix. If additional milk is required, add 1 tablespoon at a time until desired consistency. Prepare a cake cooling rack and spray with cooking spray. Spoon ¼ cup batter onto the waffle-cone maker. Using a small spatula, spread the batter evenly over the surface. Close the lid and cook for at least 1 minute before lifting the lid to check for doneness. Continue cooking until the desired color is reached, about 1½ to 2 minutes. Quickly remove the waffle from the waffle-cone maker and drape over two to three tines of the cake cooling rack, depending on the taco thickness you desire. Repeat until all waffle tacos are made. Allow tacos to cool completely so they maintain their shape. Ideally, make the shells the day before assembling the ice-cream tacos. Leftover shells can be frozen for 2–3 months.

ICE CREAM TACOS

6–8 thin waffle cone taco shells, cooled 1  H quarts ice cream, slightly softened Fudge Chopped nuts Sprinkles, optional

With a medium-sized ice cream scoop, scoop semi-soft ice cream into waffle tacos. Ice cream should be pliable so it will not crack the waffle shells. Wrap each taco individually in parchment, and return to freezer for one hour or more. When ready to serve, remove from freezer and drizzle with fudge sauce. Sprinkle with chopped nuts and sprinkles, and serve. You can also make this dessert using cannoli shells.

CHEF’S TIP

Turn for the page am re c e ic more treats!

SCLIVING.COOP   | JULY 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SC   recipe

What’s cooking at

SCLiving.coop WRAP UP DESSERTS Kitchen do-it-yourselfers will enjoy the simple process of creating homemade waffle cones as demonstrated in this video from Chef Belinda’s kitchen. Watch and learn at

SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda MORE ICE CREAM TREATS It’s going to be a long, hot summer, so don’t miss these other recipes for ice cream treats available at SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda.

LOADED BANANA SPLIT K A REN H ERM A N N

MAKES 1–2

1 banana, halved 2 –3 scoops ice cream, same or multi-flavors 2–3 tablespoons caramel sauce Chopped walnuts Sprinkles Whipped cream Cherries, for garnish

SORBET BOMBE WITH RASPBERRY SAUCE—With colorful layers of pomegranate, mango and raspberry sorbet, this cool dessert looks almost as good as it tastes.

TIPS AND TECHNIQUES GET THE SCOOP When a

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TRIPLE-CHOCOLATE BROWNIE STACKS—Just keep the chocolate coming in layers of gooey brownies, ice cream and a white-chocolate drizzle.

WHIP IT GOOD Sure, we all love the spray can, but homemade whipped cream is even better— and surprisingly easy to make! I U LI I A N EDRYGA I LOVA

dessert recipe calls for scoops of ice cream, plan ahead. Place ice cream scoops on a parchment-lined sheet pan and return to freezer for a few hours before building the desserts. This makes handling the scoops easier (they won’t melt as fast) and makes for a more attractive presentation.

GW ÉN A Ë L LE VOT

GW ÉN A Ë L LE VOT

Into a banana split boat or oblong shallow bowl, place banana halves along the sides. In the middle add the ice cream scoops. Drizzle with sauce and add nuts and sprinkles. Pipe whipped cream on top and garnish with cherries.

EASY HOMEMADE WHIPPED CREAM MAKES 2 CUPS

1 cup heavy cream 2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar ½ teaspoon vanilla extract

Into a chilled mixer bowl, place cream, sugar and vanilla. Beat on medium to high speed until stiff peaks form, about 2–3 minutes. Watch closely and do not overbeat, or cream will turn into butter.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JULY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

EASIEST-EVER BAKED ALASKA—Impress your dinner guests with this throwback dessert. It’s delicious, and it only looks hard to make.


DEEPLY ROOTED • CLEMSONSBEST.COM •

IN SOUTH CAROLINA N FLAEVW OR

G INA MOORE

16% BUTTERFAT | SUPPORT SOUTH CAROLINA’S FUTURE OF AGRICULTURE

Real Milk. Real Fruit. Real Good.


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SC   chef’s choice

Farm-fresh flavor BY M. LINDA LEE

RED ACE BEETS. MOKUM CARROTS.

Kookaburra spinach. Hon tsai tai. On a warm spring day, Chef Greg McPhee, who owns The Anchorage restaurant in the Village of West Greenville with his wife, Beth, is standing in a field in Travelers Rest, naming the neat rows of tiny, bright-green shoots that are poking their heads above the loamy soil of the Reedy River basin. These are but a sampling of the budding crops that will soon fill an acre of the 21-acre plot the couple leases in Travelers Rest. Horseshoe Farm—so-called for the horseshoe-shaped pond that embraces the plant beds and the luck they had in

FARM TO TABLE This D’Avignon radish and other locally grown produce will soon find its way onto a customer’s plate at The Anchorage in West Greenville.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JULY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

PHOTOS BY M AT TH E W FR A N K LI N C A RTER

ATTENTION TO DETAIL The talents of Chef Greg McPhee and his wife, Beth, earned The Anchorage a James Beard nomination in its first year of business.

actual connection where the farm feeds the restaurant,” Greg McPhee explains. Recognizable by the bright mural Village Harvest that adorns the Pendleton Street side of the building, The Anchorage exudes a modern farmhouse vibe inside, with its whitewashed brick walls, shiplap paneling, contemporary local artwork and small open kitchen. Upstairs, the white-granite-topped bar lures locals for craft cocktails and conversation. The menu of reasonably priced small plates changes each week, featuring the seasonal vegetables grown on Horseshoe Farm. “It’s exciting for our customers,” notes Beth McPhee. “Every time you come in you’re going to get something new.” The chef’s belief that “the The Anchorage core of any dish is color, 586 Perry Ave., Greenville height, texture, balance and (864) 219-3082; acidity,” yields dishes that theanchoragerestaurant.com sing with fresh flavor, as in HOURS: Dinner: Wednesday hand-rolled garganelli with finding the place— and Thursday, 5 p.m. to Bethel Trails rabbit, hon tsai is a partnership be9:30 p.m.; Friday and tai (aka Chinese kale), pesto tween Greg, Beth, Saturday, 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. alla Trapanese and mustard and Chris Miller of Brunch: Sunday, 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Walk-ins seed oil. That Garden Guy, welcome, but reservations are “We want to take the who oversees the recommended. same attention to detail at day-to-day operathe farm as we do in the tion of the farm. restaurant,” Greg McPhee says, referring The idea took root when the couple to the fact that Miller’s sustainable was having trouble obtaining local ingrefarming methods include using organic dients for their 2-year-old restaurant. compost, not employing chemical Though they had cultivated relationships with a bunch of local farmers, they sprays, and not tilling the soil in order to just couldn’t find the diversity of produce avoid erosion and disturbing the natural organic matter. they needed for the chef’s vegetableThis spring, the farm added a centric menu. “We wanted to have that Community Supported Agriculture program that allows customers to buy a weekly allotment of fresh produce, as well as locally made chocolates and cheese, or prepared foods made at the restaurant (think pickles, arugula pesto, chicken-liver mousse). This summer, the couple also plans to sell their produce at the Travelers Rest Farmers Market. “I get great satisfaction from seeing something that lasts,” McPhee says of the successful farm operation. “It doesn’t just get consumed on the plate.”


WIN $100 AND A WAFFLE CONE MAKER!

Win with South Carolina Living and Clemson’s Best Gourmet Ice Cream

The scoop on Clemson’s Best Clemson’s Best Gourmet Ice Cream is a Certified S.C. Grown product made with ingredients produced by South Carolina farmers. It also contains 16 percent ­butterfat—much more than other ice cream brands—making every spoonful a cool, creamy treat. To learn more or to find a retailer near you, go to clemsonsbest.com.

To celebrate National Ice Cream Month, South Carolina Living and Clemson’s Best Gourmet Ice Cream are giving away a $100 Visa gift card and Chef’s Choice waffle cone maker. We’ll draw the name of one lucky reader from all eligible entries received by July 31. For your chance to win, register today at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply or use the mail-in coupon below. While you’re at it, take our poll on the next ice cream flavor you’d like to see from Clemson’s Best. R E A D E R R E P LY T R AV E L S W E E P S TA K E S

By entering, you may receive information from these great travel and tourism sponsors: jj Alpine Helen/White County, Ga. CVB jj City of Aiken Tourism jj Clemson’s Best Gourmet Ice Cream jj Discover Upcountry South Carolina Association jj Greer Cultural Arts Council jj Culture & Heritage Museums, Historic Brattonsville jj Summerfest, Greater York County Chamber jj South Carolina Living magazine

Register below or online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply YES! Enter me in the drawing for a $100 Visa gift card and a Chef’s Choice waffle cone maker courtesy of South Carolina Living and Clemson’s Best Gourmet Ice Cream. Name Address City State/ZIP Email* Phone

South Carolina Living, RRTS, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033 or travel@SCLiving.coop. Entries must be received by July 31, 2019, to be eligible. *Winner will be notified by email.

SEND COUPON TO:

Vote for a future flavor for Clemson’s Best Blueberry Lemon Cheesecake Loaded Birthday Cake Triple Chocolate Pie Neapolitan Orange Creamsicle

Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply SCLIVING.COOP   | JULY 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SC   gardener

JULY IN THE GARDEN n Don’t mow grass when it is wet! This could not only result in an uneven, raggedy cut across the entire lawn that nosy neighbors might talk about, but it can also encourage the spread of grass diseases.

n Have you made any mud lately? Fill a large, shallow bowl, such as a large planter saucer or old birdbath, with about an inch of rich garden dirt, add water until it is the consistency of muck, and moisten it frequently to maintain the mix so it is more like goo and less like concrete. Then, see how many butterflies flit in for the moisture and nutrients they like to find in wet dirt.

L . A . JACKSO N

TIP OF THE MONTH When the flowers of daylilies fade away, pick off the spent blossoms. For reblooming cultivars, this will encourage even more flowers, but for all daylilies, it will prevent seed production, which saps energy that would otherwise be stored and used for next year’s fancy floral show. Thinking about letting some seeds mature to try growing more of your daylilies? Think again. More likely than not, they will yield uncertain, substandard offspring. Dividing daylily clumps is a faster way to propagate these beauties, and the progeny will be true copies of their parents. Early fall is a good time to dig and divide your pretties.

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BY L.A. JACKSON

POTTED PLANTS ARE THE PERFECT

solution for adding instant botanical interest outdoors to a sidewalk, porch, window, patio or deck this summer, and while they tend to be low-­maintenance, there are plenty of simple tricks to fine-tune the art of keeping these contained creations alive, well and showing off until the first fall frosts. Here are a few such pointers for your planter pleasure. Clay or plastic? Clay pots are popular because their weight permits plant groupings to grow tall with less risk of becoming top-heavy. However, unlike with lighter plastic pots, soil moisture can leech through the clay sides, so they need to be watered more often. Baby your soil. Mixing SAP (Super Absorbent Polymers) with the soil lessens the need to water plant containers so often. SAP products can usually be found in garden shops, but the soil can also be pampered—literally—for less. Simply place a clean absorbent diaper plastic-side down 6 to 12 inches (depending on the size of the plants) under the dirt in the pot or window box. Make a few cuts to expose the moisture-retaining polymer flakes. Fertilize on a regular schedule. The more a planter is irrigated, the quicker nutrients are washed out of the soil, so make it a habit during the growing season to substitute plain water with a diluted fertilizer solution every three to four weeks. Made in the shade. Many summer containers are filled with sun-­ worshiping plants, but, in such small spaces, too much of Ol’ Sol is not necessarily a good thing. To moderate the solar sizzle, place planters where they will be shielded from the worst of the sun’s rays in the afternoon. Also, keep in mind that light colors reflect more

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JULY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

L . A . JACKSO N

n Pesky squirrels, dogs and cats enjoying your garden too much? Their romps through your plants can be made less fun with liberal sprinklings of sneeze-inducing, finely ground black pepper. Additional applications will be necessary after each rain.

Planter pointers

Planters and window boxes are a lowmaintenance way to make your garden grow.

Moderate solar sizzle: place planters where they’ll be shielded from the worst of the afternoon sun. of the sun’s heat than dark hues on containers, and in doing so, help keep enclosed root systems cooler. Plant some company. Visually soften the edges of pots and window boxes by including such wandering, low-growing plants as lysimachia, creeping thyme, ornamental sweet potato or even mint that will readily, playfully flow down the sides. On a practical note, these creative plant coverings also act as living mulch to deflect sun rays from contained soil, which helps cool the enclosed dirt and prevent the loss of moisture. Lighten the load. A pretty planter doesn’t have to be a heavy planter. To make it less of a beast to move around, add Styrofoam peanuts to the bottom quarter to third of the container and then finish filling with a quality potting soil. L.A. JACKSON is the former editor of Carolina Gardener magazine. Contact him at lajackson1@gmail.com.


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Do you love ice cream?

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Delicious recipes Bonus videos & photos Exclusive stories The latest reader contests And more! Don’t miss out. Sign up today for our FREE email newsletter.

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SC   calendar JULY 12 – AUGUST 15

Upstate JU LY

12–20  The Rocky Horror Picture Show, Spartanburg Little Theatre, Spartanburg. (864) 585‑8278. 15–19  Wet & Wild Outdoor Summer Camp, Pleasant Ridge County Park, Marietta. (864) 650‑0991. 17–21  SC 4-H Horse Camp, T. Ed Garrison Livestock Arena, Pendleton. (864) 656‑4028. 18–21  South Carolina Peach Festival, multiple locations, Gaffney. crbridges@ymail.com. 19  Creek Ranger Hike for Families, Paris Mountain State Park, Greenville. (864) 244‑5565. 20  Kid’s Day at Musgrove Mill, Musgrove Mill State Historic Site, Clinton. (864) 938‑0100. 20  Slabfest, SC Botanical Garden Nursery Area, Clemson. (864) 888‑7102. 22–26  Time Travelers Camp, SC Botanical Garden, Clemson. (864) 650‑1811. 25  Peace and Love Tour, Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium, Spartanburg. (864) 582‑8107. 25–28  South Carolina Quarter Horse Association Horse Show, T. Ed Garrison Livestock Arena, Pendleton. (803) 669‑1325. 26  Night of Wonders 2019, Spartanburg Art Museum, Spartanburg. (864) 582‑7616. 26  Third Friday SUP and Kayak Paddling Tours, Table Rock State Park, Pickens. (864) 878‑9813. 26  Turtle Trail Naturalist Hike for Families, Paris Mountain State Park, Greenville. (864) 244‑5565. 27  Animal Signs Scavenger Hunt, Paris Mountain State Park, Greenville. (864) 244‑5565.

SCLiving.coop/calendar Our mobile-friendly site lists even more festivals, shows and events. You’ll also find instructions on submitting your event. Please confirm information with the hosting event before attending. 30–Aug. 1  4-H Summer Fun

Days on the Square, Abbeville County Extension Office, Abbeville. (864) 446‑2276, ext. 111.

AUG UST

2  Creek Ranger Hike for Families,

Paris Mountain State Park, Greenville. (864) 244‑5565. 2  First Friday Walk with Dr. David Bradshaw, SC Botanical Garden, Clemson. (864) 656‑2836. 2  Stroller Struts: Butterfly Boogie, SC Botanical Garden, Clemson. (864) 656‑0203. 3  Frontier Encampment, Oconee Station State Historic Site, Walhalla. (864) 638‑0079. 3  Ranger Guided Battlefield Hike, Musgrove Mill State Historic Site, Clinton. (864) 938‑0100. 6–7  Newberry County 4-H Kids in the Kitchen Day Camp, Newberry County Clemson Extension, Newberry. (803) 276‑1091, ext. 142. 9  Creek Ranger Hike for Families, Paris Mountain State Park, Greenville. (864) 244‑5565. 10  In the Dark of the Night, Rose Hill Plantation State Historic Site, Union. (864) 427‑5966. O NG O ING

Every other Wednesday 

Music Sandwiched In, Spartanburg County Public Library, Spartanburg. (864) 948‑9020. Third Thursdays  ArtWalk, downtown cultural district, Spartanburg. (864) 582‑7616. Fridays through August  Dancing on Depot, Commerce Park, Fountain Inn. (864) 724‑8044. Fridays  Starry Nights, Roper Mountain Science Center, Greenville. (864) 355‑8900. Saturdays until Sept. 28 

27  Magical Moths: National Moth Week, SC Botanical Garden, Clemson. (864) 656‑2836. 27–Aug. 3  2019 Senior League Baseball World Series, J.B. Red Owens Sports Complex, Easley. SLBWS-Director@LittleLeague.org. 30  4-H Tomato Recipe Contest, Abbeville County Extension Office, Abbeville. (864) 446‑2276, ext. 111. 30–Aug. 1  4-H2O at Dreher Island: Exploring Lake Murray, Dreher Island State Park, Prosperity. (803) 276‑1091, ext. 142.

36

AU GU ST

Farmers Market, Commerce Park, Fountain Inn. (864) 724‑8044.

Midlands J ULY

15–19  Sailing Camp, Columbia

Sailing Club on Lake Murray, Columbia. (803) 764‑6065. 15–19  Summer Smarts: Arts & Sciences Camps, Bethlehem Baptist Church, Buford. (803) 285‑7451. 16  Twilight Paddling, Chester State Park, Chester. (803) 385‑2680.

19  Free Movie in the Park: The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part, Memorial Park, Newberry. (803) 276‑6264. 20  Wild Summer’s Night Auction & Wild Game Feast, Seawell’s Catering, Columbia. (803) 256‑0670. 22–26  Astronaut STEAM Camp, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑6264. 22–26  Sailing Camp, Columbia Sailing Club on Lake Murray, Columbia. (803) 764‑6065. 22–26  Summer Smarts: Arts & Sciences Camps, First Baptist Church, Kershaw. (803) 285‑7451. 23  Kaleidoscope Community Storytelling, Jasmine Cafe and Catering, York. (803) 818‑5093. 24  Wild Wednesdays, Sesquicentennial State Park, Columbia. (803) 788‑2706. 27  Midlands Women’s Fair, Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center, Columbia. (843) 936‑1510. 29–Aug. 2  Summer Smarts: Arts & Sciences Camps, Pleasant Hill United Methodist Church, Indian Land. (803) 285‑7451. 31  Wild Wednesdays, Sesquicentennial State Park, Columbia. (803) 788‑2706. AU GU ST

2–4  Corset & Cravats Conference and 19th Century Fashion Show, downtown, Newberry. corsetsandcravats.com. 3  Annual Big Daddy Fishing Event, Santee State Park, Santee. (803) 854‑2408. 3  Old Town Concert Series: Bret Michaels, Old Town Amphitheater, Rock Hill. (803) 329‑7090. 10  Allison Creek Bluegrass concert series, Allison Creek Presbyterian Church, York. (803) 366‑1302. 10  Guild Luau, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑6264. 10  Storks & Corks, Silver Bluff Audubon Center, Jackson. (803) 471‑0291. 15  Twilight Paddling, Chester State Park, Chester. (803) 385‑2680. ONGOING

Daily in July  Colby & Megan

Chriswell Exhibit, Aiken County Visitors Center, Aiken. (803) 642‑7557.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JULY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

Lowcountry JU LY

12–21  Beaufort Water Festival,

Henry C. Chambers Waterfront Park, Beaufort. (843) 524‑0600. 16  Crab College and Island Excursion, Edisto Beach State Park, Edisto Island. (843) 869‑2998. 16–21  Junior SOS, Ocean Drive Beach & Golf Resort, North Myrtle Beach. garrett.humphries@me.com. 17  The Impact of Social Media on Local Newspapers, TidePointe Community Room, Hilton Head Island. (843) 384‑6758. 19  State Park Ecotour, Edisto Beach State Park, Edisto Island. (843) 869‑2998. 20  Charleston Caribbean Jerk Festival, Riverfront Park, North Charleston. chsjerkfest@gmail.com. 20  Introduction to Weaving, Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston. (843) 722‑2706. 20  Keeper’s Choice Animal Demonstrations, Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 852‑4200. 23  State Park Ecotour, Edisto Beach State Park, Edisto Island. (843) 869‑2998. 24  2019 Art of Jazz Series: Lee Barbour Trio, Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston. (843) 641‑0011. 26  Charleston Margarita Festival, Brittlebank Park, Charleston. charlestonmargaritafest.com. 26  Crab College and Island Excursion, Edisto Beach State Park, Edisto Island. (843) 869‑2998. 26  Fourth Friday Paddle with a Ranger, Colleton State Park, Walterboro. (843) 538-8206. 26  Gibbes Unplugged: Black Refractions Tour with Jonathan Green, Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston. (843) 722‑2706. 27  Ill Vibe the Tribe presents Symbiosis, Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston. (843) 722‑2706. 27  Isle of Palms Beach Run, The Windjammer, Isle of Palms. rmssports@aol.com. 27  Keeper’s Choice Animal Demonstrations, Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 852‑4200. 30  Crab College and Island Excursion, Edisto Beach State Park, Edisto Island. (843) 869‑2998.

2  First Friday Paddle with a Ranger, Givhans Ferry State Park, Ridgeville. (843) 873‑0692. 2  State Park Ecotour, Edisto Beach State Park, Edisto Island. (843) 869‑2998. 2–4  Craftsmen’s Summer Classic Art & Craft Festival, Myrtle Beach Convention Center, Myrtle Beach. (336) 282‑5550. 2–4  Lowcountry Summer Coin Show, Exchange Park Fairgrounds, Ladson. (843) 797‑1245. 3  Bald Eagle: Symbol of Survival, Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 852‑4200. 6  State Park Ecotour, Edisto Beach State Park, Edisto Island. (843) 869‑2998. 7, 14 and 21  Introduction to Figure Drawing, Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston. (843) 722‑2706. 9  Crab College and Island Excursion, Edisto Beach State Park, Edisto Island. (843) 869‑2998. 10  Second Saturday Paddling Trips, Colleton State Park, Walterboro. (843) 538-8206. 10 and 17  Abstract Landscape Painting with Cory McBee, Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston. (843) 722‑2706. 11  All You Need Is Love: Charleston Jazz Orchestra plays The Beatles featuring Kanika Moore, East Beach Conference Center, Kiawah Island. (843) 641‑0011. 12–16  Summer Camp: Illustration and Storybook Design (ages 8-11), Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston. (843) 722‑2706. 13  Crab College and Island Excursion, Edisto Beach State Park, Edisto Island. (843) 869‑2998. ONGOING

Nightly through August 

Summerfest, Barefoot Landing, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 272‑8349. Mondays through August  Fireworks, Barefoot

Landing, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 272‑8349. Fourth Tuesdays  Wash Day, L.W. Paul Living History Farm, Conway. (843) 365‑3596. Wednesdays  Arts and Crafts Market, Bay Creek Park, Edisto Island. (843) 869‑3867. First Saturdays  History in the Landscape, Hampton Plantation State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 546‑9361.


|

SC   humor me

It’s not rocket voodoo BY JAN A. IGOE

IN HIGH SCHOOL, SCIENCE

wasn’t exactly my favorite subject. Especially biology. Not to get too technical here, but it was icky. We were forced—some of us against our will—to disembowel a frog marinated in formaldehyde. Biology teachers do not grant “conscientious objector” status, no matter how many times you faint. Now that I am a mature, serious person, science fascinates me. I’ve realized that scientists are behind major breakthroughs that transform our lives every day. Did you know that women with bountiful bottoms have smarter kids? Facebook says so. Not because we can sit on our kids until they do their homework, but because a mom’s gluteofemoral fat starts nourishing future geniuses in the womb! Of course, the usual joy snatchers jumped up to claim the research was wildly misinterpreted, but they’re all skinny. Nobody trusts them. The greatest scientists are the ones who win Ig Nobel Prizes for innovative research. Every year, the Iggies reward “improbable research that makes you laugh, then think.” Last year, the chemistry prize went to three scientists who studied how well you can clean your kitchen with spit. Is saliva really a miraculous cleaning agent for germy surfaces? Throughout history, moms have relied on it as facial cleanser for grimy kids and emergency spot removal when nobody’s looking. Spit is a natural, cost-effective resource that’s renewable. Once Johnson & Johnson finds out, we’ll find it in a lavender-scented spray next to the Windex. The nutrition prize was another 38

revelation. Did you know that a cheeseburger has more calories than your neighbor? According to scientific calculations—let’s not think too hard about how they confirmed this one—cannibals consume fewer calories than those eating normal dead things. Please know that no one is suggesting we dine on our friends, but I wouldn’t tell the skinny moms with the dumb kids about it, just to be safe. Six relentless scientists won the economics prize for their groundbreaking research on voodoo dolls in the workplace. They wondered if voodoo dolls were an effective way to tame a nasty boss. Sometimes HR is busy, so you have to solve management issues on your own. (It’s best to store the dolls out of your boss’s view, especially if there’s a good likeness and more than a few pins.) Back in 2017, vital research in fluid dynamics came from a French scientist

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JULY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

investigating a theory that should concern all of us. Are cats actually solid matter, or are they liquid? Anyone who has ever pulled a 10-pound tabby out of a tuna can milliseconds before the beast launches itself to the ceiling knows the answer is both. They can also vaporize into thin air, so cats might be gas, too. I’ve been so inspired by the Ig Nobel winners that my bucket list includes winning one. I plan to specialize in nutrition. My research, which has already begun, will conclude whether Jelly Belly is the most reliable determinant of universal taste appeal. Scholarly summary follows: When someone asks me to taste something, it’s usually an unpleasant vegetable with no friends that will never pass the jelly bean test. My hypothesis? Nothing tastes good unless Jelly Belly makes that flavor. They offer toasted marshmallow (delicious), buttered popcorn, chocolate pudding and other reliable delights. However, you will not find an anchovy or pickled beet Jelly Belly. There’s your proof. This is information we can use in everyday life, so I feel pretty confident about my chances. My kids always bring me the latest Jelly Belly collections. You know why? They’re smart. And I’ll bet you know why they are smart. (Refer to paragraph No. 3 in case you forgot.) Will JAN IGOE successfully expand her horizons from writing to scientific breakthroughs? Her bosses are not holding their breath, but they are checking for voodoo dolls. Smart science types can reach her at HumorMe@SCLiving.coop.


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Profile for South Carolina Living

South Carolina Living July 2019  

Explore the organized chaos of farm equipment auctions where anything and everything is up for sale.

South Carolina Living July 2019  

Explore the organized chaos of farm equipment auctions where anything and everything is up for sale.

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