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2019-2020 Legislative guide

CHANGEOUT SPECIAL RE PORT

FEBRUARY 2019

Co-ops want to protect you from Santee Cooper’s $4 billion nuclear debt


We want to shift the culture by encouraging citizens in our communities to take pride in where we live and how we clean it. Our hope is that this cultural change is dominant with the next generation and those who follow. — Roy Costner, Pickens County Council Chairman

Working together for a litter-free South Carolina. 2700 Middleburg Drive, Suite 216 | Columbia, SC 29204 | 877.PAL.PRDE | info@palmettopride.org | palmettopride.org


THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS VOLUME 73 • NUMBER 2 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 595,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033 Tel: (803) 926‑3175 Fax: (803) 796‑6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop

2019 | feb SPECIAL REPORT

16 The $4 billion question Learn what South Carolina’s not-for-profit electric cooperatives are doing to protect consumers from Santee Cooper’s crushing nuclear debt.

EDITOR

Keith Phillips Tel: (803) 739‑3040 Email: Keith.Phillips@ecsc.org FIELD EDITOR

Walter Allread PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

Travis Ward ART DIRECTOR

23 2019–2020 Legislative Directory Use this special edition of South Carolina Living to keep in touch with your elected officials in Columbia and Washington, D.C. We extend our grateful appreciation to South Carolina lawmakers for their cooperation in the creation of this directory.

Sharri Harris Wolfgang DESIGNER

Susan Collins PRODUCTION

Andrew Chapman WEB EDITOR

Chase Toler COPY EDITORS

Jennifer Jas, L. Kim Welborn CONTRIBUTORS

April Coker Blake, Mike Couick, Hastings Hensel, Derrill Holly, Jan A. Igoe, L.A. Jackson, Patrick Keegan, Sydney Patterson, Cindi Ross Scoppe, Belinda Smith-Sullivan, Brad Thiessen

23 24 25 29 40 41

16

South Carolina’s U.S. Senators and House Members South Carolina Executive Branch The General Assembly, Senators The General Assembly, House Members Public Service Commission Office of Regulatory Staff

PUBLISHER

Lou Green

HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE Each legislator’s name is followed by his or her

ADVERTISING

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739‑5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

American MainStreet Publications Tel: (800) 626‑1181 Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor. ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send to your

district number and the counties he or she serves, along with contact information. State senators’ offices are on the State House grounds in the Gressette Building. State representatives are in the Blatt Building. All information is current as of January 2019, but is subject to change without notice.

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE

local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above.

4 CO-OP NEWS

Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices.

6 AGENDA

14 ENERGY Q&A Energy-saving tips for renters

10 DIALOGUE

42

© COPYRIGHT 2019. The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor.

is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network.

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Updates from your cooperative

Our efficiency experts offer tips for boosting comfort and lowering energy bills when you don’t own your home.

Smart appliances with built-in Wi-Fi can be important tools in home energy savings—today and in the future.

Restoration after the storm In the aftermath of the financial crisis created by the failed nuclear expansion project in Jenkinsville, co-ops are working side-by-side with state lawmakers to clean up the mess.

12 ECONOMY Member of the AMP network reaching more than 9 million homes and businesses

23

The cooperative difference Electric co-ops do a lot behind the scenes to bring new industry, jobs and investment to South Carolina.

GARDENER

The impatient magnolias Keep your eyes open for the first late-winter blooms of deciduous magnolias.

44

RECIPE

Easy dinner party Take the stress out of entertaining with Chef Belinda Smith-Sullivan’s roster of delicious dishes that can be made ahead and quickly finished on the day of your party.

46

TRAVELS

Touring Sandy Island Join us on a journey to a forgotten island steeped in Lowcountry history and a proud tradition of self-reliance.

50 52 54

MARKETPLACE CALENDAR HUMOR ME

Twelve hugs a day keep the crazy away Bring it in here and embrace the science that proves Aunt Maude’s awkward, extended bear hugs were good for you after all.


SC | agenda The future of energy savings

—DERRILL HOLLY

When drying clothes, separate towels and heavier cottons from lighter-weight clothing. You’ll spend less time running the dryer for lighter-weight items, which saves energy. SOURCE: ENERGY.GOV 6

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  FEBRUARY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

Legislative guide

NEED REPRINTS?

Due to overwhelming demand for this directory issue, South Carolina Living can only supply a limited number of extra copies for schools and civic groups. To request additional copies or download a free PDF version, visit SCLiving.coop/2019-2020-legislative-guide. SPECIAL RE PORT

Co-ops want to protect you from Santee Cooper’s $4 billion nuclear debt

FEBRUARY 2019

Looking for new ways to save energy now and into the future? Consider upgrading to smart appliances. A growing number of home appliances, large and small, now come with builtin Wi-Fi connections and companion apps that allow consumers to operate them remotely or program custom settings. According to the Consumer Technology Association, about 5.5 million Wi-Fi-enabled devices are added to the internet each year, and by 2020, the total is expected to surpass 21 billion. With built-in Wi-Fi, a few taps and swipes on a mobile phone or tablet are all it takes to control everything from countertop cooking appliances to your electric stove, lighting, water heater, washing machine, clothes dryer and HVAC system. Many of these devices can also interconnect with home automation appliances like the Amazon Echo, giving consumers complete control over their energy use. As home automation becomes widespread, these systems will eventually tie into load-control programs that allow your local cooperative to keep electricity costs low, predicts Keith Dennis, senior director of strategic initiatives for the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA). “Manufacturers and vendors are actually building shared access and control into these systems with utilities,” Dennis says. “The most successful models in the end will work seamlessly with the co-op to provide value to the member.”

2019-2020

ONLY ON SCLiving.coop Smashing cauliflower Can’t get enough of Chef Belinda’s delicious vegetarian dishes? Neither can we. Visit SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda for a bonus video recipe—smashed cauliflower seasoned with garlic, chives and olive oil.

Register to win $100 Sign up today for your chance to win a $100 Visa gift card in our Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes. We’ll draw the name of one lucky reader from all eligible entries received by Feb. 28. Turn to Page 51 for more details, or register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply.

GONE FISHIN’ The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and ­migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after. Minor

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

FEBRUARY 14 8:16 15 9:31 16 10:16 17 11:01 18 11:46 19 7:01 20 7:31 21 8:01 22 8:16 23 2:31 24 3:01 25 3:31 26 — 27 4:31 28 9:46

4:01 12:46 8:46 4:46 2:16 9:46 5:16 3:16 10:31 6:01 4:16 11:16 6:31 — 5:01 12:01 12:16 6:01 12:46 1:01 6:46 1:16 1:46 7:31 2:01 8:31 2:31 8:46 9:46 3:31 9:16 11:31 4:31 9:31 — 5:46 10:01 — 7:16 11:01 — 8:31 4:46 1:01 9:16

Minor

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

MARCH 1 10:16 5:16 2:31 2 10:46 5:31 3:31 3 11:01 5:46 4:16 4 11:31 6:01 4:46 5 — 6:16 12:01 6 6:46 12:01 12:31 7 7:01 12:31 12:46 8 7:16 1:01 7:16 9 7:31 1:31 8:01 10 1:46 7:46 8:46 11 2:16 8:16 10:01 12 2:46 8:31 11:46 13 3:31 9:01 — 14 2:46 10:01 — 15 8:46 3:46 12:31

10:01 10:31 11:16 11:31 5:31 6:01 6:46 1:16 1:46 2:31 3:16 4:16 5:31 7:16 8:31


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SC   agenda HIGHLIGHTS FEBRUARY 15–MARCH 15

SOUTHEASTERN WILDLIFE EXPO FEBRUARY 15–17

Charleston is known for getting wild during tourist season, but for one long weekend each February, it gets wild in a different way—with actual animals hanging out at venues across the city. The exposition showcases living creatures from wolves to great horned owls with an emphasis on conservation. Hundreds of exhibits, art displays and product showcases are promised for 2019 with a handy shuttle service to help attendees get around. (843) 723-1748; sewe.com SOUTHERN SOUND SERIES FEBRUARY 15, MARCH 9, APRIL 13

CTION! AMERA! A LIGHTS! C bruary

th of Fe The chilly mon stay indoors to e tim t is a grea ty of the rich varie in ht lig de d at an ds fin ly t one on entertainmen film festivals.

BEAUFORT FILM FESTIVAL FEBRUARY 19–24

The Beaufort Film Festival is a star-studded affair (actresses Blythe Danner and Andie MacDowell serve on the board) that showcases everything from full-length movies and documentaries to short films and table reads, all hosted at USC Beaufort’s Center for the Arts.

CARDBOARD REGATTA FEBRUARY 23

There’s no need to get dressed up for this event, where the boats are made of cardboard, and engineering creativity trumps stuffy nautical tradition. The Cardboard Regatta is an engineering challenge that encourages kids to design new ways to keep a cardboard box afloat for the length of a paddle across an Olympic-sized swimming pool. Admission is free, so come out and cheer on your favorite teams to see who floats and who sinks.

The Gibson Brothers (above), an award-winning bluegrass band with 14 albums to their credit and a reputation for blending past and present musical styles, takes the stage Feb. 15 as part of the 2019 Southern Sound concert series at the McCelvey Center in York. If you go, don’t miss “Vittles & Fiddles,” the free pre-show festival featuring a food truck and live music on the lawn. The series returns March 9 with a performance by Grammy Awardwinning band The SteelDrivers, and wraps up April 13 with mandolin virtuoso Sierra Hull. (803) 909-7242; chmuseums.org/southernsoundseries

(864) 288-6470; visitgreenvillesc.com/ event/cardboard-regatta/30369/

(843) 522-3196; beaufortfilmfestival.com SOUTHERN CITY FILM FESTIVAL

LOWCOUNTRY IRISH FEST

FEBRUARY 22–24

MARCH 9

In Aiken, the Southern City Film Festival is founded on the belief that great movies start with an idea. This film festival celebrates that creativity with movie screenings, educational workshops and a screenplay ­competition​​ —before wrapping up with an outdoor Oscars party.

Celebrate our state’s Irish heritage with traditional and modern Celtic music, dancing, food and stories at the Charleston Music Hall. This family-friendly event is divided into day activities and a night concert. For details, scheduled performers and ticket information, visit the festival website.

(803) 257-7795; southerncity.org

(843) 853-2252; lowcountryirishfest.com

8

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  FEBRUARY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

GET MORE

For more happenings this month, turn to our Calendar on Page 52, and see expanded festivals and events coverage on SCLiving.coop.


Looking to the future...

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SC   dialogue

Restoration after the storm taking ownership of the restoration effort. They surveyed the damage and began the long and difpeople who work in the electric industry are sometimes known to mark time by storms. It is ficult process of putting things back together. That the storms that most test our systems, the prepaprocess has only just begun. Due to the size and impact of this particular financial catastrophe, it rations that we’ve made, our employees and the will be many years before the restoration work is people whom we serve. accomplished, but as progress is being made, the Storm work tends to follow a predictable end is coming into sight. While our state will never pattern: identification of the potential threat, be the same, the prospects of a full recovery, which intense preparation for its arrival, endurance of looked almost impossible many months ago, look the storm itself, and then the grueling process of more and more promising as putting things back together. they continue to accomplish Sometimes there is a period ‘My mother would say to the difficult work. Our state of time after the worst of is not where she wants to be, the storm has passed, but me, “look for the helpers. but she is not where she was, before it is safe to begin work, You will always find people either. where all anyone can do is Fred Rogers, known to take in the damage and devwho are helping.”  ’ almost all of us as “Mister astation. Those times when —MISTER ROGERS Rogers,” spoke of the advice you can see the damage but that his mother gave him as can’t do anything to fix it can a child when he was anxious about a disaster he make the task seem overwhelming, even insurmight see on the news. Rogers said, “My mother mountable. But once the work begins and progress would say to me, ‘look for the helpers. You will is made, the end, even if it is far off, comes into always find people who are helping.’ To this day, sight. And that makes a big difference. especially in times of disaster, I remember my The last several years brought their own share mother’s words, and I am always comforted by of devastating storms of the typical variety, but realizing that there are still so many helpers.” they also brought a storm of a different sort. South Carolina’s electric cooperatives are thankWhen construction of the two nuclear units in Jenkinsville was halted in August of 2017, ful for the helpers in the General Assembly and significant portions of our state seemed destined the governor’s office who stepped in to begin the to face a financial catastrophe rivaling that of a process of restoration. We hope to be counted natural disaster. This storm caught many people in their company. (For more on how S.C. electric by s­ urprise, and most were left wondering how cooperatives are doing our part to protect electricthe people they had trusted to make appropriate ity consumers statewide, turn to Page 16.) preparations had actually managed to create a We dedicate this 2019–2020 Legislative problem of historic proportions. Directory issue to those who have made it their The size and scope of this nuclear financial mission to restore the damage done by all the crisis were without precedent in our industry. storms that have hit our state—both natural and Surveying the damage and devastation was overfinancial. whelming and, at times, made the crisis itself seem insurmountable. But, just like in the aftermath of a natural disaster, people began the hard and often painful work of picking up the pieces. South Carolina’s leaders, our governor and the leaders of our General Assembly, wasted no time BECAUSE OF THE NATURE OF WHAT WE DO,

MIKE COUICK

President and CEO, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina

10

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  FEBRUARY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP


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SC   economy

The cooperative difference BY KEITH PHILLIPS

p Samsung’s washing machine plant, served by Newberry Electric Cooperative, will create more than 950 new jobs when expansion is complete. t Served by Edisto Electric Cooperative,

the Volvo manufacturing plant in northern Berkeley County began producing S60 sedans in September 2018. The company plans to invest more than $1 billion in S.C. production facilities and create more than 4,000 new jobs by 2021.

VO LVO C A RS U. S .

sedan and a Samsung washing machine have in common? They’re both made in South Carolina by global companies that decided to do business here thanks to our state’s 20 not-forprofit electric cooperatives. Volvo Cars (served by Edisto Electric Cooperative), and Samsung Manufacturing (served by Newberry Electric Cooperative) are just two examples of the companies that have invested more than $5.3 billion in facilities and created more than 27,000 new jobs in South Carolina since 2014. Don’t be too surprised. Helping communities grow is what co-ops do. From humble beginnings electrifying family farms and small towns in the 1930s and 1940s, electric cooperatives have grown to collectively operate the state’s largest utility network. Working with their economic development agency, the SC Power Team, South Carolina’s electric cooperatives actively recruit new ­industries​—the kind that create good jobs, support local tax bases and boost the entire state’s economy. Co-ops are uniquely qualified for recruiting new businesses because they bring a personal touch to the work. They authentically promote the communities they serve as great places to live, not just work. And because co-ops are nimble organizations rooted in solving problems for members, businesses learn they can count on them to be responsive. It was that personal touch that helped Samsung decide to build their plant in Newberry County. The Korean company needed a reliable electricity provider, but they also wanted a community where executives and employees would feel welcome. Keith Avery, president and CEO of

SA MSU N G M A N U FAC TU RI N G

WHAT DO A VOLVO S60 LUXURY

12

Newberry Electric Cooperative, personally answered all the technical questions about the co-op’s ability to serve the plant, handing Samsung’s leaders his business card—printed in Korean— with his cell phone number highlighted. He assured the executives they could call him, at any time, for any reason. Then he spoke from the heart about the quality of life in Newberry and explained how Samsung would fit right in as part of the co-op family. “We’re selling the community as well as selling ourselves,” Avery says of the co-op’s economic development message. “We talk about everything from education to recreation.” The first washing machines rolled off the line on Jan. 2, 2018. With two production lines now in full swing, the company is still expanding the plant, right on schedule to spend $350 million in capital investment and create more than 950 jobs. In similar fashion, David Felkel, president and CEO of Edisto Electric Cooperative, personally handled the negotiations that led Volvo to build a state-of-the-art manufacturing plant in northern Berkeley County—an investment of more than $1 billion that

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  FEBRUARY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

will create 4,000 new jobs by 2021. “People in the community are tickled to death,” Felkel says. “They’re excited about the jobs, the future of the area and the quality of life that we hope to improve.” Backed by all the state’s electric cooperatives and the resources of the SC Power Team, Felkel demonstrated to Volvo executives that a small cooperative could provide better rates and service than a larger utility. The plant began producing S60 luxury sedans for sale in the U.S. and overseas markets in September 2018, and the co-op is already working with Volvo on the next phase of expansion. For current job openings at the plant, visit readysc.org/volvo. In the coming months, South Carolina Living will explore more economic development success stories that demonstrate the cooperative difference—how co-ops market communities, not just industrial sites; how they brag on their friends and neighbors when they promote the local workforce; how they bring local solutions to local problems; and how co-op economic development is about bringing new jobs and industries to every corner of the state, not just selling electricity.


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|

SC   energy Q&A

Energy-saving tips for renters BY PATRICK KEEGAN AND BRAD THIESSEN

Q A

It’s great to read about all the ways homeowners can save on energy bills, but what about folks like me who are renting?

That’s an excellent question. Not everyone can replace their furnace with an air-source heat pump, but there are several low-cost efficiency tips that can help you reduce your energy bills.

SET IT AND FORGET IT A programmable thermostat saves energy by automatically adjusting the setting two or more times each day, so you don’t have to.

MIND THE THERMOSTAT. You might be able to trim your energy bill by carefully managing the temperature in your home. The Department of Energy suggests setting your thermostat to 68 F on winter days and relying on extra layers of clothing to fight the chill. You can save more energy by turning down the thermostat even lower at night or when no one is home. The same principle works in reverse during summer months. Just set the thermostat higher to reduce your energy use for air conditioning. This process will be easier to manage if you have a programmable thermostat. Properly used, it can cut energy bills by as much as $150 a year. TRY ZONE HEATING. If you have electric baseboard heat, and don’t mind less-used rooms being colder, use the thermostat settings on each unit to tailor the temperature setting in each room. Portable 14

MORE WAYS TO SAVE Wait until you have a full load to run major appliances like dishwashers and washing machines. Fewer loads means less energy used.

electric space heaters can also be good tools for zone heating if they are used safely and wisely in the areas where you spend the most time. Keep in mind, if you’re using space heaters, you’ll need to reduce the heating you’re supplying to the rest of the home to see energy savings on your bill. ASK ABOUT A MINI-SPLIT. If your heating system needs to be replaced, ask your landlord about installing a mini-split system, which is perfect for zone heating and cooling, and easier to install than a new duct and furnace system. You could both save money in the long run. STOP AIR LEAKS. Small gaps around windows, doors, wiring and plumbing penetrations can be major sources of energy loss. These problems can be alleviated with a little weather stripping, caulk and sealing foam, but you should check with your landlord before you get started on any permanent changes to the property. Or try simple fixes that don’t require approval. For example, a $10 door draft stopper (also known as a “door snake”) is a simple way to block gaps underneath exterior doors. Sealing air leaks around your home could shave up to one-fifth off your heating and cooling bills.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  FEBRUARY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

MANAGE YOUR WINDOWS AND THEIR COVERINGS. Your windows may be letting heat out during the winter and letting heat in during the summer. Window coverings like medium- or heavy-weight curtains and thermal blinds can help. On cold winter days, window coverings can keep warmth inside and improve comfort. Opening up window coverings when you’re receiving direct sunlight is a “passive solar” technique that can help cut your heating costs. You can also cover windows with clear plastic to reduce heat loss and air leaks. During the summer, keep window coverings closed to block the sun and to keep windows from heating the cooler indoor air.

These tips will help you reduce your energy bills and increase your comfort. For even more savings, talk to your landlord about improving the property with better insulation, newer energy-efficient appliances and upgraded heating and cooling systems. Many landlords make these types of investments to add appeal and value to their rental properties. A home energy audit is the best way to identify areas for energy efficiency improvements. Contact your electric cooperative to see if they offer energy audits or if they can recommend someone local. An audit would be a great way to start a conversation with your landlord about potential improvements. Send questions to Energy Q&A, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033, or email energyqa@scliving.coop.


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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  FEBRUARY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

L A E L H EN DERSO N /CH RISTO PH ER Z ACH A ROW; CO LL AG E BY S H A RRI WO LFGA N G


What S.C. electric cooperatives are doing to protect you from Santee Cooper’s nuclear debt BY CINDI ROSS SCOPPE

When South Carolina’s two big, homegrown electric utilities abruptly abandoned work on their over-budget, overdue nuclear construction project in the summer of 2017, the prospects looked particularly grim for the 2 million South Carolinians who get their power from stateowned Santee Cooper. South Carolina Electric & Gas (SCE&G) parent SCANA Corp. had shareholders who could be forced to cover that u ­ tility’s $4.9 billion debt for the most spectacular business failure in S.C. history. Or, as it turned out, an out-of-state company could buy the utility, leaving SCE&G customers responsible for another $2.3 billion, but not the many, many billions more SCANA had hoped to charge them. But Santee Cooper doesn’t have stockholders. And at the time, the idea of selling it to a private company that could improve efficiency enough to absorb all that debt seemed too far-fetched to even take seriously. So it looked as though Santee Cooper’s $4 billion nuclear debt would be borne entirely by ratepayers. Throw in interest and an administrative add-on that Santee Cooper charges, spread the debt over 40 years, and the total for the 800,000 electric co-op accounts—that’s 1.5 million people—comes to $6.5 billion, or $4,200 per residential ratepayer. (SCE&G residential ratepayers, by comparison, face about $1,600 more in nuclear debt.)

Things still could turn out that way. But 17 months later, co-op leaders have worked to turn what at first seemed like a certainty into a long shot. In fact, it’s quite possible that their members will end up better off than SCE&G ratepayers. Here’s why: u The General Assembly spent much of 2018 working to slash SCE&G ratepayers’ costs. Now it’s time to get at least as good a deal for co-op members and the half-million others who get their power from Santee Cooper. The sale of some or all of Santee Cooper, which a special committee is exploring, is the only real option on the table. u A judge is ready to hear the co-ops’ claim that they don’t owe Santee Cooper another penny—and that they instead are owed $600 million that Santee Cooper collected from the Toshiba Corp. for failing to deliver on construction promises. In November, the judge rejected Santee Cooper’s request to have the case thrown out of court. u Central Electric Power Cooperative, which purchases energy for the state’s 20 distribution co-ops, has a contract with Santee

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Santee Cooper or another Cooper that gives it negotiatThe status quo at Santee Cooper is party purchasing part or all ing power to limit how much unacceptable, and co-op members of it. a new owner of Santee Cooper It would seem that the could recoup from ratepayers. deserve the best price that can be best-case scenario for co-op Of course, nothing is members would be for the certain. Central’s contract obtained for power, whether that’s courts to rule that Santee won’t provide any additional through a transformed Santee Cooper Cooper has no right to charge relief if Santee Cooper isn’t customers for any of its sold, and there’s no guaranor another party purchasing part or nuclear debt. But even Central tee it will be. Depending on all of it. Electric’s general counsel John what’s for sale, its debt might Tiencken (himself a retired exceed its value. The courts president of Santee Cooper) acknowledges that this is an could rule in favor of Santee Cooper. The Legislature could extreme outcome because it would plunge Santee Cooper into decide to do nothing. Or the Legislature could make a decibankruptcy and force it to default on its bonds. sion that leaves co-op members better off than they would be That wouldn’t be the end of the world: No one’s power without legislative action—but not as well off as might have supply would be interrupted, utility workers probably been possible—and still paying a lot of money for reactors wouldn’t lose their jobs, and large investment companies that will never produce any energy. and other bondholders would absorb a lot of the cost that ‘The work will teach you how to do it’ other­wise would be paid by co-op members. But it would be messy and could make some companies antsy about moving Michael N. Couick, president and chief executive officer of to South Carolina. And it runs the risk of angering legislathe state association of electric cooperatives, likes to quote an Estonian proverb to describe the co-ops’ approach: “The tors, who have the power to determine the future not only of work will teach you how to do it.” Santee Cooper but also of the co-ops themselves. This obvious yet insightful guide for solving complex probWhat would be better, Couick says, is for the Legislature, the co-ops, Santee Cooper, the bondholders and plaintiffs’ lems—gather all the relevant information and use that inforattorneys to work out an agreement on how to allocate the mation to make your decisions—explains why the co-ops don’t nuclear debt, and then for the Legislature to decide what to have a specific, detailed blueprint for how this should end. do with Santee Cooper. This still might involve a voluntary What they have instead is a set of guiding principles. Chief bankruptcy, but it would allow a more orderly, planned transiamong them: The status quo at Santee Cooper is unacceptable, and co-op members deserve the best price that can be tion from the indebted Santee Cooper to its public, private or obtained for power, whether that’s through a transformed public-private successor. 18

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  FEBRUARY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP


Construction of two new reactors at V.C. Summer Nuclear Station is shown in full swing in September 2016, less than a year before the project was abandoned. A N DRE W H AWO RTH

This idea of all the parties cooperating to create a win-winwin solution is in keeping with the nature of cooperatives: organizations formed to work together, to cooperate. It’s also a pragmatic approach given the Legislature’s power to change all the rules under which co-ops operate.

How we got here Before we talk about what that planned transition might look like, we need to understand how we got to the point where the co-op’s residential members face bills of $4,200 each for a project that will never benefit them. Santee Cooper and the electric cooperatives were created in the 1930s and 1940s to provide electricity for rural areas that commercial utilities didn’t want to serve. In 1950, the cooperatives decided to purchase their electricity from Santee Cooper, and this partnership worked well for decades. Then in 2009, Santee Cooper joined with SCANA to build two new nuclear reactors at the V.C. Summer station in Fairfield County, where they jointly owned a 1970s-era reactor. Co-op leaders complained that Santee Cooper’s 45-percent share of the project would give the utility far more generation capacity than it needed—and needlessly drive up their costs since they are contractually obliged to pay 70 percent of Santee Cooper’s construction costs. They urged Santee Cooper to sell part of its ownership. But they were rebuffed. So it might seem strange that, in 2013, Central agreed to extend its contract with Santee Cooper from 2030 to 2058. But as Couick explains, “If you don’t have a choice about them building nuclear, and they’re saying you have a choice between a 10-year mortgage or a 40-year mortgage, it’s an easy decision.” And, it might turn out, a smart one. The renegotiated

contract also allowed the co-ops to opt out of any future building plans and to opt out of the entire contract if Santee Cooper were ever sold. At some point, the nuclear construction project went horribly out of control, but Santee Cooper and SCANA kept spending money on reactors that will never be completed. Finally, on July 31, 2017, the utilities abandoned the project. SCE&G said it would charge its ratepayers for its $4.9 billion debt, plus interest, plus a profit of 10.25 percent. Santee Cooper put a temporary halt to new rate increases for retail customers, but it continued to charge Central Electric 70 percent of the debt, plus interest, plus its own 9-percent add-on, which may increase to 10 percent. Within weeks, plaintiffs’ lawyers filed suit against SCANA, SCE&G and Santee Cooper, and before year’s end, Virginiabased Dominion Energy offered to buy SCANA and reduce the nuclear surcharge. Legislators, regulators, the governor, the attorney general, environmental groups and some business groups demanded better, and through legislation and a highly contested case before the state Public Service Commission, they got a better deal at the end of 2018: SCE&G ratepayers have to swallow the $2 billion they’ve already paid for the abandoned reactors, but instead of paying an average of $27 per month for the next 60 years to pay off nuclear debt, they’ll pay around $5 a month for 20 years. SCANA was the easy problem to solve. Santee Cooper is more complicated, because there are no stockholders to help pay off the debt, it doesn’t have a regulatory overseer to control its rates, and in 2005, the Legislature—fearful that the governor might try to sell the utility—gave itself the power to decide whether and under what circumstances that could happen. uu

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The sum of the parts vs. the whole

The first involves that lawsuit that claims Santee Cooper doesn’t have the right to charge anything for the nuclear debt. Santee Cooper owns all parts of the energy supply chain: At this point, all we can say for sure is that Circuit Judge John generation, transmission and distribution to its retail cusHayes ruled in November that Santee Cooper did not meet tomers. Your local co-op, by comparison, handles only disthe extraordinarily high bar to have it thrown out of court tribution. It buys its electricity from Central Electric (a without a trial. But it’s worth noting that his order seemed to transmission cooperative), which purchases a quarter of its reject Santee Cooper’s central legal arguments: that state law energy from Duke Energy but most of it from Santee Cooper, lets it charge whatever rates it needs to pay its bills, and that under that contract that runs through 2058. Central is contractually bound to pay 70 percent of the cost of Santee Cooper owns some natural gas plants and part of the construction project, no matter what Santee Cooper might the existing nuclear reactor at V.C. Summer, but nearly half have done wrong. of its power comes from coal plants. It’s unlikely that other What does this have to do with the best way to consider utilities would be willing to pay much for any of that generselling Santee Cooper? Well, until the lawsuit is resolved, ation capacity. Instead, what’s attractive is Santee Cooper’s someone trying to buy all of Santee Cooper would have to right to sell power directly to 180,000 residential and busiconsider the fact that if the ness customers in Horry, co-ops win the case, Santee Georgetown and Berkeley The General Assembly should test the Cooper would be responsicounties—and its contract to sell power to Central. That ble for that $4 billion nuclear market to find the best way to reduce contract is estimated to be debt, but it wouldn’t be the nuclear debt, whether that means worth $52 billion over the allowed to recover that money next 40 years, but only if from ratepayers. selling all or part of Santee Cooper or the new owner can convince On the other hand, Central not to opt out. someone who bought only restructuring the utility. No option should And this, at last, brings us the transmission or distribe eliminated before it’s fully vetted. back to that planned transibution system wouldn’t be responsible for any of that. tion idea. Now, it’s true that what remained of Santee Cooper would still Central has sketched out a three-part concept: Central be responsible for those debts, but proceeds from the purcould buy Santee Cooper’s transmission system. Berkeley, Horry and Santee electric cooperatives could buy the districhase of the transmission and distribution components could be used to offset the obligation. Someone buying just the bution system to serve those 180,000 customers in Berkeley, transmission and distribution systems wouldn’t have to worry Horry and Georgetown counties, and Santee Cooper’s generabout the risk of losing the lawsuit and being saddled with all ation system could be either sold to, or managed by, a third that debt—and therefore might be willing to pay more. party under contract with the state. The state association of electric cooperatives and indiRemember, there’s a second reason that selling Santee Cooper as a whole could artificially lower the purchase price: vidual distribution co-ops haven’t endorsed that plan, but a Doing so would instantly add $1 billion to its debts, which similar arrangement could work regardless of who bought likely would reduce the amount of money the state would Santee Cooper’s transmission and distribution systems. In fact, receive by … $1 billion. Here’s why: Couick told legislators earlier this year that they should reject Santee Cooper’s $4 billion nuclear debt—as well as a purchase bid by the co-ops if someone else makes an offer that can produce better rates over the long term. $4 billion in non-nuclear debt—was financed by selling govThe key to both scenarios is that Santee Cooper would ernment bonds, which only governmental entities can do. If be sold in parts rather than as a whole. Lawmakers have the state sells all of Santee Cooper, the buyer will have to pay asked companies to submit non-binding bids to purchase or off all $8 billion worth of government bonds early and replace run either part or all of Santee Cooper, to help them decide them with $8 billion worth of private bonds. Not only would whether it’s worth trying to sell. But the bids to purchase just it have to pay higher rates on those new private bonds, but part of the utility are being evaluated in less detail than the it also would have to pay a $1 billion defeasance, or cancellabids to purchase the whole thing, and this has the potential tion, penalty to the bondholders. of making the bids to buy the whole thing look more reliable But nearly all of those bonds are tied to electricity generato legislators. The risk with this approach is that it could distion, so most of them wouldn’t have to be called in, and the bulk of the penalty wouldn’t have to be paid—if the state kept courage companies (and proposals) that might be better for ratepayers. the generation capacity (and its debts) and just sold Santee It also could artificially lower the price companies are Cooper’s transmission and distribution components. Santee willing to pay in two ways. Cooper would still be responsible for all the debt, but the 20

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  FEBRUARY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP


still meet peak electricity demand when needed? Are its power plants spread out far enough east to west, or north to south, that it can sell S.C. customers power generated in another state during the part of the day when that’s cheaper than power generated in South Carolina, and vice versa? Will it consider participating in a regional transmission arrangement with other utilities, where the power that’s provided to customers at any given time of the day comes from the company that’s producing it at the lowest cost? Will it treat The details make the difference efficiency as a meaningful alternative to building new power plants, an option that can indirectly cut costs by helping cusThe specific actions the co-ops want from the Legislature are simple enough: The General Assembly should test the tomers use less power? market to find the best way to reduce the nuclear debt, Electric cooperatives have been investing for years in prowhether that means selling all or part of Santee Cooper or grams to help members alter their energy consumption: largerestructuring the utility. And no option should be eliminated capacity water heaters that store heat and turn off during before it’s fully vetted. peak demand, and weatherBut what looks simple ization programs that save outside the State House can members enough on their The best path forward is with a utility be extremely controversial utility bills to offset the that’s committed to innovation and a inside. One of the deepest cost of the improvements. philosophical divisions in the Programs like that could consumer-focused energy future. Legislature is over the idea be turbocharged if the next of privatization, or allowing Santee Cooper is willing to the private sector to take over what are currently government focus less on building new energy generation. duties. Some see this as essential to making government more Central’s option to sign or not sign a contract with a potenefficient, while others are just as certain that it will destroy tial purchaser—a decision that will turn on the rates Santee the quality of services the government provides. And selling Cooper’s new owner is willing to guarantee—gives it a great Santee Cooper would be by far our state’s biggest effort at deal of leverage to protect co-op members from too-high rates. privatization. But the fact that it can reject a deal it doesn’t like doesn’t necesThere’s a danger that privatization advocates could be so sarily mean it can get the partner it wants. Couick’s idea of the determined to complete a sale that they ignore the details— best path forward is with a utility that’s committed to innovaand they end up with an ideological victory, but Santee tion and a consumer-focused energy future. Cooper customers end up paying more for electricity than “We don’t want a purchaser who’s just going to trade one they would have otherwise. generation source for another, bringing along the new debt An equal danger is that opponents could block any effort that would accompany that,” he says. “What we want is to sell all or part of Santee Cooper, no matter what the benesomeone who understands that putting the customers first is going to be essential in the evolving energy world. Someone fits might be to the people who pay the power bills. who’s willing to embrace the future, rather than fighting What we need, Couick and other co-op leaders argue, is to against it.” set aside our individual beliefs about privatization (and anyIf that happens, the co-ops could end up with an energy thing else) and let the work show us the way. To gather the supplier that’s truly a partner in their mission: to provide relifacts, and then let our decisions be guided by those facts. Specifically, how would a buyer pay off the $4 billion nuclear able electricity at the most affordable cost possible. And many debt without raising rates by $4 billion? Or more? co-op members could find themselves paying lower power Note that the question isn’t how much money a buyer is bills—even if their rates are elevated by part of the nuclear willing to pay the state; logically, the more it pays, the more it costs—because those partners would have made it easier for will insist on charging in rates. The question is how that buyer them to use less power. will make the payment without raising rates, or how much it will raise rates in order to cover its investment. Not just in the CINDI ROSS SCOPPE , a former associate editor of The State first year, or the first 10 years, but for decades to come. newspaper, has written extensively about the collapse of the And how, precisely, will it get to those numbers? V.C. Summer nuclear construction project. Is the utility big enough that it can create efficiencies of scale large enough to make a difference? Does it have enough GET MORE For the latest information on these issues, visit sc-cap.org/santeecooper. modern power plants that it can shutter old coal plants yet money from the sale of the other assets could be used to pay down the obligation. This is why the co-ops want the Legislature to use a process that evaluates all bids the same way, whether they are to buy all or just parts of Santee Cooper. Or, if it won’t do that, at least to require bidders to explain how they would handle the defeasance penalty, and the potential of losing the lawsuit, and a long list of other considerations.

SCLIVING.COOP  | FEBRUARY 2019  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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2019–2020 Legislative Directory

U.S. Senate Lindsey Graham [R] 290 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510 (202) 224-5972 Website: lgraham.senate.gov

Tim Scott [R] 717 Hart Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510 (202) 224-6121 Website: scott.senate.gov

U.S. House Joe Cunningham [D]

n

S.C. FEDERAL DELEGATION

WRITTEN IN 1787, RATIFIED IN 1788 and in operation since 1789, the United States Constitution is the world’s longest-­surviving written charter of government. Its first three words—“We the People”—affirm that the government exists to serve its citizens. The supremacy of the people through their elected representatives is recognized in Article I, which creates a Congress consisting of a Senate and a House of Representatives. The positioning of Congress at the beginning of the Constitution reaffirms its status as the first branch of the federal government. The Senate is composed of two senators from each state, elected by voters, for six-year terms. Under the Constitution, each state is entitled to at least one representative. Additional seats are apportioned on the basis of the state’s population. Congress fixes the size of the House of Representatives and the procedure of apportioning the number among the states. Each state is apportioned its number of representatives by means of the Department of Commerce’s decennial census. South Carolina has seven representatives elected by voters to serve two-year terms. All information is current as of January 2019, but is subject to change without notice.

NOTE:

H Columbia

1ST DISTRICT

Beaufort, Berkeley, Charleston, Colleton & Dorchester Cos. 423 Cannon House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 (202) 225-3176 Website: cunningham.house.gov

Joe Wilson [R] 2ND DISTRICT

Aiken, Barnwell, Lexington, Orangeburg & Richland Cos. 1436 Longworth House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 (202) 225-2452 Website: joewilson.house.gov

Jeff Duncan [R] 3RD DISTRICT

Abbeville, Anderson, Edgefield, Greenville, Greenwood, Laurens, McCormick, Newberry, Oconee, Pickens & Saluda Cos. 2229 Rayburn House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 (202) 225-5301 Website: jeffduncan.house.gov

William Timmons [R] 4TH DISTRICT

Greenville & Spartanburg Cos. 313 Cannon House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 (202) 225-6030 Website: timmons.house.gov

South Carolina congressional districts

Ralph Norman [R] 5TH DISTRICT

Cherokee, Chester, Fairfield, Kershaw, Lancaster, Lee, Newberry, Spartanburg, Sumter, Union & York Cos. 319 Cannon House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 (202) 225-5501 Website: norman.house.gov

James Clyburn [D] 6TH DISTRICT

Allendale, Bamberg, Beaufort, Berkeley, Calhoun, Charleston, Clarendon, Colleton, Dorchester, Florence, Hampton, Jasper, Orangeburg, Richland, Sumter & Williamsburg Cos. 200 Cannon House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 (202) 225-3315 Website: clyburn.house.gov

Tom Rice [R] 7TH DISTRICT

Chesterfield, Darlington, Dillon, Florence, Georgetown, Horry, Marion & Marlboro Cos. 512 Cannon House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 (202) 225-9895 Website: rice.house.gov

SCLIVING.COOP  | FEBRUARY 2019  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

23


S.C. EXECUTIVE BRANCH

n

2019–2020 Legislative Directory

THE SOUTH CAROLINA EXECUTIVE BRANCH includes the governor, lieutenant governor and seven constitutional officers. All serve four-year terms. The governor is the chief magistrate with supreme executive authority. The lieutenant governor assumes the position of governor if the governor is incapacitated. The secretary of state is responsible for the statewide registration of corporations, uniform commercial code interests, business opportunities, employment agencies, trademarks and notaries. The state treasurer is responsible for the receipt, investment and disbursement of all public funds for the state. The attorney general heads the state legal department. The comptroller general is the state’s chief fiscal officer and fiscal watchdog. The superintendent of education leads a system to enable students to become educated, responsible and contributing citizens. The adjutant general heads the state’s military department. The commissioner of agriculture promotes and nurtures the growth and development of South Carolina’s agriculture industry.

G OV E R N O R Henry McMaster [R] Governor’s Mansion 800 Richland St., Columbia, 29201 Office of the Governor 1100 Gervais Street, Columbia, 29201 (803) 734-2100 Website: governor.sc.gov

L I E U T E N A N T G OV E R N O R Pamela Evette [R] State House, 1st Floor East Wing PO Box 142, Columbia, 29202 (803) 734-2080 Website: ltgov.sc.gov

All information is current as of January 2019, but is subject to change without notice.

NOTE:

C O N ST I T U T I O N A L O F F I C E R S S E C R E TA RY O F STAT E

Mark Hammond [R]

Edgar Brown Building 1205 Pendleton St., Suite 525 Columbia, 29201 (803) 734-2170 Website: scsos.com

A DJ U TA N T G E N E R A L

Maj. Gen. Robert E. Livingston Jr. [R]

Wade Hampton Office Building PO Box 11778 Columbia, 29211 (803) 734-2101 Fax: (803) 734-2690 Website: treasurer.sc.gov

1 National Guard Road Columbia, 29201 (803) 299-4200 Website: scguard.com

AT TO R N E Y G E N E R A L

COMMISSIONER O F AG R I C U LT U R E

Alan Wilson [R] Rembert Dennis Building PO Box 11549 Columbia, 29211 (803) 734-3970 Fax: (803) 253-6283 Website: scag.gov

COMPTROLLER GENERAL

Richard Eckstrom [R] Wade Hampton Office Building 1200 Senate St. Columbia, 29201 (803) 734-2121 Fax: (803) 734-2064 Website: cg.sc.gov

24

Molly Spearman [R] Rutledge Building 1429 Senate St. Columbia, 29201 (803) 734-8500 Website: ed.sc.gov

T R E AS U R E R

Curtis Loftis [R]

STAT E S U P E R I N T E N D E N T O F E D U C AT I O N

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  FEBRUARY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

Hugh Weathers [R] Wade Hampton Office Building PO Box 11280 Columbia, 29211 (803) 734-2190 Fax: (803) 734-2192 Website: agriculture.sc.gov


2019–2020 Legislative Directory

THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY crafts South Carolina state laws and consists of two bodies: the South Carolina House of Representatives and the South Carolina Senate. There are 124 members of the S.C. House, who are elected every two years, and 46 members of the S.C. Senate, who are elected every four years, concurrent with NOTE:

n

S.C. SENATE

the United States presidential election. The legislature convenes at the State House in Columbia from the second Tuesday in January until the second Thursday in May unless the House fails to pass a budget by March 31, the Board of Economic Advisors (BEA) submits a forecast reduction, or the session is extended by a vote of both bodies.

All information is current as of January 2019, but is subject to change without notice.

S.C. Senate Senators’ offices are in the Gressette Building, Columbia. (H) Home

district  office

(O) Columbia

Thomas C. Alexander [R] District 1 – Oconee & Pickens Cos. (H) 150 Cleveland Drive, Walhalla, 29691 Business: (864) 638-2988 Home: (864) 638-2153 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 313 (803) 212-6220 Email: SLCIComm@scsenate.gov

Karl B. Allen [D] District 7 – Greenville Co. (H) 108 Lavinia Ave., Greenville, 29601 Business: (864) 235-9049 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 602 (803) 212-6008 Email: KarlAllen@scsenate.gov

Sean M. Bennett [R] District 38 – Berkeley, Charleston & Dorchester Cos. (H) 122 President Circle, Summerville, 29483 Business: (843) 821-3009 Home: (843) 821-3352 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 205 (803) 212-6410 Email: SeanBennett@scsenate.gov

Paul G. Campbell Jr. [R] District 44 – Berkeley, Charleston & Dorchester Cos. (H) 150 Loganberry Circle, Goose Creek, 29445 Business: (843) 296-1001 Home: (843) 569-0089 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 402 (803) 212-6230 Email: PaulCampbell@scsenate.gov

George E. “Chip” Campsen III [R] District 43 – Beaufort, Charleston & Colleton Cos. (H) 360 Concord St., Suite 201, Charleston, 29401 Business: (843) 722-0123 Home: (843) 886-8454 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 305 (803) 212-6340 Email: SFGFComm@scsenate.gov

Richard J. Cash [R] District 3 – Anderson Co. (H) PO Box 51034, Piedmont, 29673 Cell: (864) 505-2130 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia 29201 Room 506 (803) 212-6124 Email: RichardCash@scsenate.gov

Wes Climer [R] District 15 – York Co. (H) PO Box 4898, Rock Hill 29732 Business: (803) 752-0052 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 604 (803) 212-6016 Email: WesClimer@scsenate.gov

Thomas D. “Tom” Corbin [R] District 5 – Greenville & Spartanburg Cos. (H) 1139 Bailey Mill Road, Travelers Rest, 29690 Business: (864) 834-9915 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 501 (803) 212-6100 Email: TomCorbin@scsenate.gov

Ronnie W. Cromer [R] District 18 – Lexington, Newberry & Union Cos. (H) PO Box 378, Prosperity, 29127 Home: (803) 364-3950 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 410 (803) 212-6240 Email: SBIComm@scsenate.gov

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Tom Davis [R] District 46 – Beaufort & Jasper Cos. (H) PO Drawer 1107, Beaufort, 29901-1107 Business: (843) 252-8583 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 404 (803) 212-6350 Email: TomDavis@scsenate.gov

Mike Fanning [D] District 17 – Chester, Fairfield & York Cos. (H) 7825 Camp Welfare Road, Great Falls, 29055 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 606 (803) 212-6024 Email: MikeFanning@scsenate.gov

Mike Gambrell [R] District 4 – Abbeville, Anderson & Greenwood Cos. (H) Business: (864) 844-3614 Home: (864) 369-0613 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 610 (803) 212-6040 Email: MikeGambrell@scsenate.gov

Stephen L. Goldfinch [R] District 34 – Charleston, Georgetown & Horry Cos. (H) PO Box 823, Murrells Inlet, 29576 Business: (843) 357-9301 Home: (843) 385-4302 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 513 (803) 212-6172 Email: StephenGoldfinch@scsenate.gov

Chauncey K. “Greg” Gregory [R] District 16 – Lancaster & York Cos. (H) PO Box 1381, Lancaster, 29721 Business: (803) 289-6211 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 512 (803) 212-6148 Email: GregGregory@scsenate.gov

Lawrence K. “Larry” Grooms [R] District 37 – Berkeley & Charleston Cos. (H) 131 Indian Field Dr., Bonneau, 29431 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 203 (803) 212-6400 Email: STransComm@scsenate.gov

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Richard A. “Dick” Harpootlian [D] District 20 – Lexington & Richland Cos. (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 602 Email: DickHarpootlian@scsenate.gov

Greg Hembree [R] District 28 – Dillon & Horry Cos. (H) PO Box 944, N. Myrtle Beach, 29597 Business: (843) 946-6556 Home: (843) 222-1001 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 604 (803) 212-6016 Email: GregHembree@scsenate.gov

C. Bradley Hutto [D] District 40 – Allendale, Bamberg, Barnwell, Colleton, Hampton & Orangeburg Cos. (H) PO Box 1084, Orangeburg, 29116-1084 Business: (803) 534-5218 Home: (803) 536-1808 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 510 (803) 212-6140 Email: BradHutto@scsenate.gov

Darrell Jackson [D] District 21 – Richland Co. (H) 608 Motley Road, Hopkins, 29061 Business: (803) 771-0325 Home: (803) 776-6954 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 612 (803) 212-6048 Email: DarrellJackson@scsenate.gov

Kevin L. Johnson [D] District 36 – Clarendon, Darlington, Florence & Sumter Cos. (H) PO Box 156, Manning, 29102 Home: (803) 435-8117 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 606 (803) 212-6024 Email: KevinJohnson@scsenate.gov

Marlon E. Kimpson [D] District 42 – Charleston & Dorchester Cos. (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 508 (803) 212-6132 Email: MarlonKimpson@scsenate.gov


2019–2020 Legislative Directory

Hugh K. Leatherman Sr. [R] District 31 – Darlington & Florence Cos. (H) 1817 Pineland Ave., Florence, 29501 Business: (843) 662-0388 Home: (843) 667-1152 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 111 (803) 212-6640 Email: SFinComm@scsenate.gov

Gerald Malloy [D] District 29 – Chesterfield, Darlington, Lee & Marlboro Cos. (H) 1216 Salem Road, Hartsville, 29550 Business: (843) 339-3000 Home: (843) 332-5533 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 513 (803) 212-6172 Email: GeraldMalloy@scsenate.gov

Shane R. Martin [R] District 13 – Greenville, Spartanburg & Union Cos. (H) PO Box 575, Pauline, 29374 Cell: (864) 804-8499 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 211 (803) 212-6420 Email: ShaneMartin@scsenate.gov

A. Shane Massey [R] District 25 – Aiken, Edgefield, Lexington, McCormick & Saluda Cos. (H) PO Box 551, Edgefield, 29824 Business: (803) 637-6200 Home: (803) 480-0419 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 311 (803) 212-6330 Email: ShaneMassey@scsenate.gov

John W. Matthews Jr. [D] District 39 – Berkeley, Calhoun, Colleton, Dorchester & Orangeburg Cos. (H) Home: (803) 829-2383 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 613 (803) 212-6056 Email: JohnMatthews@scsenate.gov

Margie Bright Matthews [D] District 45 – Allendale, Beaufort, Charleston, Colleton, Hampton & Jasper Cos. (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 502 (803) 212-6108 Email: MargieBrightMatthews@scsenate.gov

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J. Thomas McElveen III [D] District 35 – Kershaw, Lee, Richland & Sumter Cos. (H) PO Box 57, Sumter, 29151 Business: (803) 775-1263 Home: (803) 778-0597 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 508 (803) 212-6132 Email: ThomasMcElveen@scsenate.gov

Mia S. McLeod [D] District 22 – Kershaw & Richland Cos. (H) PO Box 290692, Columbia 29229 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 613 (803) 212-6056 Email: Mia@scsenate.gov

Floyd Nicholson [D] District 10 – Abbeville, Greenwood, McCormick & Saluda Cos. (H) 527 Bryte St., Greenwood, 29649 Business: (864) 992-1878 Home: (864) 223-9460 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 610 (803) 212-6040 Email: FloydNicholson@scsenate.gov

Harvey S. Peeler Jr. [R] District 14 – Cherokee, Spartanburg, Union & York Cos. (H) PO Box 742, Gaffney, 29342 Business: (864) 489-9994 Home: (864) 489-3766 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 213 (803) 212-6430 Email: HarveyPeeler@scsenate.gov

Luke A. Rankin [R] District 33 – Horry Co. (H) 201 Beaty St., Conway, 29526 Business: (843) 248-2405 Home: (843) 626-6269 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 101 (803) 212-6610 Email: SJudComm@scsenate.gov

Glenn G. Reese [D] District 11 – Spartanburg Co. (H) 507 Fagan Drive, Lake Bowen, Inman, 29349 Business: (864) 585-1956 Home: (864) 592-2984 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 502 (803) 212-6108 Email: GlennReese@scsenate.gov

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Rex F. Rice [R] District 2 – Pickens Co. (H) PO Box 1706, Easley, 29641 Cell: (864) 884-0408 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 501 (803) 212-6100 Email: RexRice@scsenate.gov

Ronnie A. Sabb [D] District 32 – Berkeley, Florence, Georgetown, Horry & Williamsburg Cos. (H) PO Box 311, Greeleyville, 29056 Business: (843) 355-5349 Home: (843) 426-4138 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 504 (803) 212-6032 Email: RonnieSabb@scsenate.gov

John L. Scott Jr. [D] District 19 – Richland Co. (H) 215 Elmont Drive, Columbia, 29203 Business: (803) 733-5176 Home: (803) 786-2373 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 506 (803) 212-6124 Email: JohnScott@scsenate.gov

Sandy Senn [R] District 41 – Charleston & Dorchester Cos. (H) PO Box 12279, Charleston, 29422 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 601 (803) 212-6116 Email: SandySenn@scsenate.gov

Nikki G. Setzler [D] District 26 – Aiken, Calhoun, Lexington & Saluda Cos. (H) 249 Congaree Park Drive, West Columbia, 29169 Business: (803) 796-1285 Home: (803) 796-7573 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 510 (803) 212-6140 Email: NikkiSetzler@scsenate.gov

Katrina Frye Shealy [R] District 23 – Lexington Co. (H) PO Box 84783, Lexington, 29073 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 303 (803) 212-6320 Email: KatrinaShealy@scsenate.gov

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Vincent A. Sheheen [D] District 27 – Chesterfield, Kershaw & Lancaster Cos. (H) PO Drawer 10, Camden, 29021 Business: (803) 432-4391 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 504 (803) 212-6032 Email: VincentSheheen@scsenate.gov

Scott Talley [R] District 12 – Greenville & Spartanburg Cos. (H) 134 Oakland Ave., Spartanburg, 29302 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 612 (803) 212-6048 Email: ScottTalley@scsenate.gov

Ross Turner [R] District 8 – Greenville Co. (H) PO Box 16703, Greenville, 29606 Business: (864) 288-9513 Home: (864) 987-0596 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 512 (803) 212-6148 Email: RossTurner@scsenate.gov

Daniel B. “Danny” Verdin III [R] District 9 – Greenville & Laurens Cos. (H) PO Box 272, Laurens, 29360 Business: (864) 984-4129 Home: (864) 682-8914 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 412 (803) 212-6250 Email: SMediComm@scsenate.gov

Kent M. Williams [D] District 30 – Dillon, Florence, Horry, Marion & Marlboro Cos. (H) 4205 Stirk Place, Marion, 29571 Business: (843) 423-8237 Home: (843) 362-0307 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 608 (803) 212-6000 Email: KentWilliams@scsenate.gov

Tom Young Jr. [R] District 24 – Aiken Co. (H) PO Box 651, Aiken, 29802 Business: (803) 649-0000 Home: (803) 215-3631 (O) PO Box 142, Columbia, 29201 Room 608 (803) 212-6000 Email: TomYoung@scsenate.gov


2019–2020 Legislative Directory

S.C. House of Representatives House members’ offices are in the Blatt Building, Columbia. (H) Home

district  office

(O) Columbia

Terry Alexander [D] District 59 – Darlington & Florence Cos. (H) 1646 Harris Court, Florence, 29501 Home: (843) 665-7321 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 314C (803) 734-3004 Email: TerryAlexander@schouse.gov

Merita A. “Rita” Allison [R] District 36 – Greenville & Spartanburg Cos. (H) PO Box 93, Lyman, 29365 Business: (864) 909-1092 Home: (864) 439-6255 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 429 (803) 734-3053 Email: RitaAllison@schouse.gov

Carl L. Anderson [D] District 103 – Georgetown, Horry & Williamsburg Cos. (H) PO Box 694, Georgetown, 29442 Home: (843) 546-5332 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 304C (803) 734-2933 Email: CarlAnderson@schouse.gov

Lucas Atkinson [D] District 57 – Dillon, Horry & Marion Cos. (H) PO Box 583, Marion, 29571 Business: (843) 423-8237 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 333D (803) 212-6936 Email: LucasAtkinson@schouse.gov

William H. Bailey [R] District 104 – Horry Co. (H) 4487 Lake Circle, Little River, 29566 Home: (843) 458-0844 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 420D (803) 212-6918 Email: WilliamBailey@schouse.gov

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Jimmy C. Bales [D] District 80 – Kershaw & Richland Cos. (H) 1515 Crossing Creek Road, Eastover, 29044 Home: (803) 776-6416 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 503A (803) 734-3107 Email: JimmyBales@schouse.gov

Nathan Ballentine [R] District 71 – Lexington & Richland Cos. (H) 324 Sienna Drive, Chapin, 29036 Home: (803) 732-1861 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 320B (803) 734-2969 Email: NathanBallentine@schouse.gov

Justin Bamberg [D] District 90 – Bamberg, Barnwell & Colleton Cos. (H) 232 Azalea Ave., Bamberg, 29003 Home: (803) 682-2860 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 335C (803) 212-6907 Email: JustinBamberg@schouse.gov

Bruce W. Bannister [R] District 24 – Greenville Co. (H) PO Box 10007, Greenville, 29603 Business: (864) 298-0084 Home: (864) 676-9250 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 312B (803) 212-6944 Email: BruceBannister@schouse.gov

Linda “Lin” Bennett [R] District 114 – Charleston & Dorchester Cos. (H) 231 N. Ainsdale Drive, Charleston, 29414 Home: (843) 571-6330 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 414D (803) 212-6948 Email: LinBennett@schouse.gov

Beth E. Bernstein [D] District 78 – Richland Co. (H) 1019 Assembly St., Columbia, 29201 Business: (803) 799-7900 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 532C (803) 212-6940 Email: BethBernstein@schouse.gov

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Bart T. Blackwell [R] District 81 – Aiken Co. (H) PO Box 6658, Aiken, 29804 Business: (803) 648-1826 Home: (803) 649-4938 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 416D (803) 212-6884 Email: BartBlackwell@schouse.gov

Jeffrey A. “Jeff” Bradley [R] District 123 – Beaufort Co. (H) 304 Seabrook Drive, Hilton Head Island, 29926 Business: (803) 342-6918 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 306B (803) 212-6928 Email: JeffBradley@schouse.gov

Wendy C. Brawley [D] District 70 – Richland & Sumter Cos. (H) 217 Sagemont Dr., Hopkins, 29061 Home: (803) 776-9286 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 309D (803) 212-6961 Email: WendyBrawley@schouse.gov

Robert L. Brown [D] District 116 – Charleston & Colleton Cos. (H) 5925 Highway 162, Hollywood, 29449 Business: (843) 889-6440 Home: (843) 889-8835 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 330D (803) 734-3170 Email: RobertBrown@schouse.gov

Bruce M. Bryant [R] District 48 – York Co. (H) 168 Hwy 274, #323, Lake Wylie, 29710 Cell: (803) 493-3768 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 530A (803) 212-6888 Email: BruceBryant@schouse.gov

James Mikell “Mike” Burns [R] District 17 – Greenville Co. (H) 100 Old Locust Hill Road, Taylors, 29687 Home: (864) 895-4593 Cell: (864) 906-6949 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 326B (803) 212-6891 Email: MikeBurns@schouse.gov

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Paula Rawl Calhoon [R] District 87 – Lexington Co. (H) PO Box 1913, Lexington, 29071 Business: (803) 808-5224 Home: (803) 359-4550 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 320D (803) 212-6924 Email: PaulaCalhoon@schouse.gov

Micajah P. “Micah” Caskey IV [R] District 89 – Lexington Co. (H) 2811 Dalewood Drive, West Columbia, 29170 Cell: (803) 250-5834 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 323B (803) 212-6959 Email: MicahCaskey@schouse.gov

Converse A. “Con” Chellis IV [R] District 94 – Charleston & Dorchester Cos. (H) 216 Marion Avenue, Summerville, 29483 Business: (843) 771-0061 Home: (843) 873-1584 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 308A (803) 212-6871 Email: ConChellis@schouse.gov

William M. “Bill” Chumley [R] District 35 – Greenville & Spartanburg Cos. (H) PO Box 22, Reidville, 29375 Business: (864) 303-2726 Home: (864) 303-2726 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 326A (803) 212-6894 Email: BillChumley@schouse.gov

Gary E. Clary [R] District 3 – Pickens Co. (H) PO Box 1645, Clemson 29633 Business: (864) 415-0886 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 402D (803) 212-6908 Email: GaryClary@schouse.gov

Alan D. Clemmons [R] District 107 – Horry Co. (H) 1800 North Oak St., Myrtle Beach, 29577 Business: (843) 448-4246 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 519C (803) 734-3113 Email: AlanClemmons@schouse.gov


2019–2020 Legislative Directory

William “Bill” Clyburn [D] District 82 – Aiken, Edgefield & Saluda Cos. (H) 664 Edrie St., Aiken, 29801 Home: (803) 649-6167 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 416C (803) 734-3033 Email: BillClyburn@schouse.gov

Gilda Cobb-Hunter [D] District 66 – Orangeburg Co. (H) 4188 Five Chop Road, Orangeburg, 29115 Business: (803) 534-2448 Home: (803) 531-1257 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 309C (803) 734-2809 Email: GildaCobbHunter@schouse.gov

William Scott Cogswell Jr. [R] District 110 – Charleston Co. (H) 701 East Bay St., Suite 310, Charleston, 29403 Business: (803) 577-2088 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 310B (803) 212-6950 Email: WilliamCogswell@schouse.gov

Neal A. Collins [R] District 5 – Pickens Co. (H) PO Box 906, Easley, 29641 Business: (864) 350-4175 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 418C (803) 212-6913 Email: NealCollins@schouse.gov

Bobby J. Cox [R] District 21 – Greenville County (H) 419 The Parkway PMB #128, Greer, 29650 Home: (864) 631-5840 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 312A (803) 212-6883 Email: BobbyCox@schouse.gov

Westley P. “West” Cox [R] District 10 – Anderson, Greenville & Pickens Cos. (H) PO Box 315, Williamston, 29697 Business: (864) 847-9289 Home: (864) 625-0463 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 434A (803) 212-6931 Email: WestCox@schouse.gov

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Heather Ammons Crawford [R] District 68 – Horry Co. (H) PO Box 31385, Myrtle Beach, 29588 Business: (843) 915-5130 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 522B (803) 212-6933 Email: HeatherCrawford@schouse.gov

Joseph S. Daning [R] District 92 – Berkeley Co. (H) 118 Queensbury Circle, Goose Creek, 29445 Home: (843) 553-9288 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 310C (803) 734-2951 Email: JoeDaning@schouse.gov

Sylleste H. Davis [R] District 100 – Berkeley Co. (H) PO Box 1617, Moncks Corner, 29461 Home: (843) 729-9243 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 414C (803) 212-6930 Email: SyllesteDavis@schouse.gov

Chandra E. Dillard [D] District 23 – Greenville Co. (H) 5 Alleta Ave., Greenville, 29607 Business: (864) 294-2503 Home: (864) 233-6549 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 414B (803) 212-6791 Email: ChandraDillard@schouse.gov

Jason Thomas Elliott [R] District 22 – Greenville Co. (H) 116 E. Montclair Ave., Greenville, 29609 Business: (864) 235-5308 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 312D (803) 212-6877 Email: JasonElliott@schouse.gov

Shannon S. Erickson [R] District 124 – Beaufort Co. (H) PO Box 1228, Beaufort, 29901-1228 Business: (843) 255-2260 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 320C (803) 734-3261 Email: ShannonErickson@schouse.gov

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Raye Felder [R] District 26 – York Co. (H) 116 Mary Mack Lane, Fort Mill, 29715 Business: (803) 547-6715 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 402C (803) 212-6892 Email: RayeFelder@schouse.gov

Kirkman Finlay III [R] District 75 – Richland Co. (H) PO Box 11684, Columbia, 29211 Business: (803) 748-1090 Home: (803) 695-9550 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 532A (803) 212-6943 Email: KirkmanFinlay@schouse.gov

Cally R. “Cal” Forrest [R] District 39 – Lexington & Saluda Cos. (H) 137 N. Railroad Ave, Monetta, 29105 Home: (803) 685-5576 Cell: (803) 349-6741 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 323A (803) 212-6938 Email: CalForrest@schouse.gov

P. Michael “Mike” Forrester [R] District 34 – Spartanburg Co. (H) 287 Creekridge Drive, Spartanburg, 29301 Business: (864) 592-6204 Home: (864) 595-1137 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 402B (803) 212-6792 Email: MikeForrester@schouse.gov

Russell W. Fry [R] District 106 – Horry Co. (H) PO Box 14444, Surfside Beach, 29587 Business: (843) 650-9137 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 522D (803) 212-6781 Email: RussellFry@schouse.gov

Laurie Slade Funderburk [D] District 52 – Kershaw Co. (H) PO Box 188, Camden, 29021 Business: (803) 432-0188 Home: (803) 432-4371 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 422C (803) 734-3044 Email: LaurieFunderburk@schouse.gov

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Craig A. Gagnon [R] District 11 – Abbeville & Anderson Cos. (H) 504 Church St., Abbeville, 29620 Business: (864) 366-2024 Home: (864) 366-4112 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 436A (803) 212-6934 Email: CraigGagnon@schouse.gov

Kambrell Garvin [D] District 77 – Richland Co. (H) PO Box 292434, Columbia, 29229 Home: (803) 470-3961 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 335D (803) 212-6875 Email: KambrellGarvin@schouse.gov

Leon D. “Doug” Gilliam [R] District 42 – Laurens & Union Cos. (H) 3347 Buffalo-W. Springs Highway, Buffalo, 29321 Home: (864) 427-5711 Cell: (864) 426-0785 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 420A (803) 212-6968 Email: DougGilliam@schouse.gov

Wendell G. Gilliard [D] District 111 – Charleston Co. (H) PO Box 31641, Charleston, 29417 Business: (843) 209-3123 Home: (843) 402-9710 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 328B (803) 212-6793 Email: WendellGilliard@schouse.gov

Jerry N. Govan Jr. [D] District 95 – Orangeburg Co. (H) PO Box 77, Orangeburg, 29116 Business: (803) 533-7976 Home: (803) 531-1158 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 530B (803) 734-3012 Email: JerryGovan@schouse.gov

Kevin Hardee [R] District 105 – Horry Co. (H) 2082 Cane Branch Road, Loris, 29569 Home: (843) 455-3567 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 404C (803) 212-6796 Email: KevinHardee@schouse.gov


2019–2020 Legislative Directory

Christopher R. “Chris” Hart [D] District 73 – Richland Co. (H) 5219 Burke Ave., Columbia, 29203 Home: (803) 771-7701 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 432B (803) 734-3061 Email: ChrisHart@schouse.gov

Jackie E. “Coach” Hayes [D] District 55 – Darlington, Dillon, Horry & Marlboro Cos. (H) 240 Bermuda Road, Dillon, 29536 Business: (843) 841-3679 Home: (843) 774-6125 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 333C (803) 734-3099 Email: JackieHayes@schouse.gov

Rosalyn D. Henderson-Myers [D] District 31 – Spartanburg Co (H) PO Box 1311, Spartanburg, 29304 Business: (864) 345-2221 Home: (864) 707-5384 Cell: (864) 973-7595 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 530C (803) 212-6965 Email: RosalynHenderson-Myers@schouse.gov

Patricia Moore “Pat” Henegan [D] District 54 – Chesterfield, Darlington & Marlboro Cos. (H) PO Box 41, Bennettsville, 29512 Home: (843) 479-7838 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 333B (803) 212-6896 Email: PatriciaHenegan@schouse.gov

William G. “Bill” Herbkersman [R] District 118 – Beaufort & Jasper Cos. (H) 896 May River Road, Bluffton, 29910-5833 Business: (843) 255-2264 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 308C (803) 734-3063 Email: BillHerbkersman@schouse.gov

William Lee Hewitt [R] District 108 – Charleston & Georgetown Cos. (H) PO Box 928, Murrells Inlet, 29576 Business: (843) 652-4236 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 327D (803) 212-6927 Email: LeeHewitt@schouse.gov

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Jonathon D. Hill [R] District 8 – Anderson Co. (H) 1031 Double Springs Road, Townville, 29689 Cell: (864) 245-5885 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 434C (803) 212-6919 Email: JHill@schouse.gov

David R. Hiott [R] District 4 – Pickens Co. (H) PO Box 997, Pickens, 29671 Business: (864) 878-9832 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 411 (803) 734-3022 Email: DavidHiott@schouse.gov

William M. “Bill” Hixon [R] District 83 – Aiken & Edgefield Cos. (H) PO Box 7927, North Augusta, 29861 Business: (803) 279-8855 Home: (803) 278-0892 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 416A (803) 212-6898 Email: BillHixon@schouse.gov

Lonnie Hosey [D] District 91 – Allendale, Barnwell & Orangeburg Cos. (H) PO Box 423, Barnwell, 29812 Home: (803) 259-1178 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 404B (803) 734-2829 Email: LonnieHosey@schouse.gov

Leon Howard [D] District 76 – Richland Co. (H) 2425 Barhamville Road, Columbia, 29204 Business: (803) 254-9468 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 425 (803) 734-3046 Email: LeonHoward@schouse.gov

Chip Huggins [R] District 85 – Lexington Co. (H) 308 Wayworth Court, Columbia, 29212 Business: (803) 732-2000 Home: (803) 732-4418 Cell: (803) 331-8468 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 202 (803) 212-6812 Email: ChipHuggins@schouse.gov

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Max T. Hyde Jr. [R] District 32 – Spartanburg Co. (H) 22 Woodburn Road, Spartanburg, 29302 Business: (864) 804-6330 Home: (864) 582-1742 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 402A (803) 212-6790 Email: MaxHyde@schouse.gov

Joseph H. Jefferson Jr. [D] District 102 – Berkeley & Dorchester Cos. (H) 1375 Colonel Maham Drive, Pineville, 29468 Business: (843) 567-4386 Cell: (843) 991-0519 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 304B (803) 734-2936 Email: JosephJefferson@schouse.gov

Jeffrey E. “Jeff” Johnson [R] District 58 – Horry Co. (H) 7223 Pee Dee Highway, Conway, 29527 Business: (843) 488-5333 Home: (843) 397-0079 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 434B (803) 212-6946 Email: JeffJohnson@schouse.gov

Wallace H. “Jay” Jordan Jr. [R] District 63 – Florence Co. (H) 626 W. Evans St., Florence, 29501 Business: (843) 662-4474 Home: (843) 229-1874 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 327A (803) 212-6785 Email: JayJordan@schouse.gov

Mandy W. Kimmons [R] District 97 – Colleton & Dorchester Cos. (H) 108 Sullivans Landing Road, Ridgeville, 29472 Business: (843) 970-2929 Home: (843) 697-1304 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 310A (803) 212-6973 Email: MandyKimmons@schouse.gov

John Richard C. King [D] District 49 – York Co. (H) PO Box 11555, Rock Hill, 29731 Home: (803) 980-5454 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 309B (803) 212-6873 Email: JohnKing@schouse.gov

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Roger K. Kirby [D] District 61 – Florence & Marion Cos. (H) 1690 Johnsonville Highway, Lake City, 29560 Business: (843) 374-7653 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 314D (803) 212-6947 Email: RogerKirby@schouse.gov

Thomas R. “Randy” Ligon [R] District 43 – Chester & York Cos. (H) PO Box 4815, Rock Hill, 29732 Business: (803) 366-3535 Home: (803) 377-1284 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 306D (803) 212-6972 Email: RandyLigon@schouse.gov

Dwight A. Loftis [R] District 19 – Greenville Co. (H) PO Box 14784, Greenville, 29610 Home: (864) 834-5760 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 522C (803) 734-3101 Email: DwightLoftis@schouse.gov

Steven Wayne Long [R] District 37 – Spartanburg Co. (H) 240 Bandallon Place, Boling Springs, 29316 Cell: (864) 978-3104 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 304A (803) 212-6878 Email: StevenLong@schouse.gov

Phillip D. Lowe [R] District 60 – Darlington & Florence Cos. (H) 507 West Cheves St., Florence, 29501 Business: (843) 662-1234 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 327B (803) 734-2975 Email: PhillipLowe@schouse.gov

James H. “Jay” Lucas [R] District 65 – Chesterfield, Darlington, Kershaw & Lancaster Cos. (H) 1744 Garland Drive, Hartsville, 29550 Business: (843) 332-5050 Home: (843) 383-9421 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 506 (803) 734-3125 Email: JayLucas@schouse.gov


2019–2020 Legislative Directory

Nancy Mace [R] District 99 – Berkeley & Charleston Cos. (H) 295 Seven Farms Dr., Suite C-186, Daniel Island, 29492 Cell: (843) 580-6223 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 308B (803) 212-6717 Email: NancyMace@schouse.gov

David J. Mack III [D] District 109 – Charleston & Dorchester Cos. (H) 4340 Evanston Blvd., North Charleston, 29418 Business: (843) 225-4869 Home: (843) 760-0198 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 328D (803) 734-3192 Email: DavidMack@schouse.gov

Josiah Magnuson [R] District 38 – Spartanburg Co. (H) PO Box 206, Campobello, 29322 Cell: (864) 420-7933 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 304D (803) 212-6876 Email: JosiahMagnuson@schouse.gov

Richard “Rick” Martin [R] District 40 – Newberry Co. (H) 9307 Highway 34, Newberry, 29108 Cell: (803) 924-2934 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 418D (803) 212-6951 Email: RickMartin@schouse.gov

Peter M. McCoy Jr. [R] District 115 – Charleston Co. (H) 135 King St., Charleston, 29401 Business: (843) 628-2855 Home: (843) 452-4722 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 512 (803) 734-3120 Email: PeterMcCoy@schouse.gov

John R. McCravy III [R] District 13 – Greenwood Co. (H) PO Box 50658, Greenwood, 29649 Business: (864) 942-8501 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 420B (803) 212-6939 Email: JohnMcCravy@schouse.gov

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Annie E. McDaniel [D] District 41 – Chester, Fairfield & Richland Cos. (H) 2247 Kennedy Road, Winnsboro, 29180 Business: (803) 960-5782 Home: (803) 635-6894 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 330A (803) 212-6789 Email: AnnieMcDaniel@schouse.gov

Timothy A. “Tim” McGinnis [R] District 56 – Horry Co. (H) 8476 Juxa Dr., Myrtle Beach, 29579 Cell: 843-798-7440 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 530D (803) 212-6935 Email: TimMcGinnis@schouse.gov

Cezar E. McKnight [D] District 101 – Clarendon & Williamsburg Cos. (H) PO Box 688, Lake City, 29560 Business: (843) 374-4529 Home: (843) 372-3323 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 314B (803) 212-6926 Email: CezarMcKnight@schouse.gov

JA Moore [D] District 15 – Berkeley & Charleston Cos. (H) PO Box 62103, North Charleston, 29419 Business: (843) 640-0130 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 432A (803) 212-6890 Email: JAMoore@schouse.gov

Adam M. Morgan [R] District 20 – Greenville Co. (H) 803 Ikes Road, Taylors, 29687 Business: (864) 517-7068 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 314A (803) 212-6795 Email: AdamMorgan@schouse.gov

Dennis C. Moss [R] District 29 – Cherokee, Chester & York Cos. (H) 306 Silver Circle, Gaffney, 29340 Business: (864) 761-6353 Home: (864) 487-2121 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 503B (803) 734-3073 Email: DennisMoss@schouse.gov

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V. Stephen “Steve” Moss [R] District 30 – Cherokee & York Cos. (H) 210 Big Rock Road, Blacksburg, 29702 Home: (864) 839-3135 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 418B (803) 212-6885 Email: SteveMoss@schouse.gov

Christopher J. “Chris” Murphy [R] District 98 – Dorchester Co. (H) 4238 Persimmon Woods Drive, North Charleston, 29420 Business: (843) 832-1120 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 308D (803) 212-6925 Email: ChrisMurphy@schouse.gov

Brandon Michael Newton [R] District 45 – Lancaster & York Cos. (H) PO Box 2501, Lancaster, 29721 Cell: (803) 320-9615 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 404D (803) 212-6874 Email: BrandonNewton@schouse.gov

Wm. Weston J. Newton [R] District 120 – Beaufort & Jasper Cos. (H) 83 Myrtle Island Road, Bluffton, 29910 Business: (843) 706-6111 Home: (843) 706-3880 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 228 (803) 212-6810 Email: WestonNewton@schouse.gov

Mandy Powers Norrell [D] District 44 – Lancaster Co. (H) PO Box 994, Lancaster, 29721 Business: (803) 289-1800 Home: (803) 289-6409 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 422B (803) 212-6937 Email: MandyNorrell@schouse.gov

Russell L. Ott [D] District 93 – Calhoun, Lexington & Orangeburg Cos. (H) 135 Ott Farm Trail, St. Matthews, 29135 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 306C (803) 212-6945 Email: RussellOtt@schouse.gov

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J. Anne Parks [D] District 12 – Greenwood & McCormick Cos. (H) PO Box 181, Greenwood, 29648 Business: (864) 229-3206 Home: (864) 223-3193 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 434D (803) 734-3069 Email: AnneParks@schouse.gov

Marvin R. Pendarvis [D] District 113 – Charleston & Dorchester Cos. (H) PO Box 60715, North Charleston, 29419 Business: (843) 225-2520 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 328A (803) 212-6716 Email: MarvinPendarvis@schouse.gov

Thomas E. “Tommy” Pope [R] District 47 – York Co. (H) PO Box 471, York, 29745 Business: (803) 324-7574 Cell: (803) 984-6616 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 505 (803) 734-2701 Email: TommyPope@schouse.gov

Dr. Robert L. Ridgeway III [D] District 64 – Clarendon & Sumter Cos. (H) 117 N. Brooks St., Manning, 29102 Home: (803) 938-3087 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 422A (803) 212-6929 Email: BobbyRidgeway@schouse.gov

Michael F. Rivers Sr. [D] District 121 – Beaufort & Colleton Cos. (H) 734 Seaside Road, St. Helena Island, 29920 Cell: (843) 263-8467 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 432C (803) 212-6952 Email: MichaelRivers@schouse.gov

Leola C. Robinson [D] District 25 – Greenville Co. (H) 19 Prince Ave., Greenville, 29605 Home: (864) 277-0232 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 330B (803) 212-6941 Email: LeolaRobinsonSimpson@schouse.gov


2019–2020 Legislative Directory

Seth Rose [D] District 72 – Richland Co. (H) 1528 Blanding Street, Columbia, 29201 Business: (803) 851-4884 Home: (803) 361-2360 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 532D (803) 212-6971 Email: SethRose@schouse.gov

J. Todd Rutherford [D] District 74 – Richland Co. (H) 2113 Park St., Columbia, 29201 Business: (803) 256-3003 Home: (803) 799-8633 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 335B (803) 734-9441 Email: ToddRutherford@schouse.gov

William E. “Bill” Sandifer III [R] District 2 – Oconee & Pickens Cos. (H) 112 Cardinal Drive, Seneca, 29672 Business: (864) 885-2240 Home: (864) 882-1225 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 407 (803) 734-3015 Email: HLCIComm@schouse.gov

Krystle N. Simmons [D] District 117 – Berkeley & Charleston Cos. (H) PO Box 555, Ladson, 29456 Home: (843) 508-3100 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 414A (803) 212-6879 Email: KrystleSimmons@schouse.gov

J. Gary Simrill [R] District 46 – York Co. (H) 1515 Alexander Road, Rock Hill, 29732 Business: (803) 366-0445 Home: (803) 328-8089 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 518C (803) 734-3040 Email: GarySimrill@schouse.gov

G. Murrell Smith Jr. [R] District 67 – Sumter Co. (H) PO Box 580, Sumter, 29151 Business: (803) 778-2471 Home: (803) 469-4416 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 525 (803) 734-3144 Email: MurrellSmith@schouse.gov

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Garry R. Smith [R] District 27 – Greenville Co. (H) 210 Foxhound Road, Simpsonville, 29680 Business: (864) 963-0337 Home: (864) 963-0337 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 534 (803) 734-3141 Email: GarrySmith@schouse.gov

F. Michael “Mike” Sottile [R] District 112 – Charleston Co. (H) 132 Sparrow Drive, Isle of Palms, 29451 Home: (843) 886-8759 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 310D (803) 212-6880 Email: MikeSottile@schouse.gov

L. Kit Spires [R] District 96 – Lexington Co. (H) PO Box 396, Pelion, 29123 Business: (803) 606-5749 Home: (803) 894-4440 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 326D (803) 734-3010 Email: KitSpires@schouse.gov

Leonidas E. “Leon” Stavrinakis [D] District 119 – Charleston Co. (H) PO Box 30099, Charleston, 29417 Business: (843) 724-1060 Home: (843) 573-0491 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 420C (803) 734-3039 Email: LeonStav@schouse.gov

Tommy M. Stringer [R] District 18 – Greenville Co. (H) PO Box 2078, Greer, 29652 Business: (864) 877-9511 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 312C (803) 212-6881 Email: TommyStringer@schouse.gov

Edward R. “Eddie” Tallon Sr. [R] District 33 – Spartanburg Co. (H) 140 Bagwell Farm Road, Spartanburg, 29302 Business: (864) 380-8777 Home: (864) 596-1478 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 518B (803) 212-6893 Email: EddieTallon@schouse.gov

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Bill Taylor [R] District 86 – Aiken Co. (H) PO Box 2646, Aiken, 29802 Business: (803) 270-2012 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 416B (803) 212-6923 Email: BillTaylor@schouse.gov

Anne J. Thayer [R] District 9 – Anderson Co. (H) 225 Ansonborough Plantation, Belton, 29627 Business: (864) 940-1696 Home: (864) 224-2919 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 436B (803) 212-6889 Email: AnneThayer@schouse.gov

Ivory Torrey Thigpen [D] District 79 – Richland Co. (H) PO Box 291416, Columbia, 29229 Business: (803) 699-8171 Home: (803) 865-8738 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 333A (803) 212-6794 Email: IvoryThigpen@schouse.gov

McLain R. “Mac” Toole [R] District 88 – Lexington Co. (H) 180 Dogwood Circle, West Columbia, 29170 Home: (803) 755-6542 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 323C (803) 734-2973 Email: MacToole@schouse.gov

Ashley B. Trantham [R] District 28 – Greenville Co. (H) 101 West Court St., Suite A, Greenville, 29601 Business: (864) 704-1058 Home: (864) 243-5928 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 522A (803) 212-6966 Email: AshleyTrantham@schouse.gov

J. David Weeks [D] District 51 – Sumter Co. (H) 2 Marlborough Court, Sumter, 29154 Business: (803) 775-5856 Home: (803) 775-4228 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 330C (803) 734-3102 Email: DavidWeeks@schouse.gov

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John Taliaferro “Jay” West IV [R] District 7 – Abbeville & Anderson Cos. (H) 402 Brown Ave., Belton, 29627 Business: (864) 260-4025 Cell: (864) 379-1379 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 404A (803) 212-6954 Email: JayWest@schouse.gov

William W. “Will” Wheeler III [D] District 50 – Kershaw, Lee & Sumter Cos. (H) PO Box 106, Bishopville, 29010 Business: (803) 484-5454 Home: (803) 428-3161 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 422D (803) 212-6958 Email: WillWheeler@schouse.gov

W. Brian White [R] District 6 – Anderson Co. (H) PO Box 970, Anderson, 29622 Business: (864) 260-4025 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 436D (803) 734-3066 Email: BrianWhite@schouse.gov

William R. “Bill” Whitmire [R] District 1 – Oconee Co. (H) PO Box 157, Walhalla, 29691 Business: (864) 638-4237 Home: (864) 638-2970 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 436C (803) 734-3068 Email: BillWhitmire@schouse.gov

Robert Q. Williams [D] District 62 – Darlington & Florence Cos. (H) 2512 Holly Circle, Darlington, 29532 Business: (843) 413-2791 Home: (843) 395-9408 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 328C (803) 734-3142 Email: RobertWilliams@schouse.gov

Shedron D. Williams [D] District 122 – Beaufort, Hampton & Jasper Cos. (H) 608 Barry Avenue, Hampton, 29924 Business: (803) 942-3059 Home: (803) 914-0612 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 432D (803) 212-6974 Email: ShedronWilliams@schouse.gov


2019–2020 Legislative Directory

Mark N. Willis [R] District 16 – Greenville & Laurens Cos. (H) 201 Quillen Ave., Fountain Inn, 29644 Business: (864) 230-0135 Home: (864) 862-6179 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 326C (803) 212-6882 Email: MarkWillis@schouse.gov

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State House Clerks Jeffrey S. Gossett Clerk of the Senate PO Box 142 Columbia, 29202 (803) 212-6200

Christopher Sloan “Chris” Wooten [R] District 69 – Lexington Co. (H) 5347 B Sunset Blvd., Lexington, 29072 Business: (803) 359-3001 Home: (803) 609-1084 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 323D (803) 212-6897 Email: ChrisWooten@schouse.gov

Charles F. Reid Clerk of the House PO Box 11867 Columbia, 29211 (803) 734-2403

Ronald “Ronnie” Young [R] District 84 – Aiken Co. (H) 220 Deerwood Dr., North Augusta, 29841 Home: (803) 593-4745 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 418A (803) 212-6917 Email: RonnieYoung@schouse.gov

Richard L. “Richie” Yow [R] District 53 – Chesterfield & Lancaster Cos. (H) 178 Mill St., Chesterfield, 29709 Business: (843) 623-5001 (O) PO Box 11867, Columbia, 29211 Room 327C (803) 212-6949 Email: RichardYow@schouse.gov

How to reach your legislators Writing an email or letter to your legislator is the most effective way to communicate your support, concern or interest in an issue before the General Assembly. As you begin this process, consider the following tips: 1) Take a little extra time to educate yourself on the topic you wish to address. 2) When you write, identify yourself and your status as a constituent. 3) Be specific. Use bill numbers and state your position plainly. 4) Use examples that illustrate how the issue affects your local area. 5) Be respectful. Use appropriate greetings, such as “Dear Senator Smith” or “Dear Representative Jones.” 6) Provide a way for your legislator to respond by including your mailing address or email address. 7) Even if you disagree with a lawmaker’s position, end your correspondence by thanking them for their service.

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Public Service Commission The Public Service Commission (PSC) essentially functions as a court for cases involving utilities and other regulated companies. The PSC has broad jurisdiction over matters pertaining to the investor-owned electric and gas utility companies, water and wastewater companies, telecommunications companies, motor carriers of house­hold goods, hazardous waste disposal, and taxicabs. Utility regulation in South Carolina had its beginning with the passage of an act by the 1878 General Assembly, creating a

commission for the purpose of regulating railroads operating within the state. In 1910, the General Assembly established a Public Service Commission, empowering it with the authority to “fix and establish in all cities of the State rates and charges for the supply of water, gas or electricity furnished by any person, firm or corporation to such cities, the inhabitants thereof, and to proscribe penalties.” In 2005, the PSC began operating as a restructured, quasi-judicial body, as prescribed by Act 175 of 2004. Under the new

law, the PSC’s principal duty is to hear cases involving the state’s regulated utilities, while the Office of Regulatory Staff is responsible for many of the non-adjudicative functions associated with utility regulation. A joint session of the General Assembly elects the PSC for a term of four years, with one commissioner from each of the seven congressional districts. The PSC’s staff is composed of the Administrative Staff, Advisory Staff, Docketing Staff and Legal Staff.

COMMISSIONERS John E. “Butch” Howard

 Swain E. Whitfield

1ST DISTRICT

Chairman

(803) 896-5259 Fax: (803) 896-5170

5TH DISTRICT

(803) 896-5259 Fax: (803) 896-5170

LO C AT I O N

Synergy Business Park 101 Executive Center Drive Suite 100 Columbia, 29210 C O N TAC T

2ND DISTRICT

6TH DISTRICT

(803) 896-5100 Email: contact@psc.sc.gov Website: psc.sc.gov

(803) 896-5180 Fax: (803) 896-5188

(803) 896-5180 Fax: (803) 896-5188

CLERK’S OFFICE

Elliott F. Elam Jr.

Justin T. Williams

Jocelyn Boyd Chief Clerk/Administrator (803) 896-5114 Fax: (803) 896-5199

 Comer H. “Randy” Randall  Vice Chairman 3RD DISTRICT

(803) 896-5180 Fax: (803) 896-5188

G. O’Neal Hamilton

OFFICE OF T E C H N I C A L A DV I S O R S

7TH DISTRICT

James Spearman

(803) 896-5259 Fax: (803) 896-5170

Executive Assistant (803) 896-5142 Fax: (803) 896-5231 L E G A L D E PA RT M E N T

Joseph Melchers General Counsel

Thomas J. “Tom” Ervin 4TH DISTRICT

(803) 896-5259 Fax: (803) 896-5170

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(803) 896-5118 Fax: (803) 896-5231


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Office of Regulatory Staff The Office of Regulatory Staff (ORS) represents the public interest of South Carolina in utility regulation. The agency fulfills its mission by representing the concerns of the using and consuming public with respect to public utility services, regardless of the class of customer and preservation of continued investment in and maintenance of utility facilities so as to provide reliable and high quality utility services. Act 175 of 2004 created the ORS as a part of an initiative to provide a revised structure for addressing the public interest in utility regulation. This revised structure clearly separates the adjudicative function—which belongs to the Public Service Commission of South Carolina (PSC)—from the investigative, legal, prosecutorial and educational roles necessary for utility regulation. Specifically, the ORS has sole responsibility for the inspection, auditing, and examination of public utilities. The agency must be considered a party of record in all filings, applications or proceedings before the PSC. The utilities and industries that fall under the regulatory purview of the ORS are as follows: telecommunications, investor-owned electric, natural gas, water/wastewater and transportation.

The ORS has responsibility for oversight of railroad safety and natural gas pipeline safety in South Carolina. Further, the South Carolina Utilities Consumer Advocate, housed in consumer affairs, is responsible for monitoring South Carolina utilities as well as representing and providing protection for the ratepayer. The Energy Office, the principal energyplanning entity for the state, became part of the ORS July 1, 2015. In addition, the South Carolina Equipment Distribution Program— which provides specialized telephone equipment to South Carolinians with a qualifying hearing or speech challenge—is administered by the ORS. The agency is organized as follows: u Administration u Auditing u Consumer Services u Energy Policy u Human Resources u Information Services u Legal u Safety, Transportation, and Emergency Response u Telecommunications u Utility Rates u Utility Services

LO C AT I O N

1401 Main St., Suite 900 Columbia, 29201 C O N TAC T

General information: (803) 737-0800 Website: regulatorystaff.sc.gov CONSUMER COMPLAINTS AND INQUIRIES: 

In Columbia: (803) 737-5230 Toll-free within South Carolina: (800) 922-1531

 Nanette S. Edwards Executive Director (803) 737-0575 nsedwar@regstaff.sc.gov

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SC   gardener

The impatient magnolias

FEBRUARY IN THE GARDEN n If you have swaths of mondo grass or liriope gracing your landscape, before new growth begins, tidy them up by clipping the old foliage back to about 3 to 4 inches above ground with either a lawn mower or string trimmer.

BY L.A. JACKSON

n Bushes or small trees that were root pruned last fall can be moved to their new locations this month.

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TIP OF THE MONTH Just as fancy spring-blooming perennial bulbs such as hyacinths, crocuses, daffodils and species tulips begin pushing their shoots out of the ground this month, give them a light application of a complete fertilizer such as 8-8-8 or 10-10-10. The oomph to create this spring’s fabulous flower show has already been stored in the bulbs, but adding this extra shot of nutrients stimulates stronger foliage formation, which then absorbs more energy from the sun and transfers it down to the bulbs to be saved for next year’s blossom-fest.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  FEBRUARY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

L . A . JACKSO N

n Bring spring indoors by cutting 12to 18-inch dormant branches of early blossoming beauties such as flowering quince, flowering cherry, redbud, forsythia or spirea, and placing them in vases of water. The bloom buds will begin to stir in a warm, bright environment inside and burst open long before spring arrives outside. For a better display, change their water at least once a week.

A light application of 8-8-8 or 10-10-10 fertilizer when the first shoots emerge will help foster future blooms in perennial bulbs such as crocuses.

and visions of majestic broadleaf evergreens displaying large, white, scented blossoms in the simmer of a sultry southern summer probably come to mind. However, there is a maverick band of magnolias that can’t wait for the winding down of winter to begin blooming. Heck, they can’t even wait for their foliage to form before they start flaunting flowers! These impatient showoffs are collectively known as deciduous magnolias. Unlike the iconic southern magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora), they drop their leaves in the fall, but visually come bouncing back in late winter to early spring, with their blooms leading the way. One popular form of these raringto-go beauties is the saucer magnolia (Magnolia x soulangeana), which has large, early-bird flowers that look similar to those on a southern magnolia. The big blooms can glow in the familiar magnolia white hue, but, depending on the cultivar, they are usually found additionally tinged in pink or light purple. A saucer magnolia will usually stretch up to 20 feet high or more and about as wide. Want something smaller? Try a selection from the star magnolia (Magnolia stellata) clan, which will typically reach to around 15 feet high and wide. As advertised, lightly colored, strap-like, centrally radiating petals on the flowers give a pleasant, star-like dusting to bare branches yet to be adorned with midgreen leaves. White is the predominant color of the blossoms, but, as with saucer magnolias, selections blushed with light shades of pink or purple can also be found. Deciduous magnolias should be planted in rich, well-draining soil. Once established, they can stand moderate THINK OF MAGNOLIAS,

The early-bird blooms of a saucer magnolia can’t wait for spring to bring forth their beauty.

bouts of drought, but renewing mulch around them yearly makes for happier plants. While they perform well in full sunlight, if possible, site these magnolias away from a protected setting such as close to the southern side of a house where the low winter sun can create a cozy environment during the coldest of months. The reason for this odd avoidance is that deciduous magnolias in such a comfy microclimate might be encouraged to bloom much sooner than they should, leaving the flowers to suffer possible damage from hard frosts or prolonged freezes, which typically happen in midwinter. Deciduous magnolias aren’t as common in South Carolina landscapes as southern magnolias, but, at this time of year, they should be easy finds at local nurseries. They will be the barebranched, small tree wannabes with swelling buds eager to pop out and help chase the winter blues away! L.A. JACKSON is the former editor of Carolina Gardener magazine. Contact him at lajackson1@gmail.com.


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|

SC   recipe

Easy dinner party BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

Take the t of entertainou s stres minute prep ing. From the five-­ eese appetizer, to on the ham and ch se su dessert, all of the the “no-bake” tirami ly ick qu d an ahead dishes can be made led and brought mb se as and easily day of to the table on the your party.

K A REN H ERM A N N

GWÉNAËL LE VOT

HAM AND CHEESE MINI TARTS MAKES 24 MINI OR 12 REGULAR

These mini tarts are the perfect appetizer. Quick and easy to prepare; they can be made up to three days ahead and refrigerated. I cup cheddar cheese, grated H cup cooked ham, chopped 2 large eggs Kosher salt Black pepper, freshly ground H cup heavy cream G cup scallions, chopped

Preheat oven to 350 F. Spray a 24-cup mini muffin pan or a 12-cup muffin pan with cooking spray. Divide cheese and ham evenly into cups. In a medium bowl, whisk eggs, salt, pepper and cream. Distribute evenly into muffin cups and sprinkle with scallions. Bake in preheated oven for 20–25 minutes until lightly brown on top and set. Cool in pan for 5 minutes. If making ahead of time, let cool completely before refrigerating. Reheat in microwave for 30–45 seconds to serve. 44

CHICKEN CACCIATORE SERVES 4

4 chicken breasts, bone in and skin on Kosher salt Black pepper, freshly ground 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 8-ounce can sliced mushrooms 1 onion, diced 1 small red bell pepper, sliced 4 garlic cloves, minced

1 tablespoon fresh oregano or basil (or both), chopped 1 cup white wine 1 cup chicken stock 1 28-ounce can crushed tomatoes G cup halved Kalamata olives Parsley, chopped (for garnish)

Season chicken with salt and pepper. In a large skillet, heat olive oil over medium heat. Place chicken in skillet, skin-side down, and brown on both sides, 2–3 minutes per side. Remove to a platter and keep warm. To the same skillet, add mushrooms, onions and bell pepper and saute until soft. Add garlic and oregano or basil, and saute another minute. Add wine and cook until reduced, then add chicken stock and tomatoes. Place chicken back into the skillet and nestle into the sauce. Sprinkle olives on top. Reduce heat to low and simmer 30–45 minutes until chicken is very tender and nearly falling off the bone. Add additional salt and pepper if needed. Garnish with chopped parsley.

What’s cooking at SCLiving.coop QUICK WILTED ARUGULA Wilted arugula is a one-skillet dish that cooks up in minutes to add a nutritious side to any meal. Chef Belinda shows you how it’s done in this month’s video recipe, only at

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SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda


I U LI I A N EDRYGA I LOVA

TASTY TIRAMISU GW ÉN A Ë L LE VOT

LEMON ASPARAGUS FETTUCCINE SERVES 4

1 pound asparagus, each stalk trimmed and cut into thirds 1 pound fettuccine 3 tablespoons butter I cup heavy cream 2 tablespoons lemon zest

G cup lemon juice, freshly squeezed Kosher salt White pepper N cup fresh oregano and thyme, chopped H cup fresh Parmesan cheese, grated

In a steamer over hot water, steam asparagus until tender but still firm, about 4 minutes. Drain and set aside. Cook fettuccine according to instructions and set aside. In a large skillet over medium-low heat, heat butter and cream. Whisk in lemon zest and juice. (If making ahead, at this point, cool sauce, pasta and asparagus and refrigerate separately. The following day, reheat sauce and continue with recipe.) Remove sauce from heat and stir in fettuccine and asparagus until well coated. Add salt, pepper and herbs, and toss again. Sprinkle generously with Parmesan cheese and serve. To make ahead, store pasta, sauce and vegetables separately. CHEF’S TIP For make-ahead pasta: Cook pasta according to instructions until al dente (cooked, but still firm). Rinse, drain and cool to room temperature. Place in a container with a lid. Add 1 teaspoon of olive oil and mix well, to prevent pasta from sticking together. Seal and refrigerate. Pasta will keep up to three days.

SERVES 12

2 cups heavy cream, chilled 1 pound mascarpone cheese, softened 1 cup powdered sugar H teaspoon vanilla extract 2 cups unsweetened strong coffee 2 tablespoons rum (optional) 2 7-ounce packages ladyfingers Unsweetened cocoa powder

Chill the bowl and whisk beater of a stand mixer. Whip cream until peaks are formed. In another large bowl, whip mascarpone until smooth and add powdered sugar and vanilla. Gradually fold the whipped cream into the mascarpone mixture until combined, but do not overbeat. In a medium dish, combine coffee and rum. In the bottom of a 13-by-9-inch casserole dish, spread one layer of ladyfingers—completely covering the bottom—dipped very quickly in the coffee mixture. Do not soak, as ladyfingers will become soggy and fall apart. Spread half of the mascarpone mixture over the ladyfingers. Top with a second layer of ladyfingers dipped in the coffee mixture, followed by the remainder of the mascarpone mixture. Refrigerate for 8 hours or overnight. When ready to serve, dust tiramisu with cocoa powder.

SCLIVING.COOP  | FEBRUARY 2019  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

45


|

SC   travels

Touring Sandy Island  live oaks bearded with moss seem to stoop like wizened men above old boats creaking in their dockside slips. The air and sunlight seem hushed, as if they’ve been waiting a long time for something else to arrive. You can sense it in your bones, immediately—this is a place of ancient passages, of voyages and crossings. One chilly December morning, Berkeley Electric Cooperative member Captain Rommy Pyatt meets his tour group there. Tall, soft-spoken and bundled up in a camouflage jacket, he is a native Sandy Islander who now lives in Ladson as a member of the Air Force Reserve. In November of 2005, after a tour of active duty as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom, he bought a pontoon boat and a 15-passenger van to start a tour service that would show people the 40 square miles of island where he grew up. “Folks come down here and they go straight to Myrtle Beach and the entertainment, but for those who really want to know what South Carolina was like back in the days, this is like a hidden jewel,” he says. The path the tour takes in his Sun­­­

BY HASTINGS HENSEL | PHOTOS BY MIC SMITH

HIDDEN JEWEL Captain Rommy Pyatt steers his tour group toward Sandy Island and a stop at his mother’s general store on a crisp December morning.

AT THE SANDY ISLAND LANDING,

46

cruiser pontoon—from the mainland, down the canal, across the Waccamaw River and onto Sandy Island—is more or less the same path his ancestors first took in rowboats in the 19th century. “I wouldn’t call my ancestors slaves,” he says, as the boat putters downriver. “They were beyond slaves. I call them the architects and the engineers of the rice.” Looking out over a part of the Brook-­ green Gardens property that once was a rice field, Captain Rommy explains that

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  FEBRUARY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

his ancestors’ knowledge of how to cultivate rice in a tidal basin made ­Carolina Gold rice the No. 1 cash crop in the world at the time. “Not to mention they had to take out the pine trees and oak trees and vegetation, and clear out all the marsh, the weeds and the wag,” he says. “They had to fight off the alligators, snakes, mosquitoes, malaria, all that stuff.” Then they built irrigation canals, berms and rice trunks. Then they flooded the fields. Then they harvested the rice. Then they thrashed the rice to separate the grain from the husk. Then they winnowed the rice to separate the grain from the chaff. Then they bagged the rice, and loaded it on English ships. Repeat. Season after season, year after year. All for the profit of the white plantation owners. Of the 7,000–10,000 people working the rice fields in this area before the Civil War, most lived on the island’s nine plantations. “When the Emancipation Proclamation finally made it to this area … it was like a mass exodus,” he says. “Some went


north, some went out west. But there were those who remained and stayed here on the island. And since it was too much for the plantation owners to pay for labor, they let the rice go out of business.” The federal government did not fulfill its “40 acres and a mule” promise, so Sandy Islanders fended for themselves. “The island itself is pretty much selfsufficient,” Captain Rommy says. “The people—how can I say it?—we are survivors. Resilient. Adaptive. Adaptable.” Early Sandy Islanders used the discarded ballast bricks from English ships to build chimneys and homes. They hunted and fished. In 1880, they built the New Bethel Missionary Baptist Church. They worshiped and prayed. They sang and they cooked. Captain Rommy tells us all of this as we make our way across the Waccamaw and dock at the Mt. Arena community. His mother, Beulah Pyatt, greets us at the Pyatt General Store, where she sells books, cookbooks, homemade clothing, postcards and artwork. On our visit, recent flooding and high tides had damaged the store, but Mrs. Pyatt, a true Sandy Islander, demonstrated her flexibility and resilience— she set up shop on the porch. And it’s not the first time she’s had to accommodate the aftermath of storms. The store opened in 1986, and she says, “Three years later, Hugo came around and blew up the foundation.”

GET THERE All tours begin at the boat landing at the end of Sandy Island Road near Brookgreen Gardens, between Litchfield and Murrells Inlet. HOURS: In the summer, tours run Tuesday– Friday, 9–11:30 a.m. Winter hours are the same, but only run on Thursday and Friday. COST: Guided history tours start at $35 per adult, $20 for children ages 8–16, and $10 for children ages 7 and under. Captain Rommy also offers senior and military discounts. DETAILS: For online booking and a complete listing of scheduled tours, visit toursdesandyisland.com or call (843) 408-7187.

A NEW BEGINNING The New Bethel Baptist Church was built in 1880 by formerly enslaved Sandy islanders.

Mt. Arena is just one of several African-American communities on the island, where folks routinely travel the unnamed, unpaved roads for supplies at the General Store, thus avoiding the voyage to the mainland. When necessary, barges have been brought in to ferry people and supplies. The straightforward question—one he always gets—is: Why not a bridge? But “bridge” is kind of a curse word around here. The last talk of a bridge happened when a textile tycoon and timber baron wanted to harvest their acreage on the island, and then secretly begin building a golf course. Through the work of institutions such as the Southern Environmental Law Center, the S.C. Coastal Conservation League, and the S.C. Department of Transportation, the preservationists persevered. In 2011, the Nature Conservancy purchased the land holdings for $11 million, in part to help preserve the red-cockaded woodpecker. For his part, Captain Rommy is leading efforts to revitalize Sandy Island​ —to both preserve its old traditions and to secure its future. “A lot of history has gone to the grave, but what’s still here, we’re trying to preserve,” he says. “I’d like to see our ­population—the families actually from the island—actually come back and utilize the land and see what a jewel they have here.”

SCLIVING.COOP  | FEBRUARY 2019  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

47


Springtime in Charleston

Spring is the perfect time to experience

Edisto Beach, SC Lower rental rates, great fishing, lowcountry restaurants, golf and a pet friendly beach.

2019

84th Annual

House & Garden Tours March 28 - 30 The Garden Club of Charleston March 28 • Preview Party $55 March 29 -30 • Tours 1-5pm Daily Daily Tour Tickets $55

For more information & tickets: www.thegardenclubofcharleston.org

Come Catch a Memory Santee Cooper Country is home to South Carolina’s “great lakes” lakes”—— Marion and Moultrie

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Order our 2019 Visitors Guide Call (803) 854-2131 or email tourscc@oburg.net www.santeecoopercountry.org

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  FEBRUARY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP


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|

SC   calendar FEB 1 – MAR 15

Upstate F EB R UA RY

15–16  Seussical, Jr., Chapman

Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. 15–17  The Last Dance of Dr. Disco, Oconee Community Theatre, Seneca. (864) 882‑1910. 16  Romeo and Juliet, Twichell Auditorium, Spartanburg. (864) 948‑9020. 16  Upstate Heart Ball, TD Convention Center, Greenville. (864) 605‑7139. 18–24  The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, Brooks Center for the Performing Arts at Clemson University, Clemson. (864) 656‑7787. 21  Traditions: Compounded Opening Reception, Spartanburg Art Museum, Spartanburg. (864) 582‑7616. 21–24  Growing Old: Food and Oral History in Performance, Hazel B. Abbott Theater, Spartanburg. (864) 596‑9724. 22–23  Coppélia, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. 23  Fox Squirrel 5K, Sadlers Creek State Park, Anderson. (864) 226‑8950. 27  Nathan Shirley, Spartanburg County Public Library HQ, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. MARCH

1  Nai-Ni Chen Dance Company, Brooks Center for the Performing Arts at Clemson University, Clemson. (864) 656‑7787. 1  The Three Little Pigs, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. 1–9  Young Women in Art Juried Exhibition, Milliken Art Gallery, Spartanburg. (864) 596‑9126. 5  Cantus, Brooks Center for the Performing Arts at Clemson University, Clemson. (864) 656‑7787. 6  Arts on TAP, Ciclops Cyderi and Brewery, Spartanburg. (864) 596‑9021. 7  The Magic School Bus: Lost in the Solar System, Brooks Center for the Performing Arts at Clemson University, Clemson. (864) 656‑7787. 7–9  ASAC Horse Show, T. Ed Garrison Livestock Arena, Pendleton. (704) 305‑3446. 8–10  Peter and the Starcatcher, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. 10  Family Fundays: Windy Watercolors, Spartanburg Art Museum, Spartanburg. (864) 582‑7616. 11  Clemson University Symphonic Band, Brooks Center for the Performing Arts at Clemson University, Clemson. (864) 656‑7787.

52

SCLiving.coop/calendar Our mobile-friendly site lists even more festivals, shows and events. You’ll also find instructions on submitting your event. Please confirm information with the hosting event before attending.

11–13  South Carolina’s Nonprofit Summit, Hyatt Regency Greenville, Greenville. (803) 929‑0399. 14  2019 Juried Student Art Show, Milliken Art Gallery, Spartanburg. (864) 596‑9181. 15–17  Peter and the Starcatcher, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. O NG O ING

Every other Wednesday  Music Sandwiched In, Spartanburg County Public Library, Spartanburg. (864) 948‑9020. Third Thursdays  ArtWalk, downtown cultural district, Spartanburg. (864) 582‑7616. Fridays  Starry Nights, Roper Mountain Science Center, Greenville. (864) 355‑8900.

Midlands F E B RUARY

13–17  Annie Get Your Gun, Johnson

Theatre at Winthrop University, Rock Hill. (803) 323‑2399. 15  2019 Southern Sound Series: The Gibson Brothers, McCelvey Center’s Lowry Family Theater, York. (803) 684‑3948. 15  Delbert McClinton, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 16  By Way of the Back Door, Historic Brattonsville, McConnells. (803) 684‑2327. 16  Columbia City Ballet’s Sleeping Beauty, Patriot Hall, Sumter. (803) 799‑7605. 16  The Del McCoury Band, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 17  Farruquito Flamenco, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 22–24  Southern City Film Festival, downtown, Aiken. hello@southerncity.org. 23  By Way of the Back Door, Historic Brattonsville, McConnells. (803) 684‑2327. 23  James Gregory, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 23–24  Battle of Aiken, Confederate Memorial Park, Aiken. (888) 378‑7623. 24  Mayumana presents Currents, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179.

27  Guy Penrod, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 28  Buffalo Soldier, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. MAR CH

1  The Hunts, Sullivan Middle School, Rock Hill. (803) 328‑2787. 1  Mike Farris and the Fortunate Few, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 1–3  Craftsmen’s Spring Classic Art & Craft Festival, Cantey Building at the South Carolina State Fairgrounds, Columbia. (336) 282‑5550. 2  Joy of Gardening Symposium, Gateway Conference Center, Richburg. symposium@yorkmg.org. 2  March Monthly Gospel Singing, Midland Gospel Singing Center, Gilbert. (803) 719‑1289. 2  Paul Thorn, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 2  Run Hard Marathon, South Carolina State House, Columbia. stacy@runhard.org. 2  SC Rivalry Run, University of South Carolina Track and Field, Columbia. jaime@eggplantevents.com. 3  Larry Gatlin & The Gatlin Brothers, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 4  Black Violin, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 4–5  Indigo Dyeing Workshop, Santee State Park, Santee. (803) 854‑2408. 5  South Carolina Assistive Technology Expo, Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center, Columbia. (803) 935‑5263. 8  Henry Cho, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 8–15  Joye in Aiken, various venues, Aiken. director@joyeinaiken.com. 9  2019 Southern Sound Series: The SteelDrivers, McCelvey Center’s Lowry Family Theater, York. (803) 684‑3948. 9  Basic Drawing with Brad Sabelli, Center for the Arts, Rock Hill. (803) 328‑2787. 9  Church Basement Ladies, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 9  Joe Davis Run for Recovery, Walter Elisha Park, Fort Mill. (704) 893‑3800. 10  Great Guitars II, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  FEBRUARY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

10–11  Watercolor Journaling with Amelia, Santee State Park, Santee. (803) 854‑2408. 12  Color Drawing with Marge Moody, Center for the Arts, Rock Hill. (803) 328‑2787. 12  Danú: St. Patrick’s Day Celebration, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 13  The Oak Ridge Boys, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 15  Gilbert and Sullivan Favorites, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. ONGOING

Tuesdays through Saturdays until March 8  From Earth to the

Universe 2.0, Settlemyre Planetarium at the Museum of York County, Rock Hill. (803) 329‑2121. Daily  “Requiem for Mother Emanuel,” S.C. State Museum, Columbia. (803) 898‑4921. Daily until April 30  Nature Imagined, Museum of York County, Rock Hill. (803) 329‑2121.

Lowcountry FEBR UARY

1–28  23rd Hilton Head Island Gullah Celebration, various venues, Hilton Head Island. (843) 255‑7303. 13–16  Paula Vogel’s The Oldest Profession, Francis Marion University Performing Arts Center, Florence. (843) 661‑1720. 14–16  All Shook Up, Colleton Civic Center, Walterboro. (843) 549‑8360. 15–17  Southeastern Wildlife Exposition, multiple sites, Charleston. (843) 723‑1748. 17  A Renaissance Woman: “Ferdi” and the Gardens of Old Town, Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 852‑4200. 18–24  Hilton Head Island Seafood Festival, various venues, Hilton Head. (843) 384‑6410. 19–24  Beaufort International Film Festival, University of South Carolina– Beaufort Center for the Arts, Beaufort. (843) 522‑3196. 21  Wine, Women and Shoes, Hotel Bennett, Charleston. (843) 469‑5909. 22–23  25th Annual Quilt Gala, Horry County Museum, Myrtle Beach. (843) 915‑5320.

23  Folly Gras, downtown, Folly Beach. (843) 323‑5607. 23  Sharing Hope Race for Life, James Island County Park, Charleston. (843) 763‑7755. 24  A Renaissance Woman: ‘Ferdi’ and the Gardens of Old Town, Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 852‑4200. MAR CH

1–2  Myrtle Beach Marathon,

downtown, Myrtle Beach. info@mbmarathon.com. 2  Amazing Challenge Race, Myrtle Beach State Park, Myrtle Beach. (843) 238‑0874. 6–10  Charleston Food + Wine Festival, various venues, Charleston. (843) 727‑9998. 8–10  Flowertown Players’ Crimes of the Heart, James F. Dean Community Theater, Summerville. (843) 875‑9251. 9  Charleston STEM Festival, Exchange Park, Charleston. chs.stemfest@gmail.com. 9  Columbia City Ballet’s Sleeping Beauty, Magnolia Hall – Sun City Hilton Head, Bluffton. (803) 799‑7605. 9  Hunting Island Adventure Biathlon Race, Hunting Island State Park, Beaufort. biathlon@seaislandrotary.org. 9  Lowcountry Irish Fest, Charleston Music Hall, Charleston. (843) 853‑2252. 9  St. Patrick’s Day Block Party and Parade, downtown, North Charleston. (843) 740‑5854. 9  To Settle a Town, Colonial Dorchester State Historic Site, Summerville. (843) 873‑1740. 9–10  Skirmish at Gambles Hotel, The Columns Plantation, Florence. (843) 455‑2989. 11–17  Hilton Head Island Wine & Food Festival, Sea Pines Resort, Hilton Head Island. (843) 686‑4944. 13–April 18  Festival of Houses and Gardens, various locations, Charleston. (843) 722‑3405. 14  Catch the Leprechaun 5K Run/ Walk, Mount Pleasant Memorial Waterfront Park, Mount Pleasant. catchtheleprechaun@gmail.com. 14–17  Flowertown Players’ Crimes of the Heart, James F. Dean Community Theater, Summerville. (843) 875‑9251. 15–17  Dixie Swim Club, Florence Little Theatre, Florence. (843) 662‑3731. ONGOING

Fourth Tuesdays  Wash Day, L.W. Paul Living History Farm, Conway. (843) 365‑3596. Wednesdays  Arts and Crafts Market, Bay Creek Park, Edisto Island. (843) 869‑3867.


|

SC   humor me

Twelve hugs a day keep the crazy away BY JAN A. IGOE

IF YOU WORK FROM HOME LIKE I DO,

everyone thinks you’ve got it made. Sometimes they’re right. When I’m rocking old sweats and sipping a steaming mocha latte while my friends race to work on a cold, drizzly morning, it’s a pretty good deal. The only decisions I have to make are whether to brush my hair or invite birds to nest in it. Should I shower? Nah, I did that yesterday. (I think it was yesterday.) The downside is the recluse thing. After a while, working alone makes you weird. One can only spend so much time discussing climate change with a dog, no matter how well-read she is. At home, you can’t blame Fred in accounting for whatever exploded in your microwave or the rotting bean casserole in the fridge. So eventually, you’ll crave the company of bipeds who don’t slobber. When you work in solitary, the worst part is having no one to hug. There’s substantial evidence that hug-free environments are not healthy, even for writers. Legendary family therapist Virginia Satir—who gave advice before technology and potential lawsuits distanced us from physical contact—once prescribed four hugs a day to survive, eight to maintain and 12 to grow. She didn’t mean superficial, quickie hugs, either. To get the oxytocin flowing, you need genuine, first-rate embraces that last at least 20 seconds, like those boa constrictor hugs Aunt Maude inflicted after you opened her crocheted socks at Christmas. 54

That’s right, professional cuddlers earn $1 a minute, which has some of us (me) rethinking our career choice. To your body, a hug is pure pleasure. Your skin’s pressure receptors signal the brain to release its hallelujah hormones. Like magic, blood pressure drops, mood elevates, and stress goes bye-bye. (The next time you’re pulled over for speeding, just ask the officer if he needs a hug.) The good news is you can meet your daily hug quota without wearing socks or posting bail. Just call a professional cuddler. It’s as easy as ordering a pizza. He or she will arrive fully clothed from neck to ankle, ready to deliver hugs, cuddles or even tickles. It’s all perfectly platonic and legit, but the pros aren’t cheap. A 90-minute session costs about $90 before tip. That’s right, professional

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  FEBRUARY 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

cuddlers earn $1 a minute, which has some of us (me) rethinking our career choice. No one would fault you if embracing total strangers is a little too weird, but please stay openminded about livestock. Experts are touting cow cuddling as the latest panacea for the stressed-out, hug-deprived masses. Of course, cows don’t make house calls, so you’ll have to find a field where you can hang out with these sensitive creatures. Bovine cuddle sessions will set you back $300, but you can bring a friend along. (It’s a good idea to have a witness, in case the cow ever suggests you were impolite.) All the promotional cow cuddling videos show peaceful people in a state of bliss, just resting on the massive animals like furry body pillows or gently stroking their enormous heads. Even though everybody seems content, some animal gurus are concerned that this behavior is unnatural for cows, which don’t normally seek hugs, especially from other species. If you’re concerned about cow welfare, but a human cuddler is too pricey, you can still fall back on relatives. Just call Aunt Maude and tell her you want to thank her for this year’s socks in person. The woman is a natural. is studying the cuddle curriculum online so she can take a second job to help the family neuroscientist pay off her student loans. Ask your kids to consider a cuddling career before it’s too late. Join the fun at HumorMe@SCLiving.coop. JAN A. IGOE


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Profile for South Carolina Living

South Carolina Living February 2019  

Use this special edition of South Carolina Living to keep in touch with your elected officials in Columbia and Washington, D.C.

South Carolina Living February 2019  

Use this special edition of South Carolina Living to keep in touch with your elected officials in Columbia and Washington, D.C.

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