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Tasty tours

SPRING & SUMME R TRAVEL ISSUE

ay through Southern c w r u uisi yo k l ne a W

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APRIL 2018

SC SCE NE

Hiking conquest SC RECIPE

It’s all Greek to me


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2018 | april

THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS VOLUME 72 • NUMBER 4 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 584,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033 Tel: (803) 926‑3175 Fax: (803) 796‑6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop

25 Eat, walk, learn

EDITOR

Culinary tours in Greenville, Columbia and Charleston satisfy appetites for good food and local history.

Keith Phillips Tel: (803) 739‑3040 Email: Keith.Phillips@ecsc.org

Restaurateur Carmella Roche regales a Columbia Food Tours group with tales about Villa Tronco’s storied past. u

FIELD EDITOR

Walter Allread PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

4 CO-OP NEWS

Updates from your cooperative

Travis Ward ART DIRECTOR

6 AGENDA

Sharri Harris Wolfgang

South Carolina’s electric cooperatives do more than keep the lights on. Learn about three special events that demonstrate the best of the Palmetto State’s cooperative spirit.

DESIGNER

Susan Collins PRODUCTION

Andrew Chapman

10 DIALOGUE Preventing child abuse and neglect by supporting families

WEB EDITOR

Chase Toler COPY EDITOR

L. Kim Welborn

April is child abuse prevention month, but the fight to protect kids and teens is a year-round mission for the Children’s Trust of South Carolina.

CONTRIBUTORS

Jayne Cannon, Mike Couick, Jim Dulley, Jan A. Igoe, L.A. Jackson, Diane Veto Parham, Sydney Patterson, Susan Hill Smith, Belinda Smith-Sullivan PUBLISHER

Lou Green

12 ENERGY Q&A How to improve your outdoor lighting

ADVERTISING

The right lighting systems can improve the beauty of your home and provide greater security.

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739‑5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

American MainStreet Publications Tel: (800) 626‑1181 Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor. ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send to your

14 SMART CHOICE April showers Spring brings wedding and baby showers. Consider one of these nifty gifts when your invitation arrives.

Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices. © COPYRIGHT 2018. The Electric Cooperatives

of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor. is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network.

For Congaree Riverkeeper Bill Stangler, keeping Columbia’s unique network of rivers clean, clear and open to the public is more than just a job.

18 RECIPE It’s all Greek to me Ancient Greece gave us the first cookbooks, olive oil and even the chef’s hat, but leave it to Chef Belinda to show you how to make your favorite modern-day Greek dishes at home.

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Garlic chives: The double-duty herb Pretty plants that are also pretty tasty, garlic chives can brighten up your landscape as easily as they liven up your lunch.

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22

A determined couple’s record-setting hikes on the cross-state Palmetto Trail are a very personal way to fight back against MS.

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SPRING & SUMME R TRAVEL ISSUE

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No prize for porcelain Great art speaks for itself, but if you want to understand those flowery “artist statements” from dealers and galleries, you’ll need Jan A. Igoe to translate. PHOTOS, FRO M TO P: A N DRE W H AWO RTH , GW ÉN A Ë L LE VOT, M IC S M ITH

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25

Hiking conquest SC RECIPE

It’s all Greek to me

The garlic-roasted cauliflower at Pawpaw is just one of the many delicious dishes guests might sample on a walking culinary tour of Charleston. Photo by Ruta Smith.


SC | agenda Empowering the communities we serve do more than keep the lights on. True to the cooperative principle of concern for community, they also support ­charities, host community events and pay tribute to veterans. Mark your calendar for these upcoming celebrations of the Palmetto State’s cooperative spirit. SOUTH CAROLINA’S ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES

Traveling Vietnam Wall

May 3–6 Broad River Electric Cooperative, 811 Hamrick Street, Gaffney DETAILS: (866) 687-2667, broadriverelectric.com/wall WHEN:

WHERE:

Broad River Electric Cooperative will honor the service of American veterans this May when the co-op hosts the American Veterans Traveling Tribute (AVTT) Vietnam Wall at its headquarters office in Gaffney. The 80-percent scale version of the Vietnam Memorial Wall in Washington, D.C., will be accessible to the public 24 hours a day from noon Thursday, May 3, until 3 p.m. on Sunday, May 6. “Veterans have been such an important part of this cooperative’s history,” says Board of Trustees chairperson Norris Fowler. “We wanted to pay tribute to them and all those that have served our country.” See the cooperative’s website for a full schedule of public events, including a candlelight vigil and closing ceremonies.

A I KEN E LEC TRIC COO PER ATI V E

COU RTESY O F A M ERIC A N V E TER A NS TR AV E LI NG TRI BUTE

BROAD RIVER ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE

AIKEN ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE

AEC Run United WHEN: April 28, 7:30 a.m. Sponsored by Aiken Electric WHERE: Downtown Aiken Cooperative DETAILS: (803) 649-6245, and Touchstone aikenco-op.org/RunUnited Energy, Run United features a half-marathon, a 5K race and a kids’ fun run to get hearts pumping and raise funds for the United Way of Aiken County. The races kick off on Newberry Street in downtown Aiken bright and early (7:30 a.m.) on April 28. The 13.1-mile half-marathon and the 5K courses trace a scenic route past historic landmarks including Friendship Baptist Church, Whitney Polo Field, Aiken Training Track and the H. Odell Weeks Activities Center. Lace up your running shoes and pick up the pace if you intend to run—top performers are eligible for a share of more than $3,000 in cash prizes.

BLUE RIDGE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE

Blue Ridge Fest

May 4, 5:30 to 10 p.m. WHERE: Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative, What began as a way for 734 W. Main Street, Pickens employees of Blue Ridge DETAILS: (800) 240-3400, Electric Cooperative to support blueridgefest.com local charities has grown into one of the Upstate’s biggest spring festivals. Now in its 21st year, Blue Ridge Fest combines musical entertainment with a classic car cruise-in and plenty of delicious food. Dance the night away on the outdoor dance floor to the tunes of The Spinners, Jim Quick & Coastline, and Magic, an Upstate variety band. Don’t forget to buy a raffle ticket for your chance to win a $10,000 cash prize, and smile knowing you’re helping fund worthy Upstate charities. This annual fundraiser has donated nearly $2.5 million to local programs over the past two decades. SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

B LU E RI DG E E LEC TRIC COO PER ATI V E

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ONLY ON SCLiving.coop

Q&A

Writing the book on Charleston For more than 25 years, Lynn and Cele Seldon have made a ­living as travel writers, visiting exotic destinations for top magazines and newspapers. Along the way, one city seduced the couple like no other. They returned to Charleston time and time again, and thanks to a referral from the Charleston Area Convention and Visitors Bureau, the couple scored the plum assignment from Reedy Press to write 100 Things to Do in Charleston Before You Die, a new travel guide to the Holy City. “It really feels like we wrote a love letter to Charleston,” Lynn Seldon says. “This book allowed us to share that passion and share some insider tips that not even WIN AN AUTOa lot of locals know about.” GRAPHED COPY SCL: What are some of your favorite For a chance to entries in the book? win one of two Cele: The Charleston Food and Wine autographed Festival. We think it’s a great way copies of the to take a bite out of Charleston, not book, visit SCLiving.coop/100‑Things and only for its food, but for its people, tell us your favorite Charleston for its landscape. place or experience. We’ll draw Lynn: Drink a PBR at the Recovery the names of two lucky readers at Room. It’s an absolute dive bar with random from all eligible entries really diverse people there, young, received by April 30, 2018. old, locals and tourists alike. And they just happen to sell—and have for many, many years— more PBR 12-ounce cans than any other place in the country. SCL: Was it difficult to choose just 100 places? Cele: Our original list was about 150 things to do, so we nar-

rowed it down to 100 to fit the format.

SCL: Does that mean you’re halfway done with a second book? Cele: There’s been some chatter about it. We’ve covered quite

a few more places since then, and I think there could be a 100 More Things to Do in Charleston Before You Die. For more information on 100 Things to Do in Charleston Before You Die, visit seldonink.com.

GW ÉN A Ë L LE VOT

RUTA SM ITH

Lynn and Cele Seldon on the steps of Charleston’s Dock Street Theater (number 31 on their list). Originally built in 1736, it was A ­ merica’s first building dedicated to theatrical productions.

Opa! Can’t get enough of Chef Belinda’s delicious Greek recipes? Neither can we. Visit SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda for a bonus recipe to make a mouthwatering moussaka and her latest how-to video on working phyllo dough into a tasty baklava.

Pack your bags with an extra $100 No matter how you travel or where you roam, there’s always room in your luggage for extra spending cash. Enter this month’s Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and you could win a $100 Visa gift card. We’ll draw the names of three lucky readers from all eligible entries received by April 30, so don’t delay. Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply and start packing!

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SCLIVING.COOP  | APRIL 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

7


|

SC   agenda HIGHLIGHTS APRIL 15–MAY 15

JOINT BASE CHARLESTON AIR AND SPACE EXPO APRIL 28

The U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds have been wowing audiences for decades with their highspeed, close-formation flying. Their 45-minute performance of up to 40 aerial maneuvers will be the highlight of this free community event at Joint Base Charleston. The expo also features up-close looks at cutting-edge military and commercial aircraft.

CLEMSON MUSIC FESTIVAL APRIL 20–28

Take a nine-day trek through the sounds of the South at the Clemson Music Festival. Feast your ears on everything from classic Appalachian tunes by The Resonant Rogues (pictured) to the classic beach music of the Swingin’ Medallions, with plenty of Motown, jazz, Dixieland, gospel and Americana acts in between.

(843) 963-5608; jbcharleston.jb.mil/home/ joint-base-charleston-2018-air-and-space-expo

(864) 650-0585; clemsonmusicfest.org

OLD McCASKILL’S FARM SHEEP SHEARING APRIL 21

A woolly good time is sure to be had by all at the Old McCaskill’s Farm Sheep Shearing event. See how your favorite sweater got its start, tracing the process from the border collie herding demonstration, to the actual shearing, then through the hands of on-site spinners, weavers and quilters.

CH

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(803) 432-9537; oldmccaskillfarm.com

SHAGGIN’ ON THE COOPER

Shaggin’ on the Cooper kicks off a new season April 28 at the Mount Pleasant Pier. Up first to get your feet moving are the Sugarbees, who jam out The Tams just as well as the latest Adele number. Then on May 12, Shem Creek Boogie Band brings a mix of soulful oldies, Carolina shag tunes, pop-country and rock ’n’ roll. See the website for the full summer schedule. (843) 795-4386; ccprc.com/1175/shaggin-on-the-cooper

TARA HALL PADDLEFEST MAY 5

Row, row, row your boat down Black Mingo Creek in Georgetown and help raise funds to support Tara Hall Home for Boys. Not a water person? There’s plenty of fun and food to be had on land, too. Even better: All funds raised go to support Tara Hall’s programs for neglected, troubled and abused children. (843) 546-3000; tarahall.org

8

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP


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SC   dialogue

Preventing child abuse and neglect by supporting families are just stressed out. They don’t have money for kids’ new shoes or to go on the field trip at school, and that adds to their often spent on Walton’s Mountain with three generations stress. What we look for are ways the community can come in of the Walton family living under one roof. In The Waltons and around and help.” TV show, the full fury of the 1940s rushed at the fictional One of the ways Children’s Trust helps is through adminisfamily—World War II, Jim Crow laws, birth and death—but the family unit held firm, right down to each episode closing tering the Maternal Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting with, “Goodnight, John-Boy.” While my own family and York program. Working with community partners statewide, this County home were not that far apart from life on Walton’s program provides specialists who assist at-risk, low-income Mountain, it was far enough to make mothers and their young children with a me wistful for the way things used to wide range of issues during home visits, Children thrive when be—simpler, closer and reassuring. Even including health concerns, developmennow, I find myself watching reruns of tal milestones, school preparedness and families are strong—and The Andy Griffith Show for a similar economic self-sufficiency. families are strong when walk down memory’s trail. One young mother who benefited Real life is not that simple, close or from the program became pregnant in communities wrap love and her junior year of high school and had reassuring. These days, multigenerational support for new parents is often disto drop out to support herself and her support around them. infant son. Through a home-visiting placed by cross-country moves for career program, she received the support she advancement and the growing complexneeded for a healthy pregnancy and learned about child health ity of family structures. Unplugging from our devices and the and development, early education and home safety. Two years hectic demands of daily existence feels like a luxury few of us later, she completed the program and went on to earn her high can afford. Who pays the price? We all do—our children most school diploma and begin college classes—all while holding of all. April is Child Abuse Prevention Month, a time to pause and a job. Her young son benefited physically, socially and emoconsider how to keep abuse and neglect from happening in the tionally through those two years of guidance from their nurse first place. Children’s Trust of South Carolina, a statewide orgahome-visitor. Another way Children’s Trust helps is through the nization focused on the prevention of child abuse, neglect and Strengthening Families Program, serving families with children injury, believes that children thrive when families are strong— ages 6–11 through community centers, schools and churches. and families are strong when communities wrap love and The 14-week program helps families develop positive discisupport around them. Many cases of child abuse and neglect stem from parents being inadequately prepared or supported. pline practices, reduce conflict and improve parenting skills—­ Families today often feel isolated, and it can be overwhelming ultimately helping prevent abuse or neglect. to raise children without models or guidance. Many times, child abuse and neglect are viewed as things According to the S.C. Department of Social Services, there that happen to other people, but it’s really a larger problem were 17,662 children in founded cases of child abuse and that impacts whole communities. The good news: Children’s Trust not only connects the dots for families, it also helps neglect last year—enough to fill 272 school buses. The damage connect the dots for communities. of abuse lasts long after the danger and hurt have passed, with “Nobody can do this work alone—not a parent or a school adverse childhood experiences creating toxic stress that can impede normal development. The cost of treating these negaor a church,” Williams says. “We are, by nature, creatures that tive outcomes can be staggering. South Carolina spends approx- seek out one another.” To learn more about Children’s Trust of South Carolina, visit imately $1 billion annually in direct and indirect expenses scchildren.org. associated with treatment of child abuse and neglect. Raising children is always a challenge, but in this world of change, shepherds like Children’s Trust equip parents to better navigate tough times with resiliency. As Sue Williams, executive director of Children’s Trust, explains, “Creating safe, stable homes for children often starts with helping parents. A lot of MIKE COUICK President and CEO, times, parents dealing with issues like how to make ends meet The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina MY THURSDAY EVENINGS AS A YOUNG TEENAGER WERE

10

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP


The RBC Heritage presented by Boeing made a promise 10 years ago to power every drive, chip and putt with 100 percent Green Power, which is made from clean, renewable energy sources right here in South Carolina. That’s a powerful commitment to the state and to the environment.

Palmetto Electric Cooperative and Santee Cooper are dedicated partners in that promise. Santee Cooper generates Green Power to run the RBC Heritage, South Carolina’s only PGA Tour golf tournament, and Palmetto Electric delivers that power to the event. Together, we’re making a difference.

Green Power can change the way we all live, work and play. For more insight and to sign up, visit SCGreenPower.com. The RBC Heritage is held April 9 – 15 at Hilton Head Island’s Harbour Town. Learn more by visiting RBCHeritage.com.


|

SC   energy Q&A

How to improve your outdoor lighting BY JIM DULLEY

Q

I’m planning to upgrade the outdoor lighting around my home. Do you have any tips to make the project less costly and more energy efficient?

Efficient outdoor lighting systems can enhance the security and beauty of a home while minimizing the impact on monthly electric bills.

A

For even more outdoor lighting options and ideas, stroll the aisles of your local home improvement or hardware store, or contact these companies that offer efficient outdoor lighting: Energy Focus, energyfocus.com Philips Hadco, lightingproducts.philips.com Idaho Wood, idahowood.com Wave Lighting, wavelightingusa.com

12

An outdoor fixture will likely degrade or break before its LED bulb burns out. where an intruder might be hiding. Before considering more security lighting, walk around your house and look for spots where someone could hide. Do this at night because streetlights might already provide adequate brightness. Highly efficient LED bulbs are an excellent choice for many outdoor lighting applications. You can purchase new fixtures with permanent LED bulbs already installed, or just replace older incandescent or CFL bulbs in existing fixtures and enjoy plenty of light for a fraction of the electricity. LEDs are not affected by outdoor temperatures, and some LED bulbs have a lifespan of up to 50,000 hours. For this reason, the built-in bulbs found in many new LED light fixtures are not replaceable. The fixture will likely degrade or break before the bulb burns out. If your outdoor fixtures use PAR38 floodlight bulbs, switch to the halogen

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

J I M DU LLE Y

GET  MORE

PH I LI P S H A DCO

It is important to plan your outdoor lighting scheme, or it may increase your electric bills significantly. As you work with an electrician to install wiring and new fixtures, keep in mind that the best lighting plan for security is not always the best for entertaining. It would be wise to make two lighting layouts on different circuits with unique switches. With some simple math, you can calculate how much an outdoor ­lighting system will cost to operate per day. First, total the wattages of all the bulbs. Multiply this total by eight hours and then multiply by your local electric rate per kilowatt-hour. Divide this by 10 to get the number of cents per day. You may be surprised at the total. If you are upgrading security lights around your home, don’t fall for the common assumption that brighter lights are better. Lower lighting levels are actually more effective. It is difficult for the human eye to quickly adjust from a very bright area to a darker area, so lighting that is less intense makes it easier to see and pick up movement in the shadows

An add-on motion-sensing switch, shown here attached to a standard, two-bulb halogen floodlight over a garage door, is the easiest way to provide efficient and effective security lighting.

ones. They are about 25 percent more efficient than standard incandescents. Be sure to check the beam angle for each bulb. It can range from just 9 degrees to 40 degrees for similar-looking bulbs. The beam angle determines how much area is illuminated and controls light intensity. Motion-sensing light fixtures are the most efficient and effective for security. Basic on/off models use no electricity until something triggers the light to come on, scaring away intruders. Twolevel lighting systems are another option. They provide low-level background lighting all night, switching to full brightness when motion is detected. Send questions to Energy Q&A, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033, email energyqa@scliving.coop.


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SC   smart choice

April showers Spring brings showers, both the wedding and baby kind. Consider one of these nifty gifts when your invitation arrives.  BY JAYNE CANNON

MORNING JOLT

Save the newlyweds time and money in the morning rush. No need to stop at the local coffee shop with the Nespresso by Breville Pixie Espresso Maker in the kitchen. This coffee maker’s compact design is perfect for small spaces. The high-pressure pump delivers a barista-style cup, and it heats up in just 25 seconds. $172. (800) 462‑3966; bedbathandbeyond.com.

ALWAYS WATCHING

New parents want to watch their little one every minute, as much for their own peace of mind as for the baby’s safety. The MonBaby Smart Breathing Movement Monitor is a solution for everyone. The smart button clips to baby’s clothing and is monitored through a smartphone so you can tell when baby turns over, sleeps and wakes. $80. support@mondevices.com; monbaby.com.

BABY’S BREATH

Clean, fresh air makes for a happier, rested baby. The Crane Ultrasonic Cool Mist Drop Shape Humidifier offers variable control and quiet operation in a fun and colorful shape. For safety’s sake, the humidifier cuts off automatically when the water tank is empty. $50. (800) 462-3966; bedbathandbeyond.com.

MIX IT UP

Cookies, cakes, breads ... if the bride is a baker, she’ll be thrilled with a KitchenAid Artisan Mini Stand Mixer. The stainless steel bowl has a 3.5-quart capacity, so it won’t hog countertop space, and it comes in a variety of snappy colors that will brighten any kitchen. $330. (800) 462-3966; bedbathandbeyond.com.

DOUBLE DUTY

For new parents, 2 a.m. feedings are part of the new normal. Help make them a little easier with this nursery must-have, the Cuisinart BW-10 Baby Bottle Warmer and Night Light. A warm bottle and a faint light, plus the comfort of mom and dad, and baby may go back to dreamland quickly. $40. (888) 280-4331; amazon.com.

A TOAST TO YOU

Burnt toast is a bad way to start the day. That’s why you want your bread, bagel, pastry or crumpet perfectly browned. Enter the Cuisinart 4-Slice Metal Classic Toaster. Four slots and custom controls team with polished chrome for a toaster that works well and looks good, too. $70. (800) 211-9604; cuisinart.com. 14

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP


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“Largest Cruise-In in the Upstate”


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SC   stories 

Guardian of the rivers People drive across Columbia’s bridges all the time, rarely giving a thought to the three rivers that run below them. Bill Stangler knows them all by heart. “The Saluda is a little more adventurous,” says Stangler, who has spent countless hours on these waters. “It’s got some of the best whitewater on the East Coast, and it’s cold year-round. Being able to run rapids, seeing that mist come off the water, being able to catch trophy-sized rainbow trout—it’s thrilling. “The Broad has these beautiful shoals; it’s relatively free‑flowing. And some amazing things—I always see river otters, bald eagles, Rocky Shoals Spider Lilies and some of the best smallmouth bass fishing in the Southeast.” After the Saluda and Broad meet to form the Congaree, Stangler says, “It’s like going back in time. It’s like what this state and what these rivers looked like hundreds of years ago.” Trust Stangler to protect these enchanting beauties from pollution, sewage spills, intrusive development and any other threats that might prevent them from being enjoyed by all. As the Congaree Riverkeeper— one of about 350 designated water watchdogs worldwide—he is their voice, guarding them on the public’s behalf. Whether he’s collecting water-quality samples, organizing volunteer river cleanups, calling out polluters, training junior riverkeepers or testifying at the Statehouse, Stangler aims to not just safeguard the rivers, but to raise awareness about these state treasures. “This water, all these rivers, these streams, these lakes, belong to each and every one of us,” he says. “And no one person or one business or one entity should be able to damage them so the rest of us can’t use them.” —DIANE VETO PARHAM, PHOTO BY MILTON MORRIS

Bill Stangler Both he and the nonprofit he runs are called Congaree Riverkeeper (congareeriverkeeper.org). HOMETOWN: Grew up in Cary, North Carolina; stayed in Columbia after finishing grad school at USC and calls himself “nativized.” AGE: 31. PERFECT FOR HIS JOB: Stangler has loved being on the water since childhood. He studied geography, ecology and river science at USC, worked as a Midlands river guide through college, and says he’s happy to pick a fight with anyone who poses a threat to the rivers. AWAY FROM THE WATER: Enjoys hiking, Gamecock football, Columbia’s craft beer scene, concerts, and spending time with fiancee Sara McGregor. JOB:

SCLIVING.COOP  | APRIL 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SC   recipe

Many modern-day food in Greece, dishes originated tern cuisine. the cradle of Wes ve first cookbook, ga Greeks wrote the ted en inv d an t, d whea us olive oil, wine an y ba d an l dil , nt ano, mi the chef ’s hat! Oreg d an , ne isi cu k s in Gree leaves are mainstay n, mo na cin , om e cardam warming spices lik eeks are common in Gr ve clo d nutmeg an ve oli k ee Gr Using style meat dishes. ll truly bring out wi le, ab ail oil, if av profile of the unique flavor these dishes.

It’s all Greek to me BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

PISTACHIO BAKLAVA MAKES 24–30 PIECES

1 pound pistachio nuts G cup sugar (for filling) 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground cloves 1 cup butter, melted 1 roll phyllo dough (20 sheets) N cup sugar (for syrup) N cup honey 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice H tablespoon ground cinnamon Chopped pistachios for garnish

Preheat oven to 350 F. Spray a 13-by-9-inch baking pan with cooking spray. In a food processor, pulse pistachios, sugar, cinnamon and cloves. In a small bowl or cup, melt butter in microwave.

Phyllo dough is fun to work with when you know how. Learn Chef Belinda’s tricks and a shortcut version of baklava at

SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda 18

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

While baklava is baking, make syrup. In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine sugar, honey, lemon juice and cinnamon. Bring to a boil, and reduce heat to low; simmer 5–7 minutes, until slightly thickened. Stir occasionally to prevent mixture from boiling over. Drizzle over hot baklava and let cool completely. Garnish with pistachios.

BA K L AVA PHOTOS BY GW ÉN A Ë L LE VOT

What’s cooking at SCLiving.coop

Place phyllo dough on a clean, dry, flat surface or large cutting board, and cover with a damp towel to prevent it from drying out. Layer eight sheets of dough in baking pan one at a time, brushing each layer with butter. Cover with N of nut mixture. Layer two more sheets of dough, brushing each with butter, and cover with another N of nut mixture. Repeat two more sheets of dough, brushing each, and cover with remaining N of nut mixture. Cover with remaining eight sheets of dough, brushing each sheet with butter. Using a sharp knife, cut baklava into 1 H-inch diamonds or squares. Bake 30–35 minutes or until golden brown.


K A REN H ERM A N N

MY BIG FAT GREEK BURGERS SERVES 4

TZATZIKI SAUCE 1 cup plain Greek yogurt 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice H small English cucumber, peeled, grated and drained 2 teaspoons finely chopped dill 1 garlic clove, minced Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper

For tzatziki sauce, mix all ingredients, and refrigerate until ready to use. Recipe makes 2 cups; leftovers keep 3–4 days in refrigerator and go well with Greek-style kebabs.

Cut N off the top of each pita flatbread. In a medium mixing bowl, add ground beef, feta, onions, garlic, olives, oregano and Greek seasoning, and mix thoroughly. Divide into four patties, and lightly drizzle with olive oil. Grill patties on outside grill or on indoor grill pan. Keep warm. In each pita pocket, insert a lettuce leaf and a burger. Top each with a tomato slice and three cucumber slices. Add feta, if desired. Drizzle with tzatziki sauce, and garnish with a pepperoncini pepper.

GW ÉN A Ë L LE VOT

GET MORE We have another Greek favorite online. Find the recipe for Chef Belinda’s mouthwatering moussaka at SCLiving.coop/ food.

K A REN H ERM A N N

BURGERS 4 pita flatbreads with pockets 1 pound ground beef or ground lamb H cup crumbled feta cheese (more, if desired) H small red onion, chopped 1 large garlic clove, minced G cup chopped Kalamata olives 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano 1 teaspoon Greek seasoning Olive oil 4 lettuce leaves, ribs removed 4 beefsteak tomato slices 12 cucumber slices 4 pepperoncini peppers for garnish Tzatziki sauce

GREEK-STYLE KEBABS SERVES 6–8

3 pounds beef sirloin, tenderloin or lamb, cut into 1½-inch cubes Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper 2 teaspoons dried oregano 1 H teaspoons cardamom 1 H teaspoons nutmeg 1 teaspoon paprika 1 red onion, sliced

2 large garlic cloves, smashed H cup olive oil H cup red wine G cup fresh lemon juice 2–3 red bell peppers, cut into 1½-inch pieces 1 large red onion, cut into 1½-inch pieces Tzatziki sauce (optional)

Place meat chunks in a large bowl. In a small bowl, combine salt, pepper, oregano, cardamom, nutmeg and paprika. Season meat with this dry rub, tossing well to make sure all pieces are covered. In a large zippered plastic bag, place meat chunks, onions and garlic. In a medium measuring cup with a spout, whisk oil, wine and lemon juice; pour over meat, and seal bag. Toss in bag to thoroughly coat meat. Place sealed bag in a large baking dish in refrigerator; marinate meat overnight or at least 4 hours, turning bag occasionally. To grill, remove meat from refrigerator and let sit 30–45 minutes. If using wooden skewers, soak them in water 30 minutes. Thread pieces of meat, peppers and onions alternately on skewers. (Flat skewers will prevent meat and vegetables from twisting when flipped on grill.) Grill kebabs (or broil in oven) 8–10 minutes, turning occasionally. Remove from grill; let sit 15 minutes before serving. If desired, serve with tzatziki sauce.

SCLIVING.COOP  | APRIL 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SC   gardener

n Two tips for a full-flowering clematis: (1) Make sure it gets plenty of sun (at least five to six hours a day); and (2) keep the roots cool with a 3- to 4-inch-thick covering of organic mulch.

Garlic chives: The double‑duty herb 

n Green beans, corn, cantaloupes, cucumbers, watermelons, tomatoes and squash can all be planted in S.C. veggie gardens at the first of this month, but growers in western parts of the state might want to wait until the middle of April.

BY L.A. JACKSON

PRETTY PLANTS THAT ARE ALSO PRETTY

n If you haven’t given your dog or cat a flea and tick treatment in the last month, put the hair from the pet brush around the bird feeder, and see how fast the fuzz gets snatched up for building nests. While it might be tempting to add dryer lint, don’t— it could contain residual cleaning chemicals that are unsafe for birds.

TIP OF THE MONTH Backyard pond beauties such as water lily and lotus plants require a steady diet of nutrients from spring into the summer. For the best flower display, apply a balanced fertilizer throughout the growing season. To make this chore easier—and the feedings more exact—ask the folks at your favorite garden center for time-release fertilizer tablets specially formulated for potted aquatic plants.

20

L . A . JACKSO N

Time-release fertilizer tablets formulated for potted aquatic plants will provide the steady diet of nutrients water lilies need during spring and summer months to produce vibrant flower displays.

tasty, garlic chives (Allium tuberosum) are a member of the onion family, and are a bigger, bolder, more bodacious cousin of common chives (Allium schoenoprasum). They can brighten up your landscape as easily as they can liven up your lunch. Garlic chives have spunk in both size and visibility. Growing up to two feet tall—about a foot higher than regular chives—they can certainly stand out in an herb garden. Enhancing the stretch of their elegant, edible leaves are bright summertime bursts of small, white bloom clusters (butterfly and bee magnets, by the way) on long stems that nod in the slightest breeze. Such a display of eye candy is why this perky perennial is not only found in modest herb beds but seen readily holding its own in flashy landscape borders as well. Remember though, take care with pesticides when mixing edible plants with ornamentals. Wherever you place this double-duty herb (which is also deer-resistant), you can plant garlic chives now. Hardy in all parts of South Carolina, they are easily grown from seed, but for faster results, check your local nursery for transplants. An ideal garden site should have loamy, well-draining soil that basks in morning sun but settles into light shade as the afternoon fades. Since this herb has an aversion to standing water, you can certainly put it in pots as another option. Garlic chives grow quickly, but don’t be so fast to harvest the leaves. When

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

The brilliant white blossoms of garlic chives are a magnet for bees, butterflies and other pollinator insects. The flat, green leaves at the base of the stalks are edible and deliver a mild tang.

sown from seed, their first year is a transition period. The plants are developing bulbs, which will overwinter and come back the following spring with strong, sustained foliage growth. In short, pick and enjoy some leaves this year, but allow plenty to grow through the summer to help hasten bulb production that will result in a lasting garden stay. Garlic chives have staying power. Seeds from their summer flowers will easily sprout, leading to many additional plants. Divide the bulbs in the early fall about every three years to maintain vigorous production. On a culinary note, no, you won’t need to keep a big bag of breath mints handy. The tang of garlic chives is mild enough for the herb to be used raw in salads, cream cheese spreads and sandwiches. Add fresh-cut leaves to soups, stews and Asian dishes, but toss them in only at the end of cooking time to keep the heat from wilting away the delicate flavor of this tasty herb. L.A. JACKSON is the former editor of Carolina Gardener magazine. Contact him at lajackson1@gmail.com.

PHOTOS BY L . A . JACKSO N

APRIL IN THE GARDEN


R E A D E R R E P LY T R AV E L S W E E P S TA K E S

Pack your bags with an extra THREE LUCKY $100! WINNERS! No matter how you travel or where you roam this season, there’s always room in your luggage for a little extra spending cash. Register today for this month’s Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and you could win a $100 Visa gift card.

By entering, you may receive information from these great travel and tourism sponsors:

Like summer vacations, this sweepstakes won’t last forever. We’ll draw the names of three lucky readers from all eligible entries received by April 30, 2018. Sign up at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply or mail in the coupon below, then start packing.

jj Aiken County Visitors Bureau jj City of Aiken Tourism jj Alpharetta, Ga. CVB jj Alpine Helen/White County, Ga. jj Beaufort History Museum jj Biblical History Center, LaGrange, Ga. jj Black Mountain, N.C. jj Blue Ridge Fest jj Blowing Rock, N.C. TDA jj Culture and Heritage Museums, Rock Hill jj Cafe at Williams Hardware

jj Camden Tourism jj Charleston Museum jj Cheraw Visitors Bureau jj Discover Upcountry South Carolina jj Edisto Chamber of Commerce jj Fayetteville, N.C. CVB jj Hammock Coast Tourism jj Jackson County, N.C. TDA jj Johnston County, N.C. Visitors Bureau jj Lake Hartwell Country

jj Lowcountry & Resort Islands Tourism Commission jj Morris Heritage Museum jj City of North Charleston jj City of Pickens jj Santee Cooper Country jj SCDA Agritourism jj S.C. Parks Recreation and Tourism jj S.C. Strawberry Festival jj Sparkleberry Country Fair jj Visit NC jj South Carolina Living magazine

READER REPLY TRAVEL SWEEPSTAKES Register below, or online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply YES! Enter me in the drawing for a chance to win one of three $100 gift cards. Name Address 

 City/State/Zip  Email*  Phone

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SC   scene

E TRUIT GR

Determined couple’s cross-state hikes draw attention to MS BY SUSAN HILL SMITH | PHOTOS BY MIC SMITH

HER HUSBAND GAVE HER THE TRAIL NAME

Inchworm because she goes slow and stops often. After all, April Hester has multiple sclerosis, and while MS affects people in different ways, for her it can mean pain, leg problems and falls, even in everyday life. Bernie Hester took the trail name Mule, not because he’s stubborn but because he becomes something of a pack mule while carrying gear and supplies. It’s April who’s stubborn, he says. He points to her tenacity as the reason they completed South Carolina’s cross-state Palmetto Trail not just once, but twice within one year—a feat that no one else has claimed before. “She was always the positive one. I would always be the one that said, ‘We’re not going to make it to camp tonight. We’re going to come up short. We can’t get this done.’ And she would say, ‘No, we’re going to do it.’ And she was right. We always seemed to get there.” Often grueling, long-distance hiking can be as much a mental as a physical test. To finish both of their Palmetto Trail “thru-hikes,” the couple had to push through challenges and setbacks. But April already had plenty of experience with that after living with MS the past 22 years. She sums up her approach to hiking and to life simply: “You can’t say, ‘I can’t.’ ”

Discovering the Palmetto Trail April is 43, and Bernie’s 49. Both were divorced when they met online 11 years ago. She thinks her “brutal honesty” caught Bernie’s interest. He was not deterred by her MS, or her three sons. He has three sons of his own, and some of the boys’ ages overlapped. Once they married, they had their own twist on The Brady Bunch, but without girls. Even when Bernie’s oldest became a father, he added three grandsons to the family. In late 2016, the couple moved from Beaufort to the nearby crossroads town of Okatie, and around the same time, they visited the Smoky Mountains, where they talked piein-the-sky about the Appalachian Trail. As they returned through South Carolina, a sign for the Palmetto Trail caught Bernie’s attention. “We got home, and I researched it and found out, ‘Wow, this is a big trail that we’ve got in our state, and we didn’t even realize it,’ ” he recalls. They tried their first thru-hike of the Palmetto Trail in the spring of 2017, traveling from the sea to the mountains, 22

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP


‘April would say, “No, we’re going to do it.” And she was right. We always seemed to get there.’

MARKING THE MILES Bernie and April Hester, aka Mule and Inchworm, commemorate their hiking milestones in photos that Bernie posts for their Instagram followers. B ERN I E H ESTER

and surprised themselves by finishing all 350 miles of the official trail passages and several of the unofficial connecting routes within 66 days. They also found April gained strength along the way—an extreme example of exercise benefits for those with multiple sclerosis. With their second attempt at the Palmetto Trail, they added greater purpose by striving to raise awareness of MS and funds for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. They created a donation page, kept an online trail journal, posted on Instagram and took on the role of trail ambassadors for the Palmetto Conservation Foundation, which oversees and develops the trail. They also encouraged others to push themselves in their own endeavors, and in that spirit, they made their second thru-hike of the Palmetto Trail more challenging, without support from a relief RV or extended breaks of “zero days.” They also hiked more connecting miles between official trail passages as they went from the mountains to the sea—­ starting at Walhalla in the Upstate and ending in Awendaw along the Intracoastal Waterway. They put together supply caches in advance and placed them on the trail or had them shipped to post offices and the hotels where they occasionally stayed when they weren’t camping. Both of them work for Bernie’s family’s financial business, and while he brought his laptop with him to get some work done, the stresses of their lives back home

largely slipped away as they settled into a focused hiking rhythm: Eat. Drink. Move. Sleep. Repeat again the next day.

Surprising kindness Not everything went according to plan. But in the face of setbacks, they often experienced surprising kindness. After Bernie posted about running out of fuel for the camp stove when they were on the Middle Saluda Passage, an Instagram follower and his two sons hid an emergency cache of fuel and other goodies by a log with the message: “Finish MS.” And when weather hazards from Tropical Storm Nate led the Hesters to seek refuge at the sold-out Orchard Lake Campground in Saluda, the owners allowed the couple to stay overnight in the banquet room. Most of the other hikers they met along the way seemed to know someone coping with MS or a similar health challenge, and the Hesters were often boosted by online words of support they received from others, including those in the MS community. “You feel like people are backing you up, and it just fuels you to keep going, and I think we needed that a lot of times. Didn’t we?” April says. “Yes, many times,” Bernie agrees.

SCLIVING.COOP  | APRIL 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SC   scene

Explore South Carolina’s Palmetto Trail You can soak in hundreds of miles of natural beauty and history in South Carolina along the crossstate Palmetto Trail. Currently, there are 26 different passages with difficulty levels that range from easy to moderate to strenuous. If you are ambitious, you can hike the trail in its entirety from the mountains to the sea​—or the sea to the mountains. Sections of the trail are also available for biking and horseback riding. South Carolina is one of 16 states in the country that offer a cross-state trail, and while there are pieces that still need to be finished, the opportunities the Palmetto Trail already provides are something to brag about. “One thing that’s fantastic to me personally about the Palmetto Trail is that it tells the story of South Carolina in an incredibly prolific way,” says Natalie ­Cappuccio Britt, ­executive director

of the Palmetto Conservation Foundation (PCF), which promotes the trail and other greenways. For starters, you can hike across Appalachian mountain passages in the state’s northwestern corner, experiencing dramatic changes in elevation and a wealth of waterfalls. From there, the trail flows like a loose sash diagonally across the state, over rivers, by lakes and through Lowcountry cypress swamps, until it eventually spills out at the Intracoastal Waterway. Going one way or the other, you can see historic sites from the American Revolution and Civil War and traverse greenways converted from past railways. Dotting the path are a variety of communities—small towns to urban areas— where you can get food and rest in a hotel if you aren’t completely roughing it. Originally established in 1994,

GET MORE Visit SCLiving.coop to learn more about MS, including early warning signs and ways to stay healthy. See the Hesters’ pictures, videos and daily trip reports from both 2017 thru-hikes at trailjournals.com/myjournals/21333 and on instagram.com/ mule_inchworm/.

the Palmetto Trail currently has 375 miles completed so far, with another 150 connection miles to finish. Plans are underway for two major grant-backed connection projects. One will connect with Sassafras Mountain and KeoweeToxaway State Park. Another in Oconee County will include mountain bike loops that Britt suggests could be some of the best in the country. The foundation mitigates expenses for trail expansion and

upkeep with volunteers and the Palmetto Conservation Corps—a South Carolina AmeriCorps Program for young adults. But developing new trail sections still takes enormous planning and effort, says Britt, who hopes to see most of the system completed within a decade. “Our goal is to build trails that are incredibly sustainable and low-maintenance.” Visit palmettoconservation.org to learn more about the Palmetto Trail.

Toward the end of their trek, a woman whose son has MS and members of her family joined the Hesters as they walked several miles of the Santee Passage together. Bernie wrote about the moment in the trail journal. “As they turn back and we move forward, the realization starts to set in that we are building an MS family with everyone we’ve met. We just hope that in some way this hike has helped, and we hope everyone stays in contact with us. We’ve been enlightened, humbled, almost brought to tears and so grateful we’ve met so many great people. It’s been a very tough yet rewarding adventure.”

Dreaming bigger

KEEP ON TREKKIN’ April Hester, who was diagnosed with MS 22 years ago, needs frequent breaks while hiking, but that hasn’t stopped her and husband Bernie from completing the cross-state Palmetto Trail—twice.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

On Nov. 3, 2017, they completed the Palmetto Trail the second time, in only 34 days, after hiking an estimated 450 to 500 miles. They also raised more than $2,600 for MS, and while that falls far short of their ambitious goal of $100,000, the Hesters don’t intend to give up on that, either. They plan to “speed hike” the Palmetto Trail next, and admit they are contemplating a thru-hike of the 2,200-mile Appalachian Trail for as early as 2019. “I’m looking at the logistics of it,” Bernie says, “but that’s going to be a big challenge.”


SPRING & SUMME R TRAVEL GUIDE

PO RK B E LLY BY A N DRE W H AWO RTH; I NS E T BY RUTA S M ITH

FOOD COURSE, HISTORY COURSE Crispy, deep-fried pork belly over a Brussels sprouts puree can be enjoyed at Soby’s New South Cuisine in Greenville. Tour participants in Charleston (inset) learn about the city as they walk between restaurants.

Culinary tours satisfy appetites for good food and local history BY DIANE VETO PARHAM

O

ne hard-boiled egg was all Keith Lindsey ate for breakfast. Trusting reports from friends, he chose to save his stomach for the promised food-fest to follow on that day’s walking tour of downtown Greenville. “My friends who’ve done this tour say you’ll be full,” says Lindsey, a Simpsonville resident who was still a bit skeptical—not to mention hungry—as our 1:30 tour prepared to set out. He would not be disappointed.

SCLIVING.COOP  | APRIL 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SPRING R & SU M M E TRAVEL GUIDE

EAT, WALK, LEARN

By the afternoon’s end, Lindsey and 17 fellow food lovers would nibble their way through five restaurants along Green­ ville’s Main Street. Over the course of about three hours, they enjoyed chef-crafted samplings of chicken, pork belly, salad, vegetables, cakes and drinks, among other treats, along with

The lure is two simple ingredients that go well together: food and history. A N DRE W H AWORTH

a healthy serving of local history, architecture and culture. Experienced tour guides and food tourists say the lure of these pedestrian-friendly dining experiences is two simple ingredients that go well together: food and history. They’re tailor-made for people who enjoy learning the history of their own towns or places they visit, who enjoy a good stroll, and, most of all, who like to eat. “It’s out of the ordinary,” Greenville History Tours owner and guide John Nolan says. “People are always looking for something different, and they’re surprised how much they learn that they never knew.”

SETTING THE TABLE History buff John Nolan of Greenville History Tours offers an excursion that dishes up the city’s history in addition to showcasing its exploding cuisine options.

Three different walking tours—in Charleston, Columbia and Greenville—offer a taste of what these foodies-on-foot experiences are all about.

Charleston  FULL PLATE OF HISTORY

PROPER INTRODUCTION Charleston Culinary Tours begins its excursion with classic Southern fare—barbecue accompanied by a variety of pickled vegetables at Cumberland Smokehouse.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

PHOTOS BY RUTA SMITH

enturies of history and a busy culinary scene make Charleston a natural to host food tours. On an overcast but mild Friday, a crew of 16, most from out of state, has gathered in historic downtown Charleston to eat, walk and learn with Charleston Culinary Tours. Nancy Orosz is entertaining her sister and sister-in-law, ­visiting from Ohio. This tour fit perfectly with their plans. “You have to come downtown, and while you’re here, you might as well eat!” Orosz says. Charleston Culinary Tours’ downtown tour, featuring traditional Lowcountry foods in historic surroundings, appeals to tourists, owner Guilds Hollowell says. “All the old history of Charleston is right here,” he says. “Ain’t nothing changed in the last 200 years.” Tours of the Upper King Street area are preferred by locals who want to explore eclectic offerings in that edgier food ­district, Hollowell says. Our tour starts with a Southern classic—barbecue. Cumberland Smokehouse serves up family-style platters of pork rinds, pulled pork, pickled vegetables, potato salad and tangy beans that we pass from person to person. Remembering his audience of out-of-towners, tour guide Patrick Duggan explains Southern food. Pork rinds are deepfried hog skin. Barbecued pork is a South Carolina staple; try the sauces. And, he says, “In Charleston, we like to


PLEASE PASS THE BRUSSELS SPROUTS The vegetable dish is a hit, and starts the conversation flowing among tour participants at Pawpaw in Charleston.


SERVING UP THE PAST Charleston Culinary Tours guide Patrick Duggan escorts his guests through historic downtown Charleston en route to threecheese macaroni with candied bacon at Pawpaw and seafood specialties at Oyster House.

pickle pretty much anything.” Perhaps subdued by the day’s damp weather, this group focuses more on eating than socializing. Not to worry, Orosz’s sister, Susan Nank, predicts. “Nancy and I did the Upper King Street tour a few years ago when it was raining, and it was great,” Nank says. Appetites whetted, we follow Duggan outside to explore some history. And he has plenty. Duggan, whose family ties in Charleston date back to 1690, is passionate about history and food—key traits for a successful tour guide, Hollowell says. Anyone tagging along with Duggan will be stuffed with as much history as food. In fact, strangers eavesdrop as he 28

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

describes the old walled city, its cobblestone streets, 18thcentury architecture, historic churches, the ins and outs of historic renovation, pirate culture, the origins of the City Market—you name it. Seating is cozy at our second stop, Pawpaw, and conversation picks up. Personally, I think the Brussels sprouts break the ice. Seared in a cast-iron pan and covered in an apricot glaze, these veggies get everyone’s attention. “If you have to eat Brussels sprouts, this is the way to eat them,” says Bill Hance, a recent transplant to Mount Pleasant. As we meander through the scenic city, Duggan points out where the old sea wall once stood and how coastal culture and climate influenced Lowcountry food traditions. At Oyster House, we have a private dining room to enjoy plates of Lowcountry red rice with andouille sausage, shrimp and grits, pimiento cheese fritters and she-crab soup. “Those Brussels sprouts would be really good with this!” someone hollers out. With barely enough room for dessert, we stop at Kaminsky’s across from the City Market for a generous serving of Tollhouse pie—a cookie pie covered in caramel, chocolate and pecans. While we compare notes on the day’s highlights, Orosz and her guests abandon plans for a light dinner later. “We’re too full!” she says.


EAT, WALK, LEARN

SPRING & SU M M E R TRAVEL GUIDE

Columbia

WHAT’S COOKING ON MAIN STREET  PHOTOS BY ANDREW HAWORTH

here’s this fellow whose name keeps popping up in ­stories about Columbia’s Main Street: Gen. William T. Sherman. That 1865 day when the Union general’s soldiers burned their way through the capital city becomes a familiar reference point as tour guide Brian Cole leads a small group through downtown, past “one of the first buildings in Columbia to be rebuilt after Sherman burned the city” or “one of the few buildings that Sherman did not burn in the war.” Recent history has seen the Main Street district ­enjoying a food renaissance, with new restaurants opening all the time. That’s good for Cole’s 4-year-old business, Columbia Food Tours, which introduces locals and visitors to what’s good to eat on and around Main. “It took about a year and a half to get restaurants to want to sign on—they weren’t sure what a food tour was,” Cole says. Now, he has enough restaurants to ensure variety on his tours. “One time, two restaurants served quail. It must have been on sale,” he jokes. Our friendly little group of nine, all from the Columbia

DESSERT FIRST Brian Cole of Columbia Food Tours leads off his walk down Main Street with a stop for pastries at Blue Flour Bakery. At Lula Drake Wine Parlour, Jessica Williams decants reds and whites under the watchful gaze of the mysterious Ms. Drake, who left a trunk of her belongings hidden behind a trap door in the cellar.

area, meets on a sunny day in front of the Statehouse, then crosses Gervais Street to start our tour on a high note: dessert. Blue Flour Bakery opened here about a year ago. We each sit down to a preset plate of five freshly baked treats— a Parmesan-chive biscuit, maple-pecan pound cake, chocolate chip cookie, blonde brownie and raspberry thumbprint cookie, plus a glass of blueberry-hibiscus tea. Not your usual cup of tea? That’s a food-tour bonus—the chance to sample things you might otherwise miss. Mercifully, Cole provides bags for our leftovers, and we march down Main with five more restaurants to go. Along the


SPRING R & SU M M E TRAVEL GUIDE

EAT, WALK, LEARN

BUON APPETITO Pizza served by John Stubing at Main Street Public House and well-garnished sweet potato soup at Oak Table are just two of the taste treats served at a total of six stops on this tour of the Main Street district in Columbia.

way, Cole points out Columbia’s first skyscraper and the 1913 Arcade Building with the funky underground that housed its own bar scene in the 1970s. “It’s a weird place—it still really looks like the ’70s,” Cole says, with a heads up about plans for its coming renovation. Next stop is Main Street Public House, opened about 1½ years ago. Here, we fill up on their signature pizzas and hot wings, as well as general manager John Stubing’s funny stories—such as how the owners earned some special attention from the fire department while blowtorching the wooden walls during remodeling. As we leave, Ashley Schneider confides, “I’ve passed by this place a few times, and I’ve always wondered about it.” Her husband, Daniel, agrees: “Yeah, I walk down here all the time; I’ve never been in.” Just the introduction these restaurants

want—you get a warm welcome and good food, and, hopefully, you come back. We stop in Lula Drake Wine Parlour, another old building restored to new life. “The really cool part was they uncovered a trap door to a cellar that nobody had been in for 100 years,” Cole says, “and they found a trunk that looked like it could have come straight off the Titanic.” He says it was filled with personal items belonging to one Lula Drake, who ran a hat shop in this space. After a small feast of pistachio hummus, feta cheese crostini and orange-zested hush puppies, it’s hard to think about eating again. But there’s no stopping now. We head toward Villa Tronco, the oldest restaurant in South Carolina, Cole says. Third-generation owner Carmella Roche is waiting for us with countless family stories, plus Italian egg rolls stuffed with cheese and peppers, and Italian iced sugar cookies baked from her grandmother’s recipe. Trekking back down Main, Cole points out street art that is also changing the face of downtown. A row of orange and red chairs attached to metal drums, he says, is “the only place on Main Street you can play a drum.” “In the last five years, Main Street has come a long, long way, from the (Saturday street) market, to all the new businesses, to the awesome food tour....” He pauses long enough to get the laugh he’s looking for. The tour finishes strong: Oak Table serves up a rich sweet potato soup topped with toasted marshmallows, bacon jam, benne seeds, chili oil and microgreens. And finally, we head across the street to Bourbon, a whiskey bar and Cajun-Creole restaurant that wows us with a whiskey smash cocktail and a melt-in-your-mouth pork cheek on a grits cake. Someone jokes about just lingering here at Bourbon to order a full dinner. As if.

Greenville  MEET THE CHEFS

ormally, you don’t get to meet the chefs who prepare your food, John Nolan tells his Greenville History Tours food tourists. That changes today. On his At the Chef’s Table Culinary Tour, interacting with the chefs is part of the package. This “meet the chefs” tour consistently fills up. “I wanted that to be the focus of the experience at each place—have the chefs come out and explain the dishes and get personal with people,” says Nolan. “That’s a different twist.” That’s perfect for Yuliya Yurko of Easley, a creative cook who likes to sample dishes in restaurants, then re-create them 30

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

PHOTOS BY ANDREW HAWORTH

at home. Talking to Brian McKenna, kitchen manager at the all-organic Southern Pressed Juicery, Yurko quizzes him about the ingredients in his non-dairy cashew sour cream salad dressing, served with a walnut “meatball.” “Everything here is raw and plant-based,” McKenna explains, listing his dressing ingredients for her. It’s a light start to a full day. Visiting from Florida, food‑tour aficionado Jill Richards describes what makes for a great tour: “It’s the guides, the food and the history, and you have to have some compactness to it,” Richards says.


DESSERTS TOO PRETTY TO EAT? Nah. Pastry chef Amanda Mueller creates edible art as lovely as the Reedy River setting at The Lazy Goat in Greenville, and she won’t be offended if you devour every bite of her Rosemary Honey Cheesecake.


MORE THAN JUST FOOD At Soby’s New South Cuisine, Greenville History Tours’ John Nolan sates the group’s appetite for history after the tasting.

Nolan efficiently leads his 18 followers down a busy Main Street and wastes no time jumping into downtown history. A university art teacher and a history buff who wrote A Guide to Historic Greenville, he is well-prepared with a binder of oversized black-and-white photos showing previous incarnations of the places we are passing. He dishes nearly nonstop commentary about architecture, Civil Rights-era events that took place here, modern sidewalk art and the evolution of Main Street. “I’m loving the history part of this,” says Elizabeth Duncan, a schoolteacher taking the tour with husband Jonathan as an anniversary gift to themselves. “We’ve only lived here two years, and we wanted to do something we’ve never done in our new city.” At Nose Dive gastropub, our chef has prepared a bowl of charred cauliflower and shishito peppers. The occasional shishito carries a little extra heat, we are warned. “It’s a little

like playing Russian roulette with the taste,” Nolan jests. Back outside, we hear more tales of historic Greenville b­efore crossing Main to Soby’s New South Cuisine. We have the place to ourselves, and both the food—crispy, deep-fried pork belly over a Brussels sprouts puree with a beet gastrique​ —and executive chef Shaun Garcia are a hit with our group. A collector of old cookbooks, Garcia explains how he tries to teach history through the foods he cooks. “If I can make something even remotely as good as your grandma did, I’m onto something!” he says, earning applause for his food and his stories. “This is very adventurous for me,” Joel Nulph of Greenville admits, digging into his dish. “I don’t usually do these types of things.” What things, I ask—the tour or these foods? “Yes,” he says. With two more stops ahead, several folks are glad to be

Food tours in South Carolina Food tours are showing up all over South Carolina, with more in the planning stages. U P STAT E

MIDLANDS

Greenville History Tours

Columbia Food Tours

Four different culinary tours are available, offered Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays or Saturdays, depending on the tour. Tickets range from $39 to $49. (864) 567-3940; greenvillehistorytours.com

Taste of the South Culinary Tours

Tours visit four restaurants in Landrum and are available by reservation only, Tuesdays through Saturdays. (828) 817-1079; ourcarolinafoothills.com

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Main Street tours are offered on Saturdays. Tickets are $45 per person, $40 for military. (803) 760-2618; columbiafoodtours.com

Two Gals and a Fork Food Tours

Tours are usually offered on Saturdays in Columbia’s Vista area and in downtown Newberry. Tickets are $43. (803) 360-0578 or (803) 260-7992; twogalsfoodtours.com

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

LOWC O U N T RY

Charleston Culinary Tours

Six different tours are available. Some are offered Mondays through Saturdays; others are offered only on specific days of the week. Tickets range from $40 to $75. (843) 259-2966; charlestonculinarytours.com

Charleston Food Tours

Seven different options are available; five of them are walking tours. Some are offered seven days a week; others are offered only on specific days of the week. Tickets are $60. (843) 727-1100; charlestonfoodtours.com

Chow-Down Charleston

Tours are available Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays. Tickets are $58. chow-downcharleston.com


SPRING & SU M M E R TRAVEL GUIDE

EAT, WALK, LEARN

walking off calories. We trek down into Falls Park, where Passerelle Bistro serves up herbed chicken breasts with kale and roasted potatoes. Our food-loving group eats heartily while sharing recommendations for other food tours, restaurants and home recipes for macaroni and cheese. Last stop is dessert at The Lazy Goat, overlooking the Reedy River and the historic structures across the water that once housed carriage makers and a Duke’s Mayonnaise factory. Pastry chef Amanda Mueller gives us all the details on her artistic plates of olive-oil cakes reflecting the restaurant’s Mediterranean flair, served with orange zest, strawberry ricotta, fruit compote and fried mint leaves. Almost too pretty to eat—almost. It’s Nolan’s eighth dish of the day; he led a food-laden barbecue tour this morning. Showing us smartphone photos of plates piled high with barbecue, he says only four people have ever managed to eat everything on that tour. It’s been hours since this morning’s lone hard-boiled egg, and Keith Lindsey is finally full, but he’s ready to be person number five. “Challenge accepted!” he says— next time.

Make the most of your tour “Come with an empty stomach and an open mind,” Charleston tour guide Patrick Duggan advises. Your tour might not look or taste exactly like what you expected, but you’ll be well-fed and you’ll learn something new. Make a reservation. Many tours fill up well in advance. Don’t eat before you go. The combination of small plates from all restaurant stops will be at least the equivalent of one full meal. Wear comfortable shoes, and dress for the weather. Most tours take place rain or shine.

Don’t be late. Tours stay on tight schedules to accommodate participating restaurants. Some tours may cater to dietary restrictions or food allergies. Ask ahead about whether menus can be adapted to special needs. If you order anything not included on your tour, such as alcoholic beverages, be sure to tip your server.

SOUTH CAROLINA

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AGRITOURISM PASSPORT Pick up your passport to SC Farm Fun at participating farms across the state and start collecting stamps today to win Certified SC prizes! View the list of

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S P R I N G & S U M M E R T R AV E L G U I D E

There's something for everyone in Aiken County!

LIKE A VISIT TO THE HOLY LAND An Archaeological Museum Exploring Daily Life in Ancient Times

Since its founding in 2005, the Center has been praised for its excellence in accurately portraying what life would have been like for everyday people living in ancient Israel. Walk through full-scale replicas from a Biblical village and see hundreds of ancient artifacts, some almost 5,000 years old. Please make reservations for a guided tour and schedule a Biblical meal, too!

803.642.7557 discoveraikencounty.com *Photo credit Don Wuori

133 Laurens St. NW • Aiken, SC 29801

Open Year ‘Round: Tuesday-Saturday, 10 am to 6 pm 130 Gordon Commercial Drive LaGrange, Georgia (one hour southwest of Atlanta) 706.885.0363 • BiblicalHistoryCenter.com

Come Catch a Memory Santee Cooper Country is home to South Carolina’s great lakes — Marion and Moultrie • 171,000 acres with world-class fishing year-round • Birding, hiking, biking, boating, lakeside camping • 12 championship golf courses • Fascinating museums • Breathtaking gardens • 1 hour from Columbia and Charleston

Order our 2018 Visitors Guide Call (803) 854-2131 or email tourscc@oburg.net www.SanteeCooperCountry.org/SCL

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S P R I N G & S U M M E R T R AV E L G U I D E

CHARLESTON’S STORY STARTS HERE The Charleston Museum

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SCLIVING.COOP  | APRIL 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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S P R I N G & S U M M E R T R AV E L G U I D E

Live OUTSIDE.

With over 96,000 acres of public land, we have some pretty amazing facilities for your next outdoor adventure. Whether it’s golf at Cheraw State Park, hiking at Sand Hills State Forest, checking out the wildlife at Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge, or a relaxing time in one of our town’s parks, we provide the backdrop for the perfect day. For a free Visitor’s Guide, call 888.537.0014

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The African American Cultural Center of Camden presents

Camden’s Baseball Hall of Famer: Larry Doby February 24 - August 30, 2018

517 York Street

Hours: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 1:00 to 4:30 Saturday 10:00 to 4:00 For information, call 803-425-6050

Camden Archives & Museum SCLIVING.COOP  | APRIL 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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S P R I N G & S U M M E R T R AV E L G U I D E

www.pickensazaleafestival.com/ Strawberry Pageant Saturday, April 28 - 7 pm Fort Mill High School 225 Munn Road, Fort Mill

Golf Tournament Tuesday, May 1 - 9:30 am Springfield Golf Course 639 Hambley House Lane

Strawberry Pageant Saturday, April 28 - 7 pm Fort Mill High School 225 Munn Road, Fort Mill

Pick N Flick Wednesday, May 2 - 6 pm ASC Greenway – Field Trail Barn 835 Springfield Parkway

Pancake Breakfast Saturday, May 5 - 8 am Nation Ford High School 1400 A. O. Jones Blvd

Golf Tournament Tuesday, May 1 - 9:30 am Springfield Golf Course 639 Hambley House Lane

Come and Celebrate SPRING in Pickens • Azalea Festival will come alive in Downtown Pickens • Crafters, Artisans, Shops and Restaurants

Pick N Flick Wednesday, May 2 - 6 pm ASC Greenway – Field Trail Barn 835 Springfield Parkway SCStrawberryFestival.com facebook.com/SCStrawberryFestival

Pancake Breakfast Saturday, May 5 - 8 am Nation Ford High School 1400 A. O. Jones Blvd Walter Y. Elisha Park 345 N. White Street, Fort Mill info@scstrawberryfestival.com

Friday, May 4 • 4:30pm - 11:00pm Saturday, May 5 • 10:00am - 10:00pm

• Cruise in with the Antique Car Show and The City of Pickens’ 150th Celebration at the Pickens Amphitheater on Friday, April 20th

#TakeMeToPickens Friday, May 4 • 4:30pm - 11:00pm Saturday, May 5 • 10:00am - 10:00pm

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Walter Y. Elisha Park 345 N. White Street, Fort Mill info@scstrawberryfestival.com

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Antique Tractors & Engines Arts & Crafts Yesteryear Demonstrations Petting Zoo Farming Demonstrations Entertainment Stages Carnival Food Vendors Cow Milking Contest Classic Cars & Much, Much, More

Northeast Columbia, SC 29229 Clemson Sandhills Research & Education Center 900 Clemson Road

LIVE MUSIC • FACE PAINTING • LECTURE LIGHT REFRESHMENTS AND MORE

9 am to 10 pm • $10.00 per Car Load • All Proceeds go to Education

SAT, APRIL 28TH • 1:30-4PM 10782 Jacob Smart Blvd. S. Ridgeland, SC 29936

For more information call 843-284-9227 or visit us at: MorrisHeritageCenter.org

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP


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SC   calendar APR 15 – MAY 15

Upstate APRIL

20–21  Iron City Festival, downtown, Blacksburg. (864) 839‑6006. 20–21  Pickens Azalea Festival, Main Street, Pickens. pickensazaleafestival@gmail.com. 20–22  James and the Giant Peach Jr., Mauldin Cultural Center, Mauldin. (864) 335‑4862. 20­–28  Greater Clemson Music Festival, multiple sites, Clemson. (864) 650-0585. 21  Motown Music Evening, McKissick Center for Senior Wellness, Liberty. (864) 855‑3770 or (864) 650‑0585. 24  Tamassee DAR School Benefit Golf Tournament, Cliffs Valley, Travelers Rest. (864) 944‑1390. 24–26  Weekly Waterfall Tour, Devils Fork State Park, Salem. (864) 944‑2639. 27–28  Annual South Carolina Gourd Society and Ghost Creek Gourd Fest, Ghost Creek Gourd Farm, Laurens. (864) 682‑5251. 27–28  Pickens Literacy Used Book Sale, Pickens Presbyterian Church, Pickens. (864) 617‑4237. 27–28  “Reflections” Quilt Show, Pelham Road Baptist Church, Greenville. (864) 322‑8250. 28  Central Railroad Festival (Greater Clemson Music Festival event), Main Street, Central. (864) 650‑0585. 28  Spring Means Babies at Split Creek Farm, Split Creek Farm, Anderson. (864) 287‑3921. 28  Sunrise Hike, Table Rock State Park, Pickens. (864) 878‑9813. M AY

1–3  Weekday Waterfall Tour, Oconee State Park, Mountain Rest. (864) 638‑5353. 3–6  American Veterans Traveling Tribute Vietnam Wall, Broad River Electric Cooperative, Gaffney. (864) 206‑7128. 3–6  Blue Wall Birding Festival, Table Rock State Park, Pickens. (864) 878‑9813. 3–6  Piedmont Plant and Flower Festival, Greenville State Farmers Market, Greenville. (864) 244‑4023. 4  Blue Ridge Fest, Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative, Pickens. (800) 240‑3400. 5  Musgrove Mill Battlefield Guided Hike, Musgrove Mill State Historic Site, Clinton. (864) 938‑0100. 8–10  Weekday Waterfall Tour, Table Rock State Park, Pickens. (864) 878‑9813.

44

SCLiving.coop/calendar

28  Art Market at Historic Honey

Our mobile-friendly site lists even more festivals, shows and events. You’ll also find instructions on submitting your event. Please confirm information with the hosting event before attending. 11  Second Friday: Talin Hohn Exhibit Reception, Art Gallery on Pendleton Square, Pendleton. (864) 221‑0129. 11–13  Artisphere, Main Street, Greenville. (864) 271‑9398. 12  Aircraft for Animals Fly-in, Oconee County Regional Airport, Seneca. (864) 882‑4719. O NG O ING

Fridays  Starry Nights, Roper

Mountain Science Center, Greenville. (864) 355‑8900.

Midlands APRIL

15  Columbia International

Festival, S.C. State Fairgrounds, Columbia. (803) 799‑3452. 15  Footloose, Fort Mill High School auditorium, Fort Mill. (803) 493‑5667. 15–21  Come-See-Me Festival, multiple venues, Rock Hill. (803) 329‑7625. 17  Meet the Author: Florence Williams (author of The Nature Fix), 701 Whaley, Columbia. (803) 771‑0870. 19  Allison Creek Bluegrass, Allison Creek Presbyterian Church, York. (803) 366‑1302. 19  York County Art Teacher Exhibit, Center for the Arts, Rock Hill. (803) 328‑2787. 20  An Evening with Edwin McCain, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑6264. 20–21  Striped Bass Festival, downtown, Manning. (803) 435‑4405. 21  Family Farm Spring Day, Old McCaskill’s Farm, Rembert. (803) 432‑9537. 21  I Come From Strong Women, Redcliffe Plantation State Historic Site, Beech Island. (803) 827‑1473. 21  Jeanne Robertson, Sumter Opera House, Sumter. (803) 436‑2616. 21  Santee Cooper Open Team Fishing Tournament, John C. Land III Boating and Sport Fishing Facility, Summerton. (803) 435‑4405. 21  Shine & Show 2018, CPR Performance Parts, West Columbia. (803) 957‑9737. 21–22  Under the Crown and Colonial Trades Fair, Living History Park, North Augusta. (803) 979-9776. 26  Modern Composers, Chapin United Methodist Church, Chapin. (803) 318‑0488.

26  Shrimp Feast, Sumter County

Museum, Sumter. (803) 775‑0908. 27  2018 Southern Sound Series: Rhiannon Giddens, McCelvey Center’s Lowry Family Theater, York. (803) 684‑3948. 27  The Hot Club of San Francisco presents Cinema Vivant, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑6264. 28  AEC Run United Half Marathon, 5K and Kid Run, Aiken. (803) 649‑6245. 28  So You Want to Publish a Book with Kimberly G. Massey, Center for the Arts, Rock Hill. (803) 328‑2787. 28  Spring Into Sesqui 5K, Sesquicentennial State Park, Columbia. (803) 788‑2706. 28  Steam Train, S.C. Railroad Museum, Winnsboro. (803) 635‑9893. 29  “The Great American Musical” Spring Concert, Aiken’s First Baptist Church, Aiken. (803) 649‑6570. 29  Songs of Poetry and Romance with Matthew Manwarren and Jeffrey Price, Gettys Art Center, Rock Hill. (803) 328‑2787. 30  Ballet Hispanico, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑6264. MAY

3  Aiken National Day of Prayer, H.O. Weeks Center, Aiken. (803) 640‑4689. 3  Allison Creek Bluegrass, Allison Creek Presbyterian Church, York. (803) 366‑1302. 4  Relay for Life, Manning High School, Manning. (803) 707‑6766. 5  Big Green Fishing Tournament, Chester State Park, Chester. (803) 385‑2680. 5  Tour de Camden, Historic Camden Revolutionary War Site, Camden. (803) 424‑2590. 5–6  Orangeburg Festival of Roses, Edisto Memorial Gardens, Orangeburg. (803) 534‑6821. 5 and 12  Steam Train, S.C. Railroad Museum, Winnsboro. (803) 635‑9893. 12  Aiken Symphony Orchestra presents “Cameron Plays Sibelius,” The Etherredge Center, Aiken. (803) 295‑0313. 12  Beach Bash and Car Show, Friendship United Methodist Church, Rock Hill. (803) 230‑3223.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

12  Carolina Backcountry

Springtime, Sumter County Museum, Sumter. (803) 775‑0908. 12  Speed Painting in the Abstract with Dr. Bradley Sabelli, Center for the Arts, Rock Hill. (803) 328‑2787. 12  Stars Under the Stars—Movie Night at Lake Warren, Lake Warren State Park, Hampton. (803) 943‑5051. ONGOING

Daily  “Requiem for Mother Emanuel,” S.C. State Museum, Columbia. (803) 898‑4921.

Lowcountry APR IL

15  Charleston Race Week,

Charleston Harbor, Charleston. (843) 628‑5900. 15–21  Women Build 2018, Heritage Oaks, James Island. (843) 768‑0998. 18  Lunch with the Author Series—John Hart (The Hush), Belfair Plantation Club, Bluffton. (843) 521‑4100. 19  American Revolution Round Table, Callawassie Island Club, Bluffton. (757) 561‑3035. 19–22  Pee Dee Plant and Flower Festival, Pee Dee State Farmers Market, Florence. (803) 734‑2200. 20–21  SC/GA Barbeque Festival, Main Street, Hardeeville. (843) 784‑3606. 20–29  Horry County Fair, Myrtle Beach Speedway, Myrtle Beach. (843) 236‑0500. 21  Beach Walk and Shell Craft, Huntington Beach State Park, Murrells Inlet. (843) 235‑8755. 21  Process of Discovery, Colonial Dorchester State Historic Site, Summerville. (843) 873‑1740. 21  Touch of the Lowcountry Spring Gala, Jasper County Farmers Market, Jasper. (843) 726‑3673. 21–22  Art in Common Spring Festival, Valor Memorial Garden, Myrtle Beach. (843) 748‑0133. 21–22  Charleston Outdoor Fest, James Island County Park, Charleston. (843) 795‑4386. 24–26  Saltwater Kayak Fishing Expedition, Givhans Ferry State Park, Ridgeville. (843) 873‑0692. 26  Yappy Hour, James Island County Park, Charleston. (843) 795‑4386.

Horn, Coastal Discovery Museum at Honey Horn, Hilton Head Island. (843) 689‑6767. 28  Ignite the Senses Autism Awareness 5K Bubble Run and Children’s Dash, Red Cedar Elementary School, Bluffton. (843) 757‑0179. 28  Shaggin’ on the Cooper, Mount Pleasant Pier, Mount Pleasant. (843) 795‑4386. 28  To Settle a Town, Colonial Dorchester State Historic Site, Summerville. (843) 873‑1740. 28  Joint Base Charleston Air and Space Expo, Joint Base Charleston, Charleston. (843) 963‑5608. 29  Blessing of the Fleet and Seafood Festival, Mount Pleasant Memorial Waterfront Park, Mount Pleasant. (843) 884‑8517. 29  Wine Around the MarshWalk, Murrells Inlet MarshWalk, Murrells Inlet. (704) 609‑7535. MAY

2–27  Evita, Arts Center of Coastal

Carolina, Hilton Head Island. (843) 842‑2787. 3  12th Annual Bone-E-Fit, downtown, Florence. (843) 669‑2921. 4  Greater Florence Habitat for Humanity Cinco De Mayo Fiesta, downtown, Florence. (843) 665‑1624. 5  2018 River Jamboree, Lynches River County Park, Coward. (843) 389‑0550. 5  Defending Charles Towne, Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 852‑4200. 5  Tara Hall Paddle Fest, Tara Hall Home for Boys, Georgetown. (843) 546‑3000. 5  Totally Turtles, Myrtle Beach State Park, Myrtle Beach. (843) 238‑0874. 6  Annual Yacht Hop, Harbour Town Yacht Basin, Sea Pines Resort, Hilton Head Island. (843) 706‑2296. 6  Divas Half Marathon, Ocean Boulevard, North Myrtle Beach. info@runlikeadiva.com. 10  Hops and Vines, McLeod Plantation Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 795‑4386. 12  Annual Rib Burnoff and Barbecue Fest, Shelter Cove Community Park, Hilton Head Island. bhaley@hhivacations.com. 12  Mayfest on Main, Main Street, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 280‑5570. 12  Shaggin’ on the Cooper, Mount Pleasant Pier, Mount Pleasant. (843) 795‑4386. ONGOING

Fourth Tuesdays  Wash Day, L.W. Paul Living History Farm, Conway. (843) 365‑3596.


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SC   humor me

No prize for porcelain BY JAN A. IGOE

AS YOU MAY KNOW, ARTISTS

are a pretty peculiar breed. Having been one my entire life, I speak from experience. As children, we’re allergic to math and doodle through chemistry, totally ignoring the standard prefix for artist, which is “starving.” The career may be cursed, yet we still refuse to surrender our crayons. If we stick with it long enough, eventually we’ll be paying to hear tenured college professors with ZZ Top beards utter profundities to students whose parents would be shocked to learn how much malarkey tuition covers. “One of my best students took months painting exquisite portraits she could sell for thousands of dollars,” one hairy professor droned. “But instead, she baked them in a kiln and framed the ashes. Who is to say that’s not art?” Well, me, for one. I’d prefer the cash (and whatever that professor was smoking). But he had a point. The weirder you are as an artist, the more likely you’ll be noticed. Take Marcel Duchamp, a French guy who was an acclaimed painter. Even though his Nude Descending a Staircase didn’t show any actual naked people, if he’d called it Still Life of Wood Scraps, you’d see the likeness. Then, in 1917, Duchamp debuted a 3-D work he called Fountain, which turned the art world on its head. To the untrained eye and most plumbers, it was a porcelain urinal. Useful, yes. But was it art? In those days, judges weren’t ready to award best in show to a bathroom fixture. Art was still supposed to look pretty over your couch.

46

It should be pretentious enough to leave collectors wondering what language you speak and convinced you’re eccentric enough to be valuable. That’s exactly what my bachelor friend Tim needed—attractive company for the naked wall behind his couch. So an art dealer led him to a huge bouquet of flowers painted on three separate canvases. The dealer wove a hypnotic tale about Monet’s influence, audacious brushwork and harmonious hues. Surely, only a genius would boldly divide the subject this way, blah, blah, blah. The spiel was Greek to Tim, but he figured girls like flowers, so he took the threesome home to his couch. A few weeks later, he bumped into the artist at a festival and inquired about the bolt of creative lightning that inspired

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

him to split the subject in thirds. The artist seemed amused. He recalled deliver­ing the painting to the gallery via Volkswagen Beetle during a thunderstorm. Since most of the master­piece was hanging out of the trunk, it arrived warped. So the artist grabbed a box cutter, rigged up new supports, and voila—triplets. So much for the dealer’s spiel. For artists who intend to park their work in a gallery, however, a good spiel—aka artist’s statement—is essential. It should be pretentious enough to leave collectors wondering what language you speak and convinced you’re eccentric enough to be valuable. Personally, I think great art speaks for itself. Early artists didn’t need verbiage to justify their work. When a Neanderthal guy went to see his buddy, all the breaking news was etched right there on the cave wall. If he’d drawn a T. rex with shaved legs sticking out its mouth, you could safely assume “the bold, primitive rock work and inspired depiction of violent carnage” meant he’d be fetching his own beer for the foreseeable future. No artist statement required. But “blah, blah, blah, burp,” if you want one. JAN A. IGOE claims this month’s master­ful cartoon was influenced by Rembrandt’s sister, Picasso, Dr. Seuss and Adobe Photoshop. Collectors should take advantage of this raw talent by reading this magazine and sending all their money to her, unless they’re saving for a new fountain. Join the fun at HumorMe@SCLiving.coop.


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South Carolina Living April 2018  

Culinary tours in Greenville, Columbia and Charleston satisfy appetites for good food and local history.

South Carolina Living April 2018  

Culinary tours in Greenville, Columbia and Charleston satisfy appetites for good food and local history.

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