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Y L I FAADVMENTURE

CHANGE OUT

SPRING & SUMM TRAVELER GUIDE

s e i r o m e Creatingtmate parks in S.C. s

APRIL 2016

DE SC GAR

NER

Hot stuffrden in the ga E R M ny HUMO n a r G r o f m Make roo


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THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS Vol. 70 • No. 4 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 559,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033

SPR G & SUMIN M TRAVELER GUIDE

APRIL 2016 • VOLUME 70, NUMBER 4

Tel:  (803) 926-3 1 75 Fax:  (803) 796-6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop EDITOR

Keith Phillips

FEATURE

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Diane Veto Parham FIELD EDITOR

Walter Allread PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

22 Unplug and reconnect Interesting things can happen when a family ventures into S.C. state parks— and out of cell phone range.

Travis Ward

ART DIRECTOR

Sharri Harris Wolfgang DESIGNER

Susan Collins PRODUCTION

Andrew Chapman WEB EDITOR

Van O’Cain COPY EDITOR

Susan Scott Soyars CONTRIBUTORS

PUBLISHER

MIC SMITH

4 CO-OP CONNECTION

Lou Green ADVERTISING

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739-5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop National Country Market Tel:  (800) NCM-1181 Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor. ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send

Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices. © COPYRIGHT 201 6. The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor. SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network.

Lace up your running shoes for Aiken Electric Cooperative’s fifth annual Run United Half Marathon. Plus: Tips to keep your home cool, dry and comfortable this summer.

POWER USER DIALOGUE

10 Adventures great and small

A lifetime of camping mishaps can’t extinguish a love of the great outdoors. ENERGY Q&A

12 Find ways to save with a

home energy audit

A detailed assessment of your home’s energy use can provide a road map to savings. SMART CHOICE

14 Ageless technology

Getting older doesn’t mean you have to miss out on life. Check out these useful gadgets designed for seniors.

STORIES

16 Man, fire, meat

Jeff “Rhino” Bannister masters the art of outdoor cooking, one whole animal at a time.

17 Savoring the bounty

of land and sea

Nuanced flavors and attention to detail define the dining experience at Beaufort’s Saltus River Grill.

20

RECIPE

18 Carolina seafood favorites

Enjoy South Carolina’s abundance of fresh seafood with quick-and-easy versions of your favorite dishes. GARDENER

20 Turning up the heat

Hot peppers are an easy way to add a little spice to your home garden.

SPR & SUMING MER TRAVEL GUIDE

FAADVEMNTILURYE

HUMOR ME

38 Safe as a pea in a granny pod

mories Creating mete parks in S.C. sta

Our humor columnist answers the burning question: Where should we store Grandma?

34 MARKETPLACE 36 SC EVENTS Member of the NCM network of publications, reaching more than 7 million homes and businesses

18

CHEF’S CHOICE

DE SC GA R

NER

Hot stuff en in the gardE R M HUMO for Granny Make room

South Carolina’s state parks provide plenty of adventure for a family vacation. Photos by Mic Smith

BARBARA SMITH/CLEMSON EXTENSION

to your local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above.

6 ON THE AGENDA

SC LIFE

KAREN HERMANN

NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

Cooperative news

APRIL 2016

Becky Billingsley, Mike Couick, Jan A. Igoe, Charles Joyner, Patrick Keegan, Anne Prince, Susan Hill Smith, Belinda Smith-Sullivan, S. Cory Tanner, Paul Wesslund


On the Agenda For a listing p m co lete s, see of Event 6 page 3

Highlights

APRIL 30

Run United with Aiken Electric Co-op

Bring the family to downtown Aiken for some early-morning exercise around the town’s scenic sites, a chance to win cash prizes and the opportunity to raise funds for great causes. Aiken Electric Cooperative’s fifth annual Run United Half Marathon, 5K and Kids’ Fun Run gets started at 7:30 a.m. on Newberry Street. Runners’ routes meander through the historic downtown district and past polo fields, horse trails and Aiken Training Track. As an incentive, family members who register together—two or more for the half marathon, three or more for the 5K—get registration discounts and are eligible for cash-prize drawings up to $500. Proceeds benefit United Way of Aiken County to assist local agencies that help community members in need.

MAY 6

For details, visit aikenco-op.org/RunUnited or call (803) 649-6245.

Blue Ridge Fest

APRIL 28–30

Cornbread & Collard Greens Blues Festival

Good ol’ Southern cooking and a heaping helping of the blues will be served up at this three-night festival at Dr. Mac Arnold’s Blues Restaurant in west Greenville. Along with Mac Arnold (left) and Plate Full o’ Blues, each night features guest performers, including Delvin Choice, a Greenville native who appeared on NBC’s The Voice. A silent auction, antique autos display and prize giveaways help raise funds for the I Can Do Anything Foundation, supporting music and art in public schools. CARR OLL FOST ER

For details, visit drmacarnoldsbluesrestaurant.com or call (864) 558-0747.

Put on your shagging shoes and wheel on over to Pickens for a Friday-night party filled with beach music and classic cars. Hosted by Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative and Blue Ridge Security Solutions, the festival claims the Upstate’s largest classic-car cruise-in, with more than 500 vintage autos dating from 1979 and earlier. The musical lineup includes Jay and the Americans (above), Jimmy Beaumont and the Skyliners, and Jim Quick & Coastline. Find the party at the co-op at 734 West Main St. Funds raised support 12 charities serving Anderson, Greenville, Oconee and Pickens counties. For details, visit blueridge.coop/blueridgefest/ or call (800) 240-3400.

MAY 7

Bluffton Village Festival

Quaint is still the word for this community event, thanks to its picturesque setting under Spanish-moss-draped trees and its eclectic collection of arts and crafts. But in its 38th year, the Calhoun Street festival has grown to attract some 20,000 visitors and more than 200 Southeastern artisans and vendors, making it a can’t-miss outing and a chance to shop for last-minute Mother’s Day gifts. The Ugly Dog Contest, a messy pie-eating competition, and an assortment of local bands and foods round out the fun. For details, visit blufftonvillagefestival.com or call (843) 815-2277.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   APRIL 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP


EMAIL COMMENTS, QUESTIONS AND STORY SUGGESTIONS TO LETTERS@SCLIVING.COOP

Fighting heat and humidity it’s a good time to make sure your air conditioner is ready for another season of soaring temperatures and high humidity. Reducing the temperature is your HVAC system’s primary job, but lowering humidity is just as important. Simply put, high humidity makes the air feel hotter, while low humidity will make the temperature feel The first line of defense is to ensure after you have finished in cooler. High humidity can also to eliminate the residual compromise indoor air quality. that your home is properly sealed. order moisture in the air. The first line of defense is If you can reduce the indoor humidity level, you may to ensure that your home is properly insulated and sealed be able to maintain a comfortable indoor temperature in order to keep the heat and humidity that surround the with a higher thermostat setting and ceiling fans. The air house from getting inside. Leaky ducts, windows and doors movement from the ceiling fan will create a wind chill make the air conditioner work much harder to wring moisture out of the air. Homes that are sealed tight are easier to effect, lowering the temperature and increasing comfort. keep cool and dry. —ANNE PRINCE Make sure your HVAC system is the right size. If your AC unit is too big for your house, you will pay higher energy bills, and you won’t get the comfort you want and O N LY O N expect. It is also likely that the unit is “short cycling,” constantly turning off and on, never achieving optimum efficiency. When the unit runs in short bursts, it will not BONUS VIDEO operate long enough to reduce the humidity in your home. Get ready for shrimp. You’re Damp indoor air—even when it’s cool—creates a muggy hungry for seafood, but your fresh atmosphere that can lead to the growth of mold and shrimp still need to be peeled and mildew. This can be a particular concern for those who cleaned. Not sure where to start? Let suffer from allergies. Chef Belinda show you how it’s done There are some basic steps you can take to lower the at SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda. humidity in your home and make it feel cooler and more comfortable. The kitchen and bathrooms are the biggest contributors to higher humidity levels. Check to ensure that BONUS ARTICLES your range hood is ducted to the outside, as recirculating Some like it hot. Gardening range hoods are not effective in controlling moisture (or columnist S. Cory Tanner loves to grow odors). When cooking, and especially when boiling water, (and eat) hot peppers. Turn to page 20 run the vent fan. In the bathroom, run the vent fan when for tips on adding a little heat to your garden, then visit bathing or showering. Keep the fan on up to 30 minutes SCLiving.coop for his family’s pepper jelly recipe. WITH SUMMER JUST A FEW MONTHS AWAY,

SCLiving.coop

INTERACTIVE FEATURES

S.C.RAMBLE! BY CHARLES JOYNER, SEE ANSWER ON PAGE 35

Ninety Six is a town in Greenwood County that began as a _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _

e b u n c r s m a l e in the mid-1700s.

Use the capital letters in the code key below to fill in the blanks above.

A D G I N O P R S T means u n s c r amble

You could win $100. Sign up today for our Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and you could win a $100 VISA gift card. One lucky reader’s name will be drawn at random from all eligible entries received by April 30. Register today at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply.

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK Join us as we celebrate all that’s great about life in South Carolina. Add your voice to the conversation and share your photos at facebook.com/SouthCarolinaLiving.

SCLIVING.COOP   | APRIL 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

7


On the Agenda

Celebrate Earth Day with energy efficiency April 22 will mark the 45th celebration of Earth Day. The rallies and marches in the spring of 1970 called for more attention to protecting the environment. If you measure the success of that cause by greater energy efficiency, the results have been remarkable. The fuel economy of cars and other motor vehicles in the U.S. has improved from 12.2 miles per ­gallon in 1975 to 17.6 in 2013. You might think this would mean cars have lost some of their “giddyup,” but horsepower steadily increased during that time, and 0–60 mph ­acceleration went from 14 seconds to eight seconds.

E A SY E N E RGY S AV I N G S Ready to start saving energy and money the easy way? Try these tips from efficiency expert Brian Sloboda. l Check the attic for the correct amount of l Close the curtains in the summer and ­insulation. Most homes—even newer ones—don’t open them in the winter. Sunlight streaming have the R-38 level of insulation recommended for in through uncovered windows will raise the South Carolina dwellings. temperature of the room. l Turn off your computers overnight. Also, turn off video game consoles when they’re not being used. The small, but constant, energy drain created by these devices can add up over time. l Caulk around drafty windows. You pay good money to heat or cool the air in your home—why let it escape to the outside world? Even small leaks can drive up your energy costs, because they work against you every second of every day.

The Department of Energy’s Energy Star program of ­efficiency standards for ­everything from ­appliances to buildings is another example of success. According to the agency, American consumers have purchased 5.2 billion Energy Star-rated products,

l Plant a deciduous tree on the sunny side of your house. The leaves will cool your home against the sun in summer, then fall off to help warm it in the winter. l Upgrade your appliances. If you have a major appliance—like a refrigerator, washing machine or dryer—that’s more than 10 years old, consider an upgrade. The energy efficiency of a newer model will likely pay for itself with energy savings in a few years. For the shortest payback period, look for new appliances with the Energy Star label.

saving $34 billion in energy bills since the program began in 1992. New lightbulb technologies devel­ oped over the past few ­decades also shine when it comes to using less ­energy. The Department of Energy says that from 2001 to 2010,

GONE FISHIN’ The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after. Minor

APRIL

AM Major

17 10:16 4:01 18 4:16 10:46 19 4:31 11:01 20 5:01 11:31 21 — 5:16 22 12:01 5:31 23 12:31 6:01 24 1:01 6:16 25 1:31 6:31 26 2:16 7:01 27 3:01 7:31 28 4:46 8:16 29 9:46 12:46 30 8:01 1:46

8

Minor

PM Major

4:01 10:01 4:46 10:31 5:16 11:01 11:31 6:01 6:31 12:01 7:16 12:16 7:46 12:46 8:31 1:16 9:16 1:46 10:16 2:31 11:31 3:16 — 4:16 — 5:46 12:16 7:16

Minor

MAY

AM Major

1 9:37 3:22 2 10:07 3:52 3 4:22 10:52 4 4:52 11:37 5 — 5:37 6 — 6:07 7 1:22 6:37 8 1:52 7:07 9 2:37 7:52 10 3:22 8:22 11 4:37 8:52 12 9:52 12:52 13 11:52 2:07 14 9:37 2:52 15 10:07 3:22 16 3:37 10:37

Minor

PM Major

3:07 9:07 4:07 10:07 11:07 5:07 11:52 6:07 6:52 12:07 7:52 12:52 8:37 1:37 9:37 2:22 10:37 3:07 11:37 3:52 — 4:52 — 5:52 — 7:07 2:22 8:07 3:52 9:07 4:52 9:52

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   APRIL 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

lumens per watt rose from 45 to 58. That ­resulted in a 9 percent drop in the amount of ­electricity used for lighting during a ­decade when the number of bulbs increased 18 percent. The agency also reports that ­super-efficient light-­emitting diode (LED) bulbs saved $1.8 billion in energy costs in 2013 alone and that $39 billion would be saved if we ­replaced all bulbs with LEDs. But even these savings

One promising new technology, OLED, is lighting made of flexible material that can be applied to a variety of surfaces. are just the beginning. “The best is yet to come,” predicts Brian Sloboda, an energy expert with the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association. One promising new technology, OLEDs—organic lightemitting diodes—isn’t even a bulb, but lighting made of flexible material that can be applied to a variety of surfaces. “Instead of having ceiling lights, the ceiling would actually be made of OLED material. During the day, it looks like a regular ceiling, but at night, the ceiling itself would glow,” says Sloboda. “It could completely change the way architects design our buildings.” —PAUL WESSLUND


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Dialogue

Adventures great and small I HOPE YOU ENJOY THIS MONTH’S COVER STORY

MIKE COUICK

President and CEO, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina

10

on family wilderness adventures in the Upstate. It brought to mind my first summer-camp experience. I was in fourth grade when I attended Bethelwoods Presbyterian Camp in Tirzah (York County), just 5 miles from home, but a world away from anything I had experienced before. The days were filled with archery, swimming, canoeing and other new challenges. Unlike home, breakfast did not magically appear. You cooked your eggs, bacon and toast over a campfire. There was no snack drawer in the kitchen. You ate the three meals you cooked, and, heaven forbid, if a third meal of spaghetti had lost its allure, you skipped dinner. Bathrooms were communal and several hundred yards away from the campsite. My Eveready flashlight missed roots that my toes found on “last call” trips to the facilities. At age 9, campers were shifted from standard log cabins complete with bathrooms and fans to rustic covered wagons—sure enough Conestoga, and Oregon Trail-worthy. The wagons were modified to hold six bunks. Five campers and one counselor, who seemed very mature at age 18, slept with the crickets, mosquitoes and gnats. It was all great fun—until my accident. Nearly 50 years later, I can still recall climbing into the wagon and up to my bunk after a last s’more. The next thing I was aware of were the stares of 10 fellow campers and three counselors in the men’s room of the bathhouse. As my haze faded, I saw my reflection in a floor-to-­ceiling mirror. I looked like I had gone three rounds with a grizzly bear. It was hard to tell where the red clay stopped and my drying blood started. To the other campers, I was what I most wanted not to be—a 5-foot-10-inch (early growth spurt) curiosity. They asked, “What did he do?” and “Who whipped him?” Some campers’ eyes cautiously shifted to an older kid, whom we all had tagged as a likely troublemaker. One counselor, playing Sherlock Holmes,

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   APRIL 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

retraced my steps and was quite accurately able to determine the trajectory of a sleepwalking 9-year-old falling five feet out of the wagon and landing on a cedar stump. Case closed. I was a somnambulist. What a time to make the discovery! When I think about it now, that fall from the wagon set in motion a lifetime of camping misadventures. I always miss finding the one rock under my sleeping bag that will drive me crazy all night. If there’s going to be a flood, it’s going to come the day I go camping. The smoke from the fire will inevitably shift direction and fill up my tent. It’s as sure as the gravity that pulled me from that wagon in fourth grade. Today, I continue to enjoy the thrill of a wood fire in an open pit, but I find it’s much more enjoyable to retire to my own bed at night. After a day in the great outdoors, I often return to the books of my youth. I love to reread the adventure stories that capture the thrill of an adolescent boy single-handedly taking on the wild. In particular, I enjoy Jean Craighead George’s My Side of the Mountain, Gary Paulsen’s Hatchet and, of course, Jack London’s Call of the Wild. Safe from the dangers of frostbite, wolves and mountain lions, it’s enjoyable to consider life uncomplicated by many of our modern conveniences and distractions. Oh! My sleepwalking career was not over. Someday, I’ll share with you how it feels to wake up in a hotel hallway, locked out of your room and having to go to the front desk to get a key. Adventure is not restricted to the wild.


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EnergyQ&A

BY PATRICK KEEGAN

Find ways to save with a home energy audit

Q A

I keep hearing about home energy audits. How do they work? Will they save me money?

TÕNU MAURING

A home energy audit is a detailed assessment of your home that can give you a road map for future energyrelated investments. Spending a few hundred dollars on an audit can save you thousands of dollars over time and improve the comfort of your home. An energy audit can point you toward efficiency investments to help reduce your energy bills or fix areas of your home that are too hot or too cold. If you’re considering a large investment like a new furnace, air conditioner or rooftop solar system, an audit can help determine the right size and offer tips to ensure it works most efficiently for you. An energy audit can also document your home’s efficiency to help improve its resale value. You can find audit tools online to give you a basic understandA blower-door test during a home energy audit can help identify sources of air leakage. ing of how your home compares to similar ones. However, a qualified, professional home energy auditor examination of the building envelope (attic, floor and exterior walls) and has the experience LEARN MORE and high-tech tools to the energy systems in the home, such about home as the water heater, air conditioner provide a thorough energy audits from and furnace. The auditor may analyze report of your home’s the Residential Energy your recent energy bills to deterunique needs. A profesServices Network sional energy audit may mine how your energy is used and if (RESNET) at resnet.us. be a quick, visual walkuse has changed. He’ll ask about the through, which can reveal such things energy-use behaviors of those who live as inadequate attic insulation or aging in the home—for example, is someone appliances that have lost efficiency. A home all day, or does everyone leave more comprehensive, informative and for work and school? expensive audit will use diagnostic “The residents’ habits can make a equipment to assess the home. big impact on the energy bill and can Energy audits require an also be the hardest to change,” says 12

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   APRIL 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

Ford Tupper, an energy auditor with The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina. “If you go from being a household with two working adults to one with a new baby and an adult home most of the day, your energy use is going to go up.” Plan to be home during your audit. Follow the auditor, and ask questions so you’ll understand what the problems are, which ones you can address yourself and where you may need a professional. An audit may include some or all of these tests: Blower-door test: Windows are often suspected as causes for air leaks in the home, but often there are larger and less obvious sources. A blower-door test measures how airtight your home is and identifies where the air leaks are. Duct blaster: Ducts move heated and cooled air around your home. Duct testing can measure whether your ducts are leaking. Health and safety testing: Energy auditors are trained to spot safety problems, such as missing smoke detectors, possible carbon-​ monoxide concerns or moisture in the crawl space—a big issue in South Carolina, especially in the Lowcountry. Some can also test for radon. After your assessment, the auditor will analyze the information and make recommendations on ways to reduce energy use and improve comfort. Actions based on your auditor’s recommendations could lower your energy bill 5 to 30 percent. Send questions to Energy Q&A, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033, email energyqa@scliving.coop or fax (803) 739-3041.


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SCLIVING.COOP   | APRIL 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

13


SmartChoice

BY BECKY BILLINGSLEY

Ageless technology LITTLE HELPERS

UNCANNY Older hands will appreciate the light touch needed to operate the ergonomic lever on the Hamilton Beach 76606Z Smooth Touch Can Opener. Its side-cutting system leaves a smooth edge that won’t cut fingers or splash messes, and the extra height accommodates tall cans and pop tops. $29. (888) 280-4331; amazon.com.

HEAR CLEAR End the battle over who controls the television volume with a set of TV Ears. You can turn up the volume as you like on your own wireless and rechargeable headset, so you hear all the program’s dialogue clearly, while others in the room listen to the TV at levels comfortable for them. $60. (888) 883-3277; tvears.com. A HAND UP Getting in and out of a car can be challenging for anyone whose legs and joints are unsteady. The Emson 9663 Car Cane Portable Handle offers something to grab onto, slipping easily into the door latch on the car frame for extra leverage and stability. In case of emergency, it also serves as a flashlight, seatbelt cutter and window hammer. $15. (888) 280-4331; amazon.com.

14

As the body less nimble, te grows ch make many ta nology can sk s easier for seniors, from caregiving to living life more ind ependently.

EXTRA SECURITY

LIVING LARGE

FLIP OVER Flipper Big Button Remote makes it easy to control the most basic TV functions: powering on or off, changing channels and adjusting volume. You can set it to remember 30 of your favorite channels, then control the TV and cable/satellite boxes with just one remote and a few easy-to-see buttons. $30. (800) 266-8765; homecontrols.com.

FLAME GUARD Stovetop fire prevention is the goal of CookStop. Motion sensors detect whether the cook has left the room for an extended time; they launch a countdown to shut off the burner before fire has a chance to start. Common kits plug in easily to work with traditional stoves. $359. (408) 929-8808; cookstop.com. SNAPPY PHONE Designed with seniors in mind, the Snapfon ezTWO has big buttons and numbers, a bright screen with large text, a simplified menu and enhanced sounds. A monitored SOS button is available for a monthly fee. The phone is free with service activation; plans range from $10 to $30 per month. (800) 937-1532; snapfon.com. DOSE OF CAUTION Caregivers can program up to six daily alarms to remind loved ones to retrieve medications from a MedSmart Automatic Pill Dispenser. Monitoring is available to alert a caregiver if meds have not been taken within 60 minutes of the alarm time. $490 for MD2 (without patient monitoring), $790 MD2 Plus (with unlimited lifetime monitoring). (800) 549-0095; epill.com.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   APRIL 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

ZOOM IN Get the benefit of a zoom feature while reading printed books or magazines with the Cordless Wide View Illuminating Magnifier. The free-standing magnifier can enlarge any text to appear three times larger or make craft projects easier to see. The 8-inchby-10-inch lens, mounted on a flexible gooseneck, is illuminated by an LED light. $80. (800) 321-1484; hammacher.com.

MAKE NO MISTAKE Those who struggle to see the keys on a conventional computer keyboard will find typing easier on the Ergoguys CD-1038 Ezsee Large-Print Low-Vision Keyboard. The extralarge keys are bright yellow with bold black lettering for easy viewing. It sets up quickly with a USB connection and works well in low-light environments. $31. (800) 333-3330; staples.com.


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New legislatio g big $$$ on heating and coolin4, S.C. residents can enjoy:

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energy consumption

TAX CREDIT l $11,000–$27,000 COMBINED INCOME for the average homeowner

There’s never been a better time to invest al a free and your loc t. Cal You may not in realize but home is l sitting on rmal uni theyour geo a newit, ut the abo re mo rn renewable supply of energy. A WaterFurnace geothermal comfort lea to WaterFurnace dealer today ing stay le whi system taps into gthe stored solar energy in your backyard oy enj amazin savings you will to provide savings of up on rheating, ’round. cooling and hot e all yea abl70% comfortto

water. Contact your local WaterFurnace dealer today to learn how to tap into your buried treasure. YOUR LOCAL WATERFURNACE DEALERS

LYMAN, S.C.

signed into law H. 387 On February 16, Governor Haley me tax credit for which provides for a 25% state inco s. alla residential geothermal inst tion

MARY & ALLEN DISCOVERED A TREASURE IN THEIR YARD How did you learn about WaterFurnace? We heard about WaterFurnace systems on television and researched them online.

Why did you choose a geothermal system over a conventional unit? Previously, we used a heat pump by itself or in combination with a gas furnace. The science behind geothermal heat pumps demonstrated how they can be more efficient in providing comfort to the homeowner. Once we received the federal rebate, the geothermal system became as affordable as the best and most efficient heat pump.

Are you enjoying a lower power bill? We are experiencing an overall savings of $100 to $200 per month, depending on the season and how severe the weather.

What are your favorite features?

Upstate

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Rock Hill/Charlotte

PANTHER HEATING & COOLING, INC.

GeoPro Master Dealer (803) 792-0788 • pantherhvac.com

We immediately noticed and appreciated the lack of cold or hot spots in the house. It is uniformly heated or cooled. No certain area is colder or warmer than another. The system is quiet. You don’t even realize the thing is running. No kick-start noises. No shut-down noise. Cooling in the summer is amazing throughout the home.

Would you recommend a WaterFurnace system to your friends and family? Most definitely. It is expensive on the front end, but with the federal rebate, this system is a win-win. We tell anyone who is looking for a new system to at least look into this.

How did you select your contractor? We searched online and researched the material Carolina Heating Service provided (not just their company stuff). We listened to other people. We made sure the contractor had knowledge and experience with this system.

Contact your local WaterFurnace dealer today to learn how you can discover treasure in your backyard.

visit waterfurnace.com WaterFurnace is a registered trademark of WaterFurnace International, Inc.

visit waterfurnace.com

SCLIVING.COOP   | APRIL 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SC Life

SCStories

Man, fire, meat

ANDREW HAWORTH

Jeff “Rhino” Bannister

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AGE: 50 HOMETOWN: From Holly Hill; now lives in Greenville JOB: In 2015, sold the process-serving company he’d owned for 21 years; currently a professional vagabond, doing short-term stints as Uber driver, line cook, dishwasher, guest chef, “anything and everything for a new experience” CLAIM TO FAME: Founder of Bovinoche, a recurring, public, outdoor food event; visit icookwholecows.com to find upcoming events IN THE MEDIA: Past appearances on “Fat Guys in the Woods” and “American Grilled” TV shows; “Anthony Eats America” Web series; his own YouTube channel; appearing on soon-to-air cooking competition on Destination America network SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   APRIL 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

Be careful, if you’re with Jeff Bannister, about admitting you’ve never done a certain something on your bucket list. You may suddenly find yourself shooting your first pig or joining an impromptu kayak caravan to the coast. The time to try something new, Bannister opines, is always now. He’s a fan of “microadventures,” the more spontaneous the better, and he likes an audience. That’s what led to his first Bovinoche, a food event of his own invention. Loosely translated, it means “night of the cow.” Bannister saw a TV show about a centuries-old, South American method of cooking whole animals over an open flame. Naturally, he wanted to try it himself. He and a crew of willing cohorts constructed a monster-sized outdoor roasting rack, butterflied an 800-pound cow over the flames, and invited a few hundred friends to watch and eat roasted meat right off the carcass. Bovinoche was born. “People are dying for something to do, something new,” Bannister says. “An adventure they don’t have to worry about dying on, but it’s an adventure that’s out of the cube they work in.” An upbeat, what-you-see-is-what-you-get character, Bannister adopts new friends quickly and tags himself as easily distracted, occasionally profane and abundantly blessed. Bovinoche, he says, “is a direct reflection of my personality and all my flaws.” Since his first roast in the Upstate in 2011, Bannister has hosted Bovinoche events in Greer, Simpsonville and Ridgeway, with more planned in months ahead. National media coverage of his exploits has boosted his fame, and the curious flock to see him roast whole cows, goats, llamas and bacon-wrapped alligator. Meanwhile, he’s not minding the attention: “Nobody gets famous cooking hot dogs.” —DIANE VETO PARHAM


SCChefÕsChoice

BY DIANE VETO PARHAM

Savoring the bounty of land and sea LITTLE THINGS COMBINE WELL TO CREATE

6 SERVINGS

2 Vidalia onions, diced 5 stalks celery, diced (reserve tender yellow leaves) 5 cloves garlic, smashed and minced Vegetable oil Salt and pepper Old Bay seasoning 1 pound 21–25 count, shell-on, wild-caught shrimp, peeled and deveined, shells reserved 20 littleneck clams 2 quarts heavy cream ¾ pound smoked kielbasa, diced ½ pound red potatoes, diced, boiled until tender 2 ears sweet corn, grilled and cut from cob

Mix onion, celery and garlic in a bowl. In a heavy-bottomed stockpot over medium heat, add 2 tablespoons vegetable oil and half the vegetable mixture. Season with salt, pepper and Old Bay. Cook about 5 minutes, until vegetables are translucent and soft. Add shrimp shells, clams and heavy cream; bring to a simmer. Cook until all clams have opened and cream will coat back of a spoon. Strain liquid into another pot and keep warm. Adjust seasonings to taste. Reserve clam meat, and discard all shells. In another pot over medium heat, add 2 tablespoons vegetable oil and kielbasa. Lightly brown the meat, and add remaining vegetables. Cook about 5 minutes. Season shrimp with salt, pepper and Old Bay. Add to pot; cook about 2 minutes. Add reserved cream, potatoes and corn, and bring to a simmer. Add clam meat. Serve in soup bowls; top with celery leaves and Old Bay.

a picturesque setting for Saltus River Grill in Beaufort. Situated in the quaint downtown, the restaurant overlooks Waterfront Park, with views of the river and the Lady’s Island bridge. Its tree-shaded patio and low-lit interior offer options for dinnertime ambience. The food here, too, is all about little things done well. Executive chef Brian Waters aims to make the most of every single ingredient. “You have to make sure that everything works well on the plate, that it makes sense and eats well and looks beautiful,” the 33-yearold Waters says. Take Saltus’ shrimp and grits, a fan favorite over the restaurant’s 13-year history. The stone-ground grits are simmered Saltus River Grill in a broth flavored Executive chef Brian Waters grew up in 802 Bay St., Beaufort Beaufort and honed his cooking skills in with rinds from (843) 379-3474 a variety of restaurant kitchens. Parmigiano-Reggiano saltusrivergrill.com cheese wheels. Fresh HOURS: Open for Lowcountry shrimp I could kind of teach myself dinner Sunday– and local mushhow to cook,” Waters says. Saturday, 4 p.m.–until. At Saltus for the past five rooms are sautéed years, Waters has focused on restauand seasoned with a house-made stock. The dish is garnished with rant mainstays like seasonal fresh fish, bacon that Waters and staff cure and locally farmed pork and chicken, and smoke in house over seven days. prime cuts of beef. He exercises his “Everything that goes into it is very creativity with whatever vegetables are complex,” he says. “It’s a bunch of in season. nuances that all come together in the “We really try to emphasize the last minute.” bounty from the sea and the land Waters’ dedication to detail in here,” he says. his dishes developed from on-theThe dinner-only restaurant opens job training in restaurant kitchens, late afternoon with a sushi and raw bar. working his way up the line, discov“You could easily come here and not spend a boatload on a really good ering the “beauty and art” of each meal,” Waters says. station, he says. MILTON MORRIS

FROGMORE STEW CHOWDER

With no formal culinary ­training, he absorbed all he could from other chefs, learning new techniques from Internet videos and recipes, and reading cookbooks and culinary textbooks front to back, like novels. “I was always in a position where

SCLIVING.COOP   | APRIL 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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Recipe

BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

SHE-CRAB SOUP SERVES 4

Carolina seafood favorites

In a stockpot over medium heat, melt butter. Sprinkle in the flour, and stir with a whisk until combined. Add the clam juice, milk and cream, and continue whisking until smooth. Let cook until thickened, about 3–4 minutes. Add onion, one pound of the crabmeat, salt, pepper, Worcestershire, cayenne, mace and sherry. Stir to combine, and lower heat to simmer. Cook for 15 minutes, until thick. To serve, ladle into bowls, and top with remaining crabmeat and parsley.

MICHAEL PHILLIPS

South Carolina is blessed with an abundance of seafood, from st to crab and shrimp along the coa lakes, and rs rive our in freshwater fish ice at cho ular pop a es dish fish making ime all-t of mealtime. These versions y eas and k quic favorites are to prepare.

2 tablespoons unsalted butter 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1 8-ounce bottle clam juice 1 cup milk 2 cups heavy cream 1 medium white onion, grated 1 ½ pounds blue crabmeat, divided Kosher salt, to taste White pepper, to taste 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper ½ teaspoon mace (or nutmeg) ¼ cup sherry Parsley, finely chopped, for garnish

LOWCOUNTRY BOIL SERVES 6

1 packet crab-boil seasoning 2 tablespoons seafood seasoning (your favorite) 1 lemon, quartered 6 whole garlic cloves, peeled 2 pounds small red potatoes, cut in half 6 ears corn, shucked and cut in half 1 pound smoked sausage, cut diagonally into ½-inch slices 1 pound crab legs or claws 1 pound shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails on

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   APRIL 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

KAREN HERMANN

Fill a large stockpot half full with water. With the pot over medium-high heat, add seasonings, lemon and garlic cloves to the water. Bring to a boil. Reduce to medium; add the potatoes and corn, and cook for 10 minutes. Add the sausage, and cook an additional 10 minutes. Add crab legs and shrimp, and cook until the seafood turns pink, about 3–5 minutes. Drain and serve.


SHRIMP PILAU SERVES 6–8

In a Dutch oven or deep, heavy skillet, over medium-high heat, saute bacon until crispy. Remove with a slotted spoon, and set aside. Reduce temperature to medium. To the same pot, add onion, and saute until soft. Add garlic, and saute another minute. Add tomatoes and rice, and stir until all ingredients are combined. Add stock, red pepper flakes and salt. Stir, and bring to a low boil. Reduce temperature to simmer; cover and let cook until almost all liquid is evaporated, about 25–30 minutes. Add okra, and cook 5 minutes. Stir in bacon bits. Add shrimp, and cook until pink, about 3 minutes. Stir mixture, then transfer to a serving bowl. Garnish with chopped parsley.

WILLIAM P. EDWARDS

5–6 slices of thick-cut bacon, cut crosswise into ½-inch pieces 1 Vidalia onion, chopped 1 garlic clove, minced 1 14.5-ounce can fire-roasted, diced tomatoes 2 cups rice, uncooked 3 cups vegetable stock (or water) ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes Kosher salt, to taste 1 cup okra, trimmed and cut into ½-inch pieces 1 pound shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails removed Parsley, chopped, for garnish

SALMON CROQUETTES MAKES 8

WILLIAM P. EDWARDS

1 pound cooked salmon, flaked (or 1 15-ounce can of salmon)* ¾ cup chopped green onions 1 large garlic clove, minced ½ cup chopped parsley 1 slice plain bread, cut or torn into pieces 1 large egg, slightly beaten Freshly ground black pepper ¼ teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 1 cup seasoned breadcrumbs (more, if needed) ½ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes Canola oil for frying Lemon wedges for garnish

Never prepped fresh shrimp? Let Chef Belinda take the mystery out of peeling and deveining the little critters at

SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda

In a large bowl, combine salmon, onion, garlic, parsley, bread, egg, pepper and Worcestershire sauce. In a medium bowl, combine breadcrumbs and crushed red pepper flakes. Form the salmon mixture into 8 patties. Press each patty into breadcrumbs on each side, covering completely. Set aside on a plate covered with parchment or waxed paper. If you will not be cooking immediately, store patties in refrigerator. In a large skillet over medium heat, heat about half-inch of canola oil. Fry patties until brown, about 2–3 minutes on each side. Drain on a paper-towel-lined platter. Serve with fresh lemon wedges or your favorite seafood sauce. * This recipe also works well with crabmeat. SCLIVING.COOP   | APRIL 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SCGardener

BY S. CORY TANNER

Cory’s favorite hot peppers

Turning up the heat peppers, have home gardeners fired up. They’ve attracted a strong cult following, including quite a few gardeners—mostly men—who grow hot peppers exclusively. Maybe it’s the gardening version of stock car racing—add a little danger, and guys can’t resist. And the race for heat is on like never before. A South Carolina pepper breeder, “Smokin’ Ed” Currie of PuckerButt ­Pepper Company in Fort Mill, is responsible for the pepper currently ranked hottest in the world, according to ­Guinness World Records. Appropriately named Carolina Reaper, it has a searingly high rating of 1,569,300

Poblano (ancho) for drying and stuffing as chile rellenos

SCT

Jalapeno for fresh eating and pickling

USDA

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   APRIL 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

Charleston Hot cayenne for fresh eating, drying and pickling

SCT

BARBARA SMITH/CLEMSON EXTENSION

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­ coville heat units, about 300 times S hotter than a jalapeno. The Scoville scale indicates how much agony a ­pepper is likely to inflict when eaten. The variety of hot peppers available to home gardeners includes heirlooms, tried-and-true hybrids and exotic newcomers. Most people are familiar with jalapenos, cayennes and banana peppers, but more exotic types are increasingly common, such as poblanos, serranos, habaneros, and bhut jolokia (the infamous ghost pepper). You can find most pepper seed through a typical vegetable seed supplier, but for rare, unusual and stupidly hot varieties, try a specialty ­pepper-seed company. In the garden, there’s not much ­difference between growing hot or sweet peppers. Most are perfectly suited to the state’s climate and abundant sunshine. Common varieties should be available as transplants at your local garden center. Look for stout plants that aren’t too big. A 4- to 6-inch plant is preferable to larger ones. Avoid the temptation to buy plants with open flowers or fruit on them, because they’ll be especially slow to establish and grow. For rarer varieties, you can start seeds indoors six to eight weeks before your desired planting date. Pepper seed can be slow to germinate, particularly in cool soil, so be patient, and provide plenty of light once seedlings emerge. Set out plants once the soil has warmed; they’ll languish in cold soil. Piedmont gardeners should wait

SCOTT BAUER/WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Most peppers are perfectly suited to the state’s climate and abundant sunshine.

HOT PEPPERS, ALSO CALLED CHILI

Capsicum annuum is the most common domesticated pepper species, encompassing a range of fruits from mild bell peppers to medium-hot cayennes.

I opt for a good mix of flavor and a medium heat level. Here are peppers that perform well in South Carolina gardens and whose heat won’t blow your head off.

Tabasco for pepper sauces


S. CORY TANNER

Wire tomato cages are also useful for supporting pepper plants.

until May 1; most of April offers sufficient warmth in the midlands and coastal regions. Select a full-sun location with well-draining, fertile soils. Peppers prefer a soil pH of 5.8 to 6.5. A soil test will tell you if you need amendments. And be careful not to

over-fertilize. Too much nitrogen will yield beautiful, lush bushes at the expense of blooms and fruit. Peppers can suffer from blossomend rot if a lack of soil moisture prevents them from taking up calcium from the soil. I use drip irrigation to maintain even soil moisture and also to reduce leaf wetness, preventing both blossom-end rot and foliage diseases. Hot pepper plants don’t enjoy summer heat as much as you might think. In my Upstate garden, they typically stop producing during the hottest spells in July and August. But don’t give up on them—­production ramps up in the fall, and I often have plenty of hot peppers well into November, when the first frost takes them out. Wire tomato cages provide nearperfect support for pepper plants. Simply tuck the main stems up through the cage to prevent branch

breakage under GET MORE Read the profile of Smokin’ Ed heavy pepper Currie at scliving.coop/sc-life/ loads. sc-stories/man-on-fire/ Peppers are Find the Tanner family’s favorite also excellent for container garden- pepper jelly recipe at scliving.coop/home--garden ing on a sunny deck or patio. A large container, filled with high-quality potting mix, offers plenty of space for roots and reduces how often you have to water. I like to underplant my peppers with fresh herbs. Cilantro, in particular, seems to appreciate the summer shade provided by pepper plants. Plus, it’s an essential ingredient for that fresh, hot salsa you’ll be making with your peppers. is an area horticulture agent for Clemson Extension based in Greenville County. Contact him at shannt@clemson.edu.

S. CORY TANNER

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The Worthington

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New Homes Built On Your Land Visit or Contact us:

Charleston (843) 879-8661 Greenville (864) 881-1568 Augusta (706) 680-6568

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SCLIVING.COOP   | APRIL 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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ur family’s minivan wove through Table Rock State Park after 2 a.m. as the moon peeked at us through silhouette trees. We pulled up to Cabin 15, and as we began to unpack belongings, our 14-year-old daughter checked her iPhone. “No service,” she said with resignation. I grinned. My husband and I had warned our three not to expect cell service or television on this trip, and our 9-year-old son, who had been binge-watching Treehouse Masters on Animal Planet during the summer, surprised me by saying, “I don’t want to have a TV.” He was ready to be in a real forest. Whether our two teenage girls could live without Instagram remained to be seen. The kids settled into bed, and I picked up the book The First Family of Outsiders, which I found stashed in the cabin with games like Scrabble and Yahtzee. The author, Spring Slagle, is a Palmetto State mom whose own desire to unplug led her family to visit all of South Carolina’s 47 state parks. Our goal was far more modest: spend four summer days sampling the adventures that awaited us in several Upstate state parks. Traveling out from our base camp at Table Rock, we planned to climb mountains, investigate waterfalls, jump from the lake high dive, take in a genuine square dance and close our days around the firepit right here at Cabin 15. Before it was all over, we would wonder why we hadn’t made time for a trip like this much sooner.

A cabin and a park with history

We are a family of hikers, not campers. Fortunately, Table Rock State Park has not only plenty of campground space but also furnished cabins. Several, including ours, were built by President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Civilian Conservation Corps, which created the park, most of its buildings, the two main trails and Pinnacle Lake during the 1930s. Table Rock Lodge, where we would listen to local bluegrass musicians play later in the week, is held up as one of the state’s finest examples of “park-itecture.” Cabin 15 is set off on a hill with only one other cabin. While renovated with a modern kitchen and bathroom, it has its original wood walls, ceilings and chimney. There’s also a screened porch with rocking chairs and, of course, the large firepit for roasting marshmallows. We slept comfortably until the sounds of a maintenance crew next door woke us just after 8 a.m. It seemed Using Table Rock State Park’s Cabin 15 (above right) as their base camp, the Smith family spent four days exploring the adventures to be found in Upcountry state parks. The waterfalls of Lake Jocassee in Devils Fork State Park (opposite page) and the Pinnacle Lake high dive at Table Rock State Park provided cool relief on hot August days. The family’s trip happened to coincide with the Music on the Mountain bluegrass jam at Table Rock Lodge. Park visitors and local musicians gather from 2 to 6 p.m. on the second Saturday of each month to keep mountain music traditions alive. Kayaking to the far end of Pinnacle Lake provided a majestic view of Table Rock Mountain.

Interesting things can happen when a family ventures into S.C. state parks—and out of cell‑phone range BY SUSAN HILL SMITH | PHOTOS BY MIC SMITH

an unlucky start until we ventured out and met Cliff McLeod, a park staffer. McLeod, 66, actually lived in Cabin 15 in the mid-1960s, after his father became a park ranger. “We had a good time up here. We’ll just put it like that,” said McLeod, who was fortunate to become a teenager on Table Rock. He pointed to Cabin 16, which he said used to be the barracks for the young lifeguards who watched over Pinnacle Lake’s beach. The old-fashioned swimming spot continues to be popular today and still has a high dive—​a rare find that would delight my husband and son—as well as kayaks and paddleboats. Growing up, McLeod made $3 a day renting boats and picking up trash. He eventually left for the Navy but returned after 24 years and started work at Table Rock once again. He told us about a hidden trail behind our cabin that leads to remnants of the park’s now-defunct fish hatchery. When we explained that we would be hiking the main trail to the mountaintop, he advised us to look for snakes and yellow-jacket nests. “Take plenty of water and be careful,” he advised. “Y’all look like you’re pretty much used to hiking, so it shouldn’t be a problem for you.”

The race to the top

The landscape photo of the park stretched over the stone fireplace of Cabin 15 proved to be all the inspiration our 14-year-old daughter needed for the trek to the 3,124-foot SCLIVING.COOP   | APRIL 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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Boaters can swim beneath the icy water of Mills Creek Falls—if they dare. Exploring the lake by pontoon boat allows for relaxed comfort and highspeed tubing thrills. Kids love the wipeouts, especially when it’s Mom or Dad.

g in r o l p x E WATERFALLS Dive into Lake Jocassee at Devils Fork State Park

We launched onto Lake Jocassee from Devils Fork State Park in the comfort of a 22-foot, deluxe pontoon boat, ready to relax and play. Fed by four mountain streams and enveloped by protected wilderness, the 7,500-acre lake is known as one of the Southeast’s clearest bodies of water and is home to several waterfalls that are accessible only by boat. To explore them, we booked a private boat tour through Eclectic Sun, the official outfitter at Devils Fork State Park Pavilion. Run by Andy Laughridge and his wife, Debbie, Eclectic Sun also rents out pontoon boats, kayaks and paddleboards for people who want to explore the lake on their own. Our afternoon on the lake took us to four waterfalls, including a low-lying cascade in a hidden cove, where Laughridge waited in the boat as our family hopped onto the gushy banks. We climbed the hill alongside the tumbling water and circled back at the plateau for a different view of the stream as it flowed into the lake. Except for the butterflies, we had the place to ourselves. Between stops, we had a blast riding the inner tube behind the pontoon boat, looking up from the water to the mountain skyline. “This rocks,” our son proclaimed over the whir of the water, and I couldn’t help but agree. On the final stop of our tour, Laughridge took us to the steep rock face of Mills Creek Waterfall, which plunges straight down into the lake. My husband jumped into the water from the boat first, daring us to follow him. One by one, we accepted the challenge, dousing our heads underneath the icy cascade as it tumbled into Lake Jocassee and catching our breath before we triumphantly swam back to the boat together. —SUSAN HILL SMITH For more details on exploring Lake Jocassee, contact Devils Fork State Park at (864) 944-2639 or devilsfork@scprt.com. Contact Eclectic Sun at (864) 944-1191 or eclecticsun.com.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   APRIL 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP


summit of Table Rock. “Remember...,” she said as she traced the challenging, rocky trail we would take to the top of the mountain. On a day trip the year before, she and her brother reached the summit with their dad. Their older sister and I had failed to finish the last leg of the rocky trail, which is 3.5 miles one way, much of it on an incline. If we didn’t make it to the top this time, we would be shamed forever. Nothing like a little family competition to make the hike more interesting. Table Rock enchanted me on our family’s first visit, and as we started up the mountain late that morning, I remembered why. For starters, hikers enjoy immediate gratification 100 yards from the Nature Center with a close-up view of Carrick Creek waterfall. A new observation deck allows you to linger, and for those who want easier hiking, there are several options, including the Carrick Creek Trail, a moderate 2-mile loop with more waterfall views. In contrast, the rugged Table Rock National Recreation Trail that we followed rates as “very strenuous,” not only because of the steep incline but also because of the stone steps and twisted roots that complicate the path. Like a fairy-­tale woods, the trail holds a hint of potential peril. For me, the best part of our hike would be in examining the forest floor, where fallen leaves, tree stumps and other decay give way to new life. My husband, a professional photographer, was more motivated by the panoramic payoff up top. “Just think, with every step it’s getting cooler,” he pointed out as he encouraged me to speed along in the August heat. While there was some truth in that, the backpack I agreed to carry seemed heavier with each step. We live in the Lowcountry—at sea level. I prepared for this trip at home by bumping up the incline on our treadmill but couldn’t keep pace with the rest of my sporty family. My 9-year-old grabbed the backpack and ran back up the bend. “C’mon, Mommy!”

GetThere Table Rock State Park

158 E. Ellison Lane, Pickens (864) 878-9813 tablerock@scprt.com

Devils Fork State Park Oconee State Park

624 State Park Road Mountain Rest (864) 638-5353 oconee@scprt.com

161 Holcombe Circle, Salem (864) 944-2639 devilsfork@scprt.com

To learn more about the family adventures available in all 47 of South Carolina’s state parks, visit southcarolinaparks.com.

The steep, 3.5-mile trail to the top of Table Rock is rated as “very strenuous.” Hikers must choose each step carefully as they navigate around boulders and other obstacles. Park employee Cliff McLeod advises visitors to “take plenty of water and be careful.” Frequent rest stops along the way allow hikers time to enjoy the scenery and wildlife.

I caught up with the kids as they reached a boulder nearly the size of our cabin. The girls wondered about the easiest way to get around it. Our son purposefully picked the trickiest option. “This is the most dangerous,” he said as he zipped over. We stopped for a snack 1.8 miles up, at the trail’s halfway point, sitting in the sun at a small overlook by the Trailside Shelter. As we munched on baby carrots and melty trail mix, our 16-year-old delighted in a moment of cell service, eventually returning to the family’s discussion to ask if she could come back to Table Rock someday—with her friends.

Eyes wide open

As we made our way up the trail, we shared ­discoveries with each other. Black butterfly. Baby pinecones. Skunk smell! In quiet moments, I thought about how little time we had before our girls graduated from high school, and I looked at the world at my feet. I noticed the orange clay mixing with the gray minerals of broken-down rock and traced the burgundy curves of rhododendron plants to the exposed knots of their deep root system, which helps hold the forest together. And I imagined how the mountain would look in the fall and the spring. We enjoyed a flat stretch of trail before scaling a steep slab to reach Governor’s Rock, a large outcropping of exposed granite with sweeping views of neighboring Pinnacle Mountain. It was 2:30 p.m. In three hours, we had traveled 2.6 miles and reached an elevation of 2,854 feet, but we had another mile to go. We lay across the stone to rest, but SCLIVING.COOP   | APRIL 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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with a crack of thunder, restarted our climb, pressed on by my husband, who worried about losing his mountaintop photo op. By the time we reached the highest elevation of 3,124 feet, the increasingly dark sky had given way to rain, and as we rushed to the overlook, we found ourselves in a small thunderstorm. It felt a little like National Lampoon’s Vacation as my husband nearly had a Clark Griswold moment, pleading with us to wait it out.

Gruarb yPoARTNER

Peak performance

Bill Anders (holding microphone) has called square dances in Oconee State Park for decades.

Summer square dances at Oconee State Park bring all ages together The Friday-night square dance was already in full swing when we arrived at Oconee State Park, the banjo and fiddle runs ringing out into the parking lot as people of all ages filed into the barn across from the park office. Each summer, from Memorial Day to Labor Day, the park hosts weekly square dances, drawing crowds of vacationers and dedicated cloggers from across the Carolinas. “It’s a tradition that started in 1944,” explained Oconee Park Ranger Jo Anna White, who was greeting guests at the door. In 1975, the park built the barn to better accommodate the dances with more space and gymnasium wood floors. The Dixie Blue Grass Boys have played here ever since. White introduced me to 82-year-old Bill Anders, the last of four go-to callers the park has relied on for decades. “I live for it,” admitted Anders, who has directed Carolina square dances since he was a young man. And before long, he was back on stage singing for the 70 or so dancers to “Get ya’ part-nuh!” These Appalachian-style dances are popular throughout the region. Park employee Cullen Finley, who was in charge of summer recreation programs, clogs for a world-class team at Mars Hill University in the western North Carolina mountains. His friends and family are regulars at Oconee State Park, including his mom, who started a clogging team at the elementary school where she teaches. “It’s hard to find a dancer who’s not smiling,” Sharon Finley said as we sat together on the bleachers and followed the moves of the dancers. Anyone who doesn’t know how to do-si-do is welcome to join in, she assured, and there’s often a lesson for beginners. —SUSAN HILL SMITH

For more details on the Friday night square dances, contact Oconee State Park at (864) 638-5353 or oconee@scprt.com. 26

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   APRIL 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

Our oldest quickly stepped out to raise her hands in rainslicked victory. With a lightning flash, she rushed back to me and the other kids as we huddled together under a tree. Our 14-year-old wondered aloud whether her braces would up the risk of a lightning strike, and we decided to turn back. The kids and I started our descent, my husband following reluctantly behind. Anyone who hikes up Table Rock on a summer afternoon should expect rain. It’s an almost daily occurrence and makes for a slippery trip back down. Even so, our badly timed storm gave us a bonus. With the sunlight streaming into the wet forest, the colors looked even more vibrant. Better than a fairy tale, it felt like walking through a Thomas Kinkade painting. We finished our hike by 5:30 p.m. after six hours. Tired and still a bit soggy, we collapsed into the patio furniture at Cabin 15, satisfied that we had made it to the top and looking forward to the other adventures we had planned at Table Rock, as well as nearby Devils Fork and Oconee state parks. By the end of our mini vacation, we had tuned into the natural world and connected more as a family than we had in a long time, and that was our true mission. We checked out of our cabin at Table Rock with little doubt that we would return to explore more Upstate beauty with our three children, and we hoped to see other South Carolina parks, too. Visiting all 47 state parks might be beyond us, but we can’t wait to check more off our list.

Second time’s the charm for reaching the top of Table Rock.


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Calendar  of Events Third Saturdays • Milling Day, Hagood Mill Historic Site & Folklife Center, Pickens. (864) 898-2936. Sundays • Sundays Unplugged, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787.

MIDLANDS APRIL

Mayberry Comes to Westminster this May 6–7.

UPSTATE APRIL

14–16 • Stone Soup Storytelling Festival, multiple locations, Woodruff. (864) 476-8770. 15–16 • Azalea Festival, downtown, Pickens. (864) 507-0180. 15–16 • Hub City Hog Fest, downtown, Spartanburg. (864) 494-9133. 15–16 • Iron City Festival, downtown, Blacksburg. (864) 839-6006. 15–24 • Greater Clemson Music Festival, multiple locations, Clemson area. (864) 650-0585. 16 • 5K Mud Run and Spring Festival, Palmetto Equestrian Therapeutic Riding Program, Clinton. (864) 923-4998. 16 • Gourd Fest, Ghost Creek Gourd Farm, Laurens. (864) 682-5251. 16 • Party for the Planet, Greenville Zoo, Greenville. (864) 467-4300. 16 • Ralph Stanley II in concert, Walhalla Civic Auditorium, Walhalla. (864) 638-5277. 22–May 1 • “A Southern Exposure,” Walhalla Civic Auditorium, Walhalla. (864) 638-5277. 23 • Railroad Festival, downtown, Central. (864) 654-1200. 23 • Spartanburg Soaring! Barnet Park, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787. 23–24 • Musgrove Mill Revolutionary War Encampment Weekend, Musgrove Mill State Historic Site, Clinton. (864) 938-0100. 28–May 1 • Piedmont Plant & Flower Festival, Greenville State Farmers Market, Greenville. (864) 244-4023. 28–May 8 • Great Anderson County Fair, Anderson Sports & Entertainment Center, Anderson. (864) 296-6601. 30 • Princess and Pirate: Save the Frogs Day, Greenville Zoo, Greenville. (864) 467-4300.

36

30 • Spring Means Babies Festival, Split Creek Farm, Anderson. (864) 287-3921. MAY

4 • truTV’s Impractical Jokers, Bon Secours Wellness Arena, Greenville. (864) 241-3800. 6 • Blue Ridge Fest, Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative, Pickens. (800) 240-3400. 6–7 • Mayberry Comes to Westminster, Main Street, Westminster. (864) 647-5316. 6–8 • Spring Fling, downtown, Spartanburg. (864) 596-3105. 7 • Missing Orangutan Mother’s Day, Greenville Zoo, Greenville. (864) 467-4300. 7 • Seldom Scene in concert, Walhalla Civic Auditorium, Walhalla. (864) 638-5277. 13 • Endangered Species Day, Greenville Zoo, Greenville. (864) 467-4300. 13 • Pickin’ in Pickens presents Flatt Lonesome, Pickens High School auditorium, Pickens. (864) 296-9330. 13–15 • Artisphere, downtown, Greenville. (864) 271-9398. 13–22 • The Fair at Heritage Park, Heritage Park, Simpsonville. (864) 296-6601. 14 • Downtown Condo Rondo home tours, Historic West End, Greenville. (864) 370-0965. ONGOING

Tuesdays–Sundays, through May 15 • “Trivial Pursuit: A 50-State Adventure,” Children’s Museum of the Upstate, Greenville. (864) 233-7755. Thursdays, April–July • Music on Main, Morgan Square, Spartanburg. (864) 596-2026. Third Thursdays • Art Walk, downtown, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787. Second Saturdays • Heartstrings, Hagood Mill State Historic Site, Pickens. (864) 898-2936.

14–17 • Indie Grits Film Festival, primarily at Nickelodeon Theatre, Columbia. (803) 254-8234. 14–17 • Midlands Spring Plant & Flower Festival, S.C. State Farmers Market, Columbia. (803) 734-2210. 14–23 • Come-See-Me Festival, multiple locations, Rock Hill. (800) 681-7635. 15 • Pasta in the Park, Olympia Mills community, corner of Whaley and Wayne streets, Columbia. (803) 237-1793. 16 • Haynes Bluegrass Festival, Haynes Auditorium, Leesville. (803) 582-8479. 16 • Quarry Crusher Run, Vulcan Materials Quarry, Columbia. (803) 600-1800. 16 • Sporting Clays Tournament, Hermitage Farms Shooting Sports, Camden. (803) 254-0118. 16 • St. Thaddeus Home and Garden Tour, St. Thaddeus Episcopal Church, Aiken. (803) 648-5497. 16 • Taste of Blackville, downtown, Blackville. (803) 284-2444. 18 • Aiken Spring Classic Horse Show, Highfields Event Center, Aiken. (803) 649-3505. 21 • Chonda Pierce, Sumter Opera House, Sumter. (803) 436-2616. 22–23 • Striped Bass Festival, downtown, Manning. (803) 435-4405. 23 • Bike with a Ranger, Lee State Park, Bishopville. (803) 428-4988. 23 • Party for the Planet, Riverbanks Zoo and Garden, Columbia. (803) 779-8717. 23 • Pops Series: Sci-Fi in Hi-Fi by the S.C. Philharmonic, Harbison Theatre at Midlands Technical College, Irmo. (803) 407-5011. 26–27 • Weekday on the Water—Kayaking at Goodale, Goodale State Park, Wedgefield. (803) 494-8177. 29 • S.C. Garden Jamboree, Saluda Shoals Park, Columbia. (803) 356-6695. 29 • “Shenandoah,” Sumter Opera House, Sumter. (803) 436-2616.

29–May 1 • Sparkleberry Country Fair, Clemson University Sandhill Research and Education Center, Columbia. (803) 920-1621. 29 • Wine Tasting, Riverbanks Zoo and Garden, Columbia. (803) 779-8717. 30 • Earth Day Birthday, Museum of York County, Rock Hill. (803) 329-2121. 30 • Run United Half Marathon, 5K & Kids Fun Run, Newberry Street, Aiken. (803) 649-6245. 30 • S.C. Food Truck & Craft Beer Festival, S.C. State Fairgrounds. ftfa.eventbrite.com. 30 • Southern Sound Series: Iris Dement, McCelvey Center, York. (803) 684-3948. MAY

5 • Aiken National Day of Prayer, H.O. Weeks Center, Aiken. (803) 640-4689. 5–8 • Black Cowboy Festival, Greenfield Farm, Rembert. (803) 499-9658. 5 and 12 • Rhythm and Blooms, Riverbanks Zoo and Garden, Columbia. (803) 779-8717. 6–7 • Allendale County Cooterfest, downtown, Allendale. (803) 584-4619. 6–7 • Arts on the Ridge, Century House, Ridgeway. (803) 337-2213. 6–7 • South Carolina Strawberry Festival, Walter Elisha Park, Fort Mill. (803) 547-2116. 6–8 • Plum Branch Saddle Club Spring Trail Ride, Clarks Hill Lake, Plum Branch. (803) 640-2765. 6–15 • “1776,” Circle Theatre, Barnwell. (803) 259-7046. 7 • Lobster Race, downtown, Aiken. (803) 646-0523. 7 • Prosperity’s Hoppin’ with Arts and Crafts Festival, Town Square, Prosperity. (803) 364-2622. 13–14 • Aiken Bluegrass Festival, Aiken County Fairgrounds, Aiken. (803) 640-9287. 14 • Combined Test and Schooling Show, Stable View Farm, Aiken. (484) 356-3173. 14 • Governor’s Cup Road Race, starts at Capitol building, Columbia. (803) 960-6202. 14 • Leaf Print T-shirts Workshop, Lee State Park, Bishopville. (803) 428-4988. 14 • Wings and Wheels Air Festival, Fairfield County Airport, Winnsboro. (803) 635-4242.

Go to SCLiving.coop for more information and for guidelines on submitting your event. Please confirm information before attending events.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   APRIL 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

ONGOING

Daily • Planetarium Shows, S.C. State Museum Observatory, Columbia. (803) 898-4921. Tuesdays • Second Shift Twosdays, S.C. State Museum, Columbia. (803) 898-4921. Tuesdays through Sundays, through May 8 • “Vernon Grant’s Leap into Spring,” Museum of York County, Rock Hill. (803) 329-2121. Saturdays, weather permitting • Aiken Trolley Tours, Aiken Visitors Center and Train Museum, Aiken. (803) 644-1907. Fourth Saturdays • Mountain Dulcimers of Aiken, Aiken Visitors Center and Train Museum, Aiken. (803) 293-7846.

24 • Blessing of the Fleet & Seafood Festival, Memorial Waterfront Park, Mount Pleasant. (843) 884-8517. MAY

1 • Divas Half Marathon & 5K, Ocean Boulevard at 1st Avenue, North Myrtle Beach. (800) 733-7089. 6–7 • Taste of Beaufort, Henry C. Chambers Waterfront Park, Beaufort. (843) 525-6644. 6–8 • Charleston Greek Festival, Greek Orthodox Church of the Holy Trinity, Charleston. (843) 345-4478. 7 • Beer, Bacon & Music Festival, Shelter Cove Community Park, Hilton Head Island. (843) 681-7273. 7 • Bluffton Village Festival, downtown, Bluffton. (843) 815-2277. 7 • Mayfest on Main, Main Street, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 280-5570. LOWCOUNTRY 7 • Totally Turtles! Myrtle APRIL Beach State Park, Myrtle 14–16 • Puddin’ Swamp Beach. (843) 238-0874. Festival, downtown, 12 • Yappy Hour, James Turbeville. (843) 659-3030. Island County Park, 14–17 • Charleston Race Charleston. (843) 762-2172. Week, Patriot’s Point, Mount 12 • Gibbes on the Street: Pleasant. (843) 628-5900. The Year of Gibbes, Gibbes 15–17 • Charleston Outdoor Museum of Art, Charleston. Fest, James Island County Park, (843) 722-2706, ext. 225. Charleston. (843) 762-2172. 12–14 • Beaufort Charities 15–17 • Kiawah Island Motoring Invitational, Fripp Island Retreat, Ocean Park, Kiawah Golf & Beach Resort, Fripp Island. (843) 277-0271. Island. (843) 575-5667. 15–24 • Horry County Fair, 13 • Friday Night Boogie, Myrtle Beach Speedway, Myrtle Mount Pleasant Pier, Mount Beach. (843) 236-0500. Pleasant. (843) 795-4386. 15–May 1 • Play Me, I’m Yours 13–15 • Haygood/Grady Street Piano Project, multiple Memorial Tennis Championship, locations, Florence. (843) 260-6210. Kiawah Island Golf Resort, Kiawah Island. (843) 768-2838. 16 • BaconFest, House of Blues, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 357-8664. 14 • Cast Off Fishing Tournament, 16 • Soft Shell Crab Festival, Paris Mount Pleasant Pier, Mount Avenue, Port Royal. (843) 592-1892. Pleasant. (843) 762-9946. 14 • Rib Burnoff and Barbecue 16–17 • Art in the Park, Valor Park, Myrtle Beach. (843) 446-3830. Fest, Coastal Discovery Museum at Honey Horn, Hilton Head Island. 20–23 • Myrtle Beach bhaley@hhivacations.com. International Film Festival, 14–15 • Blue Crab Festival, multiple locations, Myrtle waterfront, Little River. Beach. (843) 497-0220. (843) 249-6604. 21 • Taste of Darlington, Darlington Raceway, Darlington. ONGOING (843) 398-4000, ext. 103. Daily through Sept. 5 • “Nature 22–23 • Colleton County Rice Connects” LEGOS Bricks Sculpture Festival, multiple locations, Exhibit, Brookgreen Gardens, Walterboro. (843) 549-1079. Murrells Inlet. (843) 235-6000. 22–30 • ArtFields, multiple Daily • History Tours, Old locations, Lake City. (843) 374-0180. Exchange & Provost Dungeon, Charleston. (888) 763-0448. 23 • Loris Spring Festival, downtown, Loris. (843) 756-6030. Daily • QR Code Tour, downtown, Conway. (843) 248-6260. 23 • Mullet Haul Trail Run, Mullet Hall Equestrian Center, Wednesdays through May 25 • Johns Island. (843) 795-4386. Weekly Wine Strolls, Middleton Place, Charleston. (800) 782-3608. 23 • Shaggin’ on the Cooper, Mount Pleasant Pier, Mount Saturdays • Snakes and Reptiles, Pleasant. (843) 795-4386. Huntington Beach State Park, Murrells Inlet. (843) 237-4440. 23 • Taste of the Coast, House of Blues, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 272-8163.


SCHumorMe

BY JAN A. IGOE

Safe as a pea in a granny pod IT’S NO WONDER EVERYBODY YOU MEET

is totally stressed out. On any given day, we have so many obligations, burning questions and world ­problems to solve: Am I keeping up with the Kardashians? Could Donald Trump’s hairstyle be contagious? Where is the best place to store my grandma? As a new grandma myself— the vital, probiotic-taking, working grandma with a gym membership— the third question has my attention. When my kids were little and I’d banish them to their rooms for some behavioral infraction, the little angels would maliciously mutter, “It’s OK. Someday, we’ll pick her nursing home,” just loud enough to keep me nervous for the next 20 years. Now, there’s an alternative: the portable Granny Pod. It doesn’t seem fair to label a $125,000, state-of-theart, mini hospital a mere pod, but “Nana’s Nifty Outhouse” didn’t score well with focus groups. For that colossal chunk of change, you get a small, pre-fab home with a bed, bath, fridge and microwave. It looks a bit like an upscale college dorm, except for the defibrillators, handrails, lighted floors, video surveillance and all the paraphernalia required to park an aging loved one in your backyard. They say everyone has privacy, and the family can visit when they’re not monitoring Granny’s vitals from the den. I’ve always associated backyards with doghouses and toolsheds rather than Grandma’s house, which has traditionally been over the river and through the woods. But as the boomers sprint into their golden years, some of us will require convenient, local storage. 38

This solution would never have worked for my mom’s mom. There’s no place to park a Harley or entertain bald boyfriends, which she continued to collect into her late 70s. But for the cookie-baking type, backyard storage has potential. Personally, I think pods would have more appeal if they made them for other relatives—say, weird uncles or teenagers. What parent wouldn’t want her adolescents under 24-hour video surveillance in a safe, secure and, did I stress, remote location? The pods won’t seem unusual to young adults, who have already embraced the tiny-home revolution. Forget McMansions. Tiny-home advocates say 300 square feet of living space is plenty. Mortgages are low, keeping up with the Joneses is

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   APRIL 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

moot and tiny homes give owners more time to focus on what’s really important, like Kim’s latest Kanye ultimatum. Ironically, these tiny-home lovers are likely the same people who would never be caught dead near a singlewide—which has much more room, and you get to keep the wheels—but they’ll pay upwards of $50,000 for a home smaller than a closet in their parents’ house. There’s no talk of a granddad pod, so he’s either on his own or there’s an Old Man Cave in the works. I hear Ensure will be on tap. is still in shock that she’s a grandma and is not interested in pod living. An RV might work, though. Write her at HumorMe@SCLiving.coop.

JAN IGOE


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South Carolina Living April 2016  
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