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AUGUST | SEPTEMBER 2021

VANCOUVER LIFE AT ITS FINEST

What’s cooking in this sizzling prize home? À VOTRE SANTÉ!

A NOTEWORTHY CAUSE

SKYWALK

Raise a glass with one of these tasty cocktails

These prize homes reveal like music to the senses

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CONTENTS 32

68 FEATURES

ON THE COVER Photo by Lia Crowe BC Children’s Hospital Dream Lottery spokesperson Erin Cebula in the kitchen of a

46 A NOTEWORTHY CAUSE

This prize home reveals like music to your senses

By Lisa Manfield

South Surrey prize home built by Marquis Custom Homes. Fashion provided by Nordstrom

Heather Nightingale.

Colours of dry earth, organic prints and textures— above the tree line

HOT PROPERTIES

By Jen Evans & Lia Crowe

Vancouver. Styling by Sarah D’Arcey; hair and makeup by

46

10

58 SKYWALK

B O U L E VA R D

68 BEYOND THE PALE

Kitchen trends to add colour, warmth and durability

By Lisa Manfield

76

À VOTRE SANTÉ!

Raise your glass to making it through a challenging 18 months

By Ellie Shortt

86 PEDALLING PORTUGAL

On the last of Europe’s wild coasts

By Suzanne Morphet


46

76

58

DEPARTMENTS

16

CONTRIBUTORS

18

EDITOR’S LETTER

Serendipity on the road

By Susan Lundy

22

LIFE. STYLE. ETC.

30

WELL AND GOOD

Separate but together

By Kaisha Scofield

32

WEEKENDER & SIDETRIP

Nelson and Halcyon

Manuela Mirecki

By Susan Lundy & Lia Crowe

By Lia Crowe

26

42

IN STUDIO

GOOD TASTE

A different kettle of fish: Finest At Sea

When the client is the designer

By Angela Cowan

By Lin Stranberg

56 SPACES WE LOVE

Modern spin

By Dawn Sondergaard

64

BUSINESS CLASS

Rising above the noise: Carrie Barlow

By Lauren Kramer

92

SECRETS AND LIVES

Kamelia Rahmatzadeh

By Angela Cowan

96

NARRATIVE

Hiraeth By Marie-France Boissonneault

98

BEHIND THE STORY

By Lia Crowe B O U L E VA R D

11


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contributors “The act of writing has always been

MARIE-FRANCE BOISSONNEAULT

a restorative escape for me. ‘Hiraeth’ was a brief window into my appreciation for the slower pace of life that was initiated by the pandemic. It allowed me to externalize my frustrations whilst also revisiting some of my more cherished memories. As a former multimedia artist, then professor and academic author, my interdisciplinary adventures have greatly inspired my creativity in writing. I am currently finishing the edits for my first novel, and working on a creative nonfiction humane education series for young readers.”

WRITER HIRAETH

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2021

BLACK PRESS GROUP PUBLISHER Penny Sakamoto BOULEVARD GROUP PUBLISHER Mario Gedicke PUBLISHER Harry van Hemmen harryvh@blackpress.ca 604-649-1707 MANAGING EDITOR Susan Lundy

PAGE 94

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Lia Crowe

“The SkyWalk takes you around

JENNY CLARK MAKEUP ARTIST SKYWALK

PAGE 58

and around and around, soaring to unknown heights. Each new level is jawdropping, breathtaking! For this story I wanted the makeup to feel unfamiliar and slightly otherworldly, as this is how I felt at the Malahat SkyWalk. Inspired by my surroundings, I created sharp lines and the use of voided space on model Bridget’s eyes. I applied Golden Amber Perfume Glitter Balm from Nezza Naturals to Bridget’s skin to reflect  back the sun.” Jenny Clark is a freelance makeup artist, based out of Victoria. She has worked with Boulevard for over nine years. 

WRITER BEYOND THE PALE

PAGE 68

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DESIGNERS Lily Chan, Michelle Gjerde, Tammy Robinson, Kelsey Boorman ADVERTISING SALES Vicki Clark Eleanor Ajram PHOTOGRAPHERS Lia Crowe, Don Denton, Sheila Say

“I, like many other people, have

LISA MANFIELD

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Marie-France Boissonneault, Angela Cowan, Lia Crowe, Jen Evans, Lauren Kramer, Lisa Manfield, Suzanne Morphet, Kaisha Scofield, Dawn Sondergaard, Ellie Shortt, Lin Stranberg

spent an inordinate amount of time in the kitchen this past year—both feeding my family and undertaking much pandemicfuelled baking. So I could instantly relate to Katerina’s latest kitchen trends with an emphasis on durability and letting personality and warmth shine through. And a thousand times yes to optimized storage!” Lisa Manfield is a writer, editor and content strategist. She was the founding editor of BC Living Magazine and is a regular contributor to Boulevard and Right Sizing magazines.

ILLUSTRATION Sierra Lundy DISTRIBUTION Marilou Pasion Marilou@blackpress.ca 604-542-7411

VANCOUVERBOULEVARD.COM Boulevard Magazine is published 6 times per year by Black Press Ltd. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited. The publisher is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts and photographs.


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PHOTO BY LIA CROWE

Serendipity on the road

A recent trip to Nelson, BC—as featured in the Weekender section of this issue of Boulevard—sent me down a road of reverie as I recalled two earlier visits to this beautiful West Kootenay town. The first occurred during a cross-Canada journey undertaken by my husband and I about a decade ago. The three-week jaunt called into action our cool-but-mechanically-challenged 1978 VW bus. Driving “The Pumpkin”—named for its bright orange hue—added an element of excitement to the experience since we never knew on any given day what emergency it might generate. Indeed, The Pumpkin served up a smorgasbord of mechanical issues on that trip, ranging from the annoying (no turn signals) to the confounding (an archaic points system that no modern-day mechanic seemed capable of fixing) and the downright vexing (loudly squeaking brakes that made sure anyone who hadn’t already seen us certainly heard us). However, sometimes Pumpkin incidents were caused by pilot error. And one such occurrence happened as we motored into Nelson, when I was at the wheel. It wasn’t really my fault—I blame the town planner who saw fit to construct amenities around a strikingly steep hill right in the centre of town. So there you are driving along and enjoying the sights, when suddenly you round an innocent-looking corner and then—bam!— there it is: the highway to hell. Too late to turn back; too late to get your husband to take over what will certainly be a tricky clutch-and-brake manoeuvre. A street light sits right at the top of this hill and, naturally, it turned red just as I approached. This caused instant stress as I eyed the vehicle behind us and envisioned the damage my rolling-backwards Pumpkin could do to its front end. To my credit, we discovered later that the Pumpkin’s points were starting to decline … however, to my discredit, I stalled three times and simply could not get through that intersection. The light turned green, red, green, red. (Yes, there was a line of cars behind us.) Finally, on the fourth try, Bruce stretched his long leg over to my side of the van and punched my pedal-pressed foot at precisely the right moment. We shot through the intersection like a speeding bullet. A few days after we left Nelson, I discovered I’d left behind a well-loved hoodie. There were several spots I could’ve left it, and enough time had passed that there seemed no point in trying to track it down. But the thought of that hoodie lingered and, back in Nelson for work about two years later, I started to muse: “Where would I be now if I was a hoodie left in Nelson? Perhaps I spent a few months in a coffee shop’s lost and found before being banished to a thrift store?” How funny would it be to find it, I thought, as I stepped into a thrift shop, walked over to the hoodies rack…and found my beloved hoodie. I didn’t even mind buying it a second time. Nothing quite so serendipitous as the hoodie find or as vexing as the hilltop traffic light occurred on our most recent visit. However, the trip wasn’t without its moments. Our visit was mid-pandemic, and we were test-driving a hybrid vehicle, so during a little side-trip to nearby Salmo, we thought we’d charge up the car. There wasn’t much to see in Salmo in the dark days of November (although apparently it houses the world’s oldest phone booth), but we figured we could look around and maybe check out the town’s brewpub. However, the attachment at the charging station didn’t fit our car, so we ended up hitting the road again without stopping to explore. Later we discovered a COVID-19 outbreak in Salmo was identified on that very day, so perhaps there was a little serendipity at play after all. Now that we’re all (hopefully) on the road out of the pandemic, the future of travel looks bright. May we all find a little bit of serendipity in our travels—and perhaps, if we’re lucky, a special hoodie as well.

Susan Lundy Editor 18

B O U L E VA R D


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Meeting Manuela in person and walking into her ultracool office in a brick heritage building down in Vancouver’s Gastown, one is immediately drawn into the world of someone who is unique and chic, and who definitely has something interesting to say. “Better to be bizarre than boring,” Manuela says when asked what good style means to her. “I don’t understand wanting to look the same as everyone else; individual expression is so much more engaging.” With a business degree from Simon Fraser University, Manuela says she “sort of tripped and fell” into the real estate development industry in the mid-’90s. “I started out in pre-sales of single family homes in Port Coquitlam of all places, and eventually worked my way up to the senior executive level. I worked with many of North America’s most prominent developers in landmark communities, from Houston and San Francisco all the way up the coast and across Western Canada.” Asked what fires her up the most about her work, she says, “I am part of the team that provides one of life’s most intrinsic necessities: shelter. Not only is real estate the single largest purchase that people ever make in their lives, it is also the literal building block of communities and cities. I cannot think of a more rewarding line of work. I’ve been doing it for exactly 50 per cent of my life as of this year.”

FASHION & BEAUTY Uniform: Dresses. I never ever wear pants. How else can you put on a single item of clothing and look instantly polished? The only pants I own are for skiing and the gym. All-time favourite piece: Depends entirely on the day. Currently coveting: Searching for the ideal voluminous-skirted, light-weight silk maxi dress. The sort that will float and swirl like a cloud in the breeze. Favourite pair of shoes: My weakness! While I’m fortunate to own the usual suspects of Valentino, Gucci, Ferragamo et al., I have recently become obsessed with this amazing Italian company, Girotti Shoes, which allows you to design and customize your shoes from scratch. I’ve designed and purchased eight pairs this year! It’s addictive! Favourite day-bag: LV On My SideMM. Favourite work tool: My intuition and experience. Favourite jewellery piece or designer: A rope of Tahitian black pearls that I purchased in the Tuamotu archipelago of French Polynesia on Fakarava Atoll. Fashion obsession: Custom shoes. Accessory you spend the most money on: Jewellery. Necessary indulgence for either fashion or beauty: Anything that makes you feel unique and powerful. Moisturizer: Filorga Time-Filler. The only moisturizer I’ve ever tried that actually delivered a noticeable difference in the texture of my skin. Scent: Frangipane by Chantecaille. It smells like my annual trips to Bora Bora, Tahitian vanilla and white tropical florals. Must-have hair product: Axis hair salon’s house brand Mōr Oil.

As soon as I start photographing Manuela, it’s immediately clear to me she is also a performer, so I gotta ask… “Burlesque!” she responds. “I have been a professional burlesque performer, costumer and columnist for over a decade now, and have performed on stages from Berlin to Vegas. A life highlight for me was being featured in Russia’s Cosmopolitan magazine when I headlined in Moscow a couple years ago. [Coming up], I’ve donated two performances to the first live burlesque show to be held in the city since the onset of COVID-19. I’ll be performing on September 24 at the Biltmore Cabaret, and I can hardly wait to get back on stage!” She has so much diverse life experience that I wonder what’s the best life lesson she has learned over the years. “Not to be afraid of living in a state of radical honesty! I am not responsible for other people’s fears and insecurities,” she says. And lastly, I ask Manuela to describe her own unique style. “My style is 100 per cent based on what makes me feel fabulous, regardless of current trends or dictum. Sometimes my choices align with what is considered fashionable in the moment, but often not. And I fully embrace that dissonance as it allows me to project the confidence I feel in making fashion choices that reflect me and me alone.”

STYLE INSPIRATIONS & LIFE Style icon: Iris Apfel because she is inimitable. Favourite artist: Cuban artist Tonel, who now lives and works in Vancouver. Piece of art: A freehand traditional Marquesan tattoo I had done on my hip, outdoors in the jungle of Hiva Oa, the island where Paul Gauguin did so many of his most famous portraits of Polynesian women and where he was ultimately laid to rest. I contracted fengue fever during the process, but the experience and artistry was more than worth it. Besides, what a story! Favourite flower: Peony. Favourite city to visit: Moscow. Favourite place in the whole world: Anywhere in French Polynesia. One thing that consistently lifts your spirits during these hard times: My four rescue animals that I’ve collected on my world travels.

READING MATERIAL What you read online for style: I follow random threads on IG to find people with a unique presentation of self. Fave style blog: A men’s style page on IG, @blackinspiredalphas. The style and swagger of these Black men is both beautiful and inspiring. Coffee table book/photography book: A retrospective of Art Nouveau that I purchased at the Musée d’Orsay in Paris. Last great read: A biography of Eva Braun by Heike B. Görtemaker that I purchased at the Dachau concentration camp museum in Bavaria. Book currently reading: Conflicting Missions: Havana, Washington, and Africa, 1959-1976 by Piero Gleijeses. Favourite book of all time: Bryce Courtenay’s Power of One.

B O U L E VA R D

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design notes

The

Galley reinvent your kitchen

1

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Euro-line Appliances has introduced The Galley, a multipurpose workstation that eclipses traditional island or countertop designs with its intelligent configurations. From double-tier basins and taps to cleverly designed accessories, The Galley collection has more than 50 products for customization, including built-in and free-standing workstations in all shapes and sizes, as well as cutting boards, bowls, colanders, drain racks, drain covers and specialty serving boards. Euro-Line Appliances Inc. is distributing The Galley through select Canadian appliance dealers and kitchen design studios, as well as the company’s showrooms in Toronto and Vancouver.


2

3

4

1. Serve at an IWS7S + IWS3S 2. Margaritas at The Galley Workstation 3. Prepare veggies at The Galley Workstation 4. BarStation® 2 with Hot & Cold Tap and BarTap® in PVD Gun Metal Gray™

B O U L E VA R D

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good taste

Rodrigo Pinto, general manager at Finest At Sea.

a different kettle of fish 26

B O U L E VA R D

Finest At Sea lives up to its name WORDS ANGELA COWAN

X

PHOTOGRAPHY DON DENTON


T

“We know what vessel it came from, who the captain was, the area it was caught, everything.”

he sun beats down on this summery Sunday afternoon, and as the wind shifts direction, it brings with it the smells and sounds of sizzling batter. It’s enough to make my mouth start watering, and I cannot wait for my own plate to arrive. Settled in a brick-framed shop front in Kerrisdale, Finest At Sea runs a spacious market stuffed with an abundance of everything from fillets to smoked fish, risottos, chowders and so much more, and it also runs a bustling fish and chips trade. And all of it is made from the highest quality seafood. “We never lose sight of our fish,” says Jennifer Gidora, operations manager for both the Victoria and Vancouver locations. “The boats come in, the fish is processed on site here,” she explains, emphasizing that all their products have 100 per cent traceability. “We know what vessel it came from, who the captain was, the area it was caught, everything.” She’s brought me an apricot sparkling water and an artfully laid small platter of smoked fish and spiced olives as she sits down to chat, and the light, semi-sweet bubbly is the perfect accompaniment to the array of appetizers. Finest At Sea does about 16 different smoked fish offerings, says Jennifer, and in front of me now are four: alderwood coldsmoked tuna, smoked sockeye, candied spring salmon and candied sablefish. I spear a piece of the tuna first, and it’s light and a little chewy, with a fresh flavour that pairs nicely with a bite of one of the olives. The smoked sockeye is next, brilliant orange and firm-textured. There is definitely no mush on these smoked fishes. The candied spring salmon is sweet and chewy, leaving sticky smears on my fingertips. And then there’s the sablefish. Oh, the sablefish. Buttery is the only word that comes close to describing the melt-on-the-tongue texture as I fork my first mouthful. It’s rich and soft, and intensely flavourful in a seemingly contradictory subtle way, and I can’t seem to stop eating it. And then all that’s left is a light smear on the platter and a lingering heat on the back of my tongue. I glance up with eyes wide in flavour heaven and Jennifer laughs when I tell her it’s the single best piece of fish I’ve ever put in my mouth. “It’s crazy the extent we go to to catch these fish!” she tells me. They’re found far, far north, essentially on the border with Alaska, in the “deepest, darkest, coldest parts of the ocean,” as

far down as 3,000 feet, and so are incredibly fatty. And it doesn’t have to be smoked to be delicious. For anyone who’s perhaps been hesitant to bring home a piece of this premium fish and try their own hand at cooking it, Jennifer has nothing but encouragement. “You cannot overcook sablefish,” she says firmly. “You could put it in the oven and come back three hours later, and it will still be the best fish you’ve ever eaten.” My next tasting course is a cold-smoked tuna taco and a fresh-from-the-fryer piece of battered lingcod. I give it a minute to cool and take on the taco first. Here, the tuna is seared quickly on both sides, then layered under chipotle mayo, house-made salsa and slaw, and it offers a tasty mix of chewy and crunchy textures, with a good amount of smoky spice. But as good as the taco is, my heart forever lies with all things battered and deep fried, and this is easily one of the best fish and chips I’ve ever eaten. Finest At Sea offers halibut, salmon and lingcod in its deepfried selections, and I find I’m partial to the lingcod. While halibut is a favourite for grilling and baking, it also has a more delicate flavour and texture, and the richer flavour of the lingcod stands up beautifully to the fryer. I take my first bite bare of any tartar sauce, and as I crunch through the outer layer, the sound of the crisped batter breaking apart is as satisfying as the rich flavour. And then for the rest of it, I sort of forget I’m supposed to be savouring this experience to write about it, and the lingcod (and three-quarters of the perfectly salted fries beneath) disappear, until all that’s left are my lightly oiled fingers and a few stray crumbles of fish batter. I lean back, surprisingly stuffed from all my plates, and enjoy the atmosphere, which feels a little wild, a little overflowing, a little loud and a lot friendly. And that’s all down to Jennifer’s intrepid employer and Finest At Sea owner, Bob Fraumeni, who took a childhood obsession with the sea and turned it into a nearly 50-year-old business that’s grown and adapted over the years. And Bob is as passionate about fish as he ever was, says Jennifer. “You know how some people say they live, work and breathe what they love? Bob is the only person I’ve ever known who actually does it. He loves fish,” she says. “That’s what it is. It’s his passion.” B O U L E VA R D

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well and good

Separate but together Navigating the pandemic roller coaster WORDS KAISHA SCOFIELD

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This pandemic has been scary—scary like a slowmoving but never-ending roller coaster that suddenly whips around, turns, but then lingers in the loop-de-loop, leaving us upside down and holding on for weeks on end. Do we even know what’s around the corner, or if there’s a splash zone? Unless you are over 100 years old and lived through the Spanish Flu, it’s likely that until recently you have successfully avoided the seemingly endless and undulating fear that comes from experiencing a global pandemic. One of the most difficult emotions we have had to grapple with is fear. We have carried the weight of this pandemic with our fingers tightly crossed, hoping that those five minutes in the elevator with a stranger won’t lead to infection. With every announcement and restriction, our fear rises and falls until it settles deep into our core.


It’s as if surviving this pandemic and watching the community of support blossom around us has provided a shift in perspective, igniting our bravery and solidifying our resolve. Navigating the world in such a scary and unpredictable state can have profound and confusing effects on our mental and physical health. Mental health reactions can show up as heightened anxiety or depression, mental fatigue, unpredictable irritability and lack of motivation toward tasks that were previously routine. Physically, we can experience digestive irregularities, unusual cravings, appetite suppression, increased appetite, hormonal irregularities and fatigue. What we have experienced is a collective trauma, a global trauma, and this can show up in our lives in unexpected ways. A common treatment for sufferers of traumatic and emotional events is to form and connect with a supportive community, and the unexpected silver lining of living through a truly global pandemic during the age of connectivity is that the communities we can connect with are more expansive than ever before. We may be going through traumatic life events, but at least we are all going through them together. We face this pandemic collectively: even in isolation, we are “separate but together.” Our remote connectivity has, for many, been a saviour in this otherwise dark time. The first Zoom Christmas may have been bleak but it was far better than nothing. All of this extra time spent in physical isolation has led us to spend much more time on digital connections. As our physical connectivity contracted, our global connectivity exploded, and this new connectivity might be what pulls us through or even propels us forward. For many, the depth of the pandemic-induced connectedness was first realized when the Harvard Business Review published an interview with grief expert and celebrated author David Kessler. He suggested that this dull sadness were all feeling was grief. The response was nearly universal. We immediately recognized our own familiarity with grief and knew that he was onto something. We then took to the internet and shared our experiences and the world opened up. Collectively we grieved, still separate but together. Soon after we settled into our shared grieving, we learned a new word: languishing. A brilliant New York Times piece introduced us to this new concept of not quite depressed but not quite flourishing, describing it as the “neglected middle child of mental health.” Languishing is essentially a more concrete word for “meh.” This too resonated with the masses and we

spent weeks discussing our shared feelings of malaise. Our collective yet dispersed global support group solidified and that sense of camaraderie expanded. Experiencing such big feelings collectively can diminish their hold on us. Grief, anxiety and fear can produce huge emotions, but it is often the isolation in which we experience these feelings that causes the real damage to our mental health. Because we have the ability to share this grief and fear with billions of other people, we may have a greater ability to learn and heal more completely. We have an army of support behind us, and this may provide us with the ability to lean into the emotions and release the power they have had over us during the pandemic and beyond. Maybe this brutal world event has taught us something about our own tenacity and that if we can weather this storm, previous life events or big steps that felt so overwhelming prepandemic suddenly seem manageable. You may have noticed people around you taking chances, making moves and going after their dreams. It’s as if surviving this pandemic and watching the community of support blossom around us has provided a shift in perspective, igniting our bravery and solidifying our resolve. There is no doubt that this pandemic has been unimaginably difficult and we are not out of the woods yet. Our steadfast leader through these pandemic times, Dr. Henry, has hopes that we will be back to normal in a matter of months, and while this certainly provides a degree of relief, we are only just glimpsing the light at the end of that tunnel. In the meantime, as this roller coaster slides into the dock, we can tentatively peek at the world and catch a glimpse of the profound changes all around us. We can continue this incredible emotional revolution of connectivity by sharing and supporting each other close to home and across the globe— something which may ultimately lead to a brighter future for mental health and a more compassionate social community. If you are in need of additional support with mental health and/or trauma please reach out to: The BC Mental Health Support Line, 310-6789, heretohelp.bc.ca/get-help or, Indigenous-specific BC Wide: KUU-US Crisis Line, 1-800-588-8717, kuu-uscrisisline.com

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weekender

A WORK OF ART Nelson and Kaslo are rich in art, culture and year-round amenities WORDS + PHOTOGRPAHY SUSAN LUNDY

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T

he view of Nelson from Pulpit Rock is spectacular: the town lies cradled in the valley below us, ringed by mountains and hugging the shoreline of Kootenay Lake’s west arm. Once described as the “prettiest small town in Canada” by the New York Times, the scene before us is as lovely as a painting. And, indeed, this community is a haven of artistic expression. Originally a resource-based town—Nelson was incorporated in the early 1900s after the discovery of silver in 1886—it has morphed into a centre rich in arts and culture. Even the architecture presents as art, and with some 350 restored heritage buildings, there is something to gape at around every corner. Nelson is a place to park the car and explore on foot (although prepare to climb a roller coaster of hills). Our stay in Nelson started in a historic building, The Hume Hotel, which first opened in 1898. The hotel changed hands several times in the early 1900s, underwent a Frank Lloyd Wright-inspired restoration in 1929, fell into disrepair, reemerged as the Heritage Inn and eventually, in 2005, saw

a massive restoration that returned it to its original glory. All the rooms, each named with a nod to the hotel’s history, speak to the past but have modern amenities. We stayed in the Barrister’s Suite, a spacious corner room that includes a king bed, sofa bed, electric fireplace, hardwood floors and soaker tub. It pays homage to the many lawyers who, with the hotel’s close proximity to the courthouse, have requested this room over the decades. The hotel offers several places to dine, and we enjoyed our first meal in Nelson sitting fireside in The Hume’s intimate Library Lounge. Also inside the hotel, you’ll find Mike’s Place Pub, Spiritbar and The General Store Restaurant, where we grabbed a complimentary breakfast the next morning. There’s also a liquor outlet and spa, so you hardly need to leave… But leave you must because located near The Hume is Nelson’s popular Baker Street, with its funky retailers and restaurants, many of which are located in storybook heritage buildings. And from here—keep going! The downtown is packed

www.catherinebabault.com

250-465-1422


PHOTO BY PHIL BEST, COURTESY KOOTENAY ROCKIE TOURISM

with good restaurants, cafes, coffee houses, breweries, local shops, small art galleries, the restored Capitol Theatre (a regional hub for the performing arts) and impromptu theatre venues. Or, take a walking tour of mural-art created by artists from around the world. Nelson is a year-round destination with activities that range from sitting in hot springs, to kayaking and other lake activities, golfing, fishing, snow sports and mountain biking. But if you want to see more art, hop into a vehicle and head to the sweet town of Kaslo, located one hour north along scenic Highway 31. Another history-rich town, Kaslo also has beautifully renovated buildings to enjoy, including The Langham, a former grand hotel built in the mid-1890s, and which now houses the Langham Cultural Society, a charitable public arts heritage centre, and the Japanese Canadian Museum. Beautiful parks with pristine beaches surround the downtown, and you can also explore the restored S.S. Moyie, the world’s oldest intact stern-wheeler. But just above the town is the pièce de résistance for art lovers: the Hide and Seek art installation on the Kaslo River Trail. Combining a beautiful forested hike with larger-thanlife sculptures that emerge from the forest floor, this installation seems to be the epitome of creativity. My visit to Nelson ended with a Stone & Spice Massage at The Hume’s Aura Spa. Let me tell you, this “rebalancing” treatment, which combined hot stones, deep tissue massage and a sweetly scented Indian spice serum, is not to be missed. It is a work of art.

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Soha encompasses the Artistic side of SERAC. She credits her artistically minded family, mainly her father, a pioneer, and professor of Architecture from Florence, Italy. Soha Sepehri B.ARCH/INTERIOR DESIGNER, CO-FOUNDER

seracstudios.com soha@seracstudios.com 604.312.6047


do. Hike to Pulpit Rock. This classic Nelson hike is a fairly steep trail, offering fantastic views of Nelson and Kootenay Lake from the top. Locals, it turns out, use the hike as an outdoor gym, many of them running by us as we huffed and puffed our way up. Those with energy left after reaching Pulpit Rock (elevation 338 metres) can hike up to a second outlook called Flagpole (elevation 655 metres). Round-trip distance is 3.6 kilometres to Pulpit Rock and 5.8 kilometres to Flagpole. After this rather rigorous hike, you’ll want to explore Nelson’s thriving brewery scene, which includes Torchlight Brewing, Nelson Brewing Company and Backroads Brewing Company. Nelson, once renowned for its illegal marijuana production, is now home to several legal cannabis distributors, as well.

eat. Don’t miss Yum Son in Nelson or Bluebelle Bistro in Kaslo. Yum Son is Nelson’s very first Viet-modern restaurant—and the food is divine. They also charge for wine by the ounce, an option that makes so much sense, it should be universal. Yum Son brings the flavours of southeast Asia into each of its cocktails and culinary dishes, and it’s all served up in a lively setting. Over in Kaslo, food at the Bluebell Bistro is extraordinary. This historic bistro showcases local organic products amid excellent menu options. Other recommended spots in Nelson include: Oso Negro Cafe, Nelson’s informal meeting house; Marzano, a modern Italian restaurant; Broken Hill, with an extensive whiskey library and cocktail program plus a Texas-barbecue-inspired menu; Cantina Del Centro, authentic and unique Mexican street food; and Red Light Ramen, soul food, apothecary cocktails, fresh ingredients and rich umami flavours. Yum. PHOTO COURTESY KOOTENAY ROCKIE TOURISM

see. The Hide and Seek art installation at Kaslo River Trail is the latest installation of a “Discover the Koots” series of sculptures, and the creation of a trio of artists from nearby Argenta—Yvonne Boyd, Christopher Petersen and Spring Shine. Poking out from behind rocks and under trees are eight large reinforced-concrete sculptures, depicting seven children playing hide-and-seek and one adult watching over them. To get there, find the pullout off Highway 31A as you leave Kaslo, heading towards New Denver. From here, hike down to the Trailblazers Bridge. When you cross the bridge to get to the south side of the river, look up see two faces looking back at you. As you continue downstream on the Kaslo River South Trail, the rest of the sculptures emerge. And even without the art, this is a beautiful walk.

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sidetrip

majestic & serene The healing waters of Halcyon Hot Springs Resort calm the whole system in a landscape that inspires awe WORDS + PHOTOGRAPHY LIA CROWE

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Halcyon Hot Springs Resort is steeped in history and situated in the pristine postcardworthy wilderness of BC. It taps into healing waters that are unique in their naturally occurring high lithium content and f low from deep within the mountains. Over the resplendent peaks of distant mountains, dark clouds tinged with purple and orange spill towards Arrow Lake like an avalanche full with the threat of rain and electricity. I’m simultaneously charged by the powerful storm unfolding in front of us—and completely at peace, thanks to the warm waters of the hot springs in which my partner and I are currently soaking. Deep in the Slocan Valley, nestled between the great Monashee and Selkirk mountain ranges, lies Halcyon Hot Springs Resort, which is steeped in history and situated in the pristine postcard-worthy wilderness of BC. It taps into healing waters that are unique in their naturally occurring high lithia content and flow from deep within the mountains. Arriving at Halcyon, we immediately drop into a different frequency. Everything from the aromatherapy candle to the mindful reading material and chilled white wine in our cabin indicates we have entered a space where wellbeing is at the forefront. We rejoice at the bliss of having no cell service—although wifi is available throughout if needed— and settle in for a few days of connection and self-care to the soundtrack of wild birdsong. B O U L E VA R D

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Delightfully “nerding out” on the history of Halcyon—a word used to reference times of calm and tranquility—I discover that the first hotel was built on the property in 1890, when visitors came to soak in the lithium-laden mineral waters, believed to aid in a variety of ailments from rheumatism to strokes. As we tour the property with marketing manager Patrick Spencer, its history is palpable and I easily envision guests arriving by steamship to experience the restorative nature of the healing waters. Halcyon has been through many transformations since the 1890s, partly due to a devastating fire in 1955 and a rebuild in 1998. Today, as one tours the 33-acre property there are remnants of the past—such as a beautiful preserved chapel, dating back to the 1950s— juxtaposed against areas of new growth, such as the luxurious accommodations, a gorgeous outdoor sanctuary that will be used as an event space and the site of a future food garden and greenhouse. Under new ownership now, the resort continues to evolve with a distinct vision as a unique, world-class, luxury experience. Part of that vision is to add to the relaxation component offered by the hot springs and full-service spa by partnering with local adventure tourism companies. The goal is to support local businesses and, at the same time, expand the guest experience to include activities such as whitewater rafting, fishing charters, yoga retreats, artisan workshops and helicopter tours in summer and winter.

Chef Darryl Crumb.

“We want guests to enjoy the slow life and, if they want, have something else to do. It’s important to us that we take care of our local community as well,” says Patrick. The resort recently brought in Chef Darryl Crumb to head up the Alcedo restaurant, and his experience ranges from being on Top Chef Canada to cooking in high-end restaurants in Paris, France. Darryl says he’s all about simple, high-quality, farm-to-table food reminiscent of the cuisine of the French alps, and he believes in making everything from scratch. “I grew up on a farm in Manitoba, which is where my love of food started, and it has always been a dream of mine to share that farm-to-table experience. We have some really nice farms in this area so we’ll keep it as local as possible and grow as much as possible on this property. I really hope to make this a culinary destination.” I have to agree with Darryl as our enjoyment of spending hours in the hot springs and then unwinding further with a massage in the spa is now equally matched as we’re presented with a plate of fresh Kusshi oysters, cold and flavourful, followed by smoked duck that melts in my mouth, all the while gazing out on the million-dollar view as the sun dips behind the mountains.

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Come journey through our store and be inspired to define your own distinct style. Our passion is all about exploring the four corners of the world, and bringing back to our customers quality furniture and accessories that will enhance their lives and make dream homes become a reality.

Visit one of our 5 locations or browse our website and discover everything we have to offer. Escape the ordinary with Muse & Merchant.

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fi


Using 3D software, customers become the designers, choosing the shape and size of the tabletop and the shape, size and complexity of the base, from minimal to exuberantly baroque. 42

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in studio …

When the customer is the designer Roche Bobois’ innovative Corail table uses 3D printing technology WORDS LIN STRANBERG

This year, Roche Bobois introduced the new Corail dining table, a breakthrough innovation made with largescale 3D printing technology, customized to match the customer’s unique vision. This bold new innovation is set to change the relationship between consumers and design, and between the industry and its distribution. The Corail table features an organically shaped base in ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) with flowing curves that supports a tempered glass top, so the interior of the base is clearly visible from above. Its name translates to coral, which it somewhat resembles. “We turned to the team of Fritsch and Durisotti as design collaborators,” said Cindy Susilo, Roche Bobois marketing director. “We had worked with them in the past. They had a nautical

design background, having designed kayaks and amphibious boats, with the technical expertise that was the right fit for this project.” Since its beginnings as a Parisian furniture store more than 60 years ago, Roche Bobois has collaborated closely with both design professionals and customers. Most of the items in the product line are customizable in their dimensions, fabric and leather choices as well as in many materials and finishes. The Corail dining table nudges customization to the next level. When choosing a Corail, a customer can literally design their own table within the parameters of the base design. Using 3D software on the Roche Bobois website or in-store with the help of a Roche Bobois advisor, customers become the designer, choosing the shape and size

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of the tabletop and the shape, size and complexity of the base, from minimal to exuberantly baroque. And they can apply as much as they wish of the beautiful woven effect the printer will create, wherever in the design they want. Through the configurator, they can see the result come to life. Purchasers become a force in the design process, the creators of their unique model. Their choices are saved and represent the “genetic code” used by the printer. Once this code has been entered into the printing unit, the 3D automaton is activated. In a continuous upward movement, the digitally operated nozzle pours out a ribbon of concrete in coiled layers, according to the code. The concrete coils harden during the layering process and the base, which takes about half an hour to produce, needs about 10 days to fully dry. The process is aligned with the Roche Bobois approach to eco-consciousness, which has involved the development of an assessment tool they call Eco8 used to measure the environmental impact of their products. The goal is to produce Corail tables locally. Right now, they are made in France, and it is envisioned that eventually Roche Bobois will be able to simply send a digital file to a local printer equipped with the technology, and considerably reduce the carbon footprint by cutting down on transport. 3D printing, a process of making three-dimensional solid objects from a digital file, has been around for awhile. It is additive in the sense that it creates an object by laying down successive layers of material, rather than subtractive, which involves cutting or hollowing out a piece of metal or plastic using a machine, for example. It uses less material and can be done wherever an appropriately sized 3D printer is available. Because it streamlines, simplifies and reduces the costs of designing furniture, it has radically impacted the furniture industry. As has often been the case, Roche-Bobois is among the first to use this process to innovate new breakthroughs in furniture. For example, the Mah Jong modular sofa—now an iconic piece that furnished the outdoor space for nominees and pre44

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senters at the 93rd Oscars in Los Angeles—marked a breakthrough in design when it was first created in 1971. Designed by painter/sculptor Hans Hopfer, the Mah Jong introduced a new freedom in function and form. The pieces could be configured as a sofa, armchair, lounge chair or bed and could be customized with fabrics from internationallyrenowned designers. The Mah Jong sofa transformed the concept of furniture. It was a nonconformist design that really took off in those nonconformist times. It was radical then— and is still hugely popular now. For the 93rd Oscars, Roche Bobois collaborated with the award-winning Rockwell Group, creating various compositions of the Mah Jong modular sofa in an outdoor fabric from MissoniHome. Using the Mah Jong groupings and Cute Cut cocktail tables, fresh and silk florals and lantern lighting, they created a sophisticated and whimsical outdoor space for the exclusive use of the nominees and presenters, in a cool colour palette inspired by the original tile work at Union Station, where the event took place. This year, Roche Bobois celebrates 50 years of the Mah Jong sofa. “The Mah Jong has been our number one bestselling sofa in Vancouver and Calgary year after year,” said Ray Deleurme, who has owned the Roche Bobois showroom in downtown Vancouver for 17 years. The brand itself, which has been in Vancouver for more than 35 years, is well-known and has a substantial following of devoted clients. “Customization is a very popular feature,” Ray said. “Our clientele is exacting and they know just what they want. And with our vast collection, it’s very rare we can’t find something for every client. I am very excited to bring the Corail table to our showroom. I think it is set to become another iconic Roche-Bobois piece and will be the first step in an exciting new direction.” Cindy Susilo enthusiastically agrees. “The Corail table is opening the door to a variety of exponential possibilities.”


From the first toast to the final bite, relish every moment and meal. From the first toast to the final bite, relish every moment and meal.

Cooking. Refrigeration. Dishwashing. Cooking. Refrigeration. Dishwashing.

Vancouver Showroom • 13780 Bridgeport Road Richmond, BC V6V 1V3 • 604-244-1744 Vancouver Showroom • 13780 Bridgeport Road Richmond, BC V6V 1V3 • 604-244-1744


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Suit: Dolce & Gabbana Shoes: Michael Kors B O U L E VA R D PHOTO BY LIA CROWE


A noteworthy cause These prize homes reveal like music to your senses

PHOTO BY SHEILA SAY PHOTOGRAPHY

WORDS LISA MANFIELD PHOTOGRAPHY LIA CROWE + SHEILA SAY PHOTOGRAPHY

BC Children’s Hospital Dream Lottery has done it again this year with a lineup of prize homes that will strike the right chord with anyone who is inspired to support paediatric health care advances in this province. British Columbians have become much more conscious of the growing need to support health care initiatives and research, says BC Children’s Hospital Dream Lottery spokesperson Erin Cebula. “I think many people have taken this time to reflect on what really matters. It’s family, friends and certainly our health,” she says.


HOME SWEET DREAM HOME In a year when home has become not just home, but also the office and school, as well as a space to retreat and isolate in comfort, many people have been in hot pursuit of home upgrades that meet their growing needs. And these prize homes are like music to your senses, with stunning custom-crafted features and furnishings packages that will make your housing dreams come true—all while you help families and children with complex medical needs. “Home has become top of mind for so many of us this year,” Erin says. “Because of the pandemic, people have been putting a lot of energy into the place where they spend most of their time.” Enter the BC Children’s Hospital Dream Lottery with a roster of prize-winning homes to choose from, like this Marquis Custom Homes prize-home package worth over $2.9 million. It is one of two homes to choose from in South Surrey’s Morgan Creek. It only takes a quick glance around this house to know it’s something special. The five-bedroom, 5.5-bathroom dream home boasts 5,744 square feet of living space plus an 804-square-foot garage situated in a quiet neighbourhood on a 10,012-square-foot lot.

Dress: Dolce & Gabbana Vest: Alexander McQueen Earrings: Oscar de la Renta PHOTO BY LIA CROWE

Every 2021 BC Children’s Hospital Dream Lottery ticket you buy gets you a chance to win this $2.9 million-dollar home (and a gorgeous slate of others)— and to help advance medical research that can help conquer serious childhood illnesses. 48

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OVER A DECADE OF EXPERTISE IN BRINGING IDEAS INTO REALITY

No Limit Framing Ltd. has been excelling in modern, refined, bespoke single family and multi-family residences throughout the Fraser Valley and Greater Vancouver regions with many homes built to date. We have worked with the best architects, engineers and developers in the area and continue to prove our expertise in the industry. Quality and consistency are critical to our success. Combining safety, quality, and efficiency has created consistent results for our clients, every time and all the time. We enjoy a sustained client base due to unwavering commitment to premium framing practices.

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Designed in the modern farmhouse style, this home features a warm and inviting open plan, with a great room, formal living and dining room and office den on the main floor, a spice kitchen adjacent to a luxurious chef ’s kitchen, four bedrooms on the upper floor, each with its own private bathroom suite, and a fully furnished basement with another bedroom, a large entertainment area, wine cellar, wet bar, recreation room, lounge and a state-of-the-art soundproof theatre room with an 11-foot screen. The basement also houses a wellness area with a zen room, gym and steam shower. Out back, a fully landscaped garden with built-in irrigation, hot tub and covered terrace comes complete with an outdoor kitchen, linked by way of a nine-foot eclipse window, to the indoor kitchen. The home’s many large windows offer maximum natural light throughout, while the engineered hardwood floors with radiant heating bring warmth to every corner. High-end lighting and plumbing fixtures, air conditioning and a built-in home audio system and security system round out the features list. PHOTOS BY SHEILA SAY PHOTOGRAPHY

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Out of this world experience... Galaxy Fireplaces has been a leading fireplace retailer in the lower mainland area since 2001. In the last two decades, we have earned our reputation by consistently providing industry-leading products, customer service, and technical expertise. We concentrate our efforts on what we do best - providing an experience beyond compare. Our pre-sale and post-installation services are at a top-caliber level, with a product catalog that ranges from the traditional to the very modern.

We offer a distinctive range of outdoor kitchen suites with built-in grills, patio heaters, fire pits, and tables for all your outdoor living needs. Discover indoor-outdoor fireplaces and outdoor living products at our Surrey showroom, where you will experience the latest brands and have the chance to see our products in action. Our expert team is always available to guide you through selection to installation. We are proud to offer some of the best-in-class fireplace brands like Amantii, Heatilator, Montigo, and Savannah. Our outdoor living products consist of brands like Hestan and Jackson grills - renowned for creating the most advanced and versatile kitchen equipment and grills. We provide a unique shopping experience and stand behind all of our recommendations. Our knowledgeable staff and experienced installers are here to help you make your dream space a reality.

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TOUR DE MARQUIS

Kam Dhami, president and owner of Marquis Custom Homes.

PHOTO BY LIA CROWE

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They say that home is where the heart is, and as you step through the gorgeous threshold to this home, uniquely designed with custom-crafted beams and entrance doors, and onto the chevron-patterned hall floor, you’ll instantly feel the heart in the form of the loving craftsmanship that has gone into every inch of space. To the left, a formal yet comfortable sitting room beckons visitors with its warm wood floors and beams. To the right, a home office offers privacy, organization and inspiration for today’s remote worker, with built-in cabinets, ample storage and display space, and uniquely styled finishings, such as black window casings. Further along the hallway, a formal dining room and powder room provide the perfect spaces for entertaining family and special guests, each offering inspired designs and finishings, such as gold faucets. Then the great room, with its 18-foot ceilings, leads right into the heart of the home. A spacious chef ’s kitchen features warm wood finishes and stone countertops with a six-foot waterfall island. Appliances include a Thermador range top, wall oven with steam convection and dishwasher. Black cabinets, integrated refrigerators and large windows elevate the experience of nourishing friends and family. An adjacent spice kitchen allows for a private space for prep and clean up, and features a Fulgor Milano professional gas range and Blomberg fridge/freezer plus an additional dishwasher. Next door, a laundry/mudroom with tall cabinetry provides ample space for family members to store their shoes and gear. Upstairs, exposed custom wood beams, custom geometric millwork on the walls, rustic patterned tiles and black and gold hardware bring personality into every bedroom and en suite. Kids’ rooms offer cosy window sitting areas and built-in toy storage, while the master bedroom’s limestone fireplace, soaker tub and walk-in closet bring the ultimate in comfort to this intimate enclave. On the lower level, a glassed-in wine cellar under the stairs is easily accessible to the adjoining wet bar, while a large gym space, spa, recreation room and home theatre round out the basement space.


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Home & Patio • Indoor & Outdoor • Firetables • Umbrellas & Rugs • Accessories & More


Dress: Alexander McQueen Earrings: Oscar de la Renta Head scarf: Eldo

PHOTO BY LIA CROWE

Erin Cebula is seen here in the second of two 2021 BC Children's Hospital Dream Lottery prize homes located in South Surrey's Morgan Creek.

Stylist: Sarah D’Arcey Hair and mkeup artist: Heather Nightingale Wardrobe courtesy of Nordstrom Vancouver

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For Kam Dhami, president and owner of Marquis Custom Homes, the opportunity to participate in the BC Children’s Hospital Dream Lottery this year has been perfectly in alignment with his goal of building homes that support families in the community. “Marquis Custom Homes continually strives to design and create homes that function to support the everyday lives of families by giving them a home to enjoy, beginning and ending their days together,” he says. “I am honoured that another one of my projects has been chosen by the BC Children’s Hospital Foundation for this year’s lottery [last year’s BC Hometown Heroes Marquis prize home won the 2021 Havan award for best kitchen design]. It is very important to support our local hospitals, especially the only children’s hospital in British Columbia. I have been a long-time supporter of BC Children’s, and there will always be a need to donate to the hospital to support the vision of ensuring every child is healthy and able to fulfill their hopes and dreams.” For Erin, who has worked to help promote the BC Children’s Hospital Dream Lottery for over 14 years, all of this year’s prize packages represent not only the chance to upgrade one’s living situation, but also to help make medical research breakthroughs possible for children who need them most— everything from opening the door to novel therapies for conditions like childhood cancer or rare diseases, to discovering life-changing breakthroughs in the way experts deliver care or perform surgeries. “Buy your tickets early,” she says. “We sell out almost every year.”


BUILT ON A F O U N D AT I O N O F E XC E L L E N C E Building homes for over 16 years Award-winning, lottery grand prize home builder, Marquis Custom Homes, demonstrates a passionate pursuit of detail-rich, value-driven design and high quality construction that provides homeowners with a masterfully planned and executed living environment. Integrating distinctive homes into surrounding communities and neighbourhoods, we use our expertise to work closely with our clients and realize their vision by making their dream home a reality. We are committed to quality, durability, craftsmanship, value and detail.

604-808-0790 www.marquiscustomhomes.ca


spaces we love

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A modern spin on an ’80s home WORDS DAWN SONDERGAARD

A love for their neighbourhood was a deciding factor for this busy professional couple with a young family as they looked to stay put and renovate their 1980s-built home. Featuring dark, dysfunctional rooms, beige walls and limited access between entertaining areas, the house needed an upgrade in its look and function, bringing it into the 21st century. Twin Lions Contracting delivered expert renovation and building advice for this whole home renovation that is now recognized as the 2021 winner of the HAVAN Awards Best Kitchen Renovation $75,000 to $125,000 category. Removing walls between the dining room and entry, with a small addition to the kitchen and family room, has transformed the main floor area into an open-concept space for easy, everyday living. The addition of an expansive 16-foot sliding glass door creates an excellent connection between the kitchen, family room and the backyard. The new kitchen features extensive highgloss white cabinetry that runs along the perimeter wall, creating the perfect backdrop for the ultimate working triangle with thoughtful organization. Perfect for a busy family, there’s additional counter space and storage found in the oversized, custom-built, two-level linear island with seating for four, plus additional seating for four at a dining-table height. The multilevel design creates space for multi-tasking with ease, while ensuring room for everyone. Unique black Kuzco surface-mount lights located over the island present a pleasant glow for added ambiance and task lighting, without obscuring sight-lines. The existing skylights were retained and incorporated into the new design and a large window was added to the new extension, ensuring abundant light throughout. The home’s fresh white palette offers the perfect tone for the family’s treasured artwork featuring modern interpretations of classic rock artists. Grounded by a wide-plank alabaster finish, with oak flooring throughout, the main floor emanates a fresh modern cohesive flow, perfect for care-free entertainment with family and friends for years to come. Let’s get the party started! To view award-winning home renovation projects in Metro Vancouver, check out havan.ca/awards B O U L E VA R D

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fashion

SkywalK High above the tree line, overlooking a cast of turkey vultures—as they circle, catching thermals—roams a skywalker. Boulevard visits the brand new Malahat SkyWalk, which sits at the summit of the Malahat Drive on Vancouver Island and presents a lofty world, entered through the trees. Ascend a spiral and then step into the majesty of the sky. Colours of dry earth mixed with organic prints and textures, fashion for fall 2021 blends with the landscape and, at the same time, dazzles against it.

PHOTOGRAPHY LIA CROWE STYLING JEN EVANS + KATHERINE SUNA


Talitha dress in rose ($655) by Ulla Johnson; Bronze Smoke Collar ($390) and Anni Earrings ($240), both by Lizzie Fortunato and all from from Bernstein & Gold.


Black faux leather trench jacket ($178) by Esqualo from Damsels Fashion Collections; Bone earrings ($150) by Dandi Maestre from Hughes; Keara heeled sandal ($450) by Chie Mihara from Footloose.


Eryn mini dress ($235) by Faithfull The Brand from Bernstein & Gold; Bone earrings ($150) by Dandi Maestre from Hughes; felt necklace ($225) by veronicalynndesigns. com from William Mathews Bookshop; Keara heeled sandal ($450) by Chie Mihara from Footloose.


Inwear Kasya Dress in Cinnamon ($179) from Hughes; Wave earrings in mother of pearl ($198) by Lizzie Fortunato from Bernstein & Gold; Wild Feather Wings ($1525) by veronicalynndesigns. com from Williams Mathews Bookshop.

Makeup: Jen Clark Model: Bridget Boldy Production assistant: Amelia Woodley Photographed on location at the Malahat SkyWalk. A huge thank you to everyone there for hosting our team for the day.


business class

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RISING above the noise Carrie Barlow WORDS LAUREN KRAMER

Founder of Barlow Media, Carrie Barlow is a woman at the helm of an industry where her clients share a singular goal: to rise above the marketplace noise and get their messages heard. Carrie’s specialty is helping her clients affirm their core target audience, identifying that demographic’s psychographic and sociographic profile and then devising and executing a media strategy that will allow their messaging to be amplified. At 57, her client roster has included big names like Kal Tire, SunRype, Concert Properties, CityTV, London Drugs, A&W, Value Village, the BC government and United Way, while her political work has encompassed national advocacy groups and many provincial and federal elections. A small-town girl from Prince George, Carrie knew her calling from day one. She left home at 18 to study marketing and communications at BCIT in Vancouver and, after graduating, joined an agency and launched her career in advertising. The next 18 years were a blur of 50-hour work weeks as she addressed the needs of clients large and small, and later, added a part-time teaching position at BCIT in strategic media planning and buying to her schedule. But by 2000, pregnant with her son, she was ready for change. Suspecting that those long hours at the agency were incompatible with child raising, she started Barlow Media out of a home office in North Vancouver. “I knew there were BC-based clients out there seeking local media-buying agencies staffed by people who lived among the same consumers and understood the marketplace and its challenges, rather than working with a Toronto-based agency,” she reflected. “I was lucky to have the support of several clients who left the agency to work with me, and thanks to my teaching position at BCIT, I could pick the cream of the crop as my staff base. In media, team talent is your only offering.” Within nine months Barlow Media had outgrown its home

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PHOTOGRAPHY LIA CROWE

office and moved into commercial office space. Today the company has 10 media buyers on staff, the majority of them graduates of the program Carrie still teaches to this day. “All of us at Barlow Media are trained in media planning, buying, strategy and maintenance across all media, offline and online,” she explained. “Clients come to us with a product, service or message they need to communicate, and after reaffirming their core target audiences and the required response for success, we construct a media journey of the exposure they need, be it visual, audio, digital, mobile or even game-based. Once we have a cohesive plan in place, we execute the strategy.” A testament to her skill in devising custom media strategies, Carrie’s clients are loyal and enduring. Case in point: Kal Tire has been a client for 20 years. “All our clients respect the fact that it takes so much today to be part of the conversation and to have your message really rise above the noise,” she says. “Narrative and tone are really at the forefront of the social and editorial space, and our clients need the personal investment and custom solutions that a media company like ours is able to deliver.” Hers is an industry where change occurs at lightning speed, which means media planners and buyers have to be on their toes, educating themselves about new regulations and innovations across the media landscape. Because Barlow Media has a relatively small, nimble team, decisions can happen fast, allowing strategies to pivot and respond to changing conditions immediately. The pandemic presented its own set of unique conditions. The contracting market meant companies were running lean and trying to make their finances stretch ever further. For Barlow Media’s team, that created the perfect storm of opportunity. “You test your skills during the bad times more than the

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good, and when we leaned in together, we created far more cost-efficient, inventive and effective plays within the media landscape,” she says. In terms of media consumption, it was also a time of turbulent change. “[Former US president] Trump created a situation where people who never read the news before are now reading it and having an opinion on it. To me, that’s a victory,” she says. “In Canada we saw people in all demographics, but particularly the younger demographics, engaging in the news. That’s great because it impacts society and gets people more involved in their communities.” Carrie clearly loves the exhilarating, break-neck pace of media buying, and the challenges it presents. But she’s the first to admit that while being her own boss helped her create a work environment wherein she could juggle motherhood with a career, it didn’t necessarily make life easier. She still works 35- to 40-hour work weeks, and 50-hour marathons when she’s working on election campaigns. “The hardest boss you’ll ever work for is yourself,” she says with a laugh. “If I don’t get out of bed, no one else will do it for me. Starting my own business gave me the freedom to make decisions and realign the way I perceive balance, but to this day, it’s still a struggle to maintain that balance, but these are exciting times and I just don’t want to stop.”

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LIVING BETTER STARTS HERE™

Photos: Janis Nicolay Designer: Jamie Banfield Design

Your journey to better living starts with us. Your home is more than just a project – it’s a feeling, an experience, memories made, and moments lived. Learn how we can make your dreams a reality for your next home reno or build. This kitchen in a 30-year-old mid-century Vancouver Special received a much-needed make-over from Alair Homes. Working with designer Jamie Banfield, Alair renovated the entire 3,200 square foot home, a project that required restructuring the entire upper floor, installing wooden beams, and moving the kitchen. The result is a brighter and more spacious open-concept living space. The 24-foot-long galley-style kitchen includes warm walnut flooring, rich walnut and white cabinetry, and is punctuated by black fixtures and industrial-style lighting. The custom gas stove features a stainless backsplash that ties in the kitchen’s stainless steel appliances. The 10-foot long Cae-

sarstone-topped island includes hidden double-sided cupboards for extra storage. No upper cabinetry was installed to optimize the window space. This design feature maximizes views to the backyard, and also serves as a way to bring the lush outdoor greenery in. In addition to kitchen renovations, Alair Homes is known for its luxury custom-built homes and large-scale renovations. Founded in 2007 in Nanaimo, Alair Homes now has nearly 100 offices across North America, including more than two dozen in British Columbia. Alair Homes prides itself on meticulous planning and transparent budgeting, providing clients certainty in construction.

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Beyond the pale Kitchen trends that add colour, warmth and durability to your space WORDS LISA MANFIELD PHOTOGRAPHY LIA CROWE

Spending more time at home over the past year has inspired many homeowners to invest in revamping their kitchen space. And that has led to a host of trends that are making the heart of the home more functional and fun. Katerina Vastardis of Designs by KS gave us the scoop on what’s hot in kitchen designs this year. And while the modern white kitchen isn’t going out of style anytime soon, she noted that many of the latest trends are adding character, visual interest and more functionality to today’s kitchens.  Katerina recently designed her own kitchen, and bringing in some warmth was one of her goals. “I don’t want a stark house,” she says. “I used a mixture of materials and textures so it’s not cold but still contemporary. It’s modern but with character.” To achieve that sense of warmth, Katerina mixed oak and walnut in the same space and installed black cabinets to cool the brown hues. “There’s not too much white in my kitchen,” she says. “The only white is the walls.” To introduce even more texture, Katerina added ceiling slats leading into the laundry room, and created open shelving instead of

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upper cabinets to display her cookbooks and canisters. Because she’s an avid cook and entertainer, she also bulked up functionality with an oversized five-foot sink and double dishwashers. “One is full size and the other is a dishwasher drawer, which carries over whatever the initial dishwasher couldn’t handle—wine glasses, for example.” Whatever your kitchen style and goals, this year’s trends have got something for everyone. Here are four common trends Katerina is seeing in kitchens this year.

OPTIMIZED STORAGE

There’s something to be said about the notion of “a place for everything, and everything in its place.” Especially in a busy kitchen. That could explain why Katerina is seeing more and more people opt for enhanced organization systems, such as interior cabinet accessories, uniform storage units and appliance garages, which hide all the small appliances you use on a regular basis, while keeping them easily accessible. “The appliance garage is a builtin cabinet with a door that covers your small appliances, but when you move the door out of the way, your mixer or blender or toaster is still at counter height,” she says. “You can use a mechanism called a servo drive so that the door opens with the touch of your hand.”   Interior cabinets are also getting a makeover, with accessories such as pantry pullouts to organize items like oils and spices that are used daily. “With the COVID-19 pandemic, people took home organization to the next level,” Katerina says. “Now, everything is labelled and stored in same-size containers. I’ve got all my oils labelled, and baskets and bins to hold everything for easy pull-out.”  And bonus: easy access and hideaway storage mean more space for prep and less time cleaning up. 

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COLOURFUL AND TEXTURED FINISHES

If you’ve been waiting for a chance to colour your world, the time is now as white cabinets make way for colourful millwork. “Colours are coming back in,” Katerina says. “For years we were only seeing accent pieces, for example, just the island in a colour like blue. Now we’re seeing people use colour as an overall look; a whole blue or green kitchen.” Earth tones tend to be the favoured hues, but Katerina is currently doing an apartment with a pink kitchen. And it’s not just coloured millwork. “In my house, in my daughter’s bathroom, the tiles are pink!” she says.  If colour isn’t your thing, texture might be an option for a creative finish. Quartz has been a kitchen countertop mainstay for a while, and now, wood grains are making a return to cabinets and accents to warm up the space. Backsplash tiles are another great way to add texture to your kitchen tableau. 

COOKTOPS, STEAM OVENS AND PANELLED APPLIANCES

Separating your cooking surface from your oven is a great way to create a more continuous countertop space, which not only looks sleeker but is also easier to clean. “Many of my clients are opting for a cooktop stacked on top of a wall oven, instead of a slide-in range, as it gives you a more built-in look,” Katerina says.


She’s also seeing many clients foregoing microwaves in favour of steam ovens. “They’re a healthier option and offer a richer flavour profile.”

FINALLY, THINK PANELLING, PANELLING, PANELLING.

“Almost everything is panelled in my house,” Katerina says. “Off the kitchen is the pantry area and there’s a freestanding fridge; it’s all panelled. My freezer is also panelled, and my wine fridge is as well. Panelling your appliances offers minimal lines instead of stainless steel as a feature.” And it helps to make small spaces look bigger, so it’s a great option for condos in particular. Another added bonus to panelling? It’s an opportunity to bring in more colour.

RESILIENT SURFACES

Hardwood floors will always be a classic design, but they’re not only expensive, they’re also less resilient than an engineered product. “Man-made materials are getting better,” Katerina says. “We’re seeing a trend toward vinyl plank, which is waterproof, stain-proof and scratchresistant”—qualities that are especially valuable in the kitchen. Similarly, the kitchen island quartz waterfall leg, an extended slab that runs both horizontally as well as the vertical length of the island to the floor, is still going strong and adds a pop of durable continuity to an area that often takes a bit of a beating.  Tile is gaining momentum as well, Katerina says, with its durability and fun design options for kitchen backsplashes and countertops. “It’s durable and waterproof, and we’re seeing more patterns, shapes and colours come through. People are not hesitating to take that plunge and amp up the interest in their home.” If a kitchen upgrade is on your to-do list, this year’s trends offer a perfect recipe for letting your personality shine through. So go ahead and cook up a kitchen design that’s uniquely you.  

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Silvie Pantsios (left) and Katerina Vastardis of Designs by KS.

This year, kitchens are becoming more vivid, more organized and more resilient than ever as designers amp up the functionality and fun.


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food and feast

À votre santé!

Raise your glass to making it through a challenging 18 months WORDS ELLIE SHORTT

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PHOTOGRAPHY LIA CROWE


i

have a confession to make: I enjoy coming up with cocktail concoctions slightly more than I do food recipes. Perhaps it’s because the task is a tad novel since I’m a food writer and nutritionist, or maybe it’s because I bartended for about 10 years to help support my schooling and early stages of my career—either way, muddling, shaking, stirring and pouring holds a special place in my heart. I am by no means a true mixologist, but as a recipe developer I do understand the art of finding balanced and pleasing flavour combinations. I also love entertaining. Granted, it’s something I haven’t been able to do for a while thanks to pandemic life (not to mention being a new mom), but I have historically liked to have a cocktail ready for arriving guests to sip and distract while I put the final touches on the meal. Another less obvious advantage of coming up with my own concoctions is that I can experiment with certain hidden benefits of boozy libations. Alcoholic beverages have a long history of “curing what ails you,” and while some attributions are simply superstition or merely wishful thinking, many brews offer opportunities for more than just a blissful buzz.

Digestifs traditionally help prime the belly for an abundant meal, while apéritifs may similarly settle the stomach following an overindulgent feast, and raw ferments have long been recognized as offering a boost to one’s microbiome. Bitters ease digestive discomfort, as does the vinegary tang of shrubs— two elements often incorporated in many cocktails, including a couple of the ones featured here. But the greatest benefit of all, perhaps? The smile that spreads across your face after those first couple sips, and that joyful celebratory feeling that overtakes your body as a glass is raised with loved ones. Because I love creating cocktails so much, I have a vast anthology of options and choosing just a few to share here was an admittedly tormenting task. As an attempt to focus this undertaking, and recognizing that this is in fact a food column, I went with a much-loved culinary theme: fruit and herbs. While mint may be what commonly comes to mind in the cocktail realm, unexpected herbs usually reserved for savoury dishes—like rosemary, thyme, tarragon and basil—often offer a layer of sophistication and intrigue to an otherwise tiresome tipple. My favourite method of infusing the flavours of herbs

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Tangerine + Tarragon Tequila Sunrise

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Whether you’re beginning to invite friends and family into your homes again and are looking for a fun new refreshment to try together, or if you’re still more comfortable sipping and savouring solo or with your immediate household, I encourage you to raise a toast to good health!


into a cocktail is to do just that: take a handful of your select herb, shove it into a bottle of booze of choice, let it sit overnight and strain the next day. Now, if you’re working with top-shelf liquor, and are only making a drink or two, you might not be so keen on tainting the whole batch, so in this case I suggest separating out what you’d like to infuse and combining it in a sealable glass jar with a smaller sprig of your choosing. Of course, without implementing this method you can still enjoy herbaceous benefits, whether you muddle, shake or simply stir it in, depending on the specific drink and level of botanical intensity you’re seeking. I just find it provides a depth to the flavour profiles presented in the following offerings. I should also mention that many of these can be made non-alcoholic by either leaving out the liquor altogether or substituting your favourite zero-proof spirit. So whether you’re beginning to invite friends and family into your homes again and are looking for a fun new refreshment to try together, or if you’re still more comfortable sipping and savouring solo or with your immediate household, I encourage you to raise a toast to making it through an unprecedented, challenging 18 months with an enthusiastic and meaningful salud, prost, kampai or l’chaim…however it is you like to raise a glass to good health.

Tangerine + Tarragon Tequila Sunrise Prep time: 5 minutes (plus optional overnight soak) Makes 1 cocktail What you’ll need… 2 oz blanco tequila 4 oz tangerine juice, freshly squeezed (you can really use any sort of orange, I just liked how it sounded in the name) 1 oz pomegranate juice a few sprigs of tarragon ice tall rocks glass optional garnishes: tangerine/orange slices, orange twist, tarragon How to make it… Optional overnight infusion: In a sealable glass container, or directly in the bottle, combine some tequila and tarragon and let it sit overnight. Strain and set aside. In a glass filled with ice, add the tequila, top with the tangerine juice and then the pomegranate juice, which will sink to the bottom of the glass, creating a layered effect. Add tangerine/orange slices, orange twist and a sprig of tarragon for the garnish. *Note: I use pomegranate juice instead of the classic grenadine in this recipe. I find it offers a more sophisticated and satisfying flavour profile, and isn’t quite as sweet. However, as someone who likes things even less on the sweet side, I often mellow it out with a bit of soda water as well. B O U L E VA R D

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Smokey Rosemary + Fig Old Fashioned Prep time: 10 minutes (plus optional overnight soak) Makes 1 cocktail What you’ll need… 2 oz bourbon or rye whiskey a few sprigs of fresh rosemary 1 ripe fig 1 tsp maple syrup bitters ice lighter or match cocktail shaker short rocks glass optional garnishes: sliced fig, rosemary

How to make it… Optional overnight infusion: In a sealable glass container or directly in the bottle, combine some bourbon (or rye) and rosemary and let it sit overnight. Strain and set aside. Place a sprig of fresh rosemary over top of some chopped fig on a flat plate. Hold the flame to the rosemary sprig until it catches fire (if it won’t light, dry it in the oven for 10 minutes or so on low heat). Place a rocks glass over the rosemary sprig and chopped fig, and let it rest for 5 minutes. Turn the glass over and release the smoke. Add the smoked fig to a shaker and muddle to a pulp. Add bourbon (or rye), maple syrup and a couple of dashes of bitters to the shaker and give it a good shake. Add ice to the rocks glass and strain the contents of the shaker over ice. Add sliced fig and a sprig of rosemary for the garnish. *Note: If you usually find an Old Fashioned a bit too strong, topping the drink with some soda water really helps. It’s a different drink, but you still get to enjoy the flavour offerings of this concoction without such a punch.

Watermelon Mint Shrub Prep time: 5 minutes (plus optional overnight soak) Makes 4 cocktails What you’ll need… 8 oz vodka ½ cup water pinch of cardamom pinch of sea salt 2 tbsp honey 1 cup coarsely chopped watermelon a handful of fresh mint 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar ice sparkling water medium-sized glass optional garnishes: leftover watermelon chunks, sliced cucumber, mint How to make it…

Smokey Rosemary + Fig Old Fashioned

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Optional overnight infusion: In a sealable glass container, or directly in the bottle, combine some vodka and mint and let it sit overnight. Strain and set aside. Bring the water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Add cardamom, salt and honey, stir to dissolve, and remove from the heat. Combine the watermelon and mint in a large bowl. Stir in the honey-water and let cool to room temperature, then add the vinegar. Steep the mixture in the refrigerator for several hours or overnight. Strain the mixture and set aside the watermelon cubes to use for an optional garnish, or just snack on them as you please. Fill a glass with ice and pour 2 oz of vodka and onequarter cup of the concentrate over top. Top with about threequarters cup sparkling water and garnish with the watermelon, cucumber and mint. *Note: Shrubs are great as non-alcoholic tonics as well, so if you or your guests are avoiding the hard stuff, just leave out the vodka and enjoy as is!


Watermelon Mint Shrub

Spiced Pear + Thyme Zinger Prep time: 5 minutes (plus optional overnight soak) Makes 2 cocktails What you’ll need… 4 oz rum (I’ve made this with both white and spiced rum before, both offering something different) a few sprigs of thyme 4 oz pear puree (or well muddled pear if you don’t have a blender) ¼ cup honey ¼ cup water 1 1-inch piece of ginger, peeled and thinly sliced a cinnamon stick a couple whole cloves 8 oz kombucha (plain or ginger flavoured seem to work best) medium-sized glass optional garnishes: sliced pear, cinnamon stick, thyme How to make it… Optional overnight infusion: In a sealable glass container, or directly in the bottle, combine some rum and thyme and let it sit overnight. Strain and set aside. In a small saucepan combine honey, water and ginger. Bring to a gentle simmer over medium heat, stirring until

Spiced Pear + Thyme Zinger

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Blackberry Basil Sparkler

honey dissolves into the water. Remove from the heat and set aside to steep for 20 minutes. Strain into a container, discarding the ginger, cloves and cinnamon stick, cover and refrigerate until ready to use. Combine 2 ounces of rum, 2 ounces of pear puree (or muddled pear) and honey ginger syrup with ice in the shaker and give it a quick shake. Pour the mixture into a glass and top with 4 ounces of kombucha (more or less depending on how big your glass is and how strong you like your drinks). Add pear slices, a cinnamon stick and a sprig of thyme to garnish. *Note: I find this drink equally as delicious on ice or fully strained more like a martini, hence the ambiguity in the directions. If you’re muddling the pears, try transferring the whole contents of the shaker, ice and all, into the glass so you still get the full flavour of the pears as you sip. However, if you’re using a silky smooth puree try it strained and simply chilled from the shaking process. Or play around with it and see which one you prefer!

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Blackberry Basil Sparkler Prep time: 5 minutes (plus optional overnight soak) Makes 1 cocktail What you’ll need… 1 oz gin a basil leaf or two, sliced a ripe blackberry or two ½ oz honey ½ oz fresh lemon juice

sparkling white wine, prosecco or champagne (about 2 or 3 oz) champagne flute, prosecco glass or similar optional garnish:: lemon twist

How to make it… Optional overnight infusion: in a sealable glass container or directly in the bottle, combine some gin and basil and let it sit overnight. Strain and set aside. In the bottom of your glass, place a blackberry and some sliced basil, top with honey, lemon juice and gin, and gently muddle (the back of a thin wooden mixing spoon works great for this). Top with your sparkling beverage of choice and garnish with a twist of lemon. *Note: A take on a French 75, this is a great welcome cocktail for guests. I like to prepare the base of the cocktail ahead of time (so, the muddled mix of blackberry, basil, lemon juice, honey and gin) and then just top as each guest arrives.


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travel

Pedalling Portugal The last of Europe’s wild coasts WORDS + PHOTOGRAPHY BY SUZANNE MORPHET

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t was the solitude that struck us first. As we helped our driver unload our bikes and cycling gear in Vila Nova de Milfontes, my husband and I felt alone for the first time since arriving in Portugal. Our cruise a couple weeks earlier up the Douro River was perfectly pleasant but required piling into buses when we went ashore, and mingling with other passengers at every meal. And in the historic city of Porto, we lined up with other tourists to visit museums and shop at Livraria Lello, one of the world’s most beautiful bookstores. But here, just two hours south of Lisbon, the streets of Vila Nova de Milfontes are quiet and empty except for the occasional cat that wanders past. In July and August, this village swells with Portuguese tourists, but in mid-May it feels like we have the place to ourselves. In fact, as we’ll discover, the entire coastline from here south to Sagres could almost be our own private park. “You don’t find this in Spain or France, Italy, Croatia,” opined our driver on the way here. “All the southern countries where you think of going for summer vacation have hotels, golf courses, houses, mass tourism. This is the last of Europe’s wild coast. Twenty-kilometre stretches with nothing.” Nothing, that is, except gorgeous sandy beaches, dramatic cliffs pounded by waves, windswept headlands carpeted in wildflowers, picturesque fishing villages and forests where wild boar roam. It sounds too good to be true, but more than 100 kilometres of coastline and 75,000 hectares of pine and cork forests are largely untouched by human B O U L E VA R D

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This is the last of Europe’s wild coast. Twenty-kilometre stretches with nothing … Nothing, that is, except gorgeous sandy beaches, dramatic cliffs pounded by waves, windswept headlands carpeted in wildf lowers, picturesque fishing villages and forests where wild boar roam. hands, protected from development by Portugal’s Southwest Alentejo and Vicentine Coast Natural Park. For cyclists and walkers, it’s a dream destination. And in the coming weeks and months, while we’re all still highly COVIDconscious, I can’t think of a better place to ease gently back into international travel. Even pre-COVID-19, the southwest Alentejo was the perfect place for our first self-guided cycling holiday. The company we went with—Portugal Nature Trails—gets rave reviews for its well-organized tours and support. The Portuguese company offers many itineraries, but its Easy Wild Coast sounded just right. Following quiet roads and trails with only a few big hills, we’ll ride just over 100 kilometres to Sagres, the southwestern-most point in Portugal and all of Europe. In a car, you could do it in an hour and a half. We’ll take a leisurely week. Our first morning we enjoy a filling breakfast, then say goodbye to the friendly couple who run our B&B. Our luggage will be picked up by a pre-arranged driver and moved to our next night’s accommodation. Our bikes’ GPSes have been programmed. Helmets on, we’re ready to pedal. Before long, the trail leads to the first of many cliffs over the Atlantic. When we reach the century-old Cape Sardão lighthouse (built facing inland by mistake!), we stop to observe half a 88

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dozen white storks. This is the only place in the world where these long-legged beauties nest on cliffs. We can easily peer down and see their fluffy chicks, who are blissfully unaware of their precarious situation. May is also peak wildflower season and the profusion is simply astounding. A plant called hottentot carpets the cliff edges in perky pink and yellow blossoms. It’s an invasive species from South Africa, but too pervasive—and too pretty— to even think about removal. Further on, sheep and cows graze in pastures with their young. With so much flora and fauna to photograph, I now realize why we need six days to cycle 100 kilometres! One day, when we stop to get close-up photos of a cork tree, we’re surprised to see a man herding cows. He’s wearing a brown sheepskin vest that’s clearly tailored for his outdoor needs; it’s short in the front but reaches almost to the ground in the back—perfect for sitting on. Except for his jeans and shirt, he could be from a different era. But Portugal is most definitely in the 21st century. Some months it generates enough renewable energy to power the whole country. We see some of that green power on display one day when we cycle along a ridge that’s dotted with enormous wind turbines, gently whirring in the breeze. There’s also plenty of history on this storied coast. Reach-


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ing the village of Aljezur—known for its purple sweet potatoes—we begin a slow, strenuous climb to the ruins of a medieval castle that was occupied by the Moors from the 10th to 13th centuries. At Bordeira’s beach we stop to climb sand dunes—this time on foot—and watch a lone kite surfer race across the waves. A few kilometres further on, a couple dozen surfers are catching waves off another beach that’s just as empty and pristine. Late one day we reach the Pedralva Slow Village Hotel. It’s really an entire village that slowly emptied when people moved to cities for work. In 2006, a few Portuguese entrepreneurs decided to buy and restore many of the abandoned houses for tourism. “We didn’t know who they belonged to. We didn’t know where they were,” Pedralva’s manager tells us, explaining they tracked down 200 descendants of the former owners and negotiated to buy 31 houses. Today, the gleaming, whitewashed cottages look livedin again, with red roses blooming by doorsteps welcoming “slow” tourists like us. At lunchtime on our final day we realize we’ve yet to try percebes—goose barnacles—a local delicacy. At a restaurant in Vila do Bispo the waiter shows us how to squeeze the edible flesh from what look like sharp claws. They’re salty, messy and addictively delicious. Too soon, we cycle into Sagres, our final destination. At nearby Cape St. Vincent we look north from where we came and can only marvel at this coast, once the end of the known world, and today as naturally spectacular as ever. portugalnaturetrails.com

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secrets and lives —

AND THE 7 SINS with KAMELIA RAHMATZADEH

L

isten to Kamelia Rahmatzadeh talk about design or art, or even just creativity in general, and two things quickly become apparent: she’s utterly passionate about what she does and she’s instantly likeable. She founded Designs for Life— which offers home staging, interior decorating and interior design services—when she was just 25 and still in design school, with the whole thing coming about as a bit of an accident. “My family is in construction, and I always wanted to be an interior designer,” she says. “They would hire stagers [for the new builds]…and the stagers did a good job, but they were using floral fabrics and deep jewelled tones and I thought, this just didn’t appeal to the masses.” Kamelia was in the process of outfitting her own home when an opportunity came up to stage a home with her own furniture, and it was a huge success. “I just kept getting referrals,” she says, adding that it led to an increasing number of clients who wanted Designs for Life to decorate their homes.

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X 

PHOTOGRAPHY LIA CROWE


“This past year it’s been a lot of interior design,” she says, and given her eye for unusual and striking design, it’s not surprising Vancouverites have been lining up to get Kamelia’s expertise. “Right now I love playing with scale, or patterns and textures and colour contrasts. I love using out of the ordinary artwork, or having huge light fixtures, or very small art in a big room. Things that are out of the ordinary. And I love mixing old world with new world, for decorating, not staging,” she explains. “I definitely love pushing the bar. What I hope to do in the near future is create very avantgarde, eclectic designs.”

The 7 Sins ENVY:

Whose shoes would you like to walk in? Kelly Wearstler! In my eyes she’s like the Lady Gaga of the design world, an absolute icon and visionary to the design industry. She continuously pushes the bar, impressing her audience with unexpected and avantgarde designs. It would be a great delight to walk in her shoes!

GLUTTONY:

What is the food you could eat over and over again? I am a huge foodie, so this is a tough question for me to answer. But if I must choose one, I vote for fresh, wild, sustainable seafood! When prepared well, it’s a perfectly light and satisfying meal!

GREED:

You’re given $1 million that you have to spend selfishly. What would you spend it on? Oh, I’d spend that very fast! I love to play real life Monopoly, investing in real estate. The long-term gift that keeps on giving. (Wink.)

WRATH:

Pet peeves? I always thought small rugs were my pet peeve, but recently that’s shifted to undersized sectionals or seating arrangements. I believe we should maximize the seating in our living spaces. After all, we’re paying a pretty penny for our square footage in Vancouver!

SLOTH:

Where would you spend a long time doing nothing? It’s not in my nature to be still, unless I’m near the ocean. Put me on a paddle board and under the sun and I’ll be at my happiest. Perhaps I’m a mermaid at heart.

PRIDE:

What is the one thing you’re secretly proud of ? I recently lost a dear friend and it prompted me to think of the legacies we leave behind. I am proud to be able to use Designs for Life as a platform to give back to my dedicated team members and our community. I strive to support my team in purchasing their own homes, and we plan to give back and support single mothers. In this day and age, it’s challenging enough raising children. I can’t imagine doing it alone, and I have a profound respect for all that they do.

LUST:

What makes your heart beat faster? Burning Man. It’s a magical experience that I think every human should experience. After founding Designs for Life, it is the best thing I have ever done for myself. Contrary to its connotation, this experience can be quite educational, spiritual and liberating. If you love adventure, radical inclusion and selfexpression, I strongly encourage everyone to try it, at least once.

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narrative

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WORDS MARIE-FRANCE BOISSONNEAULT ILLUSTRATION SIERRA LUNDY

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HIRAETH  

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he rain teemed down that first morning before returning to work as I sat in my chair, sipping my warm tea. I scrolled through the memories on my social media account; my morning routine of perusing what I was up to according to Facebook years ago. I glanced down at my feet; warm and snug in my grandmother’s slippers, dreading heading out into the pouring day. Three years ago, I was in Kona; revealed by the pictures of Rainbow Falls. I spent my spring break in Hawaii, where I’d leased a car and driven the entire island. There were no actual plans, other than to fill my mind with images that I would draw on to escape the reality of my repetitive existence once I returned to work. It was a welcome change from my routine to hop in the car and just drive from sunup to sundown, stopping in tiny villages or for a quick bite to eat or a dip in the ocean at a hidden beach.   This year had been different. No travel, no family or friends, no adventure, just the comforts and familiarity of my neighbourhood. I lost myself in the beauty of that image and the memory of the time I’d spent on the island. Every day in Kona had been sunny and warm, a stark contrast to the cold soaked air of the West Coast. The alarm on my watch vibrated on my wrist, breaking the spell of nostalgia and signalling me it was time to dress and get ready for work. Reluctantly dragging myself from my couch, I kicked off the orange leather slippers, pulled on a pair of warm socks and got dressed while I faced the vanity in the stillness of my room. As I brushed my hair and fastened it into a loose braid, it forced me to question the foreign reflection gazing back. Standing quietly, I revisited memories of what felt like lifetimes ago. These moments were so far from the place I found myself in today, yet still connected by the smallest of threads. 

Glancing down, I grabbed my lip gloss. I stared in the mirror as I brought the soft, glistening wand up to my lips and let it drag across them. Looking back up at my reflection, my now shiny lips glistened as though a slug had travelled across them. The slight wet look and gentle pout reminded me of those moments after a kiss. Mouth still gently parted and the slight breathlessness of surrender lingered in my mind. Although that memory was long passed, it resurfaced the recollection of the first day I’d spent with an old love. We had sat on a bench in the park by the tennis courts, watching the relay of players lob the ball back and forth for hours. Shaded by the sun, we’d scripted the conversation for the cast of actors we were observing on the courts. He had quite the sense of humour, and his laugh was rich with mischief. Thinking back, the mild blossoming fragrance of that warm summer morning when we first met wafted into my mind’s eye. We had talked for months, but this was the first time we had met face to face. I had only seen a single photo of him but had fallen for his dulcet tones. He was adept at disarming me, and it rigged our game of cat and mouse in his favour. Earlier that morning, he’d left me stranded after my overnight flight, while he dozed; oblivious to his forgotten promise. I remembered how my heart had sunk as I waited, abandoned, at the airport. It was too early to call anyone else. So, I called him. His voice was hoarse, groggy and confused.  “Where are you? Did you want to drag out the anticipation...? Or just save on parking?” I’d asked playfully.  I recalled the awkwardness in his voice for having overslept. “Oh… I’m so sorry, just hop in a cab to my place.”  It wasn’t like me to be what I construed as demanding, but I took a chance since I’d been looking forward to being

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greeted upon my landing. “You said you’d pick me up. I don’t mind waiting,” I responded in a kind and warm but firm tone. This introduction to what would be our first in-person meeting had made me uneasy. How could he have forgotten? At least it had given me a little time to freshen up and wash away the stale scent of a sleepless overnight flight. I didn’t have to wait too long before he’d arrived and texted me where he’d parked. Walking out of the terminal, the air was rife with the acrid stench of jet fuel. I smiled and timidly hugged him hello. As I got in the car, he took my bags. It was still quite early, and he asked how I was feeling after my flight. We drove to my friend’s place where I was staying so I could drop off my suitcase and then continued to his neighbourhood to return the rented car. There was a strange mood of stilted anticipation and climactic disappointment. As we walked, the warmth of the day melted away the guarded interactions and we soon fell into our familiar affectionate repartee. We searched for a place to get a drink for a few blocks, passing several closed shops, when we came across the honeyed fragrance of a fruit stand that was setting up for the day. I remembered how we were both so grateful for the store’s early morning hours. I had been dehydrated, and he was hungover. He suggested a park around the corner where we could sit, talk and savour our sweet-smelling tangy drinks. The harmony of the blended fruit juice brought me back to the summer warmth in

Hawaii. We’d texted the whole time I was away, sending pics back and forth to each other. It was almost like we were adventuring together. Nowadays, I sometimes take the detour through the familiar alleyways to walk by that park. I retrace our steps through the sordid streets, littered with the foul stench of heartbreak and nostalgia. As I meander through the backstreets, I notice how the late day sun overextends the shadows of the fire escapes. It’s like they’re reaching toward a distant past, only to meet the pavement and disappear into the murky urine-soaked filth of obscurity. The shadowy parallel mocks my melancholic yearning for my embellished memory of him. Weaving through those pathways years later toward that spot where it all came to life, I can almost smell the adhesive pong of the felt orbs that mimicked our volleyed gaze. We had taunted one another within that intimate tension, sitting on that bench and staring into each other’s eyes between conversational pauses; holding back the fulfilment of bitter delight.  Over the years, we’d often lose touch and then come back together again as though no time had passed. This year it had been just a few phone calls before the holidays; nothing like the reuniting embrace at the airport years ago. I looked at myself in the mirror again and wiped off the gloss. What was the point, anyhow? I thought. I put on my mask and headed out the door. 

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behind the story For this issue of Boulevard, the fashion team had the pleasure of photographing the fashion feature at the new Malahat SkyWalk, days before it opened to the public. The whole team was in absolute awe of the entire attraction—from the lengthy boardwalk up in the trees, which leads to the SkyWalk, to the structure itself, which spirals up above the treeline and offers views usually reserved for birds. A few brave members of our team walked out onto a large net at the top and peered all the way down to the bottom of the massive structure. One of the most memorable highlights for everyone, however, was the huge metal-tube spiral slide that winds its way down the length of the structure, eliciting screams, squeals and uncontrollable laughter from everyone who tried it. PHOTO BY LIA CROWE

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Lyon Dress in Black ($360) by Just Female from Still Life; Mesh and Pebble Necklace ($250) by veronicalynndesigns. com from William Mathews Bookshop; Bone Ring by Dandi Maestre ($270) from Hughes; Pernille Croco Shiny Sneaker by Woden ($200) from Bernstein & Gold.


One of a kind deserves One of a kind.

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Aly Jiwani

Vice President & Area General Manager

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Profile for Vancouver Boulevard Chinese and English Magazine

Boulevard Vancouver English, Aug/Sep 2021  

Boulevard Vancouver English, Aug/Sep 2021  

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