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VAMPMAGAZINE

15 LAUGHING MATTERS

FIND OUT WHY LAUGHING COULD SAVE YOU A TRIP TO THE DOCTOR [pg 15]

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FOUR FRAMED VIEWS A HIDDEN GEM, IN A DREAM LOCATION BY AVANTO ARCHITECTS

HEY...HEY HELS!NK! ARCHITECT CHRIS BRIFFA SHARES HIS EXPERIENCES IN HELSINKI

THE HELSINKI ISSUE

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Baystreet – St.Julians, Tel: +356 2099 7099 www.mangano.com


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WHAT’S IN YOUR GEAR?


bridalwear, textiles & souvenirs

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T. 21 423 858

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DIESEL STORE: Merchants Street, Valletta St. Anne’s Square, Sliema

Tel: 2258 4434 diesel.com


FROM THE EDITOR

Helsinki: the home of Nokia, Marimekko and the legendary designer and architect Alvar Aalto. It is hip without being self-consciously so, and full of Art Nouveau buildings and elegant cafés. Considered to be the love child of its neighbours Russia and Sweden, the harbour city of Helsinki is surrounded by unspoilt nature and blessed with creativity.

15. LAUGHING MATTERS

The Finnish are known to be helpful and quirky, and it is clear from what they have achieved in recent years that they are also openminded and have a flair for progress. With a coffee, the occasional beer and a regular sauna, the Finnish stay true to innovation and design, and together they have earned and nurtured the title of Design Capital 2012.

27. INTERVIEW: KARI KORKMAN

In this issue we review Scandinavia’s biggest design festival ‘Helsinki Design Week 2012’ whilst also getting to have a chat with Kari Korkman the founder and CEO of this great event. Architect Chris Briffa shares his experiences in Helsinki last summer and we also check out the bold and iconic design company born in Helsinki – Marimekko and much more! Read on to find out about the clever, the bold and the beautiful. And why not get into the whole Finnish vibe while you’re at it and listen to Sigur Rós or Röyksopp. Happy reading!

Julian Cardona explains why laughter is such an important tool in the strengthening of human networks.

19. HELSINKI DESIGN WEEK ‘12 A few highlights from Scandinavia’s biggest design fest.

Lily Aguis speaks to the CEO and founder of Helsinki Design Week.

31. DESIGNS FOR LIFE From next–gen robots to intelligent furniture.

33. FOUR FRAMED VIEWS We check out a super sleek home in the country side designed by young Finnish architects.

42. SUSANNA MAJURI Helsinki artist Susanna Majuri conveys her emotions through her lens.

52. IN THE MIX VAMP catches up with local top dj Duncan F to find out what’s in the pipeline for the summer.

54. PATTERN RECOGNITION Find out how Marimekko established world recognition as a legendary fashion icon. Editor Lily Agius

Magazine Coordinator Sam Psaila

Creative Director Chris Psaila

Contributers Chantal Busuttil Chris Briffa Clinton Chetcuti Duncan F James Micallef Grimaud Julian Cardona Kari Korkman Karl Cutajar Sandra Calafato Sean Azzopardi Susanna Majuri

Photography Karl Cutajar

Image by Marimekko

Stylist Luke Engerer Sales & Marketing Manager Matthew Spiteri 77242490 publishing@active-enterprises.com

Printers Print It

Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher is prohibited. All rights reserved. Dates, information and prices are believed to be correct at the time of going to press but are subject to change and no responsibility is accepted for any errors or omissions. Neither the editor nor the publisher accept responsibility for any material submitted, whether photographic or otherwise. While we endeavour to ensure that the organisations and firms mentioned are reputable. The editor can give no guarantee that they will fulfill their obligations under all circumstances. © Copyright 2013

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COVER SHOT Photography: Karl Cutajar Make up: Chantal Busuttil www.cbmakeupandsfx.com Hair Stylist: Clinton Chetcuti Vigorous – power to your hair Model: Emily www.somanagement.com

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VAMP MAGAZINE UPDATE

UPDATE. THE MEDUSE SERIES Inspired by the elegant and simple lines of the jellyfish, the Meduse series of coffee tables designed by Gam Fratesi for Casamania, offers a warmer welcome than the sting you would normally receive from the real thing. The typical soft and smooth body encloses its internal structure with a pressed sheet-metal top, and is available covered and upholstered in various colours. Making the Meduse a funny and comfortable pouf. The Loft – Triq San Pawl, Naxxar Tel: 2099 9966 www.loft.com.mt

There is just about everything in this collection, which still remains to be discovered in the Carpisa stores. Carpisa – 108 Naxxar Road, Birkirkara, Tel. 2149 1962 & Tower Road, Sliema, Tel. 2133 6656 www.carpisa.it

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Leather pochette €29.90

The new Spring 2013 catalogue is available online, revealing a feminine and elegant collection that is delightfully romantic and designed according to the dictates of Italian style and trends.

Leather bag €89.90

THE SPRING 2013 CARPISA COLLECTION

SCENTED CANDLEHOLDERS THAT LOOK AS GOOD AS THEY SMELL For handmade scented candleholders that look as good as they smell, check out this new range from Mdina Glass. Choose from six fragrances and a variety of shapes, sizes, colours and finishes. Available in all Mdina Glass outlets and online at www.mdinaglass.com.mt with worldwide delivery and free delivery in Malta and Gozo on orders over €25. For more information call: 2141 5786


SLIEMA

ST. JULIANS


VAMP MAGAZINE UPDATE

1 MILLION INTENSE An instantly addictive cocktail of insolence and elegance. An overdose of gold and flamboyance capitalising on the emblematic ingredients of the original fragrance. A deeper and more intense concentrate of sensuality. With 1 Million Intense, the new chapter of the 1 Million story, the flamboyant fantasy, is enhanced with gold reaching its climax. A snap of the fingers and a door opens, wielding all powers as fantasy turns to reality. The man is sophisticated, charismatic, flamboyant and a seducer. No-one can resist this charmer who lives however and wherever he likes. So when desire joins in, the tension rises, impatience grows and intensity reaches new heights. The famous ingot bottle is dressed up in a shaded effect that translates the intense character of the fragrance. At the bottom, a shy but dramatic transparency shows the interior of the bottle. As if riveted to the surface, the word INTENSE has been added to the gold-coloured box. The range is an Eau De Toilette Intense 100ml and 50ml. Distributed by Ta’Xbiex Perfumery Limited Tel: 2133 1553

FRED PERRY A NEW SEASON, NEW COLLECTION AND A NEW SHOP! That’s right, as we step into a new season, Fred Perry Sliema steps into a whole new shop! Fred Perry has been relocated from the current level 2 store in Saint Anne Square to a stylish new basement shop, within the same building, just in time to show off the new spring/summer collection and it’s certainly not a shy one, inspired by British pop culture you will see a use of bold colours and bright graphic prints, Fred Perry is defiantly making a statement this summer. Come along to our new shop located at -1 level entrance from ground level at The Warehouse.

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MDINA GLASS For the past few years, Mdina Glass has been developing a wide range of innovative lighting solutions that includes pendent lights, lampshades and ball lights. Now the range has been diversified further to include amazing, eye-catching and inspiring chandeliers. There are four very different designs available to date: The first was created in 2012 and became what is now known as ‘The Swirl’, a vibrant creation conveying movement and life. It was inspired by previous installations based on long glass swirls such as a garden water fountain. It seemed to go perfectly with the concept of a centrepiece chandelier. In the last year, Mdina Glass product designer Olivia Said and the team of skilled glassmakers have researched and experimented with other possible techniques and shapes so that the range of handmade glass chandeliers could be extended, giving customers a greater choice. These stunning chandeliers, all of which are works of art in their own right, are made to order. Mdina Glass at Ta’ Qali: Tel: 2141 5786 www.mdinaglass.com.mt


Exclusively Distributed by Ta’Xbiex Perfumery Limited Tel: 2133 1553


ictor Borge, a Danish comedian, once famously stated that laughter is the shortest distance between two people. Contrary to popular belief, laughter is not about jokes, but about building relationships, and what better bridge than laughter could there be to a friend’s inner circle or, perhaps, into that intricate labyrinth known as a woman’s heart. The average human being laughs 17 times a day – which means that humans love to laugh. So it does beg the question: why is it that laughter is such an important tool in the strengthening of human networks? The truth is that no one really knows, but theories abound. It is important to first distinguish between laughter and humour. Laughter is usually a response to humour. Not everyone has a sense of humour but, surely, all of us can laugh (although some do try their best to hide it). Robert Provine, a noted researcher of laughter from the University of Maryland, led a group of psychologists as they devised an experiment to analyse the dynamics of laughter systematically. They set out to record the laughing pattern of a group of 1,200 people as they interacted in their natural environment. The results obtained made it clear that the most common things that make us laugh are not jokes, but random, everyday expressions. Taken out of context, such phrases aren’t funny at all. Some examples of these were: “Where’s John?” or “The bus is coming” or “Where were you last night?” As one can see, these are hardly laugh-out-loud phrases, which seems to suggest that what stimulates laughter is usually another person: laughter is a by-product of our relationships. >>

LAUGHING MATTERS. WORDS BY JULIAN CARDONA

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LAUGHING MATTERS

Cultural anthropologist Mahadev Apte says that “Laughter occurs when people are comfortable with one another, when they feel open and free. And the more laughter there is, the more bonding occurs within the group.” Laughter enforces bonding, which in turn fires up more laughter and so on, and this might explain why laughter is so contagious and why we are 30 times more likely to laugh in a social setting than when we’re alone. The sound of laughter is also funny. One only has to think about why producers of comedy sitcoms usually employ what is known as a “laugh Track” as a soundtrack to the show. A laugh track is basically recorded laughter, inserted at key comic moments throughout a TV show. Time and time again, producers have noted that an audience is much more likely to laugh if there is a laugh track because it enhances

What a clever joke does is that it surprises us by taking a sudden twist and concludes unexpectedly. Of course, as in a liking for food or looks, people have different tastes in humour. Some like sarcasm, others might like wordplay or even vulgarity, but the common illogical thread is likely to be found in all scenarios. To understand the second theory, just think about what you’d feel, should your spouse fall on his or her butt “Paperissima style” (I am assuming that he survives the fall). Think about what would cross your mind if you woke up one morning to witness your neighbour being dragged multiple times around the block as she tries to restrain her horny dog as it chases a teasing lover. You’d be glad it’s not happening to you and, yes, you might also feel a tad superior (especially if it’s your husband). This is known as

moments of relief. This might explain why many people who are stressed and particularly emotional often end up exploding in an inexplicable fit of laughter, leaving passers-by speechless. Surely, there is no humour in such situations and here laughter seems to be a purely psychological mechanism triggered by an overtired brain. So whether you’re watching your neighbour chase her horny dog across the neighbourhood or your boss has been stressing you out, it is often a good idea to approach this most illogical life with healthy doses of laughter. Not only does laughter relieve stress, but studies show that it has a balancing effect on the components of the immune system – which helps us ward off diseases. Who would have thought that laughing at the misfortune of your husband or wife

WHO WOULD HAVE THOUGHT THAT LAUGHING AT THE MISFORTUNE OF YOUR HUSBAND OR WIFE MIGHT SAVE YOU THE COST OF A COURSE OF ANTIBIOTICS? their feeling of being part of a large group. It is also evident in research that dominant personalities tend to use humour more effectively than those around them. Have you ever wondered why everybody laughs when the boss laughs? By controlling laughter, dominant personalities manage to control the emotional climate in a group and this is a way of exercising power. But what exactly is funny? Why is it that some comedians are lauded by some and booed by others? And how it is that some people manage to laugh during a horror movie? Philosophers have been fascinated by this question for centuries and many of them have busted their heads relentlessly in an attempt to find a common thread through all the forms of humour. Out of the many theories, three have stood the test of time. The first one of these is the “incongruity theory”. This basically states that we laugh at illogical occurrences: when something takes an unexpected turn. This explains the dynamics of a punch line. When we listen to a joke, we mentally try to map out the direction that the story will take in an attempt to predict the outcome. 018

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the “superiority theory”. People such as Plato and Aristotle are known to have subscribed to this theory, which focuses on the dark side of comedy. Research shows that most people instinctively feel elevated when confronted with other people’s misfortunes. When there is no seriousness or danger involved, laughter is the most common response to this feeling of superiority. In other words, laughing at other people’s expense is irresistible. The final theory supposes that, much like swearing, laughter acts as a relief valve. Frank A. Clark puts it like this: “I think the next best thing to solving a problem is finding some humour in it.” Few people would disagree. A device often employed in films, in fact, is to include comic relief during moments of suspense. The effect is that the tension in the viewer melts away, meaning that the film-maker is in the position of being able to start building it up again, so that a climax can be delivered. This happens in real life as well. When emotion builds up inside us, laughter is usually exactly what is needed for some

might save you the cost of a course of antibiotics? If you plan to start taking life with a pinch of salt, just remember that next Carnival might be the time to wipe the dust off that condom costume you’ve been hiding from your wife. V


DESIGN WEEK

HELSINKI DESIGN WEEK

Co-creation was the theme of Helsinki Design Week 2012. HDW is not just an event, but a city-wide happening everyone can be a part of. Here we highlight a few pieces from the 2012 event >>

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esign Weeks have become very popular in recent years and there are now over 80 cities that host their own annual celebrations of design. Providing the opportunity to showcase each city’s pivotal role in global design, a Design Week allows the creative industries to prove their worth and show the world what they bring to their city from the cultural, social and economic perspective.

Nenonen Juha

Helsinki Design Week is the biggest design festival in Scandinavia, featuring new designs by both established designers as well as first-time creators, presenting innovative designs for ordinary objects that are part of our day-to-day lives.

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HELSINKI DESIGN WEEK Lathe Lamps by Jesper K. Thomsen and Sanne Traberg, Denmark.

Klara armchair by Patricia Urquiola for Moroso Bowl Tables by Ayush Kasliwal

The Shrine by Sigurd Larsen.

The festival has been expanding as its international network has grown and more companies and individuals participate. Events are held all over the city and range from the traditional or industrial to fashion, communication or music. >>

Lajt Chair by Janez Suhadolc

Last year, the main events of Helsinki Design Week were held in the Old Customs Warehouse and the cable factory in Katajanokka. The programme included workshops, exhibitions, seminars, visits to studios, galas and shopping. www.helsinkidesignweek.com

Helsinki Design Week 2012 was part of the World Design Capital 2012 programme. The next design week is being held from the 12th till the 22nd of September 2013.

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The main Helsinki Design Week events last year were the To Declare exhibition and Pop-Up Customs Shop, the Design Market and Helsinki Design Week LIVE. However, other small-scale events, exhibitions, talks and tours took place throughout the week in the city’s numerous museums, galleries and studios. The To Declare exhibition was curated by design expert and journalist Kaj Kalin and took place at Katajanokka’s Old Customs Warehouse. Designed by Gustaf Nystrom, the 100-year-old industrial building had been abandoned and ignored for the past 40 years, until Design Week founder Kari Korkman saw its potential.

Campana Lamp by Edra (fernando e humberto) Black Cherry Lamp by Nika Zupanc for La Femme et la Maison Siti Armchair by Arne Vehovar for Zilio Aldo & C. Sas Criatura Shoe by Leonora Jakovljevic for leonora mark-ave femina Navy Chairs by Emeco Hide and Sleep by Katrin Greiling by Kvadrat

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photos: by Anton Sucksdorff.

FASHION TRENDS

luonto by lundia

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INTERVIEW: KARI KORKMAN

VAMP CATCHES UP WITH THE CEO & FOUNDER OF HELSINKI DESIGN WEEK >>

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INTERVIEW: KARI KORKMAN

Mixing design with architecture, fashion and graphics is also due to the fact that an annual festival in a country the size of Finland requires contributions from many fields to remain topical and interesting. We also want to appeal to a number of different audiences: there is always something for the residents of the city as well as for smaller groups of professionals. We want to be seen as an umbrella that delivers the message – related to design – by universities, companies and organisations, as well as individual designers. How would you say Helsinki has grown and progressed over the years?

ari Korkman was born in a little town called Vaasa on the west coast of Finland and moved to Helsinki at the age of seven. He received his Master’s degree from the Helsinki School of Economics but also found time to cater for his creative side by producing objects such as furniture, lights and bags, until Design Producer turned Exhibition Organiser. In 2005, Helsinki Design Week was born, founded and instrumented by Kari and his design business skills and vision for city culture. Interview: Lily Agius You have produced many design exhibitions and events over the years. How does Helsinki Design Week compare? From day one, Helsinki Design Week (HDW) has been multidisciplinary – that was the basic idea for the whole festival. We are still gathering together designers, architects, fashionistas and other creative professionals to showcase and mingle, but the size of the festival today is quite a lot bigger. HDW has become the biggest design festival in Scandinavia. What is the concept and philosophy behind Helsinki Design Week, and how did it come about? Multi and preferably ideally crossdiscipline is one of the main philosophies because we believe that new ideas form a bridge between different disciplines. 028

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Helsinki is a completely different city from what it was 10 to 15 years ago. You would no doubt be amazed by the activity that the remove residents show in their social life, from initiating people to open pop-up restaurants (for a day), to participating in “cleaning days”, etc. There are plenty of events nearly every day of the year. Helsinki has an exceptionally low level of bureaucracy: for instance, I had a cup of coffee with the mayor last week and we talked about our future visions after World Design Capital Year. I might want to change the climate in the winter, but otherwise I am very happy with today’s Helsinki. What is Helsinki’s main source of income and what percentage is rooted in design? I’m afraid I don’t know the exact figures, but if I remember correctly, the percentage of residents working in creative industries is amongst the highest in the world. Did the award for Helsinki as World Design Capital 2012 come as a surprise? Yes it was a surprise to be among the two finalists for 2012. The capital city of Valletta in Malta and a city in the Netherlands are hosting the European Capital of Culture in 2018. Have you visited Malta or know anything about its culture? Congratulations! I sailed past Malta in the 1980s on a yacht but have never set foot on land. It would be exciting to get a chance to visit Valletta some day.

MULTI AND PREFERABLY IDEALLY CROSSDISCIPLINE IS ONE OF THE MAIN PHILOSOPHIES BECAUSE WE BELIEVE THAT NEW IDEAS FORM A BRIDGE BETWEEN DIFFERENT DISCIPLINES. What’s next on the agenda? I am one of the founding members of the Design Festivals Association. Last month involved a lot of travelling, in Stockholm, Munich, and Cape Town to visit their design festivals. Naturally, the preparations for the next HDW keep my team busy all year round. We also took over the Old Customs Warehouse in the heart of the city and will be developing that into a new urban cultural centre. Helsinki Design Week 2013 will take place from 12 to 23 September. For more information log on to www.helsinkidesignweek.com V


Fred Perry Stores: Merchants Street, Valletta St. Anne’s Square, Sliema Tel: 2258 4441 fredperry.com


DESIGNS FOR LIFE

FROM NEXT–GEN ROBOTS TO COOL COFFEE CUPS. HERE ARE A FEW CHEEKY AND COOL GADGETS TO GET A HOLD OF IN 2013. THE ROBOT DOUBLE Today’s smartphone has more processing power than a 1970’s supercomputer – enough to act as the hub of a streaming home-audio network, serve as a mobile medical lab or even run a robot. So now, instead of building robots from scratch, companies can construct models around smartphones. Double Double is a wheeled robot avatar that stands up to five feet tall. It holds an iPad where its head should be, while a human driver – whether across the office or across the country – uses a custom video-chat app on a smartphone to see what the iPad sees and steer the robot. Double has a gyroscopebalanced stand that allows it to roll at speeds of up to 1.5 mph without tipping over.

DSLR LENS COFFEE MUGS! We all love a hot cup of jo in the morning to bring the world into focus. This Nikon mug comes with an easy to clean, heat preserving, stainless steel lining as well as a lens cap lid, rubber grip focus and zoom rings and auto focus switch (that doesn’t do anything really, except look cool!).

STEAMING HOT Alessi’s stainless steel Il Conico kettle must be just about the sexiest-looking kettle on the market. Designed between 1980 and 1983, this kettle evolved out of the Tea and Coffee Piazza project. It was Rossi’s first mass-produced design and immediately became the newborn Officina Alessi brand’s leading product, as well as an Eighties design icon. The Il Conico range also includes an espresso coffee maker, a sugar bowl with spoon and a creamer.

NEW I POD TOUCH The iPod Touch gets a brand new design – with a super-slim aluminium body, Apple EarPods, bigger 4-inch Retina display and amazing features. Slim and lightweight, the new iPod Touch 5th Generation is simply impossible to put down.

THE HEART OF IT With a Heart, your furniture represents stateof-the-art technology and design. Imagine being able to instantly charge your devices just by placing them on the furniture. To transform your furniture into an intelligent energy platform all you need to do is attach a Heart to it. The heart itself is hidden under the furniture and creates an invisible electric field on a specific area of the furniture. Whenever a device with the ring is placed on the area, the energy transaction starts and your device is charged automatically. Charging stops when the battery is full.

RETURN OF THE OLDSKOOL Fujifilm FinePix X100 is a compact camera with an SLR-size APS-C sensor and traditional analogue control dials that hide ground-breaking technology inside a retro-styled body with looks to die for. It’s the company’s first camera with a large, APS-C sensor aimed at professionals and advanced amateurs since the S5 Pro DSLR of 2006. Fujifilm X100 is the promise of unprecedented photographic pleasure paired with timeless attraction.

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Design and construction: construction: 2008-2010 2008-2010 Gross floor floor area: area:78 78m2² m2²++sauna sauna24m² 24m² Budget: €150 000 Client: the the architects architects Structural Structural design: design:Konstru KonstruOy/Jorma Oy/JormaEskola Eskola Electrical Electrical design: design:Virtain VirtainSähkötyö SähkötyöOy/Väinö Oy/VäinöSipilä Sipilä Photos: kuvio.com/Anders kuvio.com/AndersPortman Portmanand andMartin MartinSommerschield Sommerschield

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Four-Cornered Villa Villa tProject: name: Four-Cornered Architects: Ville Hara /Ltd/Ville Anu Puustinen, Avanto Architects cts: Avanto Architects Hara and Anu Puustinen Location:Virrat, Virrat, Finland Finland Location:

he fast pace of city life can take its toll on busy minds. Some would argue that the slower pace of life in the country encourages more nourishing thoughts and a healthier lifestyle. Everyone is different, but perhaps one way to get someone who would normally never even consider the possibility of spending more time in the countryside would be to bring them, possibly blind-folded, to a sleek new home, snugly built next to a breathtaking lake and picture-perfect forest by young architects with a flair for minimal and evocative design. >>

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THE EXTERIOR IS TREATED IN BLACK – IN CONTRAST TO THE LIGHT INTERIOR – AND HAS A FLAT ROOF, WHICH DISAPPEARS FROM SIGHT WHEN VIEWED FROM THE LAKE... 034

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FOUR FRAMED VIEWS

Finnish architects Ville Hara and Anu Puustinen have created a contemporary structure based on disappearing traditions and ideals. The relationship between the fine line between nature and intervention is respectfully drawn by the simplicity and low impact of the design, while the villa is strategically placed far away from city life. The priority of the architects when designing this home, as with all their projects, was to create a personal space that encourages an emotional response, and for the building to afford respect for, and form a relationship with its surroundings. The resulting Four-Cornered Villa

offers spiritual serenity. It sits, quiet and unassuming, at one with its natural surroundings on a horseshoe-shaped island near the town of Virrat in Finland. Facing both north and east, the crossshaped and simple villa reaches towards four very different framed views. There is no sign of any neighbours – but the view of the lake in three directions and the lush forest to the west are all anyone could want. The house has been designed so that it mimics – and flows with – nature. The exterior is treated in black – in contrast to the light interior – and has a flat roof, which disappears from sight when viewed from the lake, and the double doors onto

the terraces can be fully opened, merging the interior and exterior from within. The house also works with nature. Natural light can dictate how the day is spent, with the morning sun pouring on to the breakfast table before moving to the dining room by midday, and settling in the sitting room by the evening. No curtains line the windows of the bedroom, since there is no direct sunlight to keep out, and the terraces are covered to prevent the hot summer sun overheating the building but also to allow passive solar energy to do its best in the winter. All the electricity for the house is, in fact, harvested from the sun. >>

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FOUR FRAMED VIEWS

THIS SIMPLE AND ASCETIC TYPE OF COUNTRY LIVING CONTRASTS DRAMATICALLY WITH HECTIC CITY LIFE, AND OFFERS A MINIMUM IMPACT ON NATURE. This sustainable property is in contrast with the more typical Finnish homes that are heated all year round by electricity to prevent water pipes from freezing. This one is well insulated and heated by wood from the forest resulting in a carbonneutral building. Vegetables and herbs are grown on the surrounding land and pike-perch can be fished from the lake. This simple and ascetic type of country living contrasts dramatically with hectic city life, and offers the minimum impact on nature. V

All the work and projects of Avanto Architects Ltd are shared equally by both partners. www.avan.to 040

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A is for all-inclusive. The new A-Class. The pulse of a new generation.

Either for or against, complacency is not an option. Non-conformist from the outside and quite the style icon inside. It expels boredom from the street. And gives you an easy ride in the process. High-tech: it goes without saying. Safe: no question. Efficient: naturally. It could not be a more characteristic Mercedes. And at the same time very, very different. Hello, new A-Class! HP terms available at 5.5% variable interest rate* A180 CGI €27,850 A180 CDI €29,700 including a 5 year Service Plan

A Daimler Brand

* terms and conditions apply

Auto  Sales  Ltd  -  Kind’s    Tel:  21433601    www.mercedes-benz.com.mt


I   F OLLOW   THE  LOGIC   O F   COLOURS  W HEN   I   C OMBINE   PLACES,   P EOPLE   AND  OBJECTS.   TO  ME,  T HE   M OST   IMPORTANT   QUALITY   O F   PHOTOGRAPHY   IS  I TS  CAPABILITY   TO  CONVEY   EMOTIONS. – Susanna Majuri

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SUSANNA MAJURI

SUSANNA   MAJURI

Born in 1978 in Helsinki, Susanna Majuri still lives and works in the city of her birth. Her work is in collections around the world and two of her last exhibitions were in Tokyo and Milan. Majuri poetically expresses the inspiration behind her art: >> HELSINKI ISSUE

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FASHION TRENDS SUSANNA MAJURI

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MY  CHALLENGE   I S  T O   S EE   REALITY   I N  A  NON-TRADITIONAL   LIGHT.  W HEN   I  A M   S HOOTING   PICTURES,  I  HAVE  A   P REMONITION   THAT  SOMETHING   S TRANGE   I S   ABOUT  TO   H APPEN. – Susanna Majuri

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FASHION TRENDS SUSANNA MAJURI

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SUSANNA MAJURI

“I   S UGGEST  T HAT  W E   CAN   B E   M ULTIPLE. TOUCH  YOUR  ENVIRONMENT  A ND   I T  W ILL   S HOW   I TSELF  A S   FANTASTIC. PEOPLE  A RE   U NPREDICTABLE.   THEY  A RE   M ALE  A ND   F EMALE  AT  T HE   S AME  T IME. EYES  W HISPER   S PARKS. THE  WATER   I S  T HE   M OST   R EMARKABLE.   I T   CARRIES   B ODIES. WATER   I S   C OLOUR.   THE   S HIMMER  A ND  T HE   D EEP   G REEN. – Susanna Majuri

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A NEW PERSPECTIVE.

V I SI T OU R N E W W E B SI T E AT LOF T.C OM .M T Her chair by Fabio Novembre for Casamania | Tel: 20 9999 66. Triq San Pawl, Naxxar.


For more information on Susanna Majuri you can contact Gallery Taik in either Berlin or Helsinki: www.helsinkischool.fi Bergstr. 22, D-10115 Berlin. Tel: (+ 49) 30 288 833 70. berlin@gallerytaik.com H채meentie 135 C, FI-00560 Helsinki. Tel: (+ 358) 50 563 2430. helsinki@gallerytaik.com


IT IS HARD TO RESIST A TOUCH OF AFFECTION AS DUNCAN – AKA DUNCAN ELF – SIPS HIS GLASS OF MILK AND EARNESTLY DESCRIBES HIS GOALS, IDEAS AND DREAMS. AFTER TWO HOURS IN HIS STUDIO, THE MAIN THING THAT STRIKES ME IS DUNCAN’S INSATIABLE ENERGY AND OPTIMISM THAT IS BOTH ADDICTIVE AND INSPIRING. HIS PASSION AS A DJ, AS WELL AS HIS IMAGINATIVE AND INNOVATIVE EVENTS, HAVE GAINED HIM A CONSIDERABLE AMOUNT OF RESPECT AND RECOGNITION OVER THE PAST DECADE OR SO. THERE ARE VERY FEW INDIVIDUALS ON THE ISLAND WHO ARE ABLE TO ACHIEVE SUCCESS SIMULTANEOUSLY AS A DJ, PRODUCER AND PROMOTER – AND DUNCAN IS BY FAR THE LEADER OF THE PACK. HERE ARE SOME OF THE THINGS I LEARNT ABOUT HIS PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE DURING OUR LITTLE CHAT. >>

By: Nicole Cuschieri

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IN THE MIX: DUNCAN F

You’ve had an extremely successful career so far. When did it all begin? Well, I started playing when I was around 12 during my hip hop and rap phase in the early 90s, performing for friends with a band in my aunt’s back room. My first big event, however, was in 2004 at Gianpula: Pink Panther Summer Vibrations. The previous one was moderately successful, with a crowd of around 400, but very rich in atmosphere. People had fun, word got around and the following Pink Panther was attended by nearly 1600! It was a great feeling. We had a live saxophonist playing the Pink Panther tune and the Inspector chasing the Pink Panther around with a magnifying glass. It was a fun event! What are your main goals as an artist?

Do you ever work internationally? Yes I’ve had a lot of international work in places like Ibiza, Amsterdam, Switzerland, Thailand, Poland, Sicily, London, Dubai, Germany and Ireland. I network as much as possible with foreign DJs and promoters to do swap-over work, which is great fun for all of us. What was 2012 in Malta like? Carnival in Gozo was a fantastic event – both this year and last. In 2012 we decided on a show that involved me as a Mayan tribal leader, tribesmen on stilts, bongo drummers on the terrace above and jungle sounds everywhere. Then tribal girls did a jungle style number which ended with someone getting their head chopped off on stage by the ‘tribal leader’! I managed to learn some Mayan and it

I am always pushing to improve and multi-nationalise the island by creating interaction between different countries. As an artist I hope to keep doing what I am doing for as long as I can and have lots of fun doing it! I think it’s important to keep the ego down and the creativity flowing. The rest just takes its natural course. You are now living in Amsterdam. What were your reasons for leaving? In the last 12 months I’ve been closer than ever to reaching my creative peak. I recognise it in the way I feel and listen to music. At times, certain music almost brings tears to my eyes. I could only have reached this point through experience and maturity, so it felt like it was right time to leave. I had hit a crunch point in my life and knew that the best way to grow and flourish was to leave Malta and embark on a magical adventure. One of my philosophies is that change is extremely healthy as it gives you a fresh perspective on life. So, I decided to take my music production further in Amsterdam. It’s been great so far; I’ve been introduced to some amazing people and haven’t looked back since. I have also started working for 365MAG.COM, an online channel, interviewing DJs and musicians alongside Alex Thomson, and will soon be throwing my first party in Amsterdam. I am flying back to Malta very often to keep alive my most creatively rewarding events, such as Carnival, Easter, Halloween, New Year’s Eve and last but certainly not least, The Bubble fest in the summer.

ended with me saying: “2012 is not the end of the world, but a new beginning. Just love each other”. No one understood, of course, but it felt great saying it! I love the carnival parties as I can go crazy with ideas. People expect madness and they get it. Summer 2012 was the best summer ever – the music, the people, the vibe. From boats to beaches, to roof tops, to festivals. It was off the hook! For New Year’s Eve we chose a Cinderella theme with various live performances, the venue was styled like the inside of a palace. There was a lot of effort put in to creating this event and it came as a big disappointment to me that some people were annoyed due to problems at the bar. We will be throwing a good – free – party somewhere soon, so stay tuned! Life is full of ups and downs but 2012 is definitely one year I will never forget! So it sounds like 2012 was a great year for you. What’s in the pipeline for 2013?

We have many exciting events happening in 2013. Unfortunately, I can’t give any information about most of them yet, as many of the details need to be kept a surprise! Look out for Mobilee Malta with Rodriguez Jr in March and Anja Schneider in July. But, most importantly, the Bubble is back again this year – even stronger! For people who are not familiar with the Bubble, can you sum up what it is all about? The Bubble is a charitable initiative which started off as a small party and has grown bigger over the last couple of years. It’s basically a gathering of artists, musicians and art enthusiasts at one mini festival in Buskett. Some of the proceeds go to a different charity every year, sometimes local and sometimes international. It is a great day and night and artists can exhibit and sell their work in the art market alongside live and electronic music performances. There are also collaborations with Why Not and Bouncing Buddha, amongst others, as well as healthy food, massage and relaxation. The idea for the event is to make people aware of the positive and safe bubble we live in whilst being aware that there are people on the outside of it. Many of these experience poverty, war, environmental disasters and other horrific tragedies on a daily basis. This event is aimed at being an eyeopening experience for those who attend. There is also a lot of creativity put into it by the artists themselves, creating giant bubbles, sculpting, painting, writing and much more. Plenty of hard work is being put into making the event sustainable and I have a long-term dream that it will grow into an international event that will raise substantial amounts of money to one day really make a difference in the world, and encourage other people to do the same. The key words to this event are awareness, charity, positivity and fun. I heard that you now have an alter ego Yes, a few months ago I thought it was time to reinvent myself into something a little cheekier. My new persona reflects the more magical and adventurous side of my character. His name is Duncan Elf. Can you give me three words that fuel your dreams? Love, Life, Happiness.

V

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PATTERN RECOGNITION

MARIMEKKO IS THE FINNISH TEXTILE AND CLOTHING DESIGN COMPANY RENOWNED FOR ITS ORIGINAL PRINTS AND COLOURS. IT HAS COME A LONG WAY SINCE ITS HUMBLE, YET FEISTY BEGINNINGS OVER 60 YEARS AGO. HERE’S A SNIPPET OF ITS HISTORY AND A DELECTABLE SPREAD OF THEIR DESIGNS WHICH WILL SURELY AWAKEN SOME KIND OF VIBRANCY RADAR IN YOUR BODY.

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PATTERN RECOGNITION

“ONE HAS TO DREAM... AND ONE MUST STAND OUT FROM THE REST”

he year 1949 saw the first Marimekko fashion show in the city of its creation, Helsinki. While WWII was still an open wound, playful fun and humour was re-injected onto the cat walk, offering a colourful vision of celebration. The straightforward cut and colourful patterns of the clothes were a big hit, thus laying the first stone for the opening of the first

Marimekko shop the following year. The creator behind the brand, Armi Ratia, had a simple plan of action to uphold: “One has to dream... And one must stand out from the rest”. And so it did, and still does. Marimekko has gone from strength to strength over the decades, ever evolving yet always preserving what it stands for and remaining an ever-recognisable brand: from Jackie Kennedy making their

clothing line a household name in the 1960s to Sarah Jessica Parker strutting its worth on the contemporary streets of Manhattan in Sex in the City. In fact, this Finnish fashion brand has come a long way since its humble beginnings. Since being founded in 1951, there are now 90 Marimekko stores around the globe and Marimekko products being sold in some 40 countries. >>

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MARIMEKKO IS ABOUT LIVING, NOT PRETENDING. MARIMEKKO IS ABOUT UNDERSTANDING AND ACCEPTING THE BEAUTY OF LIFE JUST AS WE ENCOUNTER IT EVERYDAY.

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The brand has evolved into creating many interior decorations as well as clothing and accessories. You can also find something for your beloved pet, like a cat or dog basket or carrier. The strong bold colours of their first designs represented the very same positive outlook as the place from which they were conceived. From an otherwise cold and dark place such as Helsinki came a retaliation, a contrast, or an armour against the mundane, if you like. And it is this attitude that is passed on to their clients. Marimekko’s vibrant colours and striking patterns continue to offer that very same message: be strong, confident and individual, yet also playful and youthful. V If you are ever in Helsinki, you can visit the Marimekko store at Kämp Galleria, Pohjoisesplandi. Or log on to www.marimekko.com to find out more about this beloved brand and to browse through everything they offer. You will also find a global location directory and can make an order online for delivery in Malta direct from Marimekko. Happy shopping! HELSINKI ISSUE

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New Look top €10.99 Zara dungarees €49.95 New Look shoes €9.99


Creative Director / Stylist – Luke Engerer – www.lukeengerer.com Photographer – Karl Cutajar Hair – Michelle Galea – Roots Hair Salon – 2745 4164 Make Up – Nicola Powell – 9986 5369

FINE LINE

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FROM TOP: Diesel helmet €150 Zara dress €49.95 New Look dress €27.99 Zara coat €119 New  Look  shoes  €34.99 Carpisa  bag  €25.90 OPPOSITE: Zara coat €119 Guess shirt €101 Guess shorts €96 Carpisa bag €15.90 New Look shoes €15.90


LEFT: New Look dress €21.99 Guess waist coat €142 RIGHT: New  Look  crop  top  €4.99 Zara  shirt  €39.95 Zara  trousers  €49.95 New Look shoes €14.99


Diesel shirt €73.00 Zara trousers €49.95 New Look shoes €19.99


Fred Perry Stores: Merchants Street, Valletta St. Anne’s Square, Sliema Tel: 2258 4441 fredperry.com


a timeless luxury. Visit our store in Zachary Street, Valletta and behold the beautiful range of luxury pieces by Lineargent.

Jewelbox – Zachary Street, Valletta. Tel: 2722 0113


EXP> SED WHERE OTHERS SAW GRAFFITI AS A PHASE IN THEIR YOUTH, JAMES MICALLEF GRIMAUD – A.K.A “TWITCH” FOUND GRAFFITI ART JUST AS IMPORTANT TO HIMSELF AS A VITAL ORGAN. VAMP MEETS UP WITH THIS HOMEGROWN STREET LEGEND.

he word “graffiti” has long been associated with rebellious young people with nothing better to do than mark their territory. It has been practised since ancient times but now, with spray paint in hand, it has been put to work with loud and intricate creations by those who have only recently come to be accepted as ‘artists’. Graffiti art still continues to hit walls that do not belong to the ‘artists’ themselves, but there has been a growing interest and respect for it to the extent that artists have received support from both governments and private spectators.

What would you say the best part about being an artist?

The craziest thing I have ever done is... jump out of an aeroplane.

To be constantly creating and evolving.

What is your view on Malta in 2013?

If you could invite anyone to your dinner party who would it have been?

We are finally moving ahead in the arts! The whole EU involvement has opened up possibilities and slashed many local egos which will definitely result in progression. The introduction of the cultural policy was also a great help but things do take time in Malta so it’s up to us to pave the way for new generations.

As a result, the status of the graffiti artist is on the rise, and it is likely that we will see more of this art-form in Malta, perhaps also as part of collaborations for all sorts of colourful and unique campaigns that can raise the spirits of all who see them.

Has to be Shogun Assassin (lone wolf with cub).

Vamp catches up this artist who is currently waiting for approval from local councils to paint a good number of public walls, with his ‘putting colour in the streets’ campaign, supported by the Malta arts fund, and Christine x art gallery.

James Brown, The Ramones, Booker T, Larry Graham, Jimi Hendrix, The Suicide Girls, Cheech, Chong, Sammy Davies Jr, all the L7 band, Sista Nancy, Les Claypool, Dave Chapelle, Lee Scratch Perry, Conan O’Brian and all my good friends, dead and alive. I’m pretty sure this dinner would turn into a pretty wild party... and for lunch, I’d have the Dalai Lama over. Favourite Movie?

If one wish you had for the world could come true? It would be to stop all the suffering in the world. What is the one thing that irritates the hell out of you? Having a terrible song stuck in my head. What do you love most in the world? The pure energy holding it together.

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What was the most memorable moment as an artist so far?

Favourite holiday destination?

That’s a tough one to pinpoint. But it’s probably setting up a solo exhibition at the Society of Arts in Bermuda.

Wherever there’s a good vibe. You can find that in many places, and I’ve had great times all over the world.

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What is your advice to our readers? Wake up, think positive and out of the box, and start adopting a DIY approach to your life.

No one I know, is truer than Twitch when coming to art. He is truly inspirational especially for someone who has not only given himself fully to the fine arts, but has made it for himself when others wouldn’t pay attention to him. Galleries & ad agencies might not represent him, however, his works will touch more peoples lives than most artists, not only by the skills he has acquired through his many years, but putting up his works everywhere beyond the confines of any gallery space. Because of all that true stuff Twitch is made up of, Malta has found a real gem. He will be the reason why the local creative scene will be given a very big progressive push that this island desperately needs. “ Artist - Chris de Souza Jensen, [aka “SeaPuppy”] V


INTERVIEW: TWITCH

“TWITCH IS A FINE EXAMPLE OF A PERSON WHO HAS NEVER GIVEN UP ON HIS NUMBER ONE PASSION & HAS DROPPED HIS WORKS ON DIFFERENT ENDS OF THE EARTH, FROM LA TO THAILAND, JUST FOR THE SAKE OF LEAVING SOMETHING OF HIMSELF BEHIND”. – SeaPuppy

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THE BALANCING ACT NOWADAYS SO MUCH IS EXPECTED OF A WOMAN THAT IT MIGHT SEEM INCOMPREHENSIBLE HOW ONE CAN SUCCESSFULLY JUGGLE A CAREER AND MOTHERHOOD – AS WELL AS A GREAT SOCIAL LIFE. VAMP CAUGHT UP WITH DR JOANNA DELIA, WHO RUNS AN AESTHETIC MEDICAL CLINIC, TO ASK HOW SHE MANAGES TO KEEP UP WITH LIFE AT WORK AND AT HOME, WHILE STILL ENJOYING LIFE TO THE FULL. It is already hard enough for a woman to run a business without also being a mother. Would you agree? I wouldn’t say it is hard for a woman to run a business. It is a mixture of courage, hard work and being lucky – and smart enough – to recognise opportunities and the right circumstances and making the right decisions exactly when required, and I think it’s the same for a man or a woman, so it applies to anyone. I am a stubborn person, and I believe in offering a service that reflects the best of my abilities, and so after a number of years working for an established clinic, it made sense for me to head off and do my own thing. We’ve been running for three years now and I am brimming with pride. We are always busy, and attract most of our clients by word-of-mouth, which is a sure sign that we are doing our work well. What attracted you to medical aesthetics to begin with? When I finished medical school, I dreamt of a surgical career, but I soon realised that you need emotions of steel and the will to work seemingly never-ending hours, which made me re-think my choices. My original aim, when deciding to become a doctor, was to spend my life helping others and making people happy. When I was introduced to the world of aesthetics I realised that I had the power to help clients gain more confidence and 070

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feel happier about themselves. It was not about changing facial attributes but about fine-tuning and restoring little issues that were hindering a person’s ability to feel truly positive about her or his appearance. And we are lucky enough to live in an age when – what with Botox and many other types of filler, as well as state-of-the-art lasers and other technologies – we are spoilt for choice with the tools to make miracles with beauty! So by listening carefully, and applying correct judgement and techniques, I can use my skills as a doctor to improve someone’s life. I think that’s one of the most wonderful abilities to possess! We have heard that you’ve recently had a baby, and you’re planning another one! How does that change things? It has not changed everything! It’s just made everything better! I never realised

how happy you feel every second of every day when you become a mother. Everything falls into place and your perspective changes. There is a purpose behind everything you do and you strive to be a better person and excel at everything just so that in your mind you are a better role model for your child. That is how I feel! Of course, I reduced my clinic hours a little bit – which made clients become more persistent about finding an appointment – and I run all my administrative work from home, but my life is remarkably fuller in the best sense possible. I have to say I had to learn to become more efficient, so that I could have more free time in which to relax with my baby. But he is such a happy child that all I can say is that he is a mood enhancer in every sense! V


HEY...HEY HELS!NK! ARCHITECT CHRIS BRIFFA PLANE-HOPS TO THE WORLD DESIGN CAPITAL OF HELSINKI. VAMP WE ASK ASKS HIMHIM WHY, WHY, HOW, HOW, ANDAND WHAT WHAT MOSMOST T CAUGHT HIS ATTENTION DURING HIS TRIP

You visited Helsinki for the first time last summer. What took you there and would you go again? Indeed this was my first time in Finland, a midsummer trip drawn by two lures: Helsinki’s well-deserved title of World Design Capital (WDC) and EASA 2012 – an architecture students’ workshop held annually in a different European town. I left Malta accompanied by a spirited group of Maltese students who participated in the workshop, but after we got there I had plenty of time to roam around the capital’s events and attractions

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on my own, and enjoy the long summer days. I am very keen to experience the Finnish winter. The next time I visit, I will go for its cold beauty and the legendary northern lights.

helpful drivers I have ever met.

How did you travel?

The World Design Capital pavilion was one of my favourite spots: it’s a temporary timber structure sandwiched between the Design Museum and the Finnish Architecture Museum, with daily lectures and discussions, books on Finnish design and a cosy, open-air cafe. Here, I found all the information I needed about events and even met some of the organisers. >>

Getting there was rather complicated: from Malta to Malmo to Stockholm to Helsinki, and back home via Rome. But it was all very last-minute and I’m sure there are easier ways if you book in advance. To get around Helsinki I either walked or used their very efficient trams – which were equipped with the most

Which attractions were the most memorable and did you enjoy the architecture?


HELSINKI: TRAVEL

Oh yes, that would be the Finnish sauna. I was lucky enough to be living a few metres away from Kotiharju: the last remaining traditional, wood-burning sauna in Helsinki. Surreal and inspiring – from the huge cast-iron stove in the stepped chamber to the half-naked bodies sitting in the street drinking beer while they cooled off. Did you get a chance to try Finnish food?

The day it rained, I enjoyed my visit to the Kiasma (Helsinki’s contemporary art museum by Steven Holl), which was followed by a short, spiritual visit to the Kamppi Chapel of Silence – a special place for contemplation placed bang in the middle of a busy shopping area. Helsinki’s famous Rock Church is a must: a semi-underground temple which is not only incredibly beautiful but also possesses some impressive acoustics. I was lucky enough to walk in when a very talented Japanese pianist was playing Chopin. It was memorable and magical, and I even went there again on my last day. One of the greatest Finnish architects and designers was undoubtedly Alvar Aalto, and Helsinki’s Finlandia (concert) Hall was one of his last great works (1971). I didn’t manage to go inside, but I was pleasantly mesmerised by the dreamlike Carrara marble which clads the entire building. Although I didn’t use any trains, I found myself roaming in and around Eliel Saarinen’s Helsinki Central Station (1919), fascinated with the intricate art nouveau detailing and interiors. I would have liked to have visited many more places, some of them even outside Helsinki, and next time I will plan my “archi-trip” a little better. Apart from design or architecture, was there anything else that inspired you?

I enjoyed their Lohikeitto – a hot, creamy salmon soup served at market stalls and pretty much everywhere else – a few times. They also bake some great bread and serve very tasty mushrooms sauces, but to be honest I wasn’t in the right mood to try renowned culinary hotspots like The Savoy or the Sea Horse. Perhaps another reason to go back... How would you describe Helsinki people? I rented a studio apartment in Kallio (meaning “the rock”), an edgy, arty-farty and very bizarre neighbourhood with rocky outcrops sitting between its high-density urban planning. Here I met my helpful landlady Heidi, an accountant-turneddesigner, who gave me loads of tips about experiencing Helsinki’s design heritage. The EASA workshop organisers were also very helpful, accommodating and polite, and they invited me to give a short talk about our architectural work in Malta. The few Finns I met were quite quaint, relaxed and easy-going. Although it does take some time to break the ice, somehow you always know where you stand with them. What struck me the most was their innovative spirit and progressiveness, an asset which the design and technology industries have put to good use: Nokia, Angry Birds, Marimekko, Iittala and Artek, are just a few examples. In one sentence, how would you describe Helsinki? A busy, maritime, design city that never tries too hard to please and yet never fails to be spontaneous, colourful and inspired by nature. V www.chrisbriffa.com

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“ACTIVE INGREDIENTS” EXPLAINED.

(Retinol, retinyl acetate, retinyl palmitate). Vitamin A is essential for making your skin look and act younger. Research clearly shows that Vitamin A is an effective cellcommunicating ingredient (meaning it can tell skin cells to behave like healthy younger skin cells). It is also a good antioxidant and essential in the treatment of acne.

SOMETIMES DECIPHERING THE LABEL ON A BOTTLE OF MOISTURISER IS LIKE TRYING TO TRANSLATE A FOREIGN LANGUAGE. HERE IS A LIST OF ‘MUST HAVE’ ACTIVE INGREDIENTS, AS WELL AS THEIR USES. VITAMIN A

Vitamin C comes in many forms, including ascorbic acid, magnesium ascorbyl phosphate, ascorbyl palmitate and ascorbyl tetraisopalmitate. Skin care products should contain stabilised Vitamin C such as ascorbyl tetraisopalmitate, which is oil soluble and stable. Vitamin C increases collagen production, helps with uneven skin discolouration, enhances the skin’s repair process and helps it withstand sun exposure.

VITAMIN C

ANTI-OXIDANTS The skin is bombarded daily with free radical damage from pollution, sun exposure, smoke, etc., causing premature ageing and wrinkling. Anti-oxidants are used to counteract the effects of free radical damage. A good skin care product should contain several anti-oxidants such as natural vitamins, Vitamins C, E and B5, beta-carotene and antioxidant plant extracts such as green tea, rooibus, lycopene, rosemary leaf extract, resveratrol, lutein and many others.

WHAT YOUR SKIN CARE SHOULD NOT CONTAIN. Everyone loves a pleasing fragrance, but when it comes to a good skin care product, whether the fragrance is natural or synthetic, it is a big “no-no”. Packaging is important. Wide-mouth glass jars will expose active ingredients to light and air, causing them to break down as soon as you remove the lid. Good skin care should come in either a toothpaste-type tube or an airless pump container.

PEPTIDES

Peptides are found only in premium skin care products due to their high cost and complexity. Two popular peptides are matrixyl® 3000, which keeps your skin young by stimulating collagen production, and dermaxyl®, which rehydrates and plumps up the skin thereby reducing the depth of wrinkles and fine lines.



VAMP Magazine 08 - The Helsinki Issue