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VAMP MAGAZINE

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ESSENTIAL STYLE FACTS FOR LIFE IN 2012

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WHITE HOUSE

A WONDERFULLY QUIRKY HIPPY HOME IN THE MOROCCAN SEA-SIDE PORT OF ESSAOUIRA PG.28

FASHION

ART

DESIGN NEWS

Morocco Issue


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FROM THE EDITOR

Every time I come to the point of putting a few welcoming sentences together, I look over the pages of the issue, sit back at my desk and welcome the thoughts of so much creativity and determination superseding the lethargic, contrived or unproductive. And I feel inspired, and content in the thought that the world has so much good to offer and to distract us from the mundane and downright evil. I am sure that I am not alone in harbouring a good lashing of pride along with other Londoners, having seen the gracious performances for the Golden Jubilee and the Olympics this summer, that brought the whole of London together regardless of nationality or status. The royal family and the ushers at the Olympics alike did everything they could to make the events as flawless as possible and of the highest quality. Such magnificent events set an example and raise the bar for how far we can go in exceeding what is expected of us, and how, when we come together, we can achieve something flawlessly executed. In fact, the Vamp team loves London so much that the next issue will focus on that great capital city. This issue meets Saho Harada, an exceptional synchronised swimmer from Japan who continues to push herself to the limits with her profession, and now devotes most of her time to teaching Maltese students everything she knows. The issue includes breathtaking underwater photography of Saho Harada taken by Kurt Arrigo – all carried out so swiftly and professionally it was a pleasure to watch them work. We are pleased to say that Kurt will be shooting the next fashion shoot taking it to a new level, once again. This is the Morocco issue focusing a number of its pages to this vibrant North African country that is so diverse in what it has to offer, from life in the raw to extreme luxury. It ticks so many boxes as a holiday destination whether it is trekking, or savouring the culture inside or outside the walls of the Medina, with picture-perfect views and for some it is a home away from home. Monique Chambers shares her love affair with this compelling country and we take you to a white-washed guesthouse in the heart of the seaside port of Essaouira. From flies saving the world to design making the world a more delectable place, there is no excuse for not finding inspiration somewhere. So let it start with Vamp, a magazine created by creatives who conceived its existence with a pure love for good quality and design. As-Salamu `Alaykum (Peace be upon you)

Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher is prohibited. All rights reserved. Dates, information and prices are believed to be correct at the time of going to press but are subject to change and no responsibility is accepted for any errors or omissions. Neither the editor nor the publisher accept responsibility for any material submitted, whether photographic or otherwise. While we endeavour to ensure that the organisations and firms mentioned are reputable. The editor can give no guarantee that they will fulfill their obligations under all circumstances. Š Copyright 2012

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Editor Lily Agius

Magazine Coordinator Sam Psaila

Creative Director Chris Psaila

Contributers Dr. Edward Duca Edgar Buttigieg Emma Wilson Graham Carter Luke Engerer Monique Chambers Ruben Grima Sandra Calafato Saho Harada Sharma Restaurant

Photography Kurt Arrigo Daniel Coppini Stylist Luke Engerer Sales & Marketing Manager Matthew Spiteri 77242490 publishing@active-enterprises.com

Printers Print It MOROCCO ISSUE

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FASHION CONTENTS TRENDS PAGE

20. FLIES -R- US These pesky creatures have more of a purpose

than most of us give credit for. Dr Edward Duca explains why.

28. THE WHITE HOUSE Vamp checks out a wonderfully quirky and awe- inspiring hippy home in the Moroccan sea-side port of Essaouira.

43. DESIGNS FOR LIFE

A few outrageous gadgets that will get your jaws dropping.

44. SINKING

An epic underwater photoshoot by Kurt Arrigo.

in>side 58. TWISTED TRUTH

Style facts that will change your life.

66. MARRAKECH Morocco is full of colour, smells, noise – and also

peace. Monique Chambers reminisces about her journey to this vibrant world.

70. ALL TOGETHER NOW

Sharma restaurant reveal the secrets for an authentic Moroccan feast, with recipes to tempt your taste buds, from small appetisers to hearty, steaming stews in clay pots.

79. TRUTHS & MYTHS

The most common skin care misconceptions relating to acne and problematic skin, by Environ.

COVER PHOTO Photographer: Kurt Arrigo Model: Saho Harada Make-up: Jean Pillow Stylist/Garments: Luke Engerer

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VAMP MAGAZINE UPDATE

UPDATE > WIN A FREE PERFUME WITH GUERLAIN For a chance to win a bottle of Guerlain, tell us what “La petite Robe noire” means in English. Send your answers by email to info@franks.com.mt by 7th October 2012, including your contact details. La Petite Robe Noire is fruity, floral and sexy! It sparkles with the tanginess of black cherry, a hint of liquorice, an armful of roses, smoked tea and patchouli leaves .

OPS! COMPETITION BY VASCAS To win an OPS! Shake watch or OPS! Love bracelet, go to www.facebook.com VascasMalta and explain why you deserve to win an OPS! Object. OPS! Love bracelet presented in 27 shades, is made from anallergic resin, including a large engraved heart-shaped silicon pendent and steel “ops!” charm. OPS! Shake watch is named for its smart mix of colours and materials, Italian design and extreme care for detail.

INSTRUCTION FOR USE – CORTONA ON THE MOVE At the second travel photography festival Cortona on the Move, visitors will be able to enjoy the first, exclusive, self-production collection by IFU©. This is the collection’s international premiere and for the duration of the festival - until 15 September - it will be providing furniture, seating and accessories at the venue and in the bookshops. During the first four days of the festival, the designers involved in a temporary museum created especially for the purpose in the Teatro Signorelli in Cortona. The visitors made some of the products from the IFU© collection using the self-production method and the prototypes are on show in the foyer of the Teatro Signorelli, the bookshops and the exhibition areas for the duration of the festival…. The IFU concept was devised and coordinated by Fenice Vision. Designer Giulio Patrizi – who gave a lecture and workshop at Malta Design Week 2011 – was the creative director of the format. Together with over[h]ome, Mario Alessiani and MomiDodi Design, he dreamed up the first IFU© collection, as well as designing some of the exhibition space at Cortona on the Move. In addition to the creative direction of the format, Patrizi has designed some of the furnishings at the festival, such as the 2h STOOL, the VF Bench inspired the photographic work of Vincent Fournier, la NORMALE and a bookshelves ELLE. www.instructionforuse.com

WILD THING Ever dreamt of owning a wild leopard? Well now’s your chance! The Bengal is a relatively new hybrid breed of cat, the result of crossing a domestic cat and an Asian wild leopard cat. Bengal cats have “wild-looking” markings, such as large spots and rosettes, and a body structure reminiscent of the Asian wild leopard cat. They have that desirable “wild” appearance with the temperament of the domestic cat. And they are now available in Malta! For more information contact Austin on 7925 5209.

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VAMP MAGAZINE VAMP UPDATE

Are women worse drivers than men? Gallus Strobel, the mayor of the small town of Triberg in Germany’s Black Forest, and a few in China believe they are.

BECOMING MORE CURIOUS The Mars rover Curiosity has successfully tested its ChemCam laser for the first time on the Red Planet, using it to blast the surface of a small rock. The fist-sized target-practice rock, now known as Coronation but originally given the temporary name of N165, was chosen for the test because it was next to Curiosity and had a smooth surface. It received 30 pulses from the ChemCam laser, each of which created a spark, within 10 seconds. The instrument recorded spectra from these sparks, to establish the chemical composition of Coronation’s surface and to see whether the composition changed during the series of pulses. “We got a great spectrum of Coronation – lots of signal,” said ChemCam principal investigator Roger Wiens of Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico in a statement. “Our team is both thrilled and working hard, looking at the results. After eight years building the instrument, it’s pay-off time!” ChemCam deputy project scientist Sylvestre Maurice of the Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie (IRAP) in Toulouse, added that the data received from the Coronation test were better than those from early tests on Earth.

They have created extra-wide parking spaces with an array of markings to indicate that they are women-only and with a male or female symbol based on their level of difficulty, according to the Daily Mail. In addition to being wider, the spaces are better lit and located close to the car park exits. Men’s parking spaces are accordingly narrower, at more difficult angles and in some cases up against concrete pillars. Tianjin, China has car parks that have ‘Ladies’ Parking’ areas complete with brighter lighting, the requisite wider spaces, pink walls and columns, female parking attendants and safety bumpers, according to the British newspaper. Statistics from the (British) Driving Standards Agency, report that “40,000 women failed their driving tests last year for not controlling their car while reverse parking”. Only 18,798 men had a similar problem. Strobel, 58, told local newspaper Suddeutsche Zeitung that the designations are not meant to be sexist and that women are welcome to give parking in men’s spaces a shot, reports the Daily Mail.

> WIN A RELAXING SPA BREAK AT MYOKA! Myoka is giving one lucky reader the chance to win a relaxing spa break at any one of their four Myoka luxury spas. The lucky winner will receive a massage, facial and an IPL hair removal treatment plus unlimited use of the spa and facilities for the day. For your chance to win simply LIKE the Myoka Spas Facebook page and send a private message of not more than 100 words explaining why you deserve to be the lucky winner for this spa package worth over €130. Myoka are also offering 15 complimentary IPL patch tests for the first competitors. Good luck! Myoka Lotus Spa, Le Meridien St Julians Tel: 21 370 163 www.myoka.com

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INTERVIEW

“I never get tired”, DJ Ruby tells me as he sets his bags down and pulls out his camera and gear. Finding out he came straight from DJing all night was a stunning piece of information and I couldn’t help but ask him how he does it. In fact, he explains, his hours are not like those of most people – swapping day for night and vice versa. This night owl is surely here during his sleeping hours, but he shows no sign of any waning energy and straightaway gets to work. DJ Ruby is now also a self-taught videographer, having learnt everything he knows from watching tutorials online. Working with vision is not new to him – for the past five years he has been a VJ (video jockey) incorporating visuals with his audio DJ sets. Towards the end of last year he discovered DSLR cameras and the superb video quality their lenses can produce and within a matter of days decided he would take on film-making and video editing professionally to embrace it with his skills in audio & visuals production. Thanks to videography, Ruby’s VJ sets also went up another level: he recently launched a show called ‘Audio Visual Perception’, which is a mind-blowing live club experience of cutting edge visuals synced with audio.

A STEP AHE D As a filmmaker, he launched a brand called ‘Pure Media’ and in just seven months he has been working non-stop making videos for many clients and also filming all his dance events and international gigs and then completing the job with video editing. This unique merging of mediums has given Ruby a new lease of life. “After 20 years of DJing non-stop, you come to point when you feel that you’ve done it all. Now, this new venture has given me the boost to give it another 20 years!”

DJ RUBY STEPS ON TO A BOAT WITH THE VAMP TEAM STRAIGHT FROM HIS LAST GIG ON A HOT JULY MORNING, TO BE TAKEN OUT TO SEA TO FILM THIS ISSUE’S FASHION SHOOT AND DISCUSS HIS NEW HOBBY TURNED CAREER DEVELOPMENT: VIDEOGRAPHY >> Words by Lily Aguis

Video editing involves a lot of time, skill and creativity. Ruby explains how it takes double the time to produce a track, and it can take days for a good 10-minute video edit to be fully done and colour graded. There are not many who can DJ, VJ and also offer a good quality video documentary of an event, and it has proved to be a successful marriage. Apart from playing all over Malta, Ruby is signed up with a Dutch management company called Fektive that promotes him as a special DJ/VJ act, and supplies him with constant international gigs all over the globe. When I asked if he ever gets a break from working, he told me that he doesn’t! He is always either DJing in Malta, performing VJ sets abroad, promoting events or producing music and now videography has filled in any chance of a break. We all jump into the sea to cool down from the relentless sun – while Ruby chooses to continue filming. I remember what he told me earlier, which couldn’t be more fitting to explain his reluctance to take a moment’s relief from the heat in the sea: “Work is my medicine!” V MOROCCO ISSUE

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FLIES–R– Words: Dr. Edward Duca

His 1600 eye segments lock on her body. Flying down, he places himself just in front of her, a little to the side. She checks him out – and likes what she sees but doesn’t let him know. He turns around, going behind her, and taps her on her ‘lower end’. Back in front of her he starts to sing, flapping his wings, vibrating the air around her, soothing her. He then tries his luck: turning behind her he licks her – oral sex – then tries to mount her. She likes him, so she lifts her abdomen up, she does nothing else. They have sex. These are Drosophila (or fruit flies).

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FLIES & HUMANS Fruit flies are 2mm long and live for just 40 days, yet they can find food, learn and remember. As this story shows, they have eerie similarities with humans. And, despite around 500 million years of evolution separating us, fruit flies still share around 70 - 75 per cent of our genes that cause disease. Obviously, flies are not humans, but close enough that we can use them to study ourselves. FLIES TO STUDY DISEASE In Malta, researcher Ruben Cachia is using fruit flies to study spinal muscular atrophy, a muscle-wasting disease that afflicts human

children and eventually leads to death. It is in a class of diseases such as the one that affects the physicist Stephen Hawkins and that led to the death of the communist leader Mao Zedong. In flies and humans this is because of a gene called the “survival motor neuron gene”, without which neurons do not survive. Neurons are needed to send a signal from the brain to the muscle, telling it to contract. Without this stimulation, muscles are unable to move and the end up shrinking from lack of use. Dr Cachia can manipulate the disease-causing gene in flies, learning more about the condition in humans. It’s a long way away, but it could lead to better treatments becoming available. >>


FLIES–R–US?

US...?


Merchant Street, Valletta. tel: 2258 4444 / St. Anne Square, Sliema. tel: 2258 4431


FASHION FLIES–R–US? TRENDS

“LARGE PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANIES USE THESE METHODS TO TEST THOUSANDS OF DRUGS, NARROWING DOWN POSSIBLE TREATMENTS FOR HUMANS” Pharmaceutical companies also use flies – to test drugs. Imagine a fly that has been modified to make too much of a certain protein in its brain. Excess of the protein causes this fly to start suffering from Parkinson’s disease. Now, imagine that fly is fed a drug and recovers, or maybe remains pretty much the same. A researcher could compare the fly with one that is not receiving treatment, to ascertain which drugs work. Large pharmaceutical companies use these methods to test thousands of drugs, narrowing down possible treatments for humans. The drugs will still need to be tested on organisms closer to humans, but using this approach has helped reduce the number of dead ends and the number of more complex animals being used to test drugs.

For example, in 1993 Swiss researcher Walter J. Gehring and his team found another master gene called “eyeless”. When this single gene was expressed throughout the body, eyes started cropping up everywhere. In fruit flies, the tools exist to express genes wherever and whenever a scientist needs.

The fruit fly is small, quite simple and easily killed – usually by swatting – to prevent it spoiling fruit, its favourite food. Despite its natural bad looks, by studying this insignificant little fly we have learnt so much about what it is to be human.

Another big Q is how do we develop in our mother’s womb? How does one sperm and one egg fuse together, split millions of times and make the 50 trillion or so cells present

The humble fruit fly is even inspiring artists. Fruit flies feature in films, performance art, dance, digital art, installations and even food art. Malta is no exception and on the 28 September, Science in the City (Researchers’ Night) will hit Valletta’s streets, filling them with science-inspired art, including some fruit flies by Liliana Fleri Soler. She will be exhibiting six-foot tall fruit flies in Merchants Street, acting out the wonderful behaviour of flies. An art exhibition called HOW? will run from the 27 September until the 28 October at St. James Cavalier exploring various scientific phenomena.

FLIES FOR SCIENCE Over one hundred years ago, American scientist Thomas Hunt Morgan started to use flies in research. He and his assistant were the first people to do so. He found out how genes are passed on from one generation to the next and in 1933 was awarded the Noble Prize for Physiology or Medicine. In 1946, Ed Lewis started to unravel a puzzle – a puzzle that took him over 30 years to bring to the public and the results of which were controversial and shook the scientific world. He found that a set of master genes control whether an organ becomes a heart, wing, leg, or other appendage. Normal fruit flies have a set of appendages called “halters” that help balance them while flying. With a single mutation, those balancing organs can be turned into another pair of wings. Similar rules direct us humans – although we are more complicated – and only a small set of genes give rise to our bodies. The fly taught us about ourselves. Lewis’s work inspired many other scientists.

FLIES IN ART

The full programme for Science in the City will be available at: www.scienceinthecity. org.mt and on Facebook (Science in the City Malta).

by adult-hood? Flies provided the answer. In the late1970s and 80s, Christiane Nusslein-Volhard, Eric Wieschaus and their team performed a screen that would uncover hundreds of genes vital for development. They fed adult flies a chemical that mutated their DNA. These mutated flies had offspring that carried these mutations, so they then looked at the embryos of these flies. The fly embryo has a very precise layout, so the researchers could easily spot changes when they found them, and they kept finding countless important clues to human development. Problems in development affect millions of people and lead to diseases as far-ranging as from various degrees of physical disability to cancer. In 1995 they were joint winners of the Noble Prize for Physiology or Medicine.

FLY FACTS They live for 40 days. Their sex is decided by XX (female) and XY (male) chromosome, like us. One female can lay up to 3,000 eggs at a maximum of 100 a day. The fruit fly is 2mm long, with 2mm sperm. The female can store sperm for two weeks in spermathacea. She can mix the sperm of different fathers and choose the best for her eggs. The males have spiky hairs called “claspers” to attach to the female during mating. V

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WIN A FREE BOTTLE OF PERFUME! [ Find out how on pg 13 ]


ELEANOR AMOROSO

SOON AFTER GRADUATING, LONDON-BASED FASHION DESIGNER ELEANOR AMOROSO’S TALENT WAS SPOTTED AND HER WORK WAS MODELLED FOR AND PUBLISHED ON THE COVER OF VOLT MAGAZINE. SINCE THEN, HER DESIGNS HAVE APPEARED IN NUMEROUS PUBLICATIONS INCLUDING ANOTHER, TANK, I-D, SCHON, NEO2, GLAMCULT, IDOL AND PAPERCUT AND HAS BEEN FEATURED ON VOGUE.COM, VOGUE.IT AND FASHIONISING.COM. VAMP CAUGHT UP WITH AMOROSO BEFORE HER ARRIVAL IN MALTA WITH HER LATEST COLLECTION FOR RUNWAY MALTA ORGANISED BY SO MANAGEMENT Interview: Lily Agius >>

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ELEANOR AMOROSO

Being based in London, are you ever compelled to use traditional English fabrics such as felt, tartan, velvet and tweed? What fabrics and materials do you favour, and have used, in your designs? I love traditional English fabrics, particularly velvet! However, my pieces are more akin to knitwear and therefore I work with long yarns which I knot together to create garments. Are there any designers and fashion icons that inspire you? Although I do not know how to knit, I am inspired by contemporary knitwear designers like Sandra Backlund and Craig Lawrence and fascinated by the innovative

Eleanor Amoroso

Your work has been described as a ‘commemoration of the forgotten art of craftsmanship’. Where did you acquire an appreciation for the hand-made and how do you think it fares in the massproduced world of fashion today? I have always worked in a craft-like way, preferring to focus on textures and textiles (although I also love clothes to be clean and modern). At university I explored a range of different techniques and stumbled upon the ancient craft of macramé. I loved the shapes and textures that can be created purely from knots and experimented by creating modern pieces that are based on what is a very traditional craft. I feel there is a place for this type of work in the fashion world of today. With the huge rise in fast fashion, I believe that there is a growing demand for unique, hand-crafted pieces.

pieces they are able to create. I have also always admired Iris Van Herpen’s amazing show-pieces: they are so different from anything else! Describe your creative process. Due to the nature of my work, it is difficult to work in a traditional way and create designs and patterns before starting the actual making process. Typically, I work on my mannequin and create the pieces around the body. It is a very slow process but it allows the collection to develop in an organic way, with each piece inspiring the next. When did you first know that you wanted to be a fashion designer? To be honest, it was never something I thought I would ever be able to do, but after the success of my graduate collection (in 2010) I just continued creating collections and everything has just happened from there. I feel very lucky! How would you describe the life of a fashion designer? Frantic! You launched your own label last year. Has your first year been as you expected it to be? I didn’t really know what to expect or how my work would be received, but I have had so much positive feedback from the press and support from people like Vauxhall Fashion Scout and Blow PR. I never expected to have done all of the things that I have had the opportunity to do already! I was lucky enough to be able to show during

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London Fashion Week less than a year after graduating and have continued to be involved each season. I have also exhibited in Milan and Amsterdam and had my work featured in numerous magazines. In a way it is very surreal. What advice would you give someone choosing the career of fashion designer? To make sure you believe in what you are doing 100% and stay true to yourself. Do you have any plans for the near and/ or far distant future? For Spring/Summer 2013, I will be exhibiting at London Fashion Week again. I hope to go on to have my own presentation next season and show again in the future! I am currently also looking for additional stockists, both in the UK and internationally. What will you be presenting at Runway Malta this September? I will be presenting a selection of pieces that truly represent my design aesthetic. The pieces will be taken from past collections as well as the new collection on which I am working now (SS13) with a focus on dramatic showpieces! V

Runway Malta is back for its third season on 29 September from 6pm to midnight. The international one-night fashion event, held at Montekristo Estates in Luqa, is the only one of its kind on the island and showcases designers and labels from all over the world in a ‘Fashion-Week’ style set-up with hourly catwalk shows. This season’s grand finale is at 10.30pm with Eleanor Amoroso. Tickets are available by email to info@runwaymalta.com or by visiting Baystreet, St Julian’s or at Mat in Birkirkara. For more information, visit www.runwaymalta.com


I AM NEW MY NEW STYLE

MOSTA 67, CONSTITUTION STR | TEL: +356 2202 2153 SLIEMA PJAZZA TIGNÉ, TIGNÉ | TEL: +356 2202 1200 ST JULIAN’S LEVEL 1, BAYSTREET SHOPPING MALL, ST GEORGE’S BAY | TEL: +356 2202 2152 VALLETTA 248A REPUBLIC STR | TEL: +356 2202 2150


The light well on the first floor has a bedroom, bathroom and living room off it with an open plan kitchen at the other end.

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THE WHITE HOUSE

THE SOUTHERN FISHING VILLAGE OF ESSAOUIRA, JUST TWO HOURS FROM MARRAKECH, HAS BEEN A SECRET BOHEMIAN HANGOUT SINCE THE 1950s. THIS IS WHERE ORSON WELLES BASED HIS OTHELLO, AND JIMI HENDRIX FOUND HIS INSPIRATION FOR CASTLES MADE OF SAND. TODAY, IT IS WHERE MANY EXPATS CALL HOME, AND CREATIVE MINDS MEET TO BECOME INSPIRED.

ar Beida (The White House) is situated at the back of Essaouira’s fortified medina, with the food markets pretty much on the doorstep and a walk of approximately 10 minutes to Essaouira’s long, sandy beach. It was lovingly restored 10 years ago by two London designers, and offers a top-end tranquil and cool escape from the outside world. From the outside, Dar Beida blends well with its white-washed 15th-century port-side neighbours. It is when you step inside that you find yourself immersed in a beaming haven of retro meets ethnic design, highlighted by the backdrop of an all-white organic space, flowing from one room to the next. >>

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They built two pot bellied fire places in the living room, and decorated it with a wall of skulls that they mostly found in Morocco.

THE WHITE HOUSE

British design partners Emma Wilson and Graham Carter started to create this organic modern living space in 2002. It took them about a year-and-a-half to rebuild the 3,200sq.ft house, commuting back and forth from London to oversee the local builders knocking down and stripping walls and bringing it back to its full glory. They surfaced the kitchen counter in tadelakt – a lime plaster often used in riads in Morocco – and eventually added the finishing touches of colourful lighting and furnishings, mainly from the 1960’s era. Furnishing the house took many years of scouring markets, salvaging old pieces and bringing them back to life, and also importing furniture from their “quirky” furniture shop in London, which they closed in 2005. They also wanted everything “a little bit wonky” and that’s what they got: a funky yet serene flow of a home. >> MOROCCO ISSUE

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THE WHITE HOUSE

This is what they call ‘the library’, situated on the ground floor. The moulded concrete shelves house many books, board games and DVDs for their guests to borrow during their stay. The chair is an original Joe Colombo from the 60s. MOROCCO ISSUE

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Autumn/Winter Collection Now in Store


THE WHITE HOUSE

The top terrace bedroom has a private terrace with views of Essaouira medina.

Dar Beida is built around a central courtyard and is set over four storeys. At ground level is a library connecting to a chill-out room with a fireplace, and the courtyard has a fountain and rest area with a blissfully relaxing hanging chair. On the first floor there is an open-plan, fully equipped kitchen/ diner at one end, a living space with stereo in the middle and two fireplaces, and a bedroom and shower room towards the back. The 2nd floor has two double bedrooms with pod fireplaces in each, and in-between the bedrooms is a curved bathroom with a skylight. Walking straight out, a large terrace is found with a rustic sunny/shady area with seating, sun-beds and a hammock. On the top floor is a double bedroom with glass-fronted doors opening out onto a private terrace and a further seating area. >> MOROCCO ISSUE

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Distributed by nmarrigo.ltd Tel: 2122 3755


THE WHITE HOUSE

Dar Beida sleeps eight and is available for hire. Each guest is made to feel at home by being given a pair of babbouche (Moroccan slippers) to wear in the house and then take home with them, and local Argan soap, towels and bathrobes, and guests are also taken on a guided tour of the medina by the English owners, who will point out the good restaurants and activities, including a cookery school, hammam, horse riding, kite surfing, trips to secluded beaches, swimming pools and souks. There is a telephone in the house for visitors to use if required, as well as Bose speakers for use with an iPod, and wireless internet access. There is also a large selection of books, CDs and board games, and for around â‚Ź15 per head, a chef will cook a traditional Moroccan meal and bring it to the door. V Transport links: Two-and-a-half hours by road from Marrakech or Agadir. Transfers to and from Marrakech can be arranged with the owners. For more information visit www.castlesinthesand.com and for booking enquiries contact Emma on any of the following: UK mobile: (0044) 07768 352190, Moroccan mobile: (00212) 667 965 386 or email: emma@castlesinthesand.com MOROCCO ISSUE

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RAY–BAN TIME MACHINE

EHT :NAB-YAR EMIT E N I H CA M hroughout its seven-and-a-half decades, Ray-Ban has been instrumental in pushing boundaries in music and the arts, forging the rise of celebrity culture and creating the power of the rock and movie stars to influence fashion. From James Dean to Audrey Hepburn to Andy Warhol, Ray-Ban has proven indispensable for cultural icons who don’t want to be seen but definitely want to be noticed. Ray-Ban has left an indelible mark on culture history. >>

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RAY–BAN TIME MACHINE

30’s

ALL ABOUT AVIATION: As new aeroplanes allowed people to fly higher and further, many US Air Force pilots were reporting that the glare from the sun was giving them headaches and altitude sickness. A new kind of glasses was introduced with green lenses that could cut out the glare without obscuring vision, and the Ray-Ban brand was born and went on sale in 1937. The original glasses featured a plastic frame with the now classic ‘Aviator’ shape. The sunglasses were remodelled with a metal frame the following year and re branded as the Ray-Ban ‘Aviator’ and it wasn’t long before the popularity of RayBan spread from pilots to anyone with an outdoor lifestyle.

40’s

market was becoming more sophisticated and had developed in two distinct directions: sportswear necessity and fashion accessory. The 1970s saw further product expansion and technical innovation: mountaineering glasses with mirrored lenses and leather side shields were developed to reflect glare and protect the eyes from sun and wind. Ray-Ban also expanded its range to include prescription eyewear as well as sunglasses.

80’s

STAGE & SCREEN: In the decade of arcade games, MTV and the Brat Pack, Ray-Ban was one of the must-have brands. In the movies, there were leading roles for the Ray-Ban Wayfarer in The Blues Brothers (1980) and Risky Business (1983). Top Gun (1986) took Ray-Ban Aviator back

AVIATION & MORE: World War II saw American Air Force pilots continue to rely on Ray-Ban. Research and development resulted in innovations such as the gradient mirror lens, which featured a special coating on the upper part of the lens for enhanced protection, but an uncoated lower lens for a clear view of the plane’s instrument panel.

50’s

HOLLYWOOD GLAM: In the wake of WWII, Hollywood was having an increasingly powerful impact on what people wore. The Ray-Ban ‘Wayfarer’ model was launched in 1952, and once they had been seen on screen legends such as James Dean in 1955’s Rebel Without a Cause and later Audrey Hepburn in 1961’s Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Ray-Ban Wayfarer became one of the most instantly recognisable fashion accessories ever. And all the time, Ray-Ban was continuing to innovate. Introduced in 1953, Ray-Ban ‘Signet’ sunglasses feature an eye-catching gold or silver frame with horizontal bands at the nose bridge, front corners and ear stems.

60’s

REVOLUTION & CHANGE: Ray-Ban adapted right along with the changing times. From roughly 30 styles at the beginning of the decade, the catalogue had expanded to 50 by 1969, including styles for men, women and children, and Hollywood stars continued to wear them.

70’s

SPORTING CHANCE: Disco was king in the 1970s, and that meant dressing to impress and often included wearing cool shades even indoors. By now, the eye-wear

Vegas. In 1999, Luxottica Group acquired the Bausch & Lomb frames business, including the brands Ray-Ban, Arnette, Killer-Loop Eyewear and REVO.

2003

CULTURE & COMMUNICATION: A major expansion of the Ray-Ban brand in 2003 included Ray-Ban ‘Optical’ for prescription lenses and Ray-Ban ‘Junior’ for children, and further developed its brand with models made from titanium. In 2006 came a complete overhaul of the Ray-Ban Wayfarer, and in 2007 Ray-Ban launched the NEVER HIDE campaign an innovative global interactive project in NYC’s Times Square featuring 12 screens displaying images submitted by Ray-Ban wearers who wanted to express themselves honestly and spontaneously at “the crossroads of the world”. Ray-Ban re-worked its most iconic models in an explosion of fresh colour for 2009 with Never Hide Colourise Communication Campaign. Additional recent Ray-Ban Wayfarer updates include models featuring designs printed on the interior of the frames such as the NYC subway map and striking floral and striped patterns and the Ray-Ban Tech Carbon Fibre Collection was born.

2010

UPDATES, ADVANCES & CELEBRATING 75 YEARS: In 2010, the Ray-Ban Aviator was back in the spotlight. Renowned rock photographer Kevin Cummins shot music icons past and present including The Virgins, The Big Pink, We Are Scientists and Iggy Pop wearing various models from the Ray-Ban Aviator family. And 2011 saw the launch of Ray-Ban ‘Light Ray’. to their fighter pilot roots, boosting sales of the Ray-Ban original... Michael Jackson established his signature look when he showed up at the 1984 Grammys in a pair of Ray-Ban Aviator. But it was Ray-Ban Wayfarer he chose for his epic Bad tour, which ran from 1987 to 1989 and became the tour with the largest audiences in history.

90’s

A NEW ERA: Ray-Ban continued to be a movie favourite in the 1990s the Ray-Ban ‘Clubmaster’ was worn by Denzel Washington in Malcolm X (1992) and Tim Roth in Reservoir Dogs (1992). 1997 saw Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones wearing Ray-Ban ‘Predator’ in Men in Black, while Johnny Depp wore a pair of Ray-Ban ‘Shooter’ in 1998’s Fear and Loathing in Las

2012

Ray-Ban celebrates its heritage with its “Legends” Communication Campaign, featuring a profile of a real person from every decade of Ray-Ban’s existence. Ray-Ban will also celebrate its 75th anniversary with a limited edition book of rare iconic images taken from the worlds of music, film, style and popular culture, all put into context by leading cultural commentators. In addition, the Ray-Ban Ambermatic 2012 Limited Edition will reinterpret four classic Ray-Ban Aviator styles with the legendary 1978 photochromic lens. V

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UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS

MAKE YOUR BURGER A DOUBLE!!

[on presentation of this voucher]


DESIGNS FOR LIFE

FOR

DESIGNS LIFE! SOME OF THE WORLDS MOST INGENIOUS DESIGNS FOR MODERN LIVING.

A WICKED USB DRIVE Here’s an interesting USB flash drive - measuring approx 74 x 54 x 22.5mm and weighing 25g - shaped as a terrible skeleton figure, but with nice details and a black coating. The head of the skeleton is the protective cap, and the hands have been molded together with the skull, so you will never worry about missing the cap. By removing the skull from the hidden USB connector, you can easily plug it into your computer, and the built-in flash memory helps you store data and transmit it between computers. The skeleton figure USB flash drive is available in three storage capacities: 4GB, 8GB and 16GB. www.usbgeek.com

JEAN MICHEL JARRE IPAD DOCK Harrods new department is selling a £300,000 (approx. €378,000) Jean Michel Jarre iPad dock, the AeroDream One. It is supplied with its own ladder and is custom-made to order. It is not clear why the unit is actually so tall – 11ft – but it is said that the sound is as immense as the price tag.

THE ECOXPRO This waterproof speaker and iPhone case can be used anywhere you want, be it in the mountains or in the sea or pool. It also comes with a waterproof jack that fits any 3.5mm headset and can be used with waterproof ECOXBUDS for a complete waterproof audio experience with 30 hours of battery life. www.ecoxgear.com/ecoxpro

FLOATING BED Designed by Dutchman Janjaap Ruijssenaars, this magnetic floating bed has enough magnets to keep 900 kgs (1,984 lbs) floating in the air. To make sure that the bed doesn’t float away due to strong wind or weird movements, it is tethered to the walls by four cables. Technically, the magnetic floating bed is for sale, but at a price of €1.2 million, you’re not likely to find it in your local home furnishings store. www.universearchitecture.com

FLEXIBLE E-INK DISPLAY The future of digital reading is flexible with this bendable plastic e-ink display. The six-inch display is made of plastic, which allows it to bend at an angle of up to 40º. It is also thinner – at just 0.7mm – and lighter than its glass counterparts, weighing just 14gms. Keep your eyes peeled for its arrival in the shops – producer LG has announced it aims to have it on the shelves soon!

KOHLER NUMI TOILET This super advanced lavvy offers something more to look forward to than just simply relieving oneself. It features a built-in music system, ambient lighting, touch-screen remote, motionactivated lid and seat, retracting bidet, air dryer, air deodoriser, heated seat, floor vents to keep your feet warm and customisable options for everyone who uses it in one household. This can be yours for $6,400 (approx. €5,100) www.kohler.com

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SINK


PHOTOGRAPHY: KURT ARRIGO GARMENTS/STYLING: LUKE ENGERER MAKE-UP: JEAN PILLOW MODEL: SAHO HARADA

IN


TWISTED TRU H.

+

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TWISTED TRUTH

STYLE IS INDIVIDUAL, A REFLECTION OF YOURSELF – WHO YOU ARE OR WHO YOU ASPIRE TO BE. YOU MIGHT NOT EVEN BE GIVEN THE CHANCE TO OPEN YOUR MOUTH BUT REST ASSURED YOU HAVE ALREADY BEEN SCANNED, PROCESSED AND CATEGORISED. UNFAIR? YES, BUT THIS IS THE REALITY OF OUR DAY-TO-DAY LIVES. THIS MY READERS IS THE FIRST IMPRESSION. BY LUKE ENGERER >> MOROCCO ISSUE

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TWISTED TRUTH

t takes less than 30 seconds. It has been scientifically proven. Some say it takes as little as 3 seconds. Well, the truth of the matter is, we live in an image conscious society, every day we are forming impressions of other people and they are forming impressions of us, and yes, you guessed it, it takes less then 30 seconds to form that impression. Basically, most of us have been programmed by society to assess pretty much everything on aesthetic value. We are drawn to products that are nicely packaged, in the same way as we are drawn to people who are well presented. We are not aware of our every thought and at times are unaware that we too are judging others, but if we are totally honest with ourselves, we all do it. We are both the victim and the perpetrator. As shallow as it may sound, you are being judged (and judging) solely on appearance. You are not only assessed based on factors about yourself that are outside your control – things you were born with, such as your skin colour, gender and age – but also on your behaviour and how you present yourself.

Different pieces, colours and styles encourage different feelings and different behaviour. What you wear not only affects you but also the people around you. Learning more about style and your personal reactions to clothing will allow you to tailor your mood according to the outfit you choose: you can be in control. If you are feeling down, you can perk yourself up. If you have an important meeting, you will know what to wear to help you focus and feel your most confident. Isn’t that a powerful tool to have in your wardrobe? Choosing the right outfit for any occasion will greatly improve your chances of success, both personally and professionally. Scientists have studied the effects of style and looking good on the ability to succeed. Your chances of promotion are almost 250 per cent greater if you wear the appropriate clothing with a style signature. Your chances are 150 per cent greater with only workappropriate clothing and are considerably reduced with a poor choice of clothing. Also, subordinates tend to react more favourably to welldressed superiors. If you are dressed well, you are well received. If you are dressed well with style, you are much better received and remembered. >>

Now, let’s talk about you. How do you rate on the first impression barometer? Let’s set the scene. You walk into a room where there are a number of people, none of whom you have ever met – and they know nothing about you either. So how do you carry yourself? Have you walked in smiling confidently or did you slouch into the room, trying not to be noticed? Are you dressed appropriately? Are you neat and tidy? Stylish? Are you wearing something poorly fitted, worn out, boring? What are they thinking of you? Have you made the right impression? You’re probably thinking: “I can’t control what people think of me”. BUT OH YES YOU CAN! If you take good care of yourself, you are showing the world that you have self-worth. In that initial encounter or first meeting, your image of self-worth is taken at face value. People will assume that there is worth in you, because you project that message. Most people are unaware of the meaning and impact of their initial impression on others. Some of you might be thinking: “I don’t care about what people think of me” and hats off to you if you honestly don’t care, but what do you think about yourself? When you look in the mirror, who do you see? We are not conscious of every reflection we pass, but it does make an impression, nonetheless. If we are happy with how we look, and we make an effort to look our best, our feelings are boosted with every glimpse. If we run out of the house looking sloppy, this will play on our subconscious, putting a damper on our day and our positive attitude. Think back to the last time you looked in the mirror and felt really good about yourself: how was your day? How did you feel? Creativity is stimulated by change and new experiences. If you wear the same thing day in, day out, you are likely to repeat the feelings of one day to the next, regardless of negative or positive influences. MOROCCO ISSUE

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TWISTED TRUTH

AS SHALLOW AS IT MAY SOUND, YOU ARE BEING JUDGED [AND JUDGING] SOLELY ON APPEARANCE. To fully understand how this all comes together, and how you can start making changes in your life, I think it is important that you understand the difference between “style” and “fashion”. Style is individual, a reflection of you – who you are or who you aspire to be. Fashion is something you manipulate to suit your style. Your style is the projection of who you are inside; it is your way of getting your message across. Creating your own personal style will help you think, feel and act your best. You will feel confident that you are making a positive first impression, and that you will be able to support that impression with every additional encounter.

In conclusion, whether you like it or not, your appearance is important. You are an individual, unique – and the way you dress and present yourself should reflect this. Break away from the shopping habits and discover the new you. This could be the first step to a brighter, happier future. If you are not sure where to get started, then in the same way you would consult a nutritionist for nutritional advice or a dermatologist for skin advice, contact a stylist for style advice! V

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SAHO HARADA

GOING FOR GOLD WENTY-NINE-YEAR-OLD JAPANESE PROFESSIONAL SYNCHRONISED SWIMMER SAHO HARADA WON A BRONZE MEDAL IN BOTH THE XII FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS IN AUSTRALIA IN 2007 AND THE BEIJING OLYMPICS IN 2008. SHE NO DOUBT HAS MANY MORE AWARDS COMING HER WAY, BUT FOR THE LAST 18 MONTHS SHE HAS MADE IT HER MISSION TO GIVE ALL HER TIME AND KNOWLEDGE TO HER MALTESE SYNCHRONISED SWIMMING STUDENTS – WHO WOULD PROBABLY NEVER HAVE BEEN INTRODUCED TO THIS, WERE IT NOT FOR HER. SAHO TALKS TO VAMP ABOUT HER EXPERIENCES SO FAR. What made you want to come to Malta? I was in England competing for a place in the Olympics but I didn’t speak English and couldn’t communicate at all. I regretted this and wanted to learn the language. I initially was checking out Canada, London and the USA, until one day my swimming coach phoned recommending Malta. So I checked up about it and then came across an advert for Malta showing amazing blue sea, so that was it...Malta it was. I also thought it would be an even better place for me to study English due to the fact that I knew no Japanese people there. When did you learn synchronized swimming? I started when I was seven years old and spent eight years with the Japanese National Team. In Japan, if you are a good athlete, you don’t have to go to school as much as other students allowing more time for training, whereas here in Malta you have to do everything at school and try to fit in extra curricula activities. I studied Physical Education and obtained a degree and a small salary from the government to support 064

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my expenses as an athlete, such as for costumes. My Japanese teacher was very strict and would make us all do a sequence all over again if one of us came up for a breath early. How did you begin teaching synchronised swimming in Malta? When I came to Malta there was no synchronised swimming here, and I wondered why. The Maltese can swim and dance very well… So I wanted to start it here. At the beginning it was very difficult,

because I didn’t have any connections here. So I just went to the national pool every day for a month until finally two coaches asked me to give a lesson. So I started giving lessons and I now have 40 - 50 students. Are you strict with your students? The Japanese way is too strict. Sometimes I find that Maltese children are spoilt but I try to find a middle way. Japanese girls are wellbehaved: attentive and responsive. Not all Maltese children listen, so I have to shout. I can read their minds easily unlike those of the Japanese – who act like soldiers and like to please.

Were your parents strict with you? My parents were not like that. They told me to live my dream and do what I wanted. Can you describe the experience of winning bronze in the XII FINA World Championships in Melbourne in 2007? In 2007 I was chosen as a solo swimmer. It was a ‘must get’ medal as Japan has one of the strongest teams in the world. Normally I prefer to perform with my team-mates, but in that competition I had to perform alone and give myself the encouragement. When I won a medal I was really relieved. I would like to thank everyone who supported me, especially my mother. How much of your time was dedicated? Synchronised swimmers do not need to swim very fast, just very well. It looks fun and easy but when you start it is very hard. If you want to compete in the Olympic Games you need to dedicate at least eight hours to training in the pool every day, with a day off a week. When I was a swimmer, we sometimes trained for 12 hours with a 30-minute break. Even when the British team were here in July, I was in the water for 12 hours a day – and I’m always swimming: seven days a week in winter and six in summer. Even on my day off in summer I choose to go swimming in the sea. Do you have any plans for the future? I had an offer to be the English national coach, but I teach a lot of children, aged from seven to sixteen, in Malta and I do not want to leave them behind. They are soon going to Slovakia for a competition. They have just started competing in competitions and I want to see how far they can go. How was it modelling for VAMP? To begin with it was hard to control the clothes. I normally swim in a swimsuit and clothes become really heavy under water making it hard to control your facial expressions whilst holding a pose and your breath all at the same time. But it was a very good opportunity for me and also fun, and now I have some nice photos shot by Kurt Arrigo. V


VAMP MAGAZINE ENTERTAINMENT

WHAT’S UP? Each season, selected international designers are invited to show their collections to a wide audience, in one, sevenhour evening session. The catwalk shows are divided into hourly presentations in the auditorium, while out in the reception hall you can find exhibitions and presentations by local designers and brands. This season, Runway Malta will be featuring international designers such as Ann Boogarts (Belgium), Julia Schaetz (Germany) and Brian Gerhardt (Netherlands) as well as big name designer Eleanor Amoroso (UK) on the catwalk showing their collections. Tickets are €20 and available either by email to info@runwaymalta.com or at the door on the night. The first 100 guests to arrive will receive a goody bag and front row seating for the night. Don’t miss it!

by Jimmy Grima

>2012

RUNWAY, MALTA’S PREMIERE FASHION EVENT! 29 SEPTEMBER

BRIDGE BAR: JAZZ SESSIONS

Every friday night for the last seven years jazz lovers have been gathering on the steps of St. Ursola, near Victoria Gate in Valletta to enjoy the cool atmosphere combined with the best line ups of local jazz talents, some of which include; Marc Galea, Lawrie Simpson, Walter Vella, Effie Azzopardi and Eric Santucci. These weekly sessions are on going every friday until 5 October from 9pm

Madison Gregory“Jesus Taunts Walter” Oil on Canvas 24” x 54”

EXHIBITIONS BY MADISON GREGORY (USA) & AMELIA SAINT GEORGE Both organised by Lily Agius Gallery. For more information log on to: www.lilyagiusgallery.com or email info@lilyaguisgallery.com

> WIN VIP TICKETS

TO MALTA’S ONLY INTERNATIONAL FASHION EVENT! THIS SEASON RUNWAY WILL BE FEATURING DESIGNERS FROM THE NETHERLANDS, BELGIUM, GERMANY AND THE UK AND YOU CAN BE IN THE CHANCE TO WIN A DOUBLE VIP PASS WHICH WILL GET YOU FRONT ROW SEATING FOR THE ENTIRE EVENT.

Q: NAME ONE OF THE DESIGNERS FEATURING AT THIS SEASON’S RUNWAY MALTA. Send your answer in an email with the subject “I should be a VIP” to info@runwaymalta.com & vampmagazine@melita.com to be in with a chance of winning!

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MAR RAKE CH> Words: Monique Chambers

MONIQUE CHAMBERS RECALLS HER HOLIDAY OF A LIFETIME IN MAGICAL MARRAKECH >>

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TRAVEL: MARRAKECH

BY THE TIME WE HAD STEPPED THROUGH THE DOOR AND TO THE DESK, I WAS IN LOVE WITH MARRAKECH.

hen Lord Byron said of Malta: “It is the land of bells, smells and yells”, he could just as easily have been talking about Marrakech. Almost as soon as you land you are hit with its vibrancy and its incessant pace. The roads are chaotic in that way that somehow makes roads charming when abroad: every pitch and every second a horn, a disregard for trafficlights and lines, vehicles of every size and shape – from bicycles balancing loads for the souk and three-wheeled vans that are beaten in speed by donkeys to swish, tinted-windowed Mercedes whisking dignitaries and tourists to their destinations. We were in the latter form of transport, seemingly circling the edge of the city. You could tell where the coiffed, cosmopolitan hotels were, manicured lawns and nondescript from their exteriors. Our hotel was a recommendation from like-minded friends, situated in the old town, a couple of hundred metres away from the hustle and

bustle of the main square set in a series of five riads that had been seamlessly joined together. An archway led us into a courtyard with herringbone stone floors, through a beautifully patterned metal door in the ubiquitous shape, which groaned open as we approached. A white linen-clad man was there to greet us with another to swiftly take our deliberately three-quarters-empty bags to our room. By the time we had stepped through the door and to the desk, I was in love with Marrakech. Islamic art is busy but beautiful, geometric and arabesque, overwhelming yet calming. Meaningful and hypnotic scripts embellish the walls of La Sultana, our home for the next few (Arabian) nights. It is stunning. Pale pink fabrics that mimic the colours of the sunrise and sunset are used to upholster the intricately patterned wooden chairs and stools in the tea room; we are offered mint tisane which is brought on a silver tray in sugaredalmond-coloured glasses – the scent arriving way before the tray. >>

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TRAVEL: MARRAKECH

The rooms – or should I say suites – were exquisite. Plain floors in pale terracotta colour, the ornate shower with a selection of oils, the toilet with rose petals scattered in the bowl, the dual basins having ample space between them, the stairs down to the pièce de la résistance, the sunken bath. The bed was big enough for a harem, and as much as it was inviting us to dive on it, we decided to go and explore. A short walk across to the main souk promised an entertaining walk home. Hawkers setting up stalls, baskets – presumably housing snakes (lids closed) – on the side of a carpet of rugs. Food being rustled up – with steam rising – along with the volume of voices and the tuning of instruments, then the calls to prayer interrupting the process. The stalls left halfway complete, as if a vapour had dissolved the people running in different directions, to different mosques, the sea of white robes was a little haunting. Entering the souk is like entering a maze. Narrow alleys packed with stalls and shops – few with doors. Carpets, leather, jewellery, hats, spices and potions, furniture, counterfeit goods, tea sets, lanterns and, best of all, eateries. While I would love to be able to give you the name of a place, or even the directions to find it, this is impossible. We had what was probably the best meal in my life in a 6ft by 6ft room with white Formica shelving as tables, rickety chairs and a toothless host, but we couldn’t find his den the next day. For a not completely sanitised experience, head for Bô-zin or Da Yakout.

The meze of dishes is best left to them. Moroccan food is not hot, but spiced with cinnamon, cloves, cumin and bay leaves, with ginger and honey featuring heavily. You won’t be brought any nasty surprises, but you may have to dance. There isn’t much to see in the city outside the souk, in fact, it was the only time (and I suspect will be the only time) my partner begged me to go shopping as he had had such fun bartering in the souk. To escape the city and a massive shipping bill, hire a taxi out to Toubkahl in the Atlas Mountains. An energetic walk will lead you up to the Kasbah, where you can marvel at the view while eating westernised versions of traditional dishes and opt for a hamaam to cleanse your body and rest your soul, before heading back to the charming chaos of the city. V

EDITORS PICKS: Accommodation: Dar Assoura, Marrakech. An intimate and peaceful get away in the heart of the Medina, and only 5 minutes away from Place Jemaa el Fna. Call 00212524386997, or email info@darassoura.com www.darassoura.com Restaurant: Le Foundouk, Marrakech. 55, Souk Hal Fassi – Kat Bennahïd Early booking is highly recommended, and try for a table on the rooftop. Call +212 (0)5 24 37 81 90 or email contact@foundouk.com. www.foundouk.com

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Monique Chambers is the editor of Indulge – a life and style magazine that loves travel and food www.indulge.com.mt.

>> I WANTED TO SOAK UP EVERY SECOND, EVERY DETAIL, EVERY IMAGE AND COMMIT IT TO MEMORY – EVEN THOUGH I KNEW I WOULD BE BACK. <<


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ALL TOGETHER NOW. Recipes by Sharma Restaurant, Mdina.

A typical Moroccan household prepares meals for everyone to share, from small appetisers and sweets, to hearty, steaming stews in clay pots. Here are some recipes for you to try at home with your family and friends >> Photos by: Daniel Coppini

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MOROCCAN CUISINE

LAMB TAGINE (Moroccan Stew) Ingredients: Serves 4-6 � 1lb lamb, beef or goat’s meat 1½lbs potatoes, peeled and sliced 1 cup olive oil 1 large onion, sliced 3 cloves garlic, crushed or finely chopped 2 tsp salt, or to taste 1 tsp ginger 1 tsp turmeric 1/2 tsp pepper 1 preserved lemon, quartered Pinch of saffron threads, crumbled (optional) Small handful of parsley and coriander sprigs, tied into a bouquet

Large handful of red or green olives

Preparation: Clay or Ceramic Tagine Method Pour olive oil into base of a tagine. Arrange onion slices across the bottom and distribute garlic on top. Add the potato slices (you can arrange them neatly if you like) and place the meat on top of the potatoes in the centre. Sprinkle the spices as evenly as possible over the meat and potatoes. Add the parsley bouquet, the olives, the preserved lemon, and about 1 1/2 cups of water. Cover tagine and place on a diffuser over medium-low to medium heat and allow to reach simmering point. This can take some time, so be patient. Once a simmer is achieved, reduce the heat to the lowest temperature necessary to maintain the simmer and cook for three to four hours, or until the meat is very tender and can be pulled apart with the fingers. >>

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MOROCCAN CUISINE

LAMB KOFTA (Meatballs) Ingredients: Serves 4-6 � 4 cloves garlic, minced 1tsp salt 1lb minced lamb 3tbsp grated onion 3tbsp chopped fresh parsley 1tbsp ground coriander 1tsp ground cumin 1/2 tbsp ground cinnamon 1/2 tsp ground allspice 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper 1/4 tsp ground ginger 1/4 tsp ground black pepper 28 bamboo skewers, soaked in water for 30 minutes

is golden and no longer pink in the centre – about five minutes each side. Sprinkle parsley over. DOLMAH (Stuffed Vine Leaves) Ingredients: Serves 4-6 � 3 cups uncooked white rice 1lb minced beef 1 tsp chopped fresh parsley 1/2 tsp ground allspice 1/2 tsp ground black pepper 1/2 tsp curry powder (optional) 1 (l6oz) jar vine leaves, drained and rinsed 2 tbsp vegetable oil 1 potato, sliced 1 cup canned tomato sauce 2 cups water, or as needed

Directions:

Method:

Mash garlic into a paste with the salt using a mortar and pestle or the flat side of a chef’s knife on a cutting board. In a bowl, mix garlic into the lamb with the onion, parsley, coriander, cumin, cinnamon, allspice, cayenne pepper, ginger and pepper until well blended. Form into 28 balls. Form each ball around the tip of a skewer, flattening into a two-inch oval; repeat with the remaining skewers. Place kebabs on baking sheet, cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes, or up to 12 hours.

In a medium-sized bowl, mix together uncooked rice, minced beef, parsley, allspice, pepper and curry powder until well blended. Pour oil into a large pan and spread to cover. Cover the bottom of the pan with a layer of potato slices – the dolmas should not be in direct contact with the bottom of the pan.

Preheat an outdoor grill for medium heat, and lightly oil grill. Cook the skewers on preheated grill, turning occasionally, until lamb is cooked to taste – about six minutes for medium done. SHISH TAOUK (Grilled Chicken on Skewers) Ingredients: Serves 4-6 � 1/4 cup lemon juice 1/4 cup vegetable oil 3/4 cup plain yogurt 4 cloves garlic, minced 2 tsp tomato paste 1½ tsp salt 1 tsp dried oregano 1/4 tsp ground black pepper 1/4 tsp ground allspice 1/4 tsp ground cinnamon 1/8 tsp ground cardamom 2 lbs skinless, boneless chicken breast, cut into 2-inch pieces 2 onions, cut into large chunks 1 large green bell pepper, cut into large chunks 1 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Lay the vine leaves out flat on a chopping board. Place about a tablespoon of the beef mixture in the centre of a leaf, fold sides in towards the centre, then loosely roll up from the bottom. Set in the pan with the seam side down. Repeat with the remaining mixture and leaves. Large leaves can be cut in half at the centre vein. Place a heavy dinner plate on top of the dolma to stop them from unrolling. The cooking pan should be about two-thirds full. Mix tomato sauce and water and pour over the dolma. The liquid should cover them by at least an inch. Add more water if necessary. Bring to the boil, cover and simmer for 45 minutes to an hour, until all the liquid has been absorbed and the rice is tender.

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Season with salt, then taste and add more tahini and/or lemon juice, if desired. Transfer mixture to a serving bowl and spread with the back of a spoon to form a shallow well. Drizzle olive oil over the top, sprinkle with parsley and place the olives around the edge. Serve at room temperature. FALAFEL (Chickpea Patties) Ingredients (makes 25 balls) Serves 4-6 � 2 cups dried chickpeas, soaked in water for 12hrs 2 slices white bread, crumbed 5 cloves garlic 2 tsp baking soda 1/3 cup chopped parsley 1/2 cup chopped coriander 1/2 small onion 1 tbsp of sesame seeds 1 tsp ground cumin 1 tsp paprika � Oil for deep frying � Salt and pepper Preparation: Wash soaked chickpeas and place in a food processor with garlic, onion and spices. Blend to a rough, moist texture, adding a little water if necessary. Place mixture into large bowl, add remaining ingredients, cover and set aside for 30 to 60 minutes. Warm oil until hot, not boiling. Add baking soda to the mixture and roughly knead in. With wet hands, shape mixture into little balls (smaller than apricots). Fry until a deep brown colour and serve hot.

BABA GHANNOUSH (Aubergine Dip)

HUMMUS (Chickpea Dip)

Ingredients: Serves 4-6 � 1 large aubergine 1/4 cup tahini, plus more as needed 3 garlic cloves, minced 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice, plus more as needed 1 pinch ground cumin 1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil 1 tbsp fresh flat-leaf parsley, chopped 1/4 cup brine-cured black olives, such as kalamata Salt to taste

Ingredients: Serves 4-6 � 1 (16) oz can chickpeas or garbanzo beans 1/4 cup of liquid from can of chickpeas 3-5 tbsp lemon juice (depending on taste) 1½ tbsp tahini 2 cloves garlic, crushed 1/2 tsp salt 2 tbsp olive oil

Preparation:

Drain chickpeas and set aside liquid from can. Combine remaining ingredients in blender or food processor.

Directions: Whisk together lemon juice, vegetable oil, plain yogurt, garlic, tomato paste, salt, oregano, pepper, allspice, cinnamon, and cardamom in a large bowl; add chicken and stir to coat. Transfer chicken mixture into a large plastic bag and refrigerate at least four hours. Preheat an outdoor grill to medium-high heat and lightly oil grill. Thread the chicken, onions, and pepper onto metal skewers. Cook on preheated grill until chicken

remove skin and discard. Place aubergine flesh in a bowl and, using fork, mash to a paste. Add tahini, garlic, lemon juice and cumin and mix well.

Prepare a medium-hot fire in a charcoal grill. Preheat oven to 190C. Prick aubergine with a fork in several places and place on the grill rack, 4 or 5 inches from the fire. Turning frequently, until the skin blackens and blisters and the flesh just begins to feel soft – 10 to 15 minutes.Transfer to a baking sheet and bake in oven until very soft – 15 to 20 minutes. Remove from oven, allow to cool slightly and

Preparation:

Add ¼ cup of liquid from chickpeas. Blend for 3-5 minutes on low until thoroughly mixed and smooth.Place hummus in serving bowl and create a shallow well in the centre and add the olive oil. V Sharma Ethnic Cuisines, 19 Casa Magazzini, Triq L-Imhazen, Mdina. Phone: 2145 3817 or 9999 6315 for bookings.


MOROCCAN CUISINE

MOROCCO ISSUE

075


discover your very own moroccan spa... ...DISCOVER LE MARQUIS SPA, The Rose Spa â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a soothing retreat that features a large variety of massages and spa therapies performed in beautiful Moroccan style rooms. The spa facilities also include a Marrakesh inspired Relaxation Area, a traditional Serail Mud Chamber, a private luxurious Whirlpool Bath, Sauna, Steam Room and Indoor Pool. Only the best and most natural products are used for all your treatments. We mainly feature YON-KA from Paris, a voyage through time, nature and science, a symbol of continuous regeneration, restored harmony and the reconciliation of body and mind.

San Antonio Hotel & SpaTriq it-Turisti, Qawra, St.Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bay Tel: 2350 3639 Fax: 21572481Email: jcamilleri@sanantonio-malta.com


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COOL Available from: Samsonite, Malta International Airport, Arrival /Departures Hall, Luqa ABC, Sliema • iCentre - University Grounds, Msida Citadel Store, Victoria, Gozo • Arkadia, Victoria, Gozo


VAMP MAGAZINE SKINCARE

TRU-MY-TH SKIN CARE MISCONCEPTIONS RELATING TO ACNE AND PROBLEMATIC SKIN

PEOPLE ARE BOMBARDED DAILY WITH A MYRIAD OF INFORMATION ABOUT SKIN CARE, SKIN SCIENCE AND SKIN TREATMENTS FROM THE MEDIA, MANUFACTURERS AND SKIN-CARE PROFESSIONALS , ALL ATTEMPTING TO JUSTIFY THAT WHAT THEY PROFESS AND ADVOCATE IS THE TRUTH AND NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH. SOMETIMES THEIR CLAIMS ARE ACCURATE AND SOMETIMES THEY ARE NOT, BUT MORE OFTEN THAN NOT, THE TRUTH MAY LIE SOMEWHERE IN BETWEEN.

ReferenceL S Baumann and J Spencer, The effects of topical vitamin E on the cosmetic appearance of scars, Dermatal Surg, 25(4), 311-5 (April 1999)

MYTH: Blackheads are caused by improperly cleansed skin. TRUTH: Blackheads or ‘comedones’ are caused by clogged pores and excessive scrubbing can irritate and further inflame the skin. Blackheads often contain dirt, oil and dry and dead skin cells that need to be removed and products that dissolve sebum are the most effective. MYTH: Chocolate and greasy food cause acne TRUTH: Eating chocolate does not cause acne. Hormonal factors,

bacteria and skin cells are at the root of problematic skin, and stress can exacerbate flare-ups. Some people may have allergic reactions to certain food that can also cause inflammation. MYTH: Drying problematic or oily skin clears up acne. TRUTH: The opposite is true. When skin becomes very dry, an environment is created in which a signal is received by the skin that it is too dry and so it produces more oil. Use drying products sparingly, and lightly moisturise the skin. The goal is to keep a balance.

MYTH: Strong scrubs, soaps and abrasives are good for your skin. TRUTH: Be careful how you wash your face. Too much scrubbing or too many abrasive products remove protective oils, create tiny micro tears and contribute to aging, irritated skin. Less is more! MYTH: Vitamin E minimises scarring: TRUTH: Vitamin E is an antioxidant that helps build skin, but there is no evidence that it does anything to help with scarring. Some research even suggests it

may have a negative effect on scarring! MYTH: Sun exposure will improve acne. TRUTH: Yes, exposure to the sun can hide the appearance of acne for a while, but it will lead to skin damage, pigmentation and drying that signals the skin to produce more oil. Sandra Calafato Director of Environ Skin Care Malta 33 years experience working as a beauty therapist.

MOROCCO ISSUE

V

081


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VAMP Magazine 06 - Morocco Issue  
VAMP Magazine 06 - Morocco Issue  

From the Editor Every time I come to the point of putting a few welcoming sentences together, I look over the pages if the issue, sit back...

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