Page 1

OCTOBER

2019

GREATER SPOKANE VALLEY

PRSRT STD ECRWSS U.S. Postage Paid Permit #010 ZIP CODE 99019

FREE

A VALLEY-WIDE COMMUNITY NEWSMAGAZINE

the candidate race is on pages 19- 30 SV HERITAGE MUSEUM TURNS 15 YEARS OLD PAGE 41

EV FOOTBALL RETURNS TO THE WIN COLUMN PAGE 36

EMERGENCY ACTION FOR CITY HALL REPAIRS PAGE 8


2 • OCTOBER 2019

Dr. Dependable

NEWS

Clark practices integrity in life, business By Craig Howard Current Contributing Editor

A dozen years ago, Keith Clark ran for a position on the Central Valley School Board against incumbent Lynn Trantow. Campaigning on a platform of reformed mathematics and an end to the four-period day, Clark captured a board seat with 55 percent of the vote. He has yet to face a challenger ever since. Currently serving as board vice president representing District 4, Clark will once again appear alone on the ballot this fall. The soft-spoken doctor of veterinary medicine continues to be a calming and insightful influence on a leadership panel overseeing a district of some 14,000 students in 29 schools and learning centers. When not diving through budget documents or discussing infrastructure needs, Clark operates Pet Vet Hospital and Wellness Center on Sullivan Road. He has also been a leader with Boy Scouts of America and a volunteer with the Spokane Humane Society and Pet Rescue. Clark and his wife, Shelly, are

proud parents of seven children. Their youngest, Jared, is a junior at Central Valley High School. Clark traces his humble roots to the small farming town of Fruitland, Idaho, west of Boise, where he grew up the oldest of four children. His dad was the community veterinarian, and Clark accompanied him on many of his rounds. Clark gravitated to the work, but his father pointed him elsewhere. “He told me to be a dentist,” Clark recalls. In school, Clark thrived in programs like Future Farmers of America and 4H. At one point, he was named the top chicken judge in Idaho and traveled to Kansas City in the role of a “National Chicken Judge.” Learning a diligent work ethic from an early age, Clark raised dairy calves, picked fruit and set sprinkler pipe. “I’d get up in the morning and feed the animals,” Clark said. While there were dogs and cats on the family farm, Clark was closest to a quarter horse named “Ciz” who lived to the age of 32.

After graduating as part of a senior class of 50 at Fruitland High, Clark enrolled at Ricks College in Rexburg, Idaho. He would take a two-year hiatus before earning his degree to serve a mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Washington, D.C. Years later, he would serve as bishop for his church in the Evergreen Ward based in Spokane Valley. Clark stayed in his home state to continue his education, majoring in microbiology at the University of Idaho. After earning his diploma in 1983, he enrolled at Washington State University, where he emerged with a doctorate in veterinary medicine in 1987. Clark’s career path took him to Arizona and back to Fruitland before he and Shelly migrated to Spokane Valley in 1995. Pet Vet has established itself as an innovator under Clark, earning accreditation by the American Animal Hospital Association – the result of a 900-point inspection. “It’s about putting animals first,” Clark says. At home, the Clark’s pet palace includes “Emma,” a domestic short-haired barn rescue cat and “Buddy,” a lovable hound mix who, at nearly 19 years old, serves as a walking promotion for the skillset of a venerable Valley vet. Q: You had plenty of responsibility growing up on a family farm. How do you think that environment helped you develop the work ethic you’ve maintained over the years? A: Working on the farm and caring for animals at an early age gave me a sense of responsibility, an understanding of the importance of being dependable and the satisfaction that comes from putting in a hard day’s work. You gain confidence as you apply yourself to those difficult tasks.

Photo by Craig Howard Keith Clark has practiced veterinary medicine in Spokane Valley since 1995. The Idaho native has also been a member of the Central Valley School Board for the past 12 years and will run unopposed on the November ballot.

Q: Your dad had a successful veterinarian practice for many years in your hometown. How challenging was it to follow in his footsteps? How are you like your dad as a vet? How are you different?

The Current

A: My father, Dr. Chad Clark, was highly regarded in his rural community. He worked primarily with large animals, which requires a lot of physical strength. It was normal for him to work 60 to 80 hours per week during periods of the year. He loved the community he served and always made himself available to people day or night. The downside was that it limited the amount of time he had for relaxation or family. I’m committed to my clients and patients in the same way, but I appreciate having a pet emergency clinic in Spokane which allows me to be with my family on nights and weekends. Q: What do you think are some of the key traits it takes to be a good veterinarian? A: Hard work is essential. It starts with working hard to acquire the knowledge, skill and expertise to properly care for your patients. The medicine and technology are constantly changing, and you must be dedicated and disciplined to keep up. You must have an innate love for animals and be sensitive to the needs of the owners as well. I could not do what I do without an amazing veterinary team to help me every step of the way. Q: What were some of your first impressions of Spokane Valley when you moved here with your family in 1995? A: Moving to the Valley in 1995 was a perfect step for our young family. I have always been impressed by the many strong families in this community. The good people and values of the community have provided a wonderful environment to raise our seven children. Although this is a larger community than the rural area I grew up in, it feels like the same values I enjoyed growing up. Q: You’ve lived in Spokane Valley before and after incorporation. As a business owner and resident, how do you feel the transition to cityhood has gone? A: The city of Spokane Valley has had its growing pains but having a division between Spokane and the Spokane


The Current

NEWS

Valley has been a good step. Incorporation has allowed the Valley to keep its identity and values. Q: Why did you first decide to run for the Central Valley School Board?

A: I initially ran for the school board because I was concerned about the math curriculum that was being taught at the time. Having a large family with children attending the district, I also felt that I needed to be more involved and give back wherever I could. Q: What was the learning curve like for you in your first year as a board member? A: Being involved in the running of a large governmental organization was much different than running my small business. Laws governing budget and educating students seemed to be endless. There was an entire vernacular when it came to governmental affairs. Initially, it took a while to learn the language and governing laws. I became more effective in the governing role as I understood the acronyms, codes, regulations, etc. Q: CVSD has faced a number of challenges related to growth and infrastructure during the time you’ve served on the board. How do you feel the district has responded to these concerns? A: As a school district, we have worked hard to listen to and involve the community in the many fiscal and educational decisions we have made. Being fiscally responsible with taxpayer funds while looking forward to the future needs and growth of our community has been a priority. We could not have navigated these issues without the community supporting us in passing bonds and levies allowing us to care for the students of the Central Valley community. Q: As you prepare to begin your next term as a board member, what are some of the primary goals you’d like the district to achieve? A: There are several issues that will continue to be a challenge in the coming years – funding and budget, managing facilities

for continued growth, ensuring relevant and quality education and the continued safety of our students. All these challenges will require continued community involvement and support. We need to continue to provide alternatives for learning and adjust to the changing times. Our district has been a leader with Spokane Valley Tech, Central Valley Virtual Learning, Spokane Valley Learning Academy, Summit School, Early Learning Center, Mica Peak High School, Running Start, etc. in providing educational opportunities that fit the needs of all students versus a “one size fits all” approach. We will continue to innovate all while keeping safety a primary concern. Q: All of your children have gone through the CVSD system with one still in high school. Putting aside your school board hat for a minute, are you happy as a parent with the education they received? A: We have had six children attend and graduate from schools in the Central Valley School District, and our seventh child is currently a junior at Central Valley. The first six children have all gone on to higher education and advanced degrees. We feel very fortunate with the education and foundation they received from the educators and administrators of the Central Valley School District. Q: Finally, can you settle the seemingly endless debate among pet owners -- dogs or cats -- which is better? A: That question may elicit debate among pet owners, but it’s actually a very important question. Before anyone selects a pet, they should be answering several lifestyle questions. For example; How many hours in a day can I spend with my pet? What temperament fits into our lifestyle, etc.? I encourage you to look up a pet selector to get started. You may want ours which is at petvet.org/petselector. Always check with your veterinarian before acquiring your next pet. They can help guide you in the process.

OCTOBER 2019 • 3

A clean community is a happy community. That’s why the City of Spokane Valley and Waste Management are pleased to provide bulk waste services with the Annual Curbside Cleanup. Spokane Valley residents who subscribe to WM garbage collection are eligible for one collection per calendar year at no additional cost. What can I set at the curb? That old stove, refrigerator, lawn mower, sofa and more! See the full list and size limits at wmnorthwest.com/spokanevalley. Call seven days in advance to schedule collection: 1-877-466-4668. (No collection during holiday weeks.) Please do not place items on the sidewalk, and not more than 24 hours before the scheduled collection.

JOIN THE CONVERSATION:

ThinkGreenSpokaneValley

LEARN MORE:

wmnorthwest.com


4 • OCTOBER 2019

The Current

SV candidates take the stage at Oct. 3 forum

From Current News Sources

It was a simple idea. Get students engaged in the community they reside in by developing and posing questions to the candidates that they will one day be voting for. And while we are at it, give the community a place where they can meet these candidates. That has been what The Current, in conjunction with Central Valley School District, East Valley School District, and West Valley School District, has been making it happen since Ben and Danica Wick purchased The Splash and The Current newsmagazines back in 2016. It may sound like a simple idea, but it takes a lot of people working together to make this work. Although Ben began this tradition, Danica has been coordinating the candidate forum with the help of East Valley High School’s Lori Merkel and University High School’s Don Owen and Ryan Montag. Together, they have developed a system that works for bringing together the community, students and the candidates. This year, a separate forum will be held for Spokane Valley candidates from 5:45 to 7:30 p.m. Oct. 3 at East Valley High School – in addition to an event later in the month featuring city of Liberty Lake races. “There are a lot of facets to coordinating an event like this,” Danica Wick said. “Paula and I

TELL ME ABOUT CREDIT UNIONS .

Photo by Danica Wick Attendees turn in ballots during the "mock election" portion of the 2018 Student-Led Candidate Forum.

end up working some long hours to make sure that we get all parties together for the event to happen.” Priority one is the candidates. “We do our best to make sure that we get as many candidates whose names will appear on the ballot as possible,” said Paula Gano, elections coordinator for The Current. “We have all the candidates for the formal program, but we usually get

additional judges, clerk or school board positions that aren’t covered in the media in attendance as well. It really is the only opportunity for the community to meet those candidates in a setting like this.” This year will be the fourth annual Student-Led Candidate Forum hosted by The Current. East Valley and University High School will be at the helm for creating

It’s like a bank, but it’s owned by members, not shareholders. See how that makes a difference for your money. Stop in or visit becu.org. Live or work in Washington or North Idaho? You’re eligible. Join us.

questions that are not only relevant to the office the Spokane Valley City Council candidates are running for, but meaningful to the students. “It is so fun and interesting to participate in the prep sessions with the students. They always have the most interesting questions that they would like to propose based on an experience they have had. For instance a couple of years ago one

PERSONAL BANKING: Spokane Valley NFC 615 N Sullivan Road, Suite D Spokane, WA 99037

North Spokane NFC 9420 N Newport Hwy Spokane Valley, WA 99218

Spokane Division NFC 916 N Division Street Spokane, WA 99202

HOME LOANS:

Insured by NCUA 800.233.2328 | becu.org

Spokane Home Loan Center 12111 E Mission Ave, Suite A Spokane Valley, WA 99206


OCTOBER 2019 • 5

The Current of the students wanted to ask about pool maintenance because of their summer job as a life guard,” Danica recalled. This year, the students will be posing questions to Spokane Valley city council candidates. Each candidate will get a question with a two-minute response, then their opponent will get a one-minute rebuttal. “There are a lot of candidates that we are putting in front of people,” Danica Wick said. “The goal is

for the audience to hear from the candidates, but to have the formal program be no longer than an hour. We don’t want those in attendance getting antsy and leaving before the mock election!” The event closes with a mock election, giving youth a chance to respond to what they heard from candidates. For more information or with questions, contact The Current at 242-7752.

November 5 General Election

Patient Focused Dentistry

GENERAL • COSMETIC COMPUTER-GUIDED DENTISTRY

Spok ane’s D ental Providers • Same

Day Crowns, Bridges, Implants • Same Day Extractions with Implants • Oral Surgery

• Root

Canals

• Nitrous/Laughing

• Extractions • 3D CBCT X-Rays

Gas

• Periodontics • Implant

Supported Dentures

• Sedation

• SATURDAY

APPOINTMENTS • SAME DAY EMERGENCIES • SAME DAY CROWNS

Liberty Lake FA M I LY D E N T I S T R Y

509-891-5001 | 1328 N. Stanford Lane Ste 100 www.libertylakefamilydentistry.com

Northpointe FA M I LY D E N T I S T R Y

509-465-5001 | 605 E. Holland Ave. Ste 108 www.northpointefamilydentistry.com

Latah Creek FA M I LY D E N T I S T R Y

509-455-5001 | 4100 S. Cheney-Spokane Rd. Ste B www.latahcreekfamilydentistry.com

Maple Street

P ay m e n t P l a n s a va i l a b l e D e n ta l s av i n g s P l a n DiscounteD Fees most insurances accePteD

FA M I LY D E N T I S T R Y

509-928-5001 | 4610 N. Ash Ste 102

Spokane Valley City Council #6

! r e t o V Be a www.TimHattenburg.com

Thank you for your vote of confidence!

Paid for and authorized by People for Tim Hattenburg • Erica Hendon, Treasurer (509) 998-0863

Paid for by People for Tim Hattenburg 511 N. Skipworth, Spokane Valley, WA 99206

www.maplestreetfamilydentistry.com

NO INSURANCE?

SAVE 20% WITH OUR MEMBERSHIP PLAN ASK US HOW

CALL OR REQUEST AN APPOINTMENT ONLINE

C entra l V a lley H igh S c hool's

S a turda y November 2nd 9-5pm S unda y November 3rd 9-5pm Admis s ion: $2.00 C entra l V a lley H igh S c hool 821 S . S ulliva n S pons ored by C V H S B a nd B oos ters


6 • OCTOBER 2019

nn

1 ( !

B (1 !

Bell e

1.5 Miles

Theft Low Medium High

Bigelow Gulch

Weil e

1 ( !

n

24th

Barker

8th

1 ( !

32nd

Lin k e

F

Map Produced: 04 Sep 2019

Starr

McKinzie

Simpso n

Liberty Lake

Dosser Reservoir

Burglary Low Medium High ( !

( !

( ! 1.5 Miles

N

SC09 Terre

a n Mi c a

Bell e

( !

0.75

1 ( !

L

65th

0

y wa ! 1 (

Molter

Sullivan

Campbell

1 ( !

Henry

Evergreen

!4 (

1 ! (

1 ( !

1 ( !

Dish m

57th

44th

Shelley Lake

SV05

40th Madison

fe r

Sc ha

Glenrose

SC10

1 ( !

( !

Sa

25 t h

1 ( Sprague !

1 ( !

ple

1 ( !

s ta Cou ntry V i er m a Kr

ke Saltese La

1 ( !

1 ( !

1 ( !

se

Cataldo

Mission

Chapman

Bowdish

1

31st

37th

Progress

Flora

(SV03 !

Pines

1 16th ! (

1 ! ( 1 ( !

1 ( !

1

Ap

r 1 ( ! ive er R Riv ne ok a Sp

Adams

16th Salte

Blake

1 ( !

4th

McDonald

Herald

Mul la n

Vista

ox Park

Farr

1 ( !

1

University

Carnahan

Argonne

s Fancher

Yardley

Havana

Thor

Freya

1 ( !

ds

( 44th !

1

Broadway

2 ( 1 ! ( !

a Kilde

an d ey l

29th 1 ( ! 1 ( !

1 ( 1 ! ( !

( ! Spokane Valley ( ! 1 ( 1! ! (

1 ( 1 ! ! ( 1 ( !

SV06!(

1 ( !

1 ( !

Valleyway

tta M arie

Indiana

Nora

Liberty Lake

1 ( !

iber ty

1 ! (

1 ( !

8th

A pp leway

2 ( !

Mission

1 ( !

Euclid

1 ( !

1 ( !

ke La

1 ( !

1

1 ( !

SV04

1 ! ( 1

1 ( !

c Hea

ntgomery 1 ( !

SV02!( 1 ( !

Mirabeau

1 ( !

Mo

1 ( !

SV01!( 1 ( !

1 ( ! 3rd

Millwood

Garland

Rowan

oa d Railr

rty L ib e

5th

Sharp

ert Gilb Wellesley

ire

Em p

Knox

1 ! ( 1 ( !

1 ( !

1 ( !

Joseph

Lynden

Freya

M

a r in go

Euclid

Buckeye

r

1 ( !

1 ( !

iv er U pr

Mission 1 ( 1 ! ( ! 1 ( ! ki Al

!! ( 1 ( ( !

1 ( !

Harva rd

Thierman

Co mb i a lu

in g

1 ( !

( 2nd !

( !! (

er rk

r Valle y S p

te Rut

!( ( ! ( ! ( !

Prepared By: Regional Intelligence Group 9 Spokane County Sheriff

SC08

1 ( !

Frederick

(! !! ( ( (!

( !

1 ( !

1 ( !

Spokane

1 2 3 4+

( !

Fo

Francis 1 ( !

( !

Simpso n

Dosser Reservoir

2019 August Theft IBR Offenses Hotspots

SC07

1 ( !

( !

Lynden

Harva rd

Kenney

Campbell

Barker

Terre

Kenney

0.75

Map Produced: 04 Sep 2019

Liberty Lake

SC09

1 ( !

Lin k e 0

N

Sprague

Sal te s e

( !

F

(1 !

(1 !

24th

40th

y wa

L Henry

Flora l ake Evergreen

1 ( !

!2 (

25 t h (1 1 ! ( !

r ive er R Riv ne ok a Sp

Molter

Progress Sullivan

Adams

McDonald

!1 (

8th

Shelley Lake

1 ( !

( !

www.ieucc811.org

(1 !

(1 !

ple

a Kilde

(1 ! (3 1 ! ! (

( !

Wellesley 1 ( !

Inland Empire Utility Coordinating Council

(2 !

(1 !

ista Coun try 1V ( ! er m a Kr

( 65th !

THE LAW ”

1-800-424-5555 or dial 811

n

!1 (

57th 1 ( !

( !

“ IT’S

www.CallBeforeYouDig.org

44th

(1 !

Cataldo

Chapman

SC10

Sa

( !

!1 ! ( 1! ( (1 11( ( ! 1! ( ! ( 1 1! ( !

1 ( !

(1 !

Mission

1 ! (

SV05

Pines

Glenrose

1 ! ( 1 ( !

32nd

1 1 ( ! !! 1 (2( ! ( (1 !

1 Broadway (1 ! (1 (1 ! ! (1 ! (1 ! 4 ( ! (1 !

(72 ( 8 212 ! ! ( ( ! ( ! 1 !

Liberty Lake Ap

ke Saltese La

(1 ( ! !

1

ds

1 ( !

!2 (

SV03 ( !

1 ( !

1 ( !

1 ! (

1 ( !

(1 ! 31st

37th

44th

16th

Bowdish

ay

R

Freya

2 9th

1 ! ( 1 ( 1! ( 1! ( !

1 ( !

1 ( !

ic a an M

1 ( !

(1 !

SV06 ( !

!1 1 ( ( !

1 !5! ( (

11

1

tta M arie

Euclid

(1 !

(1 !

iber ty

hm

( ! ! ( ( ! ( ( ! ! ( ! ( ! ! ( ( !

1

1 ( !

Dis

Carnahan

Ap pleway

Indiana 1 1! (2! ! ( ! ( 11 1 ( ( ! (8 !

( ( ! (! ! ( ! Spokane Valley ( !

4 22 ( ! 1 ! ( ! 1! ( ( 1 ( 4th2 ! 1! 2 ( ! 1( ( 1 1 ! ( ( ! 1 ! ( !

!1 ( 1 ( !

1 1! ( ! ( (4 ! !1 ( 1 ( 1! ( !

1 ( !

( !

In WASHINGTON Click or Call Two Business Days Before You Plan To Dig

Sprague

1 ( !

Madison

Park

1! 1 ( ! (

1 ( ! 1 ! (

Herald

ox

Broadway

(1! ! (2 !1 ! ( ( Nora ! (11 Mission! (2 11 ( ! ( !

1

1

(1 !

(1 !

oa d Railr

Rowan

nd ey l a

SV01

Havana

i Al k

1

1 ! ( 1 ( ! 1 ( !

SV04

!1 ( (1 !

( (! ! ( ! SV02 ( !

Garland

ke La

1 ( ! 1 ! ( (2 Hea c ! 1 ( ! 1( !9 24 11 ! ( ( ! ( ! (1 ! (1 ! 1 ! 1 ( (2 ! 1 3rd ( ( ! (! ! 1! 11! ( ( ( ! d n 1 ( ! ( 2! ! 1! ( 8th ! (2 (1 1 (! ! ( ! (! 1 ( 11 ( ! ( ! 1 ( ! 1 ! 1 ( ( ! 1 ( ! 1 ! ( 16th ! (1

!1 ( 1 ( !

1 ( !

Mirabeau

University

Sha rp

1 ( !

1 ( !

1 ( !

2

(1 !

1 ( !

Wellesley

(1 !

rty L ib e

Yardley

1 ( !

1 ( !

E

ntgomery Mo 1 2 ( ( ! !

Mullan

11! 1 ( ! ! ( ( 1 ( !

1 ( 1 2! ! ( 2 ( ! (( (2! 1 (1! ! (3 ! ! Knox 1 ( ! 1 ! ( ! 1! (1 ( 1 ! 1 1 ( ! ( ! ( V ista

Mission

Fancher

(1 !

1 ( !

Millwood

r Buckeye

e m pir

1 ! (

Farr

Freya

11 ! ( ( !

te Rut

(2 !

1 ( !

Ma r in go

!1 ( 11 ( ! ( !

1 ( !

1 ( !

(1 ! ! 1 Euclid (

Frederick 1 ( !

1 ( !

( !

1 ( !

1 ! (

1 ( !

iv er U pr

McKinzie

er rk

1 ( !

Wellesley

1 ( !

Wellesley

Joseph

Starr

Fo

Thierman

e

( !

(2 !

ert Gilb

Co l u mb i a

1 ( !

! ( ( ! (! ! (

Advertise With Us and Let Us Help You Fine Tune Your Message

1 ( !

1 ( !

( !

( !

SC08

go

( !

! ( ( !

The Current now has a 26,000 copy circulation with 16,000 being direct mailed to Spokane households across the Spokane Valley area in addition to the 10,000 copies being available for pickup at over 250 business locations. About 10,000 copies of The Splash are distributed around the end of each month, 6,000 of those through direct mail to every home and business in the greater Liberty Lake community.

Weil e

1 ! 1( ( ! 1 ( !

Bigelow Gulch

Ar

Reach 26,000+ Readers!

NEWS

SC07

1 ( !

(3 !

The Current

2019 August Burglary IBR Offenses Hotspots

1 2 3 4+

Prepared By: Regional Intelligence Group 9 Spokane County Sheriff


OCTOBER 2019 • 7

The Current

NEWS Introducing the

Safety Awareness Channel SC07

Thierman

Thierman

1 ( 1! 1! ! ( ( 1 ( !

24th

Belle

SV03 Bowdish

fe r

Sc ha

32nd 1 ( !

24th 1 ( !

n

8th

0

0.75

1.5 Miles

er

Vis ta

K

Simpso n

1 ( !

8th

ple

r ive er R Riv ne ok a Sp

y wa

Sprague

N

Liberty Lake

1 ( !

SC09 Chapman

Lin k e

2019 August Vehicle Theft IBR Offenses Hotspots

Kenney

Starr

McKinzie Harva rd

Lynden

Molter

1 ( !

Sprague

N

Liberty Lake

Dosser Reservoir

Theft From Vehicle Low Medium High ( !

( !

1 2 3 4+

Prepared By: Regional Intelligence Group 9 Spokane County Sheriff

SAFETY TIP OF THE MONTH October is fire prevention month. Make sure your home is safe with these 10 tips.

1) Smoke Alarms – Install a smoke alarm on every level of your home and test it monthly. 2) Prevent Electrical Fires – Don’t overload circuits or extension cords. Cords and wires should never be placed under rugs or in high traffic areas.

4) Alternate Heaters – Make sure there is ample space around any portable heating unit. 5) Fire Safety Sprinklers – When combined with working smoke alarms, home fire sprinklers greatly increase your chance of surviving a fire. 6) Create An Escape Route – Create and practice your escape plan with your family from every room in the house.

B

Terre

1 ( !

(5 !

3) Keep Plugs Safe – Unplug all appliances when not in use.

L Henry

Shelley Lake

a Kilde

Molte r

Cou nt r y ra m

1 ( !

Rowan

Liberty Lake

Cataldo Barker

Broadway

Starr

McKinzie

Mission

SV06

Ap

1 ( !

y wa

r ve Ri

SC09 Terre

oa d Railr

Lynden

Harva rd

Kenney

Campbell

Garland

Joseph

e e R i v k an o Sp

1 ( !

2019 August Theft From Vehicle IBR Offenses Hotspots

Map Produced: 04 Sep 2019

a ( (! Kilde !

1 ( !

L

Lin k e

F

Dosser Reservoir

Vehicle Theft Low Medium High ( !

( !

( !

Map Produced: 04 Sep 2019

1 ( !

( !

( !

1.5 Miles

2 ( !

( !

1 ( !

Bell e

ta

1 ( !

SV05

40th ds

Glenrose

25 t h

Countr y V is er am Kr

2 ( !

ke Saltese La

Sa

44th

se

1 ( !

1 ( !

Cataldo

Chapman

( !! ( ( !

Flora

!1 (

16th Salte

1 ( ! Adams

1 ( !

1 ( !

Evergreen

(1 !

4th

l ake

(1 !

McDonald

Ap pleway

Spokane Valley

Valleyway

Pines

Farr

Sprague

Shelley Lake 1 ( ! 1 ( ! 1 ( !

1 ( !

1 ( !

1 (1 ( ! !

Sullivan

1 ( !

57th

1 ( !

1 ( !

1 ( !

Adams

1 ( !

1 ( ! 1 ( !

1 ( !

p le

Rowan

1 ( !

Mission

1 ( !

Henry

Evergreen

McDonald

32nd

SV05 Blake

se

25 t h

Campbell

Flora

Bowdish

Sc h af

1 ( !

1 ( !

40th n

1 ( !

Broadway

Ap

1 ( !

Barker

Argonne

Sa

Pines

1 ( !

1 ( !

Madison

V ista

ox

er

Glenrose

Freya

University

Carnahan

Mullan Farr

Park

Fancher

Yardley

Havana

R ay

1! ( ! 2 (

1 ( !

F

1 ( !

16th Salte

1 ( !

SV03 44th

SC10

65th

0.75

Progress

s

Freya

2 ( !

1 ! ( 1 ( !

Indiana

Nora

1 ( !

Madison

Argonne

Vista

Broadway

Herald

SV02

Mission (1 !

57th

0

1 ( !

Ma r ie tta

Sullivan

!1 (

University

Carnahan

1 ( ! Knox Mulla n

Park

ox

Fancher

Yardley

Havana

1 ( !

(! ! (

1 ( !

31s t

1 ( 1 ! ( !

Progress

s

Freya

Thor

1 ( 1! ( !

1 ( !

1 ( !

1 ( !

1 ( 1! ( 1! ! (

SV06

2 ( !

(3 ! ! 1 (

1 ! ( 1 ( !

Liberty Lake

ke Saltese La

1 ( !

ca

Freya

29th

37th

1! 1 ( ( (! ! 1 ( ! 44th ! (

( !

11 ( ! ( !

1 ( 1! ! ( 1 ( !

(( ! 1 ! ! (

1 ! 4th (

1

( 1! ( 1( ! ! ( 11 ( ! 1! ( !

1 ( ! tta M arie

1 ! ( 1 ( ! 11 ( ! ( ! 1 ( ! r

nd ey l a

1 ( !

( ( ! !

( ! ( !! ( ( ! ( ! ( !

1 ( !

Spokane Valley

Valleyway

1 ! (

1 ( !

iber ty

1 ( ! 1 ! (

1 ( !

1 ( !

oa d Railr

ke La rty Lib e

1 ( !

1 ( !

1 ( ! 1 ! ( 1 ( !

8th

1 ( !

Broadway

1 ( !

Indian a Nora 1 ( ! 1 ( ( ! 1 ! Missi on 1( ( ! 1 ! 1 ( ! 1 ( !

Euclid

SV04

n tgom ery Mo

i n M

( !

11 ! ( ( !

1 ( !

Ap p leway

1 ( !

Mirabeau

h ma

SC10

1 ( !

1 ( !

1! ( ! 11 ( ( !

Wellesley

ire

Em p

!1 (

44th

er rk

1 ( !

1 ( !

Dis

37th

1 ! (

1 ( !

Sprague

1 ( !

ert Gilb

1 ( !

31st

1 ( !

( !

Fo

8th

29th

1 ( 1 ! ( !

( ! ! 11 ( ( ! 1 ( !

1 ( !

c

1 ( !

iber ty

1 ( !

16th

( ! ! ( ( ! ( !

SV01

1! ( ! 1 3rd (

1 ( 1! 1! ( ! (

1 ( !

Hea

SV02

1 ( !

Garland

Joseph

Euclid

1 ( !

SV04

nd ey l a

1 ( 3rd !

2nd 5th

c Hea

SV01 ( ! 1

ki

1 ( !

ke La

1 ( !

Al

Sharp

rty L ib e

ki Al

Sharp

2 ( ! Mission

1! ! ( 1 1( ( ! 1 ( ! 1 ( ! 1! ( ! 1! 1 ( (

ds

Euclid

M

Mission ! 1 (

( !

Mirabeau

1 ( ! n tgomery Mo

Knox

ia

a r in go

Millwood

( !

1 ( !

Millwood

Buckeye

er Rutt

1 ( !

ert

Wellesley 1 ( !

E

Euclid

Frederick

2 ( !

e m pir

a

lum b Co

Buckeye

t er Rut

1 ( !

1 ( 1! ! (

a r in go

SC08

g

Frederick

1 ( !

iv er Upr

1 ( !

! ! ( 1 ( 1 ( ! ( ! ( ! (! ! 11 ! ( ( ! ( ! ! ( 1 (

Mic

1 ( !

iv er U pr

( !

1 ( !

an

( !

Wellesley

Wellesley

er rk

rin Valle y S p

g

Gilb

Fo

Francis

SC08

ia

hm

Bigelow Gulch

Weil e

rin Valle y S p

lum b Co

D is

SC07

( !

M

By Spokane Valley Police Chief Mark Werner The maps provided below depict where citizens have reported Vehicle Thefts, Thefts from a Vehicle (also known as vehicle prowling), Burglaries and Thefts. As you view the map each circle will contain a number indicating how many instances of a particular crime were reported at that location. Spokane Thefts from a vehicle is often under reported as people often feel nothing can be done or they only lost a small quantity of loose change. However, the Spokane Valley Police Department and the Spokane County Sheriff’s office analyze this data to determine high crime areas and where to allocate resources. I encourage citizens who have been a victim of crime to call 911, if the crime is in progress, or Crime Check at 456-2233, if not in progress, to report a crime.

Bigelow Gulch

Wei le Francis

1 2 3 4+

Prepared By: Regional Intelligence Group 9 Spokane County Sheriff

7) Position Appliances Carefully – Try to keep TV sets, kitchen and other appliances away from windows with curtains. 8) Clean Dryer Vents – Clean the lint filter every time you start a load of clothes to dry or after the drying cycle is complete. 9) Be Careful Around the Holidays – Keep holiday lights away from anything that can easily catch fire. 10) Conduct Regular Inspections – Check all of your electronic equipment and wiring at least once a month.


8 • OCTOBER 2019

NEWS

City Hall repairs under way By Bill Gothmann Current Contributor

A year after City Hall was constructed in 2017, staff noted that the east wall of the Council chamber is settling. In response, the city hired consultants to determine what the problem is and how to correct it. They reported that the cause is improper soil compaction and improper soil composition. This only affects the east chamber wall, but leaves the Chamber safe to occupy. Remediation calls for installation of nine brackets and micropiles, 3.5 inch, high-strength, steel casings containing rebar and grout. These will be driven 30 feet into firm soil. The cracked bricks will be replaced, windows checked for tolerance and a portion of new floor installed. This emergency project will require some excavation, with temporary removal of landscaping and the sculpture, “The Berry Picker.” Work is under way and, except for some brick installation, is expected to be completed by Thanksgiving. The city will spend its own funds for the project, with the expectation of reimbursement by City Hall’s prime contractor, Meridian Construction. Citizen refuses 3-minute rule

to

obey

During public testimony Aug. 27, Mr. Don Meier kept speaking after the allotted three-minute period. He acknowledged his time was up, but asked for more time. Mayor Rod Higgins replied, “No.” Meier continued. The mayor noted he was making a political statement and instructed him, “Please, sit down.” Meier continued discussing his views, and, 40 seconds after the threeminute bell, the mayor declared a 10-minute break, cancelled further public testimony during this session, and continued with the next agenda item. A week later, Council Member Linda Thompson brought up the issue, and Mayor Higgins stated he had been in discussion with both the city attorney and city manager about this problem and

was trying to work out a solution. He noted that cancelling further testimony prevented a group from planning successive violations of the three-minute rule during the same session. City Attorney Cary Driskell observed, “It is first and foremost a business meeting for this council to do the business of the city. Public comment is not a right in Washington, it’s a privilege, and when that privilege interferes with the business and getting the business done then you as a council need to look at that and figure how you structure that and how you want that to occur.” On Sept. 10, staff reported that they and Council had worked out a process for handling this situation. If a person refuses to yield the floor, the clerk will shut the microphone off, and the mayor will tell the person to sit down. If he/she refuses, the person will have the privilege to speak revoked for 90 days and the mayor will gavel a recess. Upon restarting, if anyone else refuses to yield the floor, the mayor will cancel public testimony for the rest of the session. The city attorney invited anyone who wishes to discuss the process to come in and talk with him. Barker/I-90 planned

roundabouts

Staff presented plans for greatly easing traffic in the failing Barker/I-90 intersection while substantially changing circulation in the Boone/Barker/Broadway area. Two roundabouts are planned. The one on the north side would handle Barker, westbound freeway traffic, and Cataldo. The Barker median will be extended northward, permitting only right turns into and out of Boone Avenue. The roundabout on the south side would handle Barker and eastbound I-90 traffic, but permit only right turns be made onto and off of Broadway at Barker. Funding is provided from $3.9 million in state funds and $2.7 in federal funds, since I-90 is a federal highway. Preliminary

plans call for an open house in October, and three to four months of construction during the summer of 2020. There will be partial traffic restrictions during construction. Eminent domain an option for Barker/Trent The Barker/SR290 (Trent) BNSF Grade Separation Project requires the city to purchase 16 parcels of property. Negotiations for eight of these purchases are at an impasse, according to staff. Most of these are owners objecting to not including a fourth leg of the roundabout to Highland Estates. From the city’s point of view, this development is not within the city, but in the county, and it would be the county’s responsibility to provide access. The city has certain grants that have deadlines for spending. In order to meet the timelines of the project, staff is requesting Council authorize them to continue negotiations, but if no agreement can be reached, to initiate eminent domain proceedings. In that case, the Superior Court would permit the city to take the property and require the city to make just compensation to the owners. The Council unanimously approved a motion to suspend the rules and immediately adopt an ordinance permitting the staff to proceed with condemnation if no agreement can be reached. Plans for sewer expansion Staff reported details of the sewer/paving project discussed in the August issue of The Current. The streets in the targeted area north of the Spokane River and east of Barker Road are in “terrible” condition. Total cost of the project would be $3.4 million and would include sewers and curb to curb pavement. Property owners would supply $684,000 of the cost, the county $1.1 million, and the city $1.6 million. It is estimated that cost to individual property owners would include a capital facilities rate of $2,780 to pay for their share of the collecting facilities and the processing plant, and $3,560 for construction costs of the pipes in the street. These could be paid for

The Current at $46 per month over a 20-year period. In addition, the household will have to pay an estimated $4,000 for the connection from the street to the individual’s house. This totals $10,340 per individual property owner. Those houses having senior/ disabled exempt status could qualify for financial assistance, with the city using its Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) to subsidize this assistance. There was consensus for staff to prepare a resolution that would allow the use of the city’s CDBG funds for sewer assessment and hookup assistance. City to develop action plan”

“housing

The legislature approved a bill that encourages cities to develop increased urban density and would provide grants to aid in developing a “housing action plan.” City staff determined Spokane Valley already has made changes to the city’s comprehensive plan in line with the bill. A divided council approved asking the staff to develop a “housing action plan” that would be in line with city objectives and qualify for state financial assistance in forming such a plan. Sales tax rebate for affordable housing The Washington State Legislature passed Senate House Bill 1406, permitting cities to receive a rebate of the sales tax paid to the state of 0.0073% to be used for affordable housing. For Spokane Valley, this means a return of $178,000 annually. On Sept. 9, Council passed a resolution declaring its intent to develop and pass an enabling ordinance. Note that the tax rate of the city would remain the same. The city would be retaining part of that tax rather than shipping it to the state. The city has to adopt the ordinance no later than July 28, 2020. Sullivan Park to increase by 14 acres Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) owns a 13.84 acre parcel directly north of Sullivan Park and, some time ago, offered to sell it to the city. However, some land was contaminated with aluminum


The Current dross along the north border so the city refused the offer. Since that time, WSDOT, working with the Department of Ecology, initiated remediation which is expected to be complete within 2019. WSDOT and the city have developed a purchase and sales agreement whereby the city would purchase the land for the appraised price, $844,000, on the condition that the remediation is completed as declared by the Department of Ecology. Council authorized staff to acquire the parcel. Public hearing for 2020 budget At a public hearing for the 2020 budget on Sept. 10, amounts were unchanged from those reported in last month’s The Current. The budget proposes $86.9 million in expenditures, including 44.9 million in the general fund and $42 million over 23 additional funds. The one exception is that the cost to implement the crisis coresponse team is now within the budget as a $100,000 expenditure for Public Safety. This team, consisting of a law enforcement officer and a mental health specialist, would address those situations where mental health of the offender is a contributing issue. A portion of the cost of this program may be offset by a nonrecurring Trueblood grant for a limited time. If so, staff noted a portion of the $100,000 could be spent for mental health or homelessness efforts. On Sept. 24, City Manager Mark Calhoun presented a preliminary 2020 Budget of $90 million, with recurring revenue growth of 5.9 percent over last year and recurring expenditures growing just over 3 percent over last year. They estimate 2020 property taxes will be $1.23 per thousand, 7.2 cents less than last year. Staffing levels are to increase by 1.5 full time equivalent employees, with the addition of a code enforcement officer and adding half time to the attorney’s office to handle code enforcement cases. Calhoun noted that 2020 will be the fourth year of street expenditures exceeding revenue. He also stated, “Our challenge is to determine how to finance the [Pavement Preservation] plan.” Part of Broadway-Thierman to

be vacated

OCTOBER 2019 • 9

NEWS

A privately initiated vacation request came to the city that would cede 3000 square feet of the northwest corner of Broadway and Thierman to the adjacent parcels. In 1985, WSDOT acquired the property and then conveyed what was not used back to the property owners. It has been used as private property ever since, is already improved and maintained, and is not needed by the city. As a result of this proposal, there will be no physical change. Value of the property is less than application fee already paid, so there will be no sales cost to the property owners. Council approved the request. Sidewalk snow removal again studied Snow plowing sidewalks has been a perennial problem for the city. Crews tried having snow plows go slower, moving the berm from the sidewalk to the street, but large, hard to navigate berms were created and costs increased. In February 2016, Council passed an ordinance that if there is an accumulation more than three inches, it must be removed within 48 hours. Those safe routes to schools within a half mile of their school, called Tier 1, were given priority and enforced. Only one citation has been given in the last two years. Staff is examining whether to plow both sides of residential safe routes to school, 42 miles total, or just one side, 23 miles. Businesses in Tier 1 areas would be expected to plow their own sidewalks. The city has purchased two pieces of equipment and a trailer. They estimate about $180,000 will be spent for equipment and more for labor. However, staff has, thus far, been unable to find a contractor to do the job. Council suggested contacting schools to see if they could do part of what is needed, since they already keep the sidewalks clear within their own properties. There was consensus to concentrate on both sides of Tier 1 routes. Changes proposed for chronic nuisance provisions Spokane Valley adopted a chronic nuisance ordinance in 2018 to address the rising

number of nuisance properties associated with extensive criminal activity. Under the ordinance, the city can pursue legal action against properties with more than four “criminal events” plus a junk violation, or five criminal complaints in a year. They could then obtain a court order to gain access to the property and clean it up. Three changes are now being proposed for the ordinance. First, it is being extended to other types of dwellings, such as mobile homes, manufactured homes and recreational vehicles. Second, staff wants to remove the 30-day period after a warning prior to issuing a notice and order, substituting a “reasonable period” of 14-45 days. Third, staff wanted to make it clear that only a person responsible for the violation can be eligible for a waiver of the code enforcement fee. Council advanced this to a second reading. Council briefs

• City Council approved the first reading of an ordinance that

permits the city to obtain parcels for the Barker/BNSF Grade Separation Project and transfer their ownership to the state when the project is finished, since it is a state road that is being developed. • Staff reported sales of $176,795 by over 100 local vendors and attendance of 17,180 for this year’s Farmers Market. • Staff reported that CRAVE had a budget of $183,000, feeding local coffers. There were 3,000 attendees, slightly more than last year’s event, and provided lodging nights for over 400 rooms. • Council approved vacating portions of Glenn Road and Baldwin Avenues south of the freeway. Council then approved leasing portions of University Road to Circle M properties for $100 per year under a number of restrictions. • Mayor Higgins reappointed Mr. Tom Hormel to the County’s Housing and Development Advisory Committee for another three-year term.

Join us!

The

FUN is in the FIND!

Everything from RARE TO RETRO

October 4-5-6, 2019 Spokane Fair and Expo Center 4 0 4 N H AVA N A S T | S P O K A N E , WA

$6 ADMISSION

FREE PARKING

CusterShows.com

FRIDAY 4PM-9PM SATURDAY 10AM-6PM SUNDAY 10AM-4PM

509.924.0588


10 • OCTOBER 2019

NEWS

Millwood briefed on lawsuit over plan change

Final vote on designation postponed to October By Nina Culver Current Contributor

The Millwood City Council postponed a vote on an ordinance giving final approval to a Comprehensive Plan designation change on two parcels of land during September’s meeting, instead holding an executive session to discuss a lawsuit appealing the decision filed by a citizen’s group headed by city council candidate Jay Molitor. The city council previously held a voice vote to change the designation of the two vacant lots, which the city owns, from residential to public reserve. They are located next to 8319 E. South Riverway and were purchased by the city in 2016. Opposition to the city’s proposal has been plentiful. When the city purchased the land, it indicated it wanted to

put a park there, though the city said this summer that no plan to develop the parcels currently exists. The residents opposed to the Comprehensive Plan change said they were opposed to a park because of the location in a quiet, residential neighborhood with narrow streets. In April, Molitor created the group behind the lawsuit, called Millwood Citizens Preserving Neighborhood Integrity. The lawsuit alleges that the decision the city made is in violation of the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) and the Growth Management Act. The lawsuit raises a lot of the issues brought up in public comments opposing the change. One of the allegations is that the city did not prepare a “meaningful” environmental impact statement,

merely writing that the proposal was a “non-project action” in nearly every category. “(City) Staff took the position that SEPA review will take place when the rezone takes place, but this is also demonstrably untrue,” the lawsuit reads. “Park uses will hereafter be permitted under the Plan amendment of 2019, and the only review provided is for code compliance.” Mayor Kevin Freeman said he postponed the vote at the September meeting so the council could be briefed on the lawsuit first. “We wanted to give the council an opportunity to hear about the lawsuit in executive session and answer any questions they had,” he said. Freeman said he expects the ordinance that formally adopts the Comprehensive Plan change on the parcels will be voted on at the council’s October meeting. Attorney Milton Rowland said he felt it was necessary to file the lawsuit before the council’s vote on the ordinance because by law it had to be filed within 21 days of the city’s final action, and he’s not sure if the court would consider the initial voice vote in August the final action or not. “We filed it when we did out of an abundance of caution,” he said. Rowland said a park will unquestionably have an impact on the neighborhood but those impacts haven’t been addressed in any way. “What’s going to happen to the neighborhood?” he said. “It’s going to make a tremendous change. There’s been no evaluation of what the traffic impact will be like, what the noise impact will be like. There’s been no look at the consequences.” Rowland said he’s been an attorney for many years and he’s never seen a city make such a targeted change to a comprehensive plan. “That’s an awfully, awfully small and focused Comprehensive Plan change,” he said. Rowland said the group he represents also plans to file an appeal of the city’s decision with the Eastern Washington Growth

The Current Management Hearings Board. In other business, the city council voted to approve pay increases for the city council, who are paid per meeting, and the mayor, who is paid a monthly stipend. Freeman said the city looked at council and mayoral pay in other similarly sized cities in Washington and realized that Millwood was falling behind. “We found that current salaries have increased,” he said. “We are well below par.” The pay for council members was increased from $40 per meeting to $75 per meeting. The mayor’s pay increased from $600 per month to $800 per month. The changes to the mayor’s pay will take effect immediately but the council member pay change will only take effect for each seat after an election is held for that particular seat. Councilwoman Shawna Beese was the only one to vote against the proposal. “I’ve never liked politician salary increases,” she said. The council also voted to begin paying the members of the city’s historic preservation commission and planning commission a small stipend per meeting. Freeman said those two commissions do a lot of work, particularly the planning commission. “When you’re doing this job, there’s more to it than showing up, sitting around a table for two hours and going home,” he said. “From the standpoint of the planning commission, I think everyone knows the effort they put into it.” “The planning commission is a lot,” said councilman Andy Van Hees, who previously served on the planning commission. Councilwoman Kate McLachlan said she hoped the stipends would help recruitment efforts. “There have been openings on those commissions, and we have had problems filling them,” she said. The stipends were set at $40 per meeting for planning commission members and $25 per meeting for historic preservation commission members. The vote adopting the changes was unanimous.


OCTOBER 2019 • 11

The Current

The Woman in Black A ghost play

October 30, 31 November 1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 9 CVHS Bear Boosters


COMMUNITY

12 • OCTOBER 2019

The Current

Calendar of Events COMMUNITY EVENTS Oct. 1 | Compass Club Luncheon – 11 a.m., Spokane Club, 1002 W. Riverside Ave., Spokane. Program will be a Chico’s Fashion Show. Luncheon is $25 per person, and reservations are required. For more, email harris1003@comcast.net. Oct. 5 | Used Book Sale – 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main Ave., Spokane Valley. “Name Your Price” sale supporting Friends of the Spokane Valley Library. Pre-sale opens at 8:30 a.m. for a $10 admission fee. Oct. 10 | Veterans Car Show – 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Spokane Vet Center, 13109 E. Mirabeau Parkway, Spokane Valley. Veterans and family members are invited to first annual event showcasing all eras of cars, trucks and motorcycles. No entry fee. Lunch provided. RSVP by Oct. 7 to Stu Sturtevant at 893-4735 or Robert.Sturtevant@va.gov. Oct. 24 | “Falling Into Fall” – 12:30 p.m., Tri-Community Grange, 25025 Heather St., Newman Lake. Annual fundraiser held by Newman Lake Ladies Aid to benefit Christmas families and the local school districts. Lunch is $5, and there will also be a bag auction and country store. All welcome. For more, email nlladiesaid@gmail.com. Nov. 2 | Into Africa Auction and Dinner – 5:30 p.m., Mirabeau Park Hotel, 1100 N. Sullivan Road, Spokane Valley. Authentic African art and crafts will be auctioned as well as getaways, sports packages,

Over 80 • New Patients Welcome • Gentle Family Dentistry • Preventative Care • Cosmetic & Implant Dentistry

athletic memorabilia, lavish baskets and more to support the work of Partnering for Progress in Kenya. African dishes and western food will be served. Tickets are $75 per person or $450 for a table of 8. For more, visit partneringforprogress. org or call 720-8408. Nov. 9 | 16th Annual Heritage Program – 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Spokane Valley Eagles, 16801 E. Sprague Ave., Spokane Valley. Annual event supporting the Spokane Valley Heritage Museum will include a presentation this year on the history of Liberty Lake. Luncheon and silent auction will also be a part of the festivities, which cost $20 in advance or $25 at the door. For more, call 922-4570. RECURRING ACT 2 Senior Classes | Affordable classes offered by Community Colleges of Spokane to those who are retired or planning to retire. A wide range of courses from geology and history to exercise and art are offered at CenterPlace, 2426 N. Discovery Place, as well as other locations throughout the area. For more, search for “Act 2” at scc. spokane.edu. Baha’i Fireside Conversation | 7 to 8 p.m., third Thursday of the month, Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main Ave. Discussion of Baha’i teachings, history and perspectives on resolving the challenges facing humanity. All are welcome. For more, call 599-2411. Café Card Club | 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Tuesdays, On Sacred Grounds, 12212 E. Palouse Hwy., Valleyford. Play pinochle, cribbage, or hearts.

Google Reviews

Free Whitening w/purchase of new patient exam, necessary x-rays & recommended cleaning

924-9596 See Us Atwww.kathrineolsondds.com

For more, call 951-7039 or email onsacredgrounsrising@gmail.com. Catholic Singles Mingle | Meeting times and locations vary. This group, with no dues, is for single adults of all ages. More at www.meetup. com/Catholic-Singles-Mingle. Free Last Sunday Lunch | Spokane Valley United Methodist Church, 115 N. Raymond Road, Spokane Valley - 12:30 p.m. on the final Sunday of every month in the church’s Fellowship Hall, Room 115 Grange Meeting and Dessert | 6:30 p.m., third Wednesday of the month, Tri-Community Grange, 25025 Heather St., Newman Lake. The public is welcome for this community-based service organization. For more, call 2262202. Men’s Weekly Bible Study | 7 a.m. Tuesdays. Millwood Presbyterian Church, 3223 N. Marguerite Road, Millwood. The men’s weekly Bible Study meets in the Reception Hall with different members sharing in the leading of the study. All men are invited to join. More at www. milwoodpc.org. Rockford Crochet Class | 10 a.m. to noon, Saturdays, Harvest Moon, 20 S. First St., Rockford. Free classes. We have crocheters, knitters, embroidery, quilting and needlepoint. Come and share what you are doing. For more, call 2913722. Rockford Historical Society | 11:30 a.m. second Friday of the month (February to November), The Harvest Moon, 20 S. First St., Rockford. For more, call 291-3193.

Spokane County Library District | Locations include Argonne, Fairfield, Otis Orchards, and Spokane Valley. Special events and weekly activities for all ages including book clubs, children’s story times, classes, Lego club, teen anime club and writing clubs. More at scld.org. Spokane Valley Eagles | 16801 E. Sprague Ave. Breakfast served Sundays 9 to 11:30 a.m. Lunch served Thursdays 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. followed by bingo from 1 to 3:30 p.m. More at www.foe3433. com. Spokane Valley Partners Food Bank | Weekly distribution takes place Wednesdays and Thursdays at 10814 E. Broadway Ave. by appointment. Appointments are available during the following days/times: Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., Thursday, 11 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. (reserved for age 60 and over and physically-handicapped people with limited mobility). Address verification required. To make an appointment, call 927-1153, ext. 10, Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 1 p.m. Spokane Valley Quilt Guild | Meetings at 7 p.m. on the first Tuesday of February, April, June, August, October and December at Valley Assembly of God Church, 15618 E. Broadway Ave., Spokane Valley. Open to all interested in sharing ideas and skills of our quilting craft. Participants can access a comprehensive library, engage experienced teachers and participate in community service projects. More at svqgspokane.com.

Submit your entries for

Eat, Shop

&Be Merry danica@libertylakesplash.com

SHARE YOUR

Adve


The Current

OCTOBER 2019 • 13

COMMUNITY

Spokane Valley Senior Citizens Association | 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays at CenterPlace, 2426 N. Discovery Place. Activities include bridge, billiards, book club, Red Hat Ladies, Mahjongg, ACT II classes, foot care, Medicare assistance, monthly excursions to Northern Quest Casino, Meals on Wheels location and more. Annual dues are $25/single or $45/couple. For more, call 926-1937 or visit spokanevalleyseniorcenter.org.

MUSIC & THE ARTS Oct. 11-27 | “Music Man Jr.” -Various times. Theatre Arts Center at the Lake, 22910 E. Appleway Ave., Liberty Lake. There’s trouble in River City when a fast-talking salesman gets his heart stolen by the town librarian in this adaptation of the Tony Award-winning Broadway classic. For tickets and more info, visit tacatthelake.com. Oct. 12 | 13th Annual Artist Showcase and Art Auction – CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place, Spokane Valley. Art, live music, dinner, auction and quick finish demonstrations are part of the festivities organized by the Spokane Valley Arts Council. For tickets or more info, visit spokanevalleyarts. org or call Jim Harken at 924-5009. Oct. 18-20 | “Lux Radio Theatre’s Casablanca” -- Various times. Ignite! Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway Ave., Spokane Valley. Nazi spies, the Resistance, a love triangle! Join us at Rick’s Café as we stage Lux Radio Theatre’s suspenseful Casablanca, complete with commercials and sound effects! For tickets and more info, visit igniteonbroadway.org. Oct. 25-Nov. 3 | “A Place to Call Home: A Play about the Hutton Settlement” – Various times, Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St., Spokane. In honor of its centennial celebration, this production brings to life the remarkable story of the Hutton Settlement, recalling Levi Hutton’s struggles and joys as he built and endowed the 100-yearold Hutton Settlement, beautifully situated in the Spokane Valley. For more or to purchase tickets, visit spokanecivictheatre.com. Oct. 26-27 | Spokane Writers

Conference – North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Road, Spokane. 5th annual event includes writing workshops and small group intensives led by published authors and journalists. Sessions require online registration and are provided free of charge. For more, visit scld. org/engage. Nov. 9-10 | Spokane Fall Folk Festival – Spokane Community College Lair, 1810 N. Greene St., Spokane. 24th annual festival presented by the Spokane Folklore Society featuring 100 groups, workshops, crafts and family activities. For more, visit spokanefolkfestival.org or call 8283683.

RECURRING The Fire Brigade| 7 p.m., first Saturday of the month, Ignite! Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway Ave., Spokane Valley. Ignite!’s improv troupe fires up family-friendly comedy. For more, visit igniteonbroadway.org. Pages of Harmony | 6:30 to 9 p.m., Wednesdays, Thornhill Valley Chapel, 1400 S. Pines Road. Four-part, a cappella harmony, men’s barbershop chorus. More at pagesofharmony.org. Spirit of Spokane Chorus | 6:45 p.m. Tuesdays, Opportunity Presbyterian Church, 202 N. Pines Road. Make new friends by joining this women’s chorus, specializing in four-part, a cappella harmony in the barbershop style. More at 218-4799. Spokane Valley Camera Club | 7:15 p.m., third and fourth Monday of the month (September through April). Liberty Lake Sewer and Water District building, 22510 E. Mission Ave., Liberty Lake. All levels of ability—students through experienced photographers— are invited to learn. Social events include field trips and workshops. More at 951-1446 or www.sv-cc.org

HEALTH & RECREATION Oct. 5 | Parents with Children Guided Hike –Oct. 5 | Parents with Children Guided Hike – 9:30 a.m., Camp Caro Trailhead, 698 S. Sargent Road, Spokane. Bring the kids for a fun, family-friendly hike with the

See CALENDAR, Page 14

Long t c e l E Re-

Debra

Central Valley School Board Director #3 Paid by Committee to Re-Elect Debra Long 14222 E Desmet Avenue, Spokane Valley, WA 99216


14 • OCTOBER 2019

The Current

CALENDAR

Continued from page 13 Dishman Hills Conservancy. Led by Carol Christensen, Dishman Hills Conservancy board member, this easy trek through the Dishman Hills Natural Area includes a walk to Nimbus Knob with low elevation gain and well-marked trails. To sign up for this free event, visit dishmanhills.org/events. Oct. 5 | Walk to End Alzheimer’s 2019 – 10 a.m., Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St., Spokane. Annual walk to raise funds and awareness for Alzheimer’s includes Promise Garden Ceremony followed by 3-mile walk. Family and petfriendly. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. For more, visit act.alz.org/ spokane. Oct. 19 | Marilyn’s Walk – 9:45 a.m., Rocky Hill Park, 24901 E. Mission Ave., Liberty Lake. A memorial walk honoring Marilyn Dhaenens, an avid walker and community pillar who died Oct. 18, 2018, while walking in Liberty Lake. T-shirts will be available for $20 on a first-come basis at the John L. Scott office in Liberty Lake from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 18 and at the park on Oct. 19. Following opening remarks, the walk along Marilyn’s normal route will begin at 10 a.m. For more, contact Christine Sitton at 991-5105 or csitton@johnlscott.com. Oct. 26 | Superheroes vs. Villains Pickleball Tournament – HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave., Liberty Lake. 5th annual men’s and women’s doubles tournament; superhero or villain attire required. Registration of $45 per person by Oct. 18. For more, visit hubsportscenter.org or email info@hubsportscenter.org.

RECURRING Al-Anon Family Meetings | Tuesdays, noon to 1 p.m., Opportunity Christian Church, 708 N. Pines, Spokane Valley. Is there a problem of alcoholism with a relative or a friend? Al-Anon/ Alateen family groups can help. For more, call 456-2125. Decreasing Anger Group | 3 to 4:30 p.m. Tuesdays, the Vet Center, 13109 E. Mirabeau Parkway, Spokane Valley. Eligibility: combat veteran from all eras, military sexual trauma survivors. For more, call Steve at 893-4746 to make an intake appointment. DivorceCare Recovery Support Group | Mondays 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Eastpoint Church, 15303 E. Sprague Ave. Learn how to heal from the deep hurt of divorce and discover hope for your future. DivorceCare for Kids (ages 5-12) meets at the same time and location. Cost is $25 for workbook. More at 892-5255 or eastpointchurch.com. Family and Friends of Addicts| 6 p.m. Wednesdays, The ONE Church, 15601 E. 24th Ave., Spokane Valley. Support group utilizing tools and principles to help navigate relationships with addicts and finding peace, strength and hope. For more, call 590-2422. GriefShare Support Group (Mondays)| 6:15 to 8 p.m. Mondays, The ONE Church, east entrance, 15601 E. 24th Ave., Spokane Valley. Most recent program began Feb. 20, but join at any time. Designed to help cope with loss, whether recent or years ago. For more, call Sue at 294-1664 or Jere at 710-3354. GriefShare Support Group (Thursdays) | 10 a.m. Thursdays, Spokane Valley Church of the Nazarene, 15515 E. 20th Ave. Most

recent program began Jan. 17 and runs 13 weeks, but join at any time. If you have lost a loved one and are dealing with grief, stop by to share or just listen. For more, call 926-1545. HUB Sports Center | 19619 E. Cataldo Ave., Liberty Lake. Various activities and events occur throughout the week including: • Pickleball drop-in: 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday; 10 a.m. to noon Tuesday and Thursday; 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday and Sunday. $3/seniors, $5/non-seniors. • Classes including Kenpo Karate, Taekwondo and Fit for YOUR Life. See hubsportscenter.org for cost and times. Military Sobriety Support Group | 10 to 11:30 a.m., Spokane Vet Center, 13109 E. Mirabeau Parkway, Spokane Valley. For more, call Steve at 893-4746. Mindful Music & Movement | 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Wednesdays, Willow Song Music Therapy Center, 21101 E. Wellesley #102, Otis Orchards. Specifically designed for those living with chronic health issues such as Parkinson’s, dementia, COPD, MS, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, cancer. $10 donation suggested. Facilitated by board-certified music therapist, Carla Carnegie. For more, visit willowsongmusictherapy.com or call 592-7875. Yoga in Rockford | 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays, Rockford Park, 20 W. Emma St., Rockford. In case of inclement weather, classes will be held at Dave’s Autobody, 8 W. Emma St.

CIVIC & BUSINESS

Oct. 2 | Short Course on Local Planning – 6 to 9 p.m., Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main Ave., Spokane Valley. Free presentation and discussion on how cities plan and implement strategies to accommodate growth while achieving a desired community vision. Event organized by Spokane County Library District in partnership with the City of Spokane Valley, Washington State Department of Commerce and The Planning Association of Washington. For more, visit scld.org or call 893-8200. Oct. 3 | Student-led Spokane Valley Candidate Forum – 5:45 to 7:30 p.m., East Valley High School, 15711 E. Wellesley Ave., Spokane Valley. Students ask questions of candidates for Spokane Valley City Council. Mock election following the formal program. The public is encouraged to attend this event organized by The Current. Oct. 8 | Deputy Sheriff Hiring Open House – 6 to 8 p.m., Spokane County Sheriff’s Training Center, 6011 N. Chase Road, Newman Lake. Free informational event for those interested in applying for both entry-level and lateral deputy sheriff positions. Reservations required and can be made at 4774711. For more, email recruiting@ spokanesheriff.org. Oct. 9 | Taxpayer Town Hall – 4 to 6 p.m., Spokane Valley City Hall, 10210 E. Sprague Ave., Spokane Valley. Spokane County Treasurer Michael Baumgartner will present updates on how the Treasurer’s Office collects, safeguards and invests over $1 billion in tax dollars, and attendees are also invited to learn about available taxpayer

Funeral Home & Crematory

The first name your family trusts. SPOKANE

509-328-2600

S P O K A N E VA L L E Y

509-926-2423


OCTOBER 2019 • 15

The Current assistance programs and share ideas. Housing counselors from SNAP will also be in attendance to share information on their services including foreclosure prevention loans and housing counseling program. For more, call 477-4786 or email treasurer@spokanecounty. org. Oct. 10 | Student-led Liberty Lake Candidate Forum – 5:45 to 7:30 p.m., Selkirk Middle School, 1409 N. Harvest Parkway, Liberty Lake. Students ask questions of candidates for Liberty Lake Mayor and City Council. Mock election following the formal program. The public is encouraged to attend this event organized by The Splash. Oct. 11 | Live2Lead Simulcast – 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Eastpoint Event Center, 15303 E. Sprague Ave., Spokane Valley. Morning simulcast features speakers such as John Maxwell, Rachel Hollis and Marcus Buckingham followed by afternoon of practical follow-up led by local leaders. For more or to register, visit live2leadspokane.com. Oct. 16 | “Building Your Brand” Lunch and Learn – Noon to 1 p.m., Spokane Valley City Hall, 10210 E. Sprague Ave., Spokane Valley. Local marketing firm The Woodshop leads this free workshop. Oct. 21 | Manufacturing Matters Dinner – CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place, Spokane Valley. Event to commemorate the region’s rich history of making quality goods that fuel economic prosperity. Evening includes networking reception, gourmet meal and program highlighted by keynote address from Terry Judge, CEO of HOTSTART, Inc. Tickets are $50. Register at spokanevalleychamber.

org. Wednesdays in October | SCORE Small Business Classes – Wednesday mornings, SBA Training Room, 801 W. Riverside Ave. 4th Floor, Spokane. Cost is $25 if preregistered. SCORE Spokane offers a variety of low-cost workshops designed to encourage the success of emerging and small business owners. Free business mentoring is also available. For more, visit spokane.score.org. RECURRING Spokane Valley City Council | Regular meetings held the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 6 p.m. in Council Chambers at Spokane Valley City Hall, 11707 E. Sprague Ave., Ste. 101. Council study sessions are held the first, third and sometimes fifth Tuesdays at 6 p.m., also in Council Chambers. Millwood City Council | Regular meetings at 7 p.m. on the second Tuesday of each month at Millwood City Hall, 9103 E. Frederick Ave. Spokane Flag Museum | Sponsored by the Sons of the American Revolution and the Fairmount Memorial Association, details the rich history of the American flag, Monday-Friday 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Saturdays 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Pines Cemetery, 1402 S. Pines Road, Spokane Valley. For more, call 9262753 or visit fairmountmemorial. com/south-pines-cemetery. Spokane Valley Kiwanis | 6:45 a.m. Tuesdays, Valley Hospital Education Center, 12606 E. Mission Ave. More at spokanevalleykiwanis. net. Greater Spokane Valley Rotary | Noon to 1 p.m. Wednesdays, Darcy’s, 10502 E. Sprague Ave. More at svrotary.org.

PROVEN LEADERSHIP • DEDICATION FOR C.V. SCHOOLS • ATTORNEY AT LAW YEARS OF SERVICE TO FAMILIES AND CHILDREN.

“Thank you for your vote of confidence for our Children & our community.” -Cindy McMullen Paid for by Committee to Re-Elect Cynthia McMucllen for C.V. School Board, 4336 S. Farr Rd, Spokane Valley, WA 99206

SVFD Report

From Current News Sources Spokane Valley Fire Department crews responded to a total of 1,518 emergency from Aug. 15 to Sept. 15, down from 1,557 during the previous reporting period: • Emergency Medical Services 1125 • Building Alarms 43 • Motor Vehicle Accidents 85 • Fires 84 • Dispatched and cancelled en route 43 • Hazardous Materials 12 • Service Calls 19 • Vehicle Fires 4 • Auto vs Pedestrian 3 • Technical Rescue 2

Dumpster Fire – At 3:20 a.m. Aug. 23, SVFD responded to a dumpster fire call near East Sprague Avenue. The fire was called in by several people who noticed it about 20 feet from the building. A man burnt his hand trying to put out the fire. Crews arrived, treated the individual, put out the fire and returned to service. Extrication – At 9:51 p.m. Aug. 29, SVFD responded to a moving violation involving multiple vehicles near North Flora Road. A passerby called into dispatch that a sedan had ran into a van. The van had significant damage and a passenger trapped inside. The sedan had hit the van and pinned it to the side of a hill. The man was extricated and transferred for further medical treatment. Structure Fire – At 8:30 p.m. Sept. 7, SVFD responded to a call near East Clarke Street in Liberty Lake regarding a house fire. A woman called in coughing and said there was smoke pouring out of her house. Upon arrival, no smoke or flames were visible. All occupants of the home were outside. Upon investigation, crews found a mattress leaned up against a wall sconce and light bulbs. They were burning into the mattress, causing the smoke. Crews removed the mattress from the residence, unscrewed the lightbulbs and ventilated the house. Smoke Investigation – At 11 p.m. Sept. 13, SVFD responded to a fire near 10th

and Henry. A residence had a backyard recreational fire going. Homeowners were informed of the current burn restrictions. The fire was put out without any issues. Education was provided and crews returned to service. Cannabis Facility Fire – At 5:22 p.m. Sept. 15, SVFD firefighters responded to a commercial structure fire in the 2600 block of North Woodruff Road. A 911 caller from Grow Op Farms reported heavy black smoke coming from one of its marijuana grow rooms and were evacuating employees from the building. Crews arrived to a large commercial building with no smoke or flames visible from the outside and an audible fire alarm sounding. On a second floor, firefighters found dark smoke coming from a grow room due to a smoldering fire that had self-extinguished. Crews ensured the fire hadn’t spread and helped evacuate the smoke. A total of 11 fire trucks and command vehicles responded with approximately 25 firefighters. One fire engine, one ladder truck and one battalion chief responded from the Spokane Fire Department from an automatic aid agreement. Fire companies were returned to stations once they were no longer needed, with the last crew and fire investigator leaving after approximately two hours. The fire was accidental in nature. There is no current estimate in cost of damages, and the exact cause is still pending investigation. No injuries were reported. Approximately 80 employees safely evacuated the building, and the business remains open. About SVFD – The Spokane Valley Fire Department serves the City of Spokane Valley, City of Liberty Lake, City of Millwood and the surrounding unincorporated areas of Spokane County with a combined population of 125,000 across 75 square miles. SVFD firefighters and paramedics responded to more than 17,280 emergency calls in 2017. Established in 1940, SVFD is an Accredited Agency by the Commission on Fire Accreditation International, one of only a handful in Washington State. For more information about Spokane Valley Fire Department, visit www. spokanevalleyfire.com.


16 • OCTOBER 2019

The Current

Remember to return your ballot by November 5th Thank you for voting! Paid for by Lance Gurel for Spokane Valley City Council Po box 496 Spokane Valley 99037

SPOK A N E VA LLEY A RTS CO UNCIL

Artist Showcase

1 3 TH ANNUAL

Newest Endeavor

ART AUCTION

OC TOBE R 12, 2019

ART • LIVE MUSIC • DINNER DO N ’ T M I S S T HI S GRE AT E V E N T !

C e n t e rP l a c e Reg i on a l E ve nt C e nt e r • 2426 N Di s cover y P l ac e in Spo ka ne Va lley C EN T ER P L AC E R EG I O N A L E V E NT CE NT E R

MICHELE USIBELLI

BOB WILFONG

F O R T I CK E T S , PLE ASE C ON TAC T J I M H ARK E N • 5 0 9 .9 2 4 .5 0 0 9 O R PU R CH A S E O N OU R WE B SI T E • WWW. SPOK AN EVALLEYARTS.OR G

LESA DELISI


The Current

LIBRARY

Valley planning, development, infrastructure are focus of library program By Erin Dodge Current Guest Contributor

As you travel through the City of Spokane Valley, you’ve most likely seen areas of rejuvenation around the businesses along East Sprague Ave. In other Valley areas, you’ve no doubt come across new tracts of houses, duplexes, apartments, and infill development properties for future residential and commercial building. But did you know that there is a comprehensive plan (over 150 pages) for the Valley that anticipates growth through 2037? You can find the plan at www.spokanevalley.org within the Community and Public Works Department’s page. When librarians at Spokane County Library District interviewed

Spokane Valley residents, they heard concerns about the community’s rapid growth. And for many of us, an in-person face-to-face discussion can be a good way to get the information we need. With this in mind, the Library District has partnered with the City of Spokane Valley, the Washington State Department of Commerce, and The Planning Association of Washington to bring the “Short Course on Local Planning” to Spokane Valley Library. The 3-hour “Short Course on Local Planning” takes place on Wednesday, October 2, at 6pm, in the library’s meeting room. So, if you’ve ever wondered how local governments plan for growth,

Learning Circles bring a new way of learning By Stacey Goddard, Public Services Manager Spokane County Library District

I love being able to take classes online. I love the flexibility online learning gives, especially because of the busy lives we all lead. When I decided to pursue my master’s degree, I couldn’t afford to quit my job and go to school full time in another city or state, so an online program was the only option that was going to work for me. Fortunately, University of Washington’s distance learning program allowed me to keep my job and my house while I worked on my degree. True confession time—after I had earned that degree, the incentives that had helped me meet assignment deadlines, such as getting the most out of my money (aka tuition) and discussing assignments with classmates, just weren’t there

anymore when I would sign up for an online training or class. So while I love the idea of taking a grant writing class or learning to use a software program like Tinkercad, my follow-through since graduate school has been terrible. I’ve started classes with the best intentions but end up dropping them after a couple of weeks. It turns out that I really like the social aspect of people coming together in a place to learn something. My pressure-prompted brain relies on the sense of accountability that comes with a commitment to learning in person with others, participating in the learning process, and wanting to know and discover the course material. Which is why I’m excited that the Library District is launching Learning Circles this fall! Learning Circles offer the convenience of an online class

OCTOBER 2019 • 17

5 T H A N N UA L you now have a chance to find out. You’re invited to come out to learn how cities plan and implement strategies to accommodate growth while achieving a desired community vision. In this workshop, professionals in law and planning present a general overview of land use planning for interested citizens, the development community, and local officials. The presentation may cover topics like planning a city for future development, expanding residential and commercial development, and ensuring traffic and infrastructure can support growth. After the presentation, there will be time for questions you might have about local planning and how citizens can be part of that process. This presentation, discussion, and learning opportunity is free and open to the public. To find upcoming library programs, pick up a copy of ‘Engage’ at your local library or get the digital version online at www. scld.org/engage.

Spokane Writers Conference

Writing workshops & small group intensives led by published authors & journalists Deepen emotions in early drafts Alchemy of memory Screenwriting for a visual medium

and the accountability of a classroom setting—the best of both worlds. If any part of my story rings true for you, Learning Circles might be a great fit. All Learning Circles have a facilitator, online content, and a learning environment where participants both teach and learn. Learning Circles meet once a week for 4–8 weeks, depending on the topic. We’re kicking things off with a 3D Printing Learning Circle at Spokane Valley Library on Thursday, October 3. In the Learning Circle, we’ll learn how to use Tinkercad to design printable 3D objects. If technology topics aren’t your thing, consider the Fiction Writing Learning Circle starting at North Spokane Library on Wednesday, October 30. We’ll also have a Personal Finance & Budgeting Learning Circle starting on Monday, January 27, at Argonne Library. To learn more about Learning Circles and to register for a class, I encourage you to visit www. p2pu.org/scld.

Querying & pitching Crafting quality dialogue Submitting to literary journals & more Saturday, Oct 26 10am–5pm Sunday, Oct 27 1–4:30pm Learn more at www.scld.org/engage

www.scld.org


18 • OCTOBER 2019

The Current

Student Led Candidate Forum OCtober 3 @ 5:45 East Valley High School

5:45 - Doors Open

Meet with all candidates in attendance at their tables

6:00 Formal Program Students will ask each candidate one question, with a rebuttal from their opponent

7:00 Mock Election

Questions? Contact us at 242-7752

Featuring Spokane Valley City Council Candidates additional candidates in attendance before and after the formal program


OCTOBER 2019 • 19

The Current

Special Election G u i d e 2019 Dear Readers:

With the upcoming election heating up and the sea of political signs filling our streets, we at The Current wanted to take the opportunity to provide you w i t h

some information about the candidates seeking your vote this election cycle. In order to give you more insight into who these people are we reached out to all of the candidates appearing on your ballot and asked them to please provide a 300-word response to the following questions (which we would publish at no cost). 1. What best qualifies you

for this position? 2. What is the most important issue that needs addressed? We have also gave them some fun questions for your enjoyment. While not everyone chose to respond to our request, a good number have and I hope that you find their unedited responses helpful for your voting consideration. In addition to the information listed in the following pages we have partnered with University High School and East Valley High School to host a candidate forum to give you the opportunity to come and hear directly from the candidates for Spokane

Valley City Council and individually connect with a number of the other candidates that will be in attendance for the open house before and after the formal program. A mock election will also be held for all those in attendance. The event is free, so we hope that you will come and join us October 3, 2019 5:45 at East Valley High School Gymnasium.

Thanks for reading The Current, we hope you enjoy it!

The Current Team P.S. If you have any feedback on how we can enhance the voter’s guide or if you found it valuable please let us know by emailing us at elections@ libertylakesplash.com or by calling our office at 509-2427752


20 • OCTOBER 2019

The Current

Central Valley School Director Dist # 1

Cindy McMullen

What best qualifies you for this position? I have the history, knowledge and commitment to serve our students, families and community. For 32 years, 28 on the Central Valley School Board and 4 on the State Board of Education, I have been actively involved in school policy matters at the School District, State and Federal level, currently

serving on the state association’s Legislative Committee and chairing its Federal Legislative Committee, as well as being a past president of that Association. I take my governing responsibilities very seriously, focusing on how best to meet our students’ diverse needs. I have long advocated for multiple educational opportunities so our students can learn and grow to their full potential. Through a strong working relationship with fellow boardmembers and District staff, I am proud to be part of the growth of our schools and the excellent programs and services we provide our students. What is the most important issue that needs to be addressed? Continuing to provide an excellent education to every student is our most important issue. This means safe, secure facilities, strongly supported staff,

excellent curriculum, current technology and a supportive environment in each of our 26 school buildings. Despite building 3 new schools and adding space in the remodel of 10 more, and now building Ridgeline High School, we must plan for the coming enrollment growth. The new state funding mechanism has reduced total funding for our district and further restricted the use of some of that funding. We must be open to new ways of approaching our challenges, continue to reach out to the community for direction and support, and maintain transparency in all our actions. Our focus must be firmly fixed on what our students need to learn and how best to provide those resources in every Central Valley school and program.

John Myers

What best qualifies you for this position? I served students, their families, fellow educators, the community, for 32 years as a teacher, coach, school administrator before retiring three years ago. But more importantly, I see the call to be in service, to be a servant-leader, as the best “job” one can ever embrace.

Central Valley School Director Dist # 3

Debra Long

What best qualifies you for this position? I am seeking re-election to the Central Valley School Board as I believe I have made a difference in education. Together with our community we have remodeled or built over 15 schools. As a board, we collectively agreed to invest and create Spokane Valley Tech School and then sought funding from our legislature for

Phase II and III. These schools will have a profound impact on the lives of our children. Running for the school board can be a challenging and exciting experience. Serving on the board has been very rewarding. It has allowed me to contribute to our community and help make a difference in our schools and to our children. As a school board director, we must partner with parents, teachers and administrators so that all children receive a quality education. We must build upon the fundamental skills of reading, writing and arithmetic, by giving our students the knowledge they need in order that they may lead us into the next century. Truly it is no secret that I am a band geek and love our drama programs. These programs have enhanced the lives of our children

and our community which is why I still run the Central Valley Craft Fair and help in CV Drama. The funds raised from the Craft Fair allow our children to travel and participate in events outside of our local area. It is my belief that activities and programs keep our children in school and engaged in our community. What is the most important issue that needs to be addressed? The most important issue at the moment is the overcrowding of our schools. While our current overflow is low, we have an amazing district and more people are moving into the area every day. Safety is another major concern of mine. While many district schools have been updated we still have more to do.

Susan Dolan

What best qualifies you for this position? After teaching at Central Valley High School for the past 28 years, I believe a prior educator would be helpful. I have felt the impact of the board’s decisions, and I hope that my experience will provide fresh insight as we face difficult decisions in the future. I feel uniquely qualified


OCTOBER 2019 • 21

The Current

C a n d i d a t e s F av o r i t e s What is the most important issue that needs addressed? To insure that every student finds a place in education where they are supported, challenged, respected, and prepared for their unique future.

Food

Ice Cream

Public Servent

Cindy McMullen Ron’s

Mocha almond fudge

Robert F. Kennedy

John Myers Home

Debra Long Otis Grill

Susan Dolan

“Another Scoop, please.” Martin Luther King, Jr.

Cookies and Cream

Anthony’s in CDA

Rasberry Sorbet

Keith Clark

Produce out of my own garden

Vanilla

Abraham Lincoln

Mother Teresa

George Washington

Central Valley School Director Dist # 4 for this position because of the many “hats” I have worn in the district, including, of course, being a mother and grandmother of Central Valley School District students. While at CVHS, I taught primarily American Literature and US History before becoming the librarian in 2001. While at CVHS, I served on a variety of school and district level committees including, but not limited to the following: K-12 librarians and the Language Arts curriculum committee (which I chaired or co-chaired for 15 years) while we grappled with ways to meet state and federal standards by developing a guaranteed and viable curriculum. In 1993, I was asked to join a “new” district committee with the goal of adding and implementing technology into our schools. I remained a member of the district technology planning team as well as a technology and software

instructional coach for the next 26 years. What is the most important issue that needs addressed? I have watched our district deal with serious over-crowding, budget shortfalls, and state and federal mandates. I believe that my participation on many building and district committees has provided me with a deep understanding of how our district operates, its problems, successes, and issues yet to be faced, most especially the impact of the past year’s budget shortfall that required cutting back critical support staff like psychologists, nurses, librarians, custodians and teacher trainers. Additionally, technology is outpacing our schools at a rapid rate which will leave our students behind in an ever-changing world.

Keith Clark

What best qualifies you for this position? I have had the privilege of serving as a Central Valley School Board of Director (District #4) since 2007. As the Father of seven children, I’ve had children attending school in our district since 1995. Over the years, I’ve learned how to operate and administrate within the educational establishment. As

a taxpayer and business owner, I have a vested interest in being fiscally responsible. As a parent, I’ve been happy to support the passage of bonds which have allowed us to remodel existing schools and add additional schools. What is the most important issue that needs addressed? The safety and well-being of our students is one of my highest priorities. We have invested in all our physical facilities with safety in mind. We’ve enhanced our protocols, purchased additional security camera’s, secured vestibules and continue to partner with local law enforcement. We are teaching our students the importance of “see something, say something”. The community is very supportive of our efforts.


22 • OCTOBER 2019

The Current

Ballot Drop Off Locations

Otis Orchards Library

City of Millwood Council Positio

22324 E Wellesley Ave Otis Orchards, WA 99027 Spokane Valley Library 12004 E Main Ave Spokane Valley, WA 99206

Liberty Lake Library

Argonne Library

23123 E Mission Ave

4322 N Argonne Rd

Liberty Lake, WA 99019

Spokane, WA 99212

Ed Mack

C a n d i d a t e s F av o r i t e s Food

Ice Cream

Public Servent

Ed Mack Ambrosia

Chocolate Gelato

Mahatma Gandhi

Mary McLachlen Pyor’s

Mint and Chocolate Chip

What best qualifies you for this position? I am a thoughtful, good listener, and I seek to thoroughly understand all sides. I strive to find reasonable and fair outcomes for contentious issues. From the business world, I bring insight and experience in strategic planning, problem solving, and leadership. I would be honored to do my part

City of Millwood Council Position

Eleanor Roosevelt

Andre Van Hees Bennidito’s

Molasses cookie

Theodore Roosevelt

Jay Molitor Casa de Oro

to serve the citizens of Millwood, utilize tax dollars wisely, enhance safety, and carefully manage changes in our community. What is the most important issue that needs to be addressed? The most important issue Millwood faces today is the financial responsibility of the City to its citizens. Millwood is a small community that needs tax dollars managed prudently. I believe the current City Council is not living up to this responsibility. In 2016, the City purchased two riverfront, residential lots with the stated purpose of developing a park that includes water access. Records indicate the City paid more than $64,000 above the appraised value for the properties, even though the City Attorney informed the Mayor that the City had no legal basis to pay more than the appraised market value. In 2018, the City

Huckleberry

Andrew Van Hees

What best qualifies you for this position? Having a young family, I am highly motivated to keep Millwood family and business friendly. I previously served on the Shoreline Committee and the Planning Commission for Millwood. During the last 4 years as a city councilman, I have enjoyed the open dialogue of a small city and being part of

the city government. In particular, being on the east side of Millwood, people have felt like their voices aren’t heard and I am proud to represent them. My positive personality creates an environment for citizens to connect with me to have open and honest dialogue in a non-confrontational environment, whether it be at the store, home, or by phone, to voice their concerns, and I am honored to be able to convey their voices. Citizens should have the ability to voice their concerns and questions to a city official without having to go to a meeting. Transparency in city government, whether it be large or small, is paramount for a successful community. Working amongst opposing sides of an issue, it is helpful to remain optimistic and allow both sides to be heard. I have often been able to bring levity to difficult conversations. The current


OCTOBER 2019 • 23

The Current

on 3 increased a utility tax to make up a shortfall in the fund that provides our street services. The future costs of developing, maintaining and patrolling a park only add to the mismanaged expense of the properties. These are prime riverfront properties that could increase tax revenue rather than increase traffic, parking problems, noise, litter, and other nuisances on a quiet, narrow, residential street. The best action the City could take now is sell these lots on the open market and spend the proceeds on important issues such as crime prevention, safety, and infrastructure maintenance and improvements.

Mary (Kate) McLachlan

What best qualifies you for this position? I’m well qualified to serve on the Millwood City Council because I’ve spent my life in service to the public. I worked as a public school teacher from 1986 to 2000 for the Northport and Riverside School Districts. I then went to Gonzaga Law School and interned for the

Attorney General’s Office. After graduating from GU Law in 2003, I worked for the Attorney General’s Office as an Assistant Attorney General until 2011. I became an Administrative Law Judge in 2011 and have worked for the Office of Administrative Hearings in the Spokane Valley ever since. Aside from two years in Northport and two years in Olympia, while starting my respective careers in teaching and in the law, I’ve lived in Spokane or in Millwood my entire life. In my current job, my role is to hear evidence, apply the law, and make fair and impartial decisions. I can be counted on to apply those same skills to my role on the City Council. What is the most important issue that needs to be addressed? A big issue facing Millwood right now is the decision about what to do with two lots the

city purchased along the Spokane River. There is a lot of fear and speculation about what will be done with the properties, but so far no actual plan has been put forth for the City Council to decide. I’m not one who makes a decision before having the facts, so I can’t say now how I would vote for a plan that was put before me. However, I can assure voters that I will make a decision that I believe is best for the river and best for all citizens of Millwood. I’m not likely to vote in favor of any plan that will block the view of the river from the rest of the city.

of Directors dealing with many different issues and personalities. I will bring increased fiscal and fiduciary responsibilities, representing ALL the citizens of Millwood. What is the most important issue that needs to be addressed? There are numerous infrastructure issues that need to be addressed: streets, sidewalks, our beautiful existing park, updating/beautifying our “business district”, but the most important issue is law enforcement. We continue to have increased theft and crime and we have minimal law enforcement to deter these activities. This is an issue that concerns many citizens in Millwood. Also with the Argonne corridor increasing traffic, more and more people speed through Millwood and there’s no law enforcement to

enforce our speed limits. The current administration would rather spend OVER a MILLION DOLLARS OF OUR TAX DOLLARS on a park that is less than ½ acre. This proposed park is located in the very Northwest corner of the City, in a quiet residential neighborhood, that very few Millwood residents would use. This park will only bring more crime to Millwood when we already don’t have enough law enforcement as it is. It would be prudent to invest all this money in additional law enforcement and our other infrastructure opportunities for our City!

n4 council works well together. No one person has his/her own agenda. My hope is to remain your Millwood city councilman for many years to come. What is the most important issue that needs to be addressed? No one issue stands out in my mind as needing to be addressed first. Millwood is on a good path that needs to be continued. Maintaining our parks and public spaces, welcoming new businesses, traffic and public safety concerns are ongoing conversations throughout Millwood government. Millwood has been and will continue to be a safe and friendly city for everyone. We strive to provide the most up-to-date services while being fiscally responsible with your tax dollars.

Jay Molitor

What best qualifies you for this position? I feel I’m very well qualified for this Millwood City Council position. I have lived in Millwood for 40 years. I have years and years of management experience that included business development and budgeting, among many other executive responsibilities. I’ve also served on numerous Board


24 • OCTOBER 2019

The Current

City of Spokane Valley Council Position 2

Brandi Peetz

What best qualifies you for this position? For the past two years, I have been proactive in our community, engaging with business owners and citizens to create economic growth for our city. As the only candidate with city council experience, I have the background and knowledge to continue moving the City forward. Due to the advocacy

done during my trips to Olympia and Washington D.C. the City received the only WA State Tiger grant that fully funded our Barker road grade separation project. It is because I value the importance of citizen engagement, that I have hosted a “coffee chat” for citizens to discuss public safety with our Chief of Police and will continue to take every opportunity to involve our community in policy decisions. What is the most important issue that needs to be addressed? My criminal justice/sociology degree and experience as a 911 operator gives me added insight into what is needed for public safety for our citizens as pubic safety constitutes 60% of our total expenditures. One proposal we will be funding is to have a mental health professional accompany a law enforcement officer in order to divert individuals with

mental health conditions to the appropriate resources instead of the jail. This ensures that we are getting our citizens mental health resources that are attainable while also providing an avenue to decrease recidivism which in turn saves on jail costs. It is imperative that we partner with our law enforcement officers and give them the tools needed in order to do their jobs effectively and keep our communities happy and safe.

Michelle Rasmussen

What best qualifies you for this position? I have nearly 10 years of hands-on, city-related experience that no other current or past councilmember has had coming into an election. As an employee, I developed and managed department budgets and created the draft Six Year Business Plan into the working document that is still used today for budgeting

City of Spokane Valley Council Position 3

Arne Woodard

What best qualifies you for this position? First is the experience and history I have with the city and the Valley. I was born here and have spent my life in Spokane Valley, building businesses and employing people. Second, I have long rich relationships all through the community: church, business, charities and government. Third, I am

currently in the position and have great deal of knowledge. Fourth, I am well researched and prepared for each and every meeting. And fifth, I continue to have the passion and servant’s heart I started with. What is the most important issue that needs to be addressed? Homelessness. If we don’t get to some common sense reality of this issue and practical solutions, it will drive everything in the city; budgets, crime, employment and an array of other issues.

Lance Gurel

What best qualifies you for this position? The City of Spokane Valley has reached a turning point. We have grown to become one of the largest cities in the State of Washington. With this growth, we find ourselves with big city problems – problems that require new leaders and new solutions. What is the most important issue that needs to be addressed?


OCTOBER 2019 • 25

The Current

C a n d i d a t e s F av o r i t e s purposes. Working with I.T., I established the city’s online customer service request and response program for interaction with the citizens and was part of the team who created the city’s first Economic Development Ad Campaign. I have been a Planning Commissioner for the past three years and was the commission chair in 2018. I am a member of the WSDOT Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Technical Committee and part of the Spokane Transportation Authority Citizen Advisory Committee. Additionally, my husband and I owned a construction and low voltage company for 25 years. What is the most important issue that needs to be addressed? Two items take precedence; Public Safety and Pavement Preservation. First, Public Safety: It has been a challenge to fill

vacant officer positions. For example, we instituted the officer ‘power-shift’ a few years ago to address key times of crime within a 24-hour period and have never been able to fully implement it due to a lack of officers. We need to address this as our officers are stretched very thin. Secondly, resources to sustain our pavement preservation program must be addressed. We have been supplementing the recurring costs of pavement preservation from reserve money. Doing so is not the answer. I don’t believe in kicking the can down the road any longer and we need to have discussions with the citizens asking two questions: What kind of road conditions are you comfortable with and what are you willing to pay to keep them that way?

Food

Public Servent

Ice Cream

Michelle Rasmussen Iron Horse Grill

Brandi Peetz Caruso’s

Pralines and Cream

Moose Tracks

Ronald Reagan

Ozzie Knezovich

Arne Woodward Ferraro’s Italian Family dining Chocolate Caramel Ronald Reagan

Lance Gurel The Garden Café & Eatery

Neapolitan

Teddy Roosevelt

Bo Tucker Thai Bamboo and Mongolian BBQ George Washington

Huckleberry from Mary Lou’s

Tim Hattenburg Boomers Classic Rock Bar and Grill Teddy Roosevelt Unchecked growth is taxing our infrastructure. We should make developers help pay for the infrastructure their developments require. Our school districts should be consulted when the city approves new housing developments. We need growth; but we need smart, controlled growth, not urban sprawl. We need to take stewardship of our roads seriously with a new funding formula that provides funds to preserves our streets without imposing new taxes. Spokane Valley needs to be a safe place to work, play, go to school, and worship. We need leaders who realize that attracting and retaining the best new businesses requires building a community that is friendly and welcoming to all. I have worked as an accountant and as a laborer. I’ve worn white collars and blue collars. I’ve worked with people from all walks of life. I understand the

richness that comes with our diverse society. As an accountant and smallbusiness owner, I’ve learned the importance of getting the most out of your money and living within your means, the same qualities that are important in city government. But mostly, I’ve learned the importance of working to find common ground to solve our common problems. Two plus two is not a partisan issue or a Democrat/ Republican issue. Finding common ground to our city’s problems requires a leader who isn’t controlled by special interests, who will bring new ideas to the table, and who values finding common-sense solutions that work for everyone. I believe that strong workers and strong families make strong communities and strong businesses.

Sea Salt Caramel


26 • OCTOBER 2019

The Current

City of Spokane Valley Council Spokane Valley Fire Commission Position 6

Bo Tucker

Bradley Mertens

What best qualifies you for this position? My work ethic in running a local business for the past 22 years. What is the most important issue that needs to be addressed? Congestion and Infrastructure.

What best qualifies you for this position? I have been a part of 6 different emergency service organizations, from across the country. This experience allows innovative ideas to be offered for new problems or even streamlining old issues with concepts from other agencies. I strongly believe

that a fire department has a tremendous resource, in using best practices from other departments to help create solutions. For the citizens of Spokane Valley, this would be getting the correct resources, coupled with highly trained personnel rapidly to emergencies. Keeping in mind that the citizens deserve a board that will always ask questions to ensure their taxes are utilized appropriately and efficiently. What is the most important issue that needs to be addressed? I feel that firefighter safety is number one. With the valley growing in population and traffic increasing with both residents and non-residents traveling our streets, calls for service increase. I want to

YOUR VOTE COUNTS

Tim Hattenburg

What best qualifies you for this position? Having lived in the Spokane Valley since 1959, I understand the values and priorities of families in our

community. I have gained valuable experience working with people and tackling issues by teaching and coaching, and athletic director for the Central Valley School District. I’ve served on the Spokane County Library Board of Trustees for ten years, where I worked with multi-million dollar budgets. These life experiences, along with many others, have given me the knowledge and qualifications to manage people, budgets and resolve issues. I want to put these qualities to work for the Spokane Valley. As your City Council Member,

my primary goal is to be accountable and available to all the citizens of Spokane Valley. What is the most important issue that needs to be addressed? I am focused on working on the issues of public safety, local infrastructure, parks and recreation spaces and activities, and smart growth, as well as ensuring quality and affordable housing solutions are available as the Valley continues to grow. As I have talked with thousands of people at their doors, one of the biggest concerns is from people living in single family homes,

regarding the over building in their neighborhoods, and the stress it puts on the infrastructure. The Valley will continue to grow and change, and I want to be a positive part of that change.


OCTOBER 2019 • 27

The Current

ner Position 1 ensure that the department is providing the correct staffing levels, correct response with the correct equipment and at the right time. This means having better, more efficient methods of responses and always trying to improve service to the community

Patrick Burch

What best qualifies you for this position? As a candidate for Spokane Valley Fire Department’s Board of Fire Commissioners Position 1, the following are what best qualifies me for this position: I have been serving as the Position 1 Fire Commissioner after being retained in November of 2017 and

Measure Text The legislature passed Initiative Measure No. 1000 concerning affirmative action and remedying discrimination, and voters have filed a sufficient referendum petition on this act. Initiative 1000 would allow the state to remedy discrimination for certain groups and to implement affirmative action, without the use of quotas or preferential treatment (as defined), in public education, employment, and contracting. The Effect of the Proposed Measure if Approved The public vote on Referendum 88 will decide whether Initiative 1000 (I-1000) becomes law.

I-1000 would allow the state to remedy documented discrimination or underrepresentation of disadvantaged groups in public education, employment, and contracting. Whether a group is disadvantaged would be determined by a valid disparity study or proven in court. I-1000 would also allow affirmative action to increase diversity in public education, public employment, and public contracting. I-1000 would define affirmative action as a policy that considers an individual’s race, sex, ethnicity, national origin, age, sensory, mental or physical disability, or veteran or military status, when selecting qualified persons for opportunities

after being appointed to the position July 2016. I was also elected by the board of fire commissioners to serve as board chair during 2018 & 2019. My previous 9 years of volunteer service as a member and team leader with Spokane Valley Fire Department’s Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) and Fire Corps, and 8 years of service in the Navel Reserves, also add to my qualifications as Fire Commissioner. Additional experience comes from my employment with The Boeing Company. I developed lean management skills, and as a financial controller I was responsible for large program budgets. Currently I am the co-owner and business manager of Neurotherapy Northwest, a mental health practice, which has operated successfully for the past 13 years in Spokane Valley. What is the most important issue

that needs to be addressed? The most important issue we are facing in our fire district is the growth that we are experiencing throughout our service area. A priority I have as Fire Commissioner is continued fiscal responsibility while maintaining and improving Spokane Valley Fire Department services to our district as we grow. We continue to look for ways to reduce cost and improve our response times through improvements to processes and better efficient use of equipment. It would be an honor to continue to serve as your Spokane Valley Fire Department Position 1 Fire Commissioner.

in public education, public employment, and public contracting. Affirmative action would include, for example, recruitment, hiring, training, promotion, outreach, setting and achieving goals and timetables, and other measures to increase diversity. Affirmative action could not be used to impose quotas. In addition, race, sex, color, ethnicity, national origin, age, sexual orientation, sensory, mental or physical disability, and veteran or military status could not be used as the sole qualifying factor to select a less qualified person over a more qualified person.

establish or maintain eligibility for federal programs. But before such actions could be taken, certain state government officials would have to determine that it was necessary to avoid a material loss of federal funds.

I-1000 would not prohibit state and local government from taking actions needed to

I-1000 would also establish a Governor’s commission on diversity, equity, and inclusion. The commission would monitor and enforce agency compliance with I-1000. The commission could propose or oppose legislation. It would publish annual reports on the progress of agencies in achieving diversity, equity, and inclusion in public education, public employment, and public contracting. Various elected and appointed officials would serve on the commission.


28 • OCTOBER 2019

The Current

Spokane Valley Fire Commissioner Position 2

Mike Kester

What best qualifies you for this position? As a Veteran Firefighter in the Coast Guard, former ex-officio game warden, and retired railroad conductor for BNSF, I understand our duty to one another in this community. It’s why I have been active on boards like the Safari Club International, volunteer at the YMCA, am

active in our church, and deliver meals to seniors. For the last three decades my wife and I have made Spokane Valley our home. Together we have three kids and five grandkids. I’m running for Spokane Valley Fire Commissioner Position 2 because I want to do more for this community I love so much. I understand contracts, regulations, and budgets both as a former government employee and as a union member. As someone on a fixed income, you can believe I am going to make sure every dollar of our levy funded fire department is spent wisely. I will ask the tough questions and listen. What is the most important issue that needs to be addressed? It is my priority to ensure the Spokane Valley Fire Commission

is focused on safety and fiscal responsibility. We don’t need further lawsuits and poor communication with those on the front line. Our firefighters worked 18 months without a contract, and it took mediation to get the deal done. I believe in listening to all stakeholders and working to bring everyone together for our common goals. I’m proud to be the candidate endorsed by our Spokane Valley Firefighters and I ask for the honor of your vote.

Ron Schmidt

What best qualifies you for this position? The best asset that I bring to this position is my passion for the community and the job. I have continued to work with our board and administration to advance our fire district to a premier status. I am the longest standing board member and as such have knowledge of the workings of the department

Spokane Valley Fire Commissioner Position 4

John Gaurisco

What best qualifies you for this position? I am a self-motivated northwest native with a devotion to the local community, the skills to increase economic growth and sustainability, a strong background in sales and marketing, public speaking and years of small-business and entrepreneurial success.

Proven track record of executive leadership through strategic relationship building, careful financial budgets and negotiations, and measurable sales and marketing results. Successful business practices within diverse industries (nonprofit, corporations, local, national, small businesses) to increase overall business development. Years of community involvement served within various local organizations including local Chambers of Commerce, city organizations, and executive boards. Admired presenter and educator, experienced with small to large group speaking and training engagements within schools, businesses, nonprofit organizations like Rotary. What is the most important

issue that needs addressed? Keeping Public current with the technologies, that will both 1st Responders public.

to

be

Safety latest protect & the

Candidates Fa Food

Ice Cream

Mike Kester Hu Hut

Mudslide

Fo

Ron Schmidt Home

“Another Scoop, plea

John Guarisco

Hay J’s & Ambrosia in the Spokane

Bradley Mertens Fieldhouse Pizza

Patrick Burch

H

Conleys - I love their Banana Cream


OCTOBER 2019 • 29

The Current

Measure Text

that I can share with others as we make decisions. What is the most important issue that needs to be addressed? The most important thing that we need to be concerned about is our community growing. As we continue to get more houses and more businesses we need to be able to provide the same level of exceptional service that our community has become accustomed to. But at the same time maintain our fiscal goals and be responsible with our spending.

av o r i t e s Public Servent

legislation governing certain immediate actions in times of emergency resulting from enemy attack. The authorized legislation includes measures to ensure continuity of state and local governmental operations and appointing public officers to ensure public duties continue to be carried out.

The legislature has proposed a c o n s t i t u t i o n a l amendment concerning legislative powers in times of emergency. This measure would add “catastrophic incidents” to the specified times of emergency that the legislature may take certain immediate The Effect Of The actions to ensure continuity of state and Proposed Amendment local governmental If Approved operations. This measure would The Constitutional allow the legislature adopt legislation Provision As It to governing continuity of Presently Exists state and local operations Article II, section 42 not just in case of “enemy of the Washington State attack,” but also in the Constitution permits event of “catastrophic the legislature to adopt incidents.”

ormer Missoula Fire Chief Herb Wohl (my Grandpa)

ase.” Martin Luther King, Jr.

Valley Pralines As a Rotarian I admire Bill & Melinda Gate

Huckleberry

m Pie

Huckleberry

Abraham Lincoln

Ronald Reagan

NOVEMBER 5


30 • OCTOBER 2019

The Current

Spokane Superior Court Judge Position 12

Rachelle Anderson

What best qualifies you for this position? I am seeking to retain my position as Spokane County Superior Court Judge Position 12. I am uniquely qualified for this job based on my many years of practice as a family and juvenile law attorney here in Spokane followed by time as an Administrative Law Judge,

and most recently 8 years as a Superior Court Commissioner. Throughout my legal career I have been committed to fair and impartial proceedings for everyone who appears in front of me- ensuring the litigants feel heard and that their issues were taken seriously and considered carefully. What is the most important issue that needs to be addressed? As a judicial officer, issues we focus on are ensuring fair proceedings that are nondiscriminatory to any section of our population. I believe the most important issue for the judiciary is to be ever aware of the quality of time and attention we give to the people who appear in front of us.

Thank you to all of the candidates who took the time to respond and answer our questions for this Special Election Guide. We appreciate the hard work you are putting in and your willingness to serve our commmunity in these public service roles. Thank you to the staff of The Current for your hard work in creating this special feature as a service to our community. Please note that these statements were provided by the candidates or their staff and have been printed ‘as is’ and without any editing by The Current.

Voter registration deadline is October 28th Go to https://weiapplets.sos.wa.gov/MyVote/#/login to get signed up before it is too late!

Ballot mailing begins October 16 and need to be postmarked by November 5 to track to your ballot go to http://www.spokanecounty. org/2994/Track-Your-Ballot


OCTOBER 2019 • 31

The Current

brought to you by Athlete of the Month

Citizen of the Month

The University High volleyball team keeps winning this season with setter Joliana Poplawski right in the middle of things. The senior co-captain had 34 assists in a victory over Gonzaga Prep last month, a match in which the Titans roared back after losing the first set to win 3-1. She was named to the All Greater Spokane League second team last season and earned honorable mention as a sophomore. Poplawski was part of a U-Hi squad that advanced to state last year. She came up with a series of critical digs and assists in a five-set state qualifying victory over Walla Walla. Poplawski plays club volleyball with the Renovators, a team that qualified for nationals this summer. She maintains a 3.92 grade point average and is a member of the National Honor Society and the Ronald McDonald House Teen Board.

Aileen Luppert makes it a point to make a difference. The managing librarian at the Spokane Valley Library serves as leadership committee chair of the Greater Valley Support Network, a collection of individuals and groups dedicated to helping those in need. For the last two years, she has been a catalyst in organizing Spokane Valley Connect, a one-day event that mobilizes resources for the less fortunate. The Spokane native also serves as vice-chair of the Spokane Homeless Coalition. Luppert graduated from Lewis and Clark High School and The Evergreen State College and has her master’s in library science from the University of Washington. She will celebrate a decade with the Spokane County Library District next February. She was recently honored for her work in library services by the Washington State Library Association. Luppert is the proud mom of a daughter.

Student of the Month Leadership is a priority of titan proportions for University High senior Micah Bell. After serving as ASB secretary as a sophomore and junior, Bell is now ASB president. He maintains a 4.0 grade point average and is a member of National Honor Society. In his current role with ASB, Bell oversees coordination of events like a blood donation drive this month, a campaign he has been involved with since his freshman year. In November, he will help facilitate a collection at the school as part of KREM’s “Treats for Troops” program. Bell works a part-time, after-school job and has volunteered as a junior counselor at YMCA’s Camp Reed for the past two summers. As a freshman, Bell was honored with a PACE trait award for trustworthiness. He would like to pursue pre-med in college and a career in endocrinology.

Join us in supporting

Yvonne Aitken Matt Albertson Krista Andrizzi-Larsen Nick Arrotta Brian Asmus Charity Bagatsing Jeremy Ball Katina Ballard Margie Basaraba Mark Beattie Samara Behler Darrah Bosse William Bouten Stacia Bowers Bryce Brewer Drew Brooks Parker Brooks Jim Brown Fuzzy Buckenberger Staci Buckenberger Patrick & Dee Burch Nadine Burgess Tory Burney Kert Carlson

Debi Camarda Jarrod Carter Bill & Heidi Chapman Michael Chiesa Leonard & Rima Christian Kent Clausen Kent Cline Dale & Marilyn Cline Kevin & Keri Collins Traci Couture Roxanne Crafton Bennie Crocker Megan Cunningham Patrick Cunningham Michael Davisson Nick Defazio Lani DeLong Patricia Dempsey Austin DePaolo Mike DeVleming Frankie DeWitt Brandon Deyarmin Marty Dickinson Tom Dingus

Leanne Donley Kristen Duncan Dan Dunne Skip Eagle Chris & Angie Elam Lori Feagan Greg Ferraro Nina Flugel Mike Foley Angie Folz Steve Freng Ann Frunk Danielle Garrett Bill & Pam Gothmann Dean & Elizabeth Grafos Chad & Misty Griffith Patti Groth John Guarisco Karen Gude Vikas Gumbhir Chuck & Janet Hafner Cindy Hallett Dieanna Hamper Jeff & Nicole Hanley

Peter Hawkins Brittany Heidenreich Mike Helmberger Josh Heytvelt Tawny Hiett David Hightower Brooke Holloman Ron & Deanna Hormann Thomas & Lori Houck Aimee Hubbard Greg Jackson Terry & Bev Johnson Darin Justus Suzun Kaiser Cris Kaminskas Michele Kelly Kelly Kiki Loren Kilham Kristen King Wilma Koski Jessica Kovac Stacy Hale Kowtko Debbie Krum Dayne Kuhlmann

Max & Mary Kuney Kristi Kuntz Amy Larsen Andrew Lawson Debra Long Crystal Madsen Patty Marcus Bobi Marshall Darren Mattozzi Bob McKinley Kay Wright McGlockin Albert Merkel Veronica Messing Dan & Jaysea Middlebos Beva Miles Dennis Mitchell Karin Morris Adam Morrison Nicole Murphy Donna O’Leary Mike Offield Dennis Olson Lon Page Geoff Palachuk Tiffanie Papich John Pardee Chuck Parker Sylvia Passe Mike Pearson Peetz Family Chris Pendell Dana Pendergrass Brad Pesnell Christy Peterson Mary Marler Petty Tomi Pintler Danielle Pirello Kim Plese Julie Primmer Bonnie Quinn-Clausen Cara Rachelle Sue Radmaker Brock & Sheri Ann Reidt Jim Reincke Blent Rice Mark Richard Kevin Richey Sherri Robinson

Come visit your Spokane Valley Neighborhood Financial Center located at 615 N Sullivan Road

800-233-2328

Thanks you for all you do in our community

Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich Associated General Builders Barbelle Fitness Studios Cartel Inc. GT-X Sports Performance Iron Workers PNW Lalozy Coffee NE WA & N ID Bldg & Construction Trades Council Northwest Sportscards Ponderosa Republican Women Republicans of Spokane County Sharp Shooting Indoor Range Sharp Voice Shotzy’s on Pines SV Firefighters IAFF 876 Stahl Optical UA Local 44 UFCW 1439

! u o y k Than

Julie Rosenoff Stephen Ross Rob & Mindy Rowe Marcia Sands Phil Sanford John & Tiffany Saraceno Kaye Schaich Theresa Schimmels DJ & Kathy Schultz Angela Sety Adam Sharp Eldonna Shaw Brandi Shea Tina Nogler Sheldon Dan Shields Damon Simmons Shon Skiles Becky Smallfoot Adam Smith Norel & Alex Smith Cheryl Smith Carol Snyder Traci Steenburgen Cathy Stevens Cheryl Stewart Patrick Stretch James Sweetser Marcus Sweetser

Anthony & Ashley Tarter CJ Taylor Paula Taylor Lacy Thomas Karrie Sundell Thomson Norman & Carrie Thomson Jim Tieken Joe Tortorelli Jeff & Cheryl Tower Tom & Karen Towey Casey Vansickle Jacqueline Van Wormer Alyssa Venable Ben Volk Abbie Wagar Eric Walker Chris & Jana Welp Chud & Cindy Wendle Robert & Dawn West Chad White Ben & Danica Wick Paige Willingham-Lentz Rick & Diana Wilhite Ken & Tina Wisenor Ken Witter Kathy Wolrehammer Emma Woolley Dan & Jan Young

Paid for by the Committee to Re-Elect Brandi Peetz, PO Box 14932, Spokane Valley, WA 99214


Brought to you by


The Current

OCTOBER 2019 • 33

Open Gym For All Ages - Fridays 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM. Indoor Playground 12:00-1:00 during the regular school year

Instructional Classes offered

morning, afternoon, evening and weekends for all goals & abilities toddler through adult

2515 N. Locust Road Spokane Valley 99206

509-315-5433

Bitty Bee Mondays & Wednesdays weekly from 9:30am – 12:30pm! Movie Night- evening of fun, friends, gymnastics, popcorn and movies!

www.spokanegymnastics.com


34 • OCTOBER 2019

The Current Brought to you by

Want to sponsor this section? Ask us how! 242-7752

About and for Valley seniors

Rotary pair help others during decades of perfect attendance effort to eradicate polio around the By Nina Culver Splash Contributor

There’s something about the Rotary Club that inspires members to stick around for decades, and according to two longtime Greater Spokane Valley Rotary members, that something is the ability to help others. “I love Rotary,” said Ron Schoenberger, who has been a member for 51 years. “You’re going to help the world. You become a part of humanity.” “Everyone needs an outlet to help others, and Rotary is good for that,” said 41-year member Tom Markson. “I think it’s a collective opportunity to serve your fellow man. It’s your biggest bang for the buck. You can just do so much more collectively than you can do yourself.” Markson arrived in Spokane Valley in 1968 to be the administrator of the brand-new Spokane Valley General Hospital, which is now MultiCare Valley Hospital. He later joined the Spokane Valley Rotary. “I think it was the thing to do if you were in business,” he said. Schoenberger started with the Spokane East Rotary, which merged with the Spokane Valley group two years ago. He said one of the things he liked most about Rotary was its

world. It’s an effort that was joined by the Gates Foundation several years ago. When Rotary started, there were between 250,000 and 300,000 new cases of polio every year. Last year that was down to 25, with a few pockets of the disease remaining. “Rotarians have gotten killed in countries trying to inoculate kids,” Schoenberger said. “In two or three years, there will be no more polio in the world.” In recent years, with the waning of polio cases, fundraising efforts have shifted to drilling wells around the world to give communities clean water. But not all the charity is carried out in far-flung corners of the world. Much of it is close to home. Twenty years ago, Shoenberger’s club started an effort to build a small house on wheels that the Spokane Fire Department could use to teach children what to do if there was a fire in their home. They spent $20,000 on the effort before they ran out of money. “We had no idea how much it would cost,” he said. “Downtown Rotary took it over and it cost $110,000 when it was done.” Schoenberger’s club also started

selling corn on the cob and soda at the Spokane County fair 27 years ago as a fundraiser. Since then, they’ve added baked potatoes and turkey legs. The effort was taken over by the Spokane Valley Rotary when the two clubs merged. “We sell between 5,000 and 7,000 ears of corn, 2,500 baked potatoes and 2,000 turkey legs,” he said. “We make most of our money on pop. Last year was our best year.” That money has gone to organizations like the Spokane Guild School, Meals on Wheels and the HOPE School for the deaf. Rotary East also used to hand out food baskets at Thanksgiving and Easter and give away books to school children. Meanwhile the Spokane Valley Rotary was also helping Meals on Wheels and the food bank as well as giving out college scholarships. The club also built the original Spokane Valley Senior Center on Mission, Markson said. But perhaps his favorite Rotary effort has been the annual breakfast with Santa the group hosts. “We’ve had a lot of projects,” he said. Schoenberger was in the insurance business for 55 years and said it was an early business partner who first took him to a Rotary meeting. “You couldn’t join Rotary,” he said. “You had to be invited. He would invite me once a month, and I loved it.” He joined in 1967. He’s not only

been an active member since then, he’s never missed a meeting. Every Rotary club meets on Wednesdays, and even when he is out of town, Schoenberger finds a Rotary meeting to attend. “Everyone was expected to have a high attendance record,” he said. Back then, members wore suits and ties to meetings. Women weren’t allowed in until 1988. “Before that it was the old boys club,” he said. The emphasis on perfect attendance has waned in recent years, but Schoenberger is proud of his 51-year record. He even managed to maintain his record despite some surgeries. He said he’s had Rotary meetings in his hospital room and his home. “You can’t go to Rotary when you have a new hip, so they come to you,” he said. Though he’s 84, Schoenberger has no plans to quit his involvement in Rotary. “I have no intentions at all of quitting,” he said. “When the good Lord takes me, that’ll be the end of it.” Markson, 87, is also proud of his perfect attendance record. “Once you start, it’s like you’ve got this record of attendance,” he said. “It’s fun to do it and a challenge to do it.” Markson said he’s also found lifelong friendships in Rotary. “It’s so fulfilling,” he said. “You have to emphasize service above self and be willing to participate. Membership in Rotary is not a spectator sport.”

Serving the greater Spokane Valley since 1985 Residential and Office Cleaning Licensed and Insured

Photos by Nina Culver With 92 years of combined membership, Rotarians Ron Schoenberger (seated in his beloved Jaguar) and Tom Markson tout the joys of helping others – and never missing a meeting.

www.amaculate.com


OCTOBER 2019 • 35

The Current

E NRI C HE D L I VI NG. L AS TIN G VALUE.

THE

lifestyle

THE

YOU WANT

THE

quality

community

YOU L OVE

YO U DE S E RV E

New homes in Spokane, Spokane Valley, Liberty Lake, Post Falls & Coeur d’Alene. gr eenstonehomes.com


36 • OCTOBER 2019

The Current

Sponsored By:

EV football returns to win column By Steve Christilaw Current Contributor

Tom Griggs likes to tell his East Valley football team that they need to measure their successes without looking at a scoreboard. But after a winless first season leading the Knights, it was good for both Griggs and his players to finally get a victory. Henry Stevens threw three touchdown passes as East Valley beat North Central 47-28 at Albi Stadium Sept. 19 to snap a 14-game losing streak that stretched back to the 2017 season. “Oh, man that feels good,” the coach said afterward. It was ironic that Griggs’ first win at East Valley came against North Central, the team he coached previously. While players shook hands after the final horn, he talked at length with players and coaches he knew from his time with the team. “I know them,” he said. “I still have friends there, and I love the kids. I hate to see them lose a game but at the same time I am so happy my kids here got a win under their belts.” Two of the team’s four seniors played big roles in the game’s scoring. Bodie Bedow caught two fourth-quarter touchdown passes and Zach Honegger gained 78 yards on the ground and scored two touchdowns. Part of the challenge of coaching at a Class 2A school is the way numbers play out. Every once in a while, you go through a player drought when the numbers for a class or two are just small. “That’s just the way it goes,” Griggs said. “We have a really small senior class, but the ones we have are doing a great job of leadership. But if you look at the kids we had out there, especially in the second half, they were mostly sophomores.” Stevens is a junior quarterback and fellow junior Caden Katsel had 16 carries for 50 yards and a touchdown a year after suffering a broken back.

The Knights enjoyed their biggest offensive night in recent memory. In their first two games of the season, they managed just one touchdown in a 35-7 loss to Deer Park and were shut out by Lakeland in Week 2. In 2018, the Knights scored 39 points in a loss to Lake City in a shootout and dropped a 27-26 loss to East Valley of Yakima in the finale. In fact, it was the most points an East Valley squad has scored since a 58-57 win over North Central to open the 2017 season. Defensively, the Knights gave up four touchdowns to a team that had scored just six points in its first two games. North Central running back Kade Garvey carried 17 times for 198 yards and three touchdowns. Against West Valley in the season opener, Garvey

had more carries (14) than yards (13). NC had 23 total carries for 18 yards in Week 2 against Pullman. “Getting a win is such a big thing, and I’m glad these kids can enjoy this,” Griggs said. “No matter how much we talk about not measuring ourselves by the scoreboard, nothing reinforces what you’re trying to do like experiencing a win.” The Great Northern League has the Knights facing all four league rivals in October, with the annual showdown with arch-rival West Valley scheduled for Nov. 1. The coach sees reinforcements coming for his program. “I really like the middle school coaches we have and the job they are doing to get kids ready to play here,” Griggs said. Part of East Valley’s success over the years has been tied to getting players to take part in multiple sports, and that cross-sport experience pays off in each sport. Football and wrestling have a long-standing benefit to each other.

A great many professional football players were also standout high school wrestlers with a better understanding of balance, footwork and leverage as a result. East Valley’s second-year boys basketball coach, Jeremy Knee, said he was so committed to multiple-sport participation with his winter players that he reached out to Griggs when he was hired to help out as a football assistant. He currently coaches wide receivers and defensive backs. “We’re definitely encouraging that,” Griggs said. “But we just aren’t getting the participation we’ve had in the past at this point. All of our coaches in all of the sports are encouraging it. At a school this size that’s an important part of being successful. “For those kids who aren’t playing another sport, we’re working hard to get them in the weight room and making themselves stronger year around.” It’s all a work in progress, and the next hurdle for Griggs and the Knights is to build off Win No. 1.

Photo by Steve Christilaw The East Valley football team enjoyed an extra pep in its step at practice following a recent streak-ending win against North Central.


OCTOBER 2019 • 37

The Current

Softball greats stand the test of time By Mike Vlahovich The Final Point

The seventh annual Spokane Metro Softball Hall of Fame induction banquet last month was akin to a 50-year high school reunion where a bunch of gray hairs (for those who still had hair) re-live their good old days. Except some of these gray hairs are still playing! Guys like Buster Dickinson, whose rookie year was listed as 1964. For crying out loud, he’s still at it 55 years later. Krista Forester’s rookie year was 1970. She’s still playing 49 years later. Karl LeBret? Rookie year 1972, and still playing. Jack Parker, rookie year 1974, still playing. Tom Adams, rookie year 1975, still playing. I suspect they need an hourglass to time their journey around the bases. Recreational attest, is life.

softball,

they

I played against Adams back in the day and have been out of

action for nearly 25 years. Ripped a calf muscle back then (rehabbed it in time to play in a regional 50-over tournament in Portland and thereafter wisely hung it up). Could you imagine still playing at age 75? A couple of guys have tried to get me out of retirement. I’d need oxygen and a defibrillator at the ready. But I digress. I had covered and played and “coached” three of the newest Hall-of-Famers back in the day; West Valley graduate Peggy (Almquist) Wells and Kevin and Jim Olson from University. It was Peggy who invited me and my wife, Tambra (my first star recruit), to the induction ceremony at the Eagles Lodge downtown, two of her 20-plus family members and friends in attendance. A third, Peggy’s then-Eagles slowpitch softball coach Steve Kent, allowed he knew nothing about the game, only that it helped get him a job teaching at his alma

Rollins propels Eagles out of the gate By Steve Christilaw From the Sidelines

If an athlete wants to make a name for himself or herself, it helps to have a memorable name. But for Alyjouah Rollins – his first name is pronounced “Elijah” – his growing name recognition has nothing to do with spelling and everything to do with his ability on the football field. In the second week of the 2019 season, the West Valley receiver caught seven passes for 182 yards and three touchdowns. Those numbers alone are well worth garnering attention. But how he made those last two touchdowns -- from 68 and 79 yards out -- tell an even better story. The Eagles trailed 19-7 at halftime against Shadle Park, but in the second

half quarterback Matt Allen, who had been harried through the first two quarters by a fierce Highlander pass rush, found time in the pocket and fired downfield to where Rollins had found a seam in the Shadle secondary. The WV senior and Shadle cornerback Ryan Schmidt got to the ball simultaneously and both got a hand on it, popping it straight up. Rollins plucked it out of the air and raced to the end zone for a 68-yard score. On the Eagles next offensive series and working from their own 21, Allen again fired deep, finding Rollins posted up at midfield. Schmidt again arrived at the same time as the football, but this time when both players went up for the catch, Schmidt bounded off and fell to the turf. Stunned to find himself all alone at midfield, Rollins first looked

mater and eventually becoming the Eagles football coach – his comfort zone. But he must have known something because his Eagles girls made numerous trips to state in softball, finishing second three times, the first in 1985, Peggy’s senior year. She said she began by playing youth baseball with a brother before joining Spokane Valley Girls Softball, the organization founded by Sal Jackson, Babe Wehr and Noreen Sale. She met her Ken Wells through softball, got her mathematics degree, taught and coached volleyball at her alma mater and currently teaches at Freeman. Softball obsessed, the couple began an odyssey that has taken them to tournaments in Georgia (twice), Texas, Minnesota, Florida, sharing a national title when a windstorm shortened the tournament. She played in a fastpitch tournament in New York, but prefers slowpitch women’s and co-ed. “It’s a hitter’s game, right?” says Wells, who pointed out they played as many as four nights a

to an official to see if there was a flag thrown on the play. Seeing none, he turned and raced the final 50 yards for the 79-yard touchdown. ••• University coach Ernie Aguilar added Hanford transfer Aayiana Fuller to his cross country squad. Fuller placed ninth at state in the 800 meters last year. Sophomore Taylor Schillinger won the 800 in the GSL freshman meet last spring and is making the jump to cross country for the Titans. Jacob Easton placed seventh at state last year and returns to lead the Titan boys. ••• West Valley won the state Class 2A girls cross country title a year ago in unprecedented fashion. The squad’s No. 5 runner, senior Sydney Stone put on a finishing kick that ultimately pulled the Eagles into a first-place tie, and No. 6 runner Emma Garza provided the tiebreaker to earn the title.

week in their heyday. I can relate. Back in the day, Tam and I were doing the same: county men, women, co-ed softball with an occasional weekend tournament mixed in. As coach and sportswriter, I had a recruiting advantage, and we were pretty successful. The Olsons were University High athletes who I covered, and they, too, became teammates on our men’s team. (Can you see a pattern in my life? Pretty one dimensional.) According to the program, they began playing softball in 1971 and 1977, respectively, and retired in 2002. Lightweights! Peggy continued playing through 2005, according to the Hall of Fame program. Their son, Hunter, also a WV graduate, was drafted by Miami in 2016 and pitched professional baseball until injury ended his career this season. “I really didn’t look at it as being an athlete,” Peggy says of her softball odyssey. “I loved to win, but for me it was the relationships. People don’t understand. I don’t know if anybody will have what we had.”

Coach John Moir lost two runners to graduation and a third to the drama department. Garza struggled through last season with a hip injury and will attempt to do the same again this year. She will ultimately need surgery to correct the congenital condition. ••• A year ago, the West Valley volleyball squad struggled through an 0-15 season. This year, the Eagles have turned the page and started their season with three wins in their first five matches – falling only to Central Valley and Pullman while posting wins over Greater Spokane League teams Shadle Park and North Central and winning a thrilling five-set match with Clarkston for their first Great Northern League victory. Sophia Witt recorded 11 kills, served up three aces and made six blocks to lead WV’s winning effort against the Bantams. Riley Young came up with 32 digs.


38 • OCTOBER 2019

The Current

News Droplets

Senior citizens and people with disabilities may qualify for discounts on their energy bill.

Avista is offering a rate discount program for electric and natural gas customers in Washington. To be eligible, customers must be senior citizens age 60+ or individuals living with a disability. The program is administered by SNAP for our customers residing in Spokane County. To find out if you’re income-eligible and learn more about the program, please contact SNAP at (509) 319-3020, email ratesdiscount@snapwa.org, or visit www.snapwa.org.

SV tourism available

funding

Firefighters money for coats

raising

The City of Spokane Valley is accepting applications from nonprofit and public agencies to fund events and marketing activities in 2020 that promote tourism and enhance the city’s local economy. Applications and any supporting documentation must be received by the city by 4 p.m. Oct. 4 to be considered for funding. Proposals will be accepted for activities that bring out-of-area visitors to Spokane Valley to enjoy local hotels, shops, restaurants, recreational activities and other services. The city’s Lodging Tax revenues provide funding for the tourism awards. Last year, 10 organizations received tourism awards ranging from $1,000 to $55,000 in support of local fairs and festivals, sporting events, visitor attraction and other tourism-related efforts. Applicants should review the city’s Lodging Tax Grant application for specific guidelines. Applications are accessible at spokanevalley.org (select “Departments” on top menu and then select “Finance”) or by contacting Sarah Farr at sfarr@spokanevalley.org or 7205041.

Donations are being collected for Operation Warm, an annual drive organized by Spokane Valley Firefighters Local 876. Last year, firefighters gave more than 400 brandnew winter coats to area children who didn’t have one. The coats are distributed through Spokane Valley schools. “This still leaves a lot of kids without a coat in Central, East and West Valley school districts,” Firefighter Scott Niebuhr said. This year, it’s hoped to extend Operation Warm to more elementary schools served by SVFD firefighters with the help of businesses, organizations and individuals who would like to help. A $20 donation buys one Spokane Valley child a brand-new coat. Donations can be made at www.OperationWarm. org/Spokane-Valley. Donations of new, unused winter weight coats are being accepted as well, and can be dropped off at any Spokane Valley fire station. For more, email svffoperationwarm@gmail. com. Coats will be collected through November, with distribution beginning earlier in the fall.


BUSINESS

The Current

OCTOBER 2019 • 39

Canopy opens modern branch in Valley By Nina Culver Current Contributor

Canopy Credit Union has opened a new branch at the corner of McDonald Road and Sprague Avenue in Spokane Valley in a heavily remodeled building that at different times used to house a dance studio, a convenience store and a used car dealership. The name may be unfamiliar to some, but the credit union has been in the Spokane area for decades as Spokane Federal Credit Union. The name was changed in July to reflect its broader reach. Many people thought they had to be a federal employee to join, said CEO

A Canopy Credit Union teller demonstrates the new Teller Connect technology in use at the Spokane Valley location.

Charlotte Nemec, though that hasn’t been the case since the credit union was granted a community charter to serve Spokane, Stevens and Pend Oreille counties last year. “We haven’t changed who we are,” Nemec said. Canopy Credit Union has its main office at 601 W. Mallon Ave. and a branch at 1212 W. Francis Ave. – both in Spokane. Nemec said there’s been talk of a Spokane Valley branch for 20 years. “The members have asked and asked us for an additional location, and Spokane Valley always rose to the top,” she said. “There are quite a few members out here.” The credit union picked the site at 13105 E. Sprague Ave. because it was for sale, Nemec said. “It is tough to find property for sale,” she said. “We don’t want to lease.” The property, which includes a separate vacant parcel just to the north, was $837,000. The extensive remodeling cost just over $1 million. Nemec said they haven’t decided what to do with the extra parcel at this point. Nemec said they considered other locations, but didn’t want to be on Pines Road because it was too busy and spots near the Spokane Valley City Hall weren’t east enough. “We want to be different,” she said. “It’s a great corner.”

Photos by Nina Culver Canopy Credit Union CEO Charlotte Nemec showed off the space at the new Spokane Valley branch just before it opened last month.

Canopy Credit Union’s Spokane Valley branch opened in September at 13105 E. Sprague Ave. The building has a small footprint, which is what they wanted. The main floor is 3,588 square feet, and there’s a basement for storage. “It was big enough and not too big,” she said. “It’s easy in and out. It just checked all our boxes.” The credit union does not fill the entire space. The plan was to have a Revel 77 coffee shop in the building, but the plans fell through. “It just wasn’t going to work for them,” Nemec said. While she’s disappointed to lose a “great partner,” Nemec said they are actively looking for another coffee shop to co-locate in their building. “It could be a bakery that serves coffee, too,” she said. “We are looking for another partner.” Having a coffee shop in the branch is one way to encourage people to come in and stay awhile, Nemec said. While there will be seating in the coffee shop area, people are also welcome to lounge in the modern credit union lobby, she said. “The coffee shop concept really fits who we are,” she said. “We want people to feel comfortable coming in and relaxing.” The coffee shop portion has brand new flooring and cabinets and is just waiting for a tenant to make finishing touches, Nemec said. “It’s all decked out and ready to go,” she said. There’s also a spacious patio outside. “Outdoor seating in the Valley is really scarce,” Nemec said. “It was a priority for us.” Co-locating with a coffee shop gives each the opportunity to promote each other. “The hope is that we’ll have a real symbiotic relationship,” she said.

The new Spokane Valley branch is different in other ways as well. There is no long counter staffed by tellers. Instead, visitors will use the Interactive Teller Machine in the corner called Teller Connect. Customers are connected to a teller via video chat at the push of a button. That allows the credit union to have centrally located tellers who serve multiple locations. “Our teller head count has not changed,” Nemec said. “We just serve more locations.” There will always be member advocates on duty to help those that need it, and the branch will also offer mortgage and consumer lending, IRAs, financial planning and more. “It’s a full-service branch,” Nemec said. “It’s not like you won’t have a human being here to talk to. It’s high tech, but high touch.” The branch will also offer financial education designed to help people handle their money and build wealth. “We’re very focused on serving people of modest means,” she said. Plans call for three employees to start with, Nemec said. There’s a staff area in the back with desks and a small kitchen. There are two small offices and a large meeting room off the lobby. “It’s pretty simple, clean,” she said. Though Nemec has only been the CEO for a little over a year, she’s no stranger to the credit union. She started working there when she was 26 years old and has stayed for 24 years. She spent the last 14 years as the vice president of administration. “It’s been a real fun journey,” she said. “This credit union has been my home away from home.”


40 • OCTOBER 2019

The Current

What is your level of ‘response-ability’? By Verne Reed Guest Columnist

+

Paid for by Campaign to Reelect Ron Schmidt PO Box 727 Spokane Valley, WA 99037

You are cordially invited to The Spokane Valley Heritage Museum’s 16th Annual Heritage Program Fundraiser! Saturday November 9th, 11am - 2 pm Spokane Valley Eagles Event Room, 16801 E Sprague Ave Luncheon Silent Auction Raffle Presentation, Early History of Liberty Lake

Tickets: $20 at the Museum, $25 at the door RSVP 509.922.4570 All Proceeds Benefit The Museum

What do you think of when you hear the word “responsibility”? I hear my mother’s voice sternly questioning, “Who is responsible for this mess?” As badly as I wanted to blame my little brother, I knew it was my doing. The responsible thing to do was to own my actions. Besides, I knew I would be in more trouble if my mom found out I was blaming someone else for something I had done. A responsible person accepts the consequences of their own actions and decisions. They consciously make decisions that seek to improve themselves or to help others. I like Steven Covey’s insights: “Look at the word responsibility – ‘response-ability’ – the ability to choose your response. Highly proactive people recognize that responsibility. They do not blame circumstances, conditions or conditioning for their behavior. Their behavior is a product of their own conscious choice, based on values, rather than a product of their conditions, based on feeling.” I remember enforcing this concept with my 5-year-old son after he accidently broke a window. My goal was to make sure he knew I was not mad at him or that he was in trouble. None the less, the window was broken, and he was the one that broke it. I helped him accept the blame and find a way to make things right. Responsibility is a character

trait that can be acquired or strengthened. We can all learn to be more responsible and help others within our stewardship to become more responsible. Children learn by watching adults. When they see their parents, teachers, leaders, etc. demonstrating responsible behavior, they are more likely to model what they see. Just like my 5-year-old son, we have all made mistakes or said things we wish we could take back. The point is to assume the consequences and learn and grow from them. A highly developed sense of responsibility does not come overnight. It starts with a decision to improve and a committed effort. When we or the children in our lives make less than responsible choices, it is time for an honest evaluation of the action and a renewed commitment to do better. Becoming a responsible person requires each of us to make choices in alignment with many other PACE character traits: Respect, Citizenship, Caring, Fairness, Honesty, Diligence, Trustworthiness, Courage and Integrity. Eleanor Roosevelt said it best: “In the long run, we shape our lives, and we shape ourselves. The process never ends until we die. And the choices we make are ultimately our own responsibility.” Verne Reed recently retired from 43 years as an educator for children with special needs. He is the PACE president for the 2019-2020 school year. He and his wife, Ann, are volunteers at the Airway Heights Correctional Facility.


The Current

HISTORY

SV Museum celebrates 15 years Annual fundraiser will highlight Liberty Lake By Linda Ball Current Contributor

Founder and museum director Jayne Singleton said the Spokane Valley Heritage Museum is a “small museum with a big vision.” It may have a small footprint, but it’s jam-packed with artifacts that tell the story of the Spokane Valley, Liberty Lake and beyond. Singleton, a former teacher, was the eldest of seven children, and she believes that’s where she honed her leadership skills. “There wasn’t a museum, no one was collecting history,” she said of the Valley and surrounding area. She founded the nonprofit Spokane Valley Legacy Foundation, and in 2004 made a proposal to the City of Spokane Valley, which had just been incorporated the previous year, to take over the Spanish/colonial style building the museum is housed in. The museum building, circa 1912, was originally built as the town hall for Opportunity Township, which stretched south

to 32nd, north to Mission, west to Argonne and east to Evergreen. Townships were abolished in the early 1970s. When the Spokane Valley Legacy Foundation secured the building for $1 from the city, Singleton had already been hard at work on setting up the legal structure and organizing a task force to restore the building. Things really fell into place, with everything they needed just seeming to happen, Singleton said. She calls them “lo and behold” moments. Not only did the taskforce restore the building, they made sure to get the building listed on the state and national historic registers. The museum building was the Valley’s first library, also serving as a silent movie house, then hosting the “talkies.” Five different church congregations met at the building, and Congressman Tom Foley debated George Nethercutt within those walls in 1994. The building itself is worth a look. Singleton said the museum’s

Submitted Photos The Heritage Program (pictured here in 2018) draws a crowd each year in support of the Spokane Valley Heritage Museum.

growth has been phenomenal. In addition to its annual fundraiser -- or “fun” raiser as she calls it -the museum is also celebrating its 15th birthday in conjunction with the 16th annual Heritage Program. This year’s program will focus on the history of Liberty Lake going back to the mid to late 1850s. Liberty Lake used to be called Lake Grier, and at one point had seven resorts hugging its shores. It was a popular getaway, where families came to “bathe” and boat in the lake. The history also includes the Coeur d’Alene Tribe, which had to contend with an influx of settlers, miners and even the army in Liberty Lake. “Liberty Lake played a vital role in recreation for Spokane Valley residents and the City of Spokane,” Singleton said. “In the early 1900s, a lot of people took the train out to the lake to enjoy dancing at the Pavilion or to cool off on the beach.” Many of the Liberty Lake artifacts were donated by Howard and Mary Floy Dolphin, among others. They include historic photos, signs and advertisements from the former lakeside resorts. Eventually, the lakeside resorts were sold to private investors for various reasons and are now all private property. All told,

OCTOBER 2019 • 41 the museum has more than 400 artifacts pertaining to Liberty Lake. The Heritage Program, which was attended by 170 people last year, will also include a brief presentation on the museum and its many achievements, which include collecting more than 10,000 photographs, 5,700 historical records and receiving the key to the City of Spokane Valley. The museum’s 20-member board is also in the process of planning to add on to the building, with the addition including a basement for extra storage and two floors above ground. The Heritage Program will be held Saturday, Nov. 9, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Spokane Valley Eagles, 16801 E. Sprague Ave. It includes a luncheon catered by the Eagles, silent auction and the program. An item of historical significance in the auction is a stay in Wallace, Idaho, which has its own colorful history. There will be other hotel stays, restaurant certificates, a women’s cruiser bicycle and gift baskets. All proceeds from the silent auction will benefit the museum. Tickets for the event are $20 and can be purchased at the museum or $25 at the door. For more information, call 922-4570.

A century ago, Liberty Lake was advertised as the recreational destination for the Inland Northwest. The annual Heritage Program fundraiser Nov. 9 will focus on the history of Liberty Lake, beginning with the Coeur d’Alene Indians who lived there through the era of resorts and recreation.


BUSINESS

42 • OCTOBER 2019

Father, sons build homes on a foundation of excellence By Keith Erickson Current Contributor

Legacy Ridge, with its panoramic views and beautiful custom homes lining quiet streets above bustling

Liberty Lake, for years has been a hot spot for homebuyers looking for the perfect community to call home. The stately houses in Legacy Ridge are as diverse as the scenery that surrounds them.

The Current

While each house is unique, there is a common thread at Legacy Ridge: Distinguished custom builder Milionis Custom Homes. Comprised of brothers Scott and Sam Milionis, along with their father, Steve, the trio has been building quality homes in the greater Spokane area for 13 years and has a big presence in Legacy Ridge. Milionis Custom Homes started in 2006 when Steve, who was flipping

Photo by Danica Wick Brothers Sam (left) and Scott (right) Milionis work closely with their clients to create the house they have always wanted. These signs, created in part by a custom metal sign company and completed by Scott, are placed in front of each of their projects during construction.

PROPANE! BANNER FUEL

THE FUEL DELIVERY EXPERTS! NO HIDDENTHE FEES!FUEL No Delivery Fee! No Hazmat Fee! DELIVERY EXPERTS! THE FUEL DELIVERY MAKE AN APPOINTMENT TODAY FOR: EXPERTS! THE FUEL Delivery · Installation · Repairs · Maintenance DELIVERY EXPERTS! DELIVERY 535-1711 | 122 N.THE Helena | FUEL www.bannerfuel.com

anner FURNACE & FUEL, INC.

homes for a living, decided to switch gears and start building high-end home with his sons. “We wanted to build custom homes, and it really took off,” Scott Milionis said. Focused on precision and quality, the Milionis’ have built a solid reputation with countless happy clients and many prospective buyers waiting in the wings. Despite their growing popularity, Scott said the builders know their limits as they draw the line between quantity and quality. “We try not to build too many homes because we’d rather focus on high standards, not high production,” he said. Currently, Milionis has four homes under construction in the region. The brothers and their father work closely with their clients throughout the building process, forging a tight bond with frequent interaction from the first turn of dirt until the key is turned. “It’s almost like a marriage,” Scott said. “We are pretty much joined at the hip with our clients for about a year, sometimes longer with more intricate design details.” While Milionis Custom Homes has made its mark in Legacy Ridge, the builder also has projects in Morningside and Browne’s Mountain in Spokane, on the Palouse in southern Spokane County, Harvard Vista Estates at Newman Lake and, in Idaho, Riverstone in Coeur d’Alene and Trails End Estates in Post Falls. A booming building market currently has Milionis Custom Homes stretched thin by demand, Scott said. “The last three to four years have been challenging because of the labor

32nd Annual

Fall/Holiday Handcrafters Bazaar Handcrafts, quilts, & baked goods All proceeds go to community needs.

Fri 10/25 and Sat 10/26 9 am to 4 pm each day

Millwood Community Presbyterian Church 3223 N. Marguerite Rd, Spokane, WA 99212

For more information, call 924-2350


OCTOBER 2019 • 43

The Current

Building customer satisfaction, one home at a time

Milionis Custom Homes has created beautiful spaces from Legacy Ridge to Brown’s Mountain and from the Palouse to Spokane Valley. shortage in the industry,” he said. “Even some of the sub(contractors) we’ve used for a long time have been difficult to get.” Scott said the family-run business subcontracts most of the work, with the family members acting as project managers. Steve establishes the client relationships and builds a strong rapport while brother Sam is involved mostly from “dig out to framing.” Scott said he’s involved throughout the process. At least one of the Milionis’ visits each site on nearly a daily basis. While most of the work is subbed out, Scott said he and his father and

Photo by Danica Wick Jeff Sheffield and Steve Milionis are meticulous about staining and lacquering doors. They are one of the only companies that still wait until trim is up to lacquer and finish the wood.

brother are meticulous about each project every step of the way to solidify what is likely their clients’ biggest investment of their lifetime. “Providing value in a custom home is a daunting task. In the case of a custom home, value involves countless decisions, purchases and applications of skilled labor taking place over hundreds of days,” Scott said. “Many aspects of the hidden value of our homes will not be evident for years as the quality of the individual building products and the quality of the skilled labor battle against the passage of time,”

he added. “Value is created by consistent attention to detail.” That attention to detail is of paramount importance, Scott said, whether Milionis Homes is working on a million-dollar-plus home of more than 5,000 square feet or a relatively modest home of 2,200 square feet. “Our clients come in with high expectations, and we like to deliver,” Scott said. “I consider us to be a true custom builder. We don’t build the same house twice. Every one is different and that can be a little challenging, but that’s exactly what we went.”

Milionis Homes has the highest available A+ rating with the Better Business Bureau and is a member of good standing with the Spokane Home Builders Association and the National Home Builders Association. Here’s what a few of their clients are saying: “We were delighted beyond our expectations with our custom home built by Steve Milionis. Steve, his sons, staff and crew demonstrated building expertise, craftsmanship and great working relationships during all phases of construction.” Brent Burgquam and Ardith Wells “Our experience with Milionis Homes during the construction of our home is that they listened to and tried to understand our needs, then find a solution for it. Often, when we could not make up our minds, they helped to make decisions based on our interest and their experience in the business.” Hong & Lihua Huan “For the past nine-plus years I have focused my business on selling custom lots and custom homes. During this period, I have encountered numerous builders — unfortunately with some mixed results — until I met and worked with Steve Milionis. Milionis Homes consistently meets and exceeds my high standards.” Randy Long, Managing Broker Century 21 Beutler and Associates

Since its start in 2006, Milionis Homes has built a solid reputation in the local custom home market.


44 • OCTOBER 2019

The Current

The Neighborhood Sound a bulletin board to share life moments

Want to share something on The Neighborhood Sound? Send it to TheSound@valleycurrent.com

nce of If you have an abunda peppers or , ns ee gr fy squash, lea or Learning tdo Ou the at als the anim You can m! the Center would love the OLC at to les tab deliver the vege email info@ 8508 E. Upriver Dr. or wvsd.org.

Rock Climbing STARs! The EV STAR program students were hosted by Courageous Kids Climbing Organization at Wild Walls on Friday, September 13th!

Valleyfest’s 30th Anniversary was a huge success. Thank you to all those who participated and attended the festivities

Washington State Employee Credit Union’s (WSECU) Teacher of the Week Trent teacher Geri Gaddy was nominated by one of her students as Teacher of the Week for WSECU! She got the “big check” as her award at a Mariners game last weekend! Way to go Geri!!!!!


OCTOBER 2019 • 45

The Current THE LIBERTY LAKE VALLEY GREATER SPOKANE

Love The Current? Support our partners.

A VALLEY-WIDE COMMUNITY NEWSMAGAZINE

COMMUNITY NEWSMAGAZINE

EDITOR/PUBLISHER

Ben Wick

ben@libertylakesplash.com

CO OWNER

Danica Wick

danica@libertylakesplash.com OFFICE MANAGER

Paula Gano

paula@libertylakesplash.com GRAPHICS

Randy Edwards

Reach 26,000+ Readers!

randy@libertylakesplash.com

CIRCULATION Larry Passmore circulation@libertylakesplash.com CONTRIBUTORS

Steve Christilaw, Nina Culver, Linda Ball, Keith Erickson, Bill Gothmann, Craig Howard, Mike Vlahovich The Valley Current P.O. Box 363 Liberty Lake, WA 99019 Phone: 242-7752; Fax: 927-2190 www.valleycurrent.com The Current is published monthly by or before the first of each month. It is distributed free of charge to every business and home in the greater Spokane Valley area. Copies are located at drop-off locations in Spokane

The Current now has a 26,000 copy circulation with 16,000 being direct mailed to households across the Spokane Valley area in addition to the 10,000 copies being available for pickup at over 250 business locations. About 10,000 copies of The Splash are distributed around the end of each month, 6,000 of those through direct mail to every home and business in the greater Liberty Lake community.

The Current is committed to serving the Greater Spokane Valley area through excellent community journalism. We can’t do it at all without you, our readers, and we can’t do it for long without support from our advertisers. Please thank our business partners and look to them when offering your patronage. Our sincere appreciation to the following businesses for their foundational partnerships with The Current and its partner publications:

ENRI

THE

lifestyle

YO U WAN T

Valley, Liberty Lake and the surrounding area.

The Current is brought to you by

Wick Enterprizes Submitted materials

Publishing House

Advertise With Us and Let Us Help You Fine Tune Your Message

Announcements, obituaries, letters to the editor and story ideas are encouraged. Submit them in writing to publisher@valleycurrent.com. Submissions should be received by the 15th of the month for best chance of publication in the following month’s Current. Subscriptions Subscriptions for U.S. postal addresses cost $12 for 12 issues. Send a check and subscription address to P.O. Box 363, Liberty Lake, WA 99019. Subscriptions must

be received by the 15th of the month in order for the subscription to begin with the issue printed the end of that month. Correction policy The Current strives for accuracy in all content. Errors

SERVICE DIRECTORY

THE

Banner Fuel • Liberty Lake Family Dentistry

GREATER SPOKANE VALLEY

HAVE AN EVENT COMING UP?

A VALLEY-WIDE COMMUNITY NEWSMAGAZINE

g re e n s t o n e h o m

Index of advertisers

Following are the local advertisers in this issue of The Current.

Amaculate Housekeeping

34

Greenstone 35

People for Time Hattenburg

email to editor@valleycurrent.com. Confirmed factual

Avista Utilities

38

Gus Johnson Ford

36

Simonds Dental Group

errors will be corrected on this page in the issue

Banner Fuel

42

Handcrafters

42

Spokane County Library District 17

following their discovery.

BECU 4

Hennessey 14

Spokane Fall Folk Festival

10

Campaign to Elect Ron Schmidt

40

Inland Empire Utility CC

6

Spokane Gymnastics

33

Central Valley Theatre

11

Jim Custer Enterprises

9

Spokane Model Train Show

40 16

should be reported immediately to 242-7752 or by

Advertising information Display ad copy and camera-ready ads are due by

5 48

5 p.m. on the 15th of the month for the following

Committee to ReElect Brandi Peetz 31

Kathrine Olson, DDS

12

Spokane Valley Arts Council

month’s issue. Call 242-7752 for more information.

Committee to Retain Patrick Burch 13

Lace Gurel

16

Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce 46

Cornerstone Pentecostal Church 46

Liberty Lake Family Dentistry

5

CVHS Band Boosters

Liberty Lake Farmer’s Market

46

Advertising integrity Inaccurate

or

deceptive

advertising

is

never

5

knowingly accepted. Complaints about advertisers

Cynthia McMullen

15

Liberty Lake Orthodontics

should be made in writing to the Better Business

Debra Long

13

Northern Quest

Bureau and to advertise@valleycurrent.com. The Current is not responsible for the content of or claims made in ads. Copyright © 2019 All rights reserved. All contents of The Current may not be reproduced without written permission of the publisher.

3 48

Valley Heritage Museum

40

Waste Management

3

Service Directory

45

TREE SERVICE AFFORDABLE ARBORIST 83 ft. Backyard Lift • Removals • Thinning • Pruning Shaping • Lot Clearing • Stump Grinding Residential & Commercial • A+ Rated BBB Member Affordable Arborist Tree Care, Inc. 509-879-0577 • Veteran Owned & Operated WA Lic#AFFORAT935KG

YO

Waste Management • Spokane County LibrarySpokane District New homes in Spokane, Valley, Libe

EVENT & MEETING FACILITY The Tri Community Grange Event Hall is an affordable location for parties, receptions, dances, reunions and meetings. Full kitchen, stage, piano, tables and chairs, NEW AC, handicap accessible, large parking lot and free signage Meeting Times: 6:30 pm the first Wednesday of every month. Phone: 509-270-6089

quality

Of note: This thank you message was produced by The Current’s advertising team, which works its tail off on behalf of partner businesses, helping them share their messages through advertisements. This is an independent function from The Current’s editorial team, which has its own evaluation process to determine the community news stories and features it pursues. For more information about a win-win partnership that expertly markets your business to thousands of readers (while making this home-grown community newspaper possible), email advertise@valleycurrent.com. With story ideas, contact editor@valleycurrent.com.


46 • OCTOBER 2019

The Current

Valley Chamber

HIGHLIGHTS

Experience the Difference of Pentecost

CONNECT.

EMPOWER.

INNOVATE.

Manufacturing Matters Dinner Join us to commemorate our region’s rich history of making quality goods that fuel economic prosperity for our families and our region. We welcome you to the Manufacturing Matters Dinner on Monday, October 21st, at CenterPlace Regional Event Center. The evening begins with a networking reception from 5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m., followed by a gourmet meal and program from 6:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Upcoming Events Transportation Committee Tuesday Oct. 1 Government Action Committee Monday Oct. 14 After 5 Networking Wednesday Oct. 30 Register online at spokanevalleychamber.org

Come and Pray with Us! Services: Sunday @ 11am & Tuesday @ 7:30pm Prayer: Monday-Saturday 6am-9am www.spokanecornerstonechurch.org 21326 E Mission Ave, Liberty Lake WA

New Members: July & August American Family Insurance Mistica Wright Agency Anderson Tax & Financial

The Keynote Address will be: Terry Judge, CEO of HOTSTART, Inc.

Anytime Fitness Spokane Valley Appleway RV AtWork! DispatchHealth

Underwriting Sponsors: Eide Bailly Modern Electric Water Company Wagstaff, Inc.

Fish Window Cleaning Fresenius Medical Care Joya Child & Family Development Liberty Lake Coworking Mover For You, LLC Northwest Bank

Tickets are available for $50 per person or $400 per table of 8.

Rescue4All Salem Arms Community Housing Sandpoint Chocolate Bear Schafer Insurance & Financial

Get more information and register at: spokanevalleychamber.org

Service Southside Community Center The Blissful Whisk, LLC The Creative Office

FARMERS MARKET L i b e r t y

L a k e

Every Saturday 9am -1pm

shop • Eat • Connect

BUY OUT THE FARMERS

2019 Market Season is Soon Coming to a Close These remaining weekends are your last chance to enjoy a wonderful slice of the delicious Veraci Pizza as well as being your last opportunity to stock up on locally grown foods for the winter. 1421 N. Meadowwood Ln. Liberty Lake, WA 99019 | 509-924-4994 | www.spokanevalleychamber.org

Visit us at LLFarmersMarket.com or find us on


The Current

Changes coming to Otis Orchards will impact LL I own the 20 acres located on the

north and east side of Harvard Road at the corner of Euclid. Originally, I owned all 93 acres from Arden to Harvard, Euclid north to the railroad tracts. I have owned it for 40 years since 1979. I bought it from the 93-year original homesteaders the Pringles. The Psomas family is located right across the road and has been there longer and farms also. They own 15 acres. Our farms along with Centennial Properties on the southwest corner keep Otis Orchards area farming and keep Otis Orchards looking pristine and rural. All this area on north Harvard Road is comprised of large acreage and totally undeveloped. Avista owns the 43 acres to the north and on the east side of Harvard. I sold to them in 1984. It sits vacant. That acreage is open ground that It should eventually become a park. Obviously, it will take a community generated effort and proposal to make them do that, but it is clear that this is one of the last large undeveloped places in that community. It is an excellent place for a huge community park, and future conservation funds ought to buy the land. Otis Orchards also borders the Spokane River for at least 7 miles. It has a lot of potential for recreation and high-priced housing. It amazes me that there is never anything written about anything happening up north in Otis Orchards. It is definitely the future of the Liberty Lake community growth. After all, all the housing north of I-90 is densely packed tract housing. Developers are making their fortunes, but people are being densified into cookie cutter lots like urban planning wants. That packedin community may not be the urban answer in a decade from now. Certainly not everyone wants this. Liberty Lake is defined. It has no actual large growth potential.

OPINION Once it is filled, that is all there is. It cannot grow west (Spokane Valley), east (Idaho), or south (Mica Peak). There is a vast amount of open land in Otis Orchards. Harvard will eventually become a commercial traffic corridor and offer multiple uses. Otis Orchards simply lacks zoning. It is deliberately not presently inside the Urban Growth Area. That omission is intentional. It has been the case since 1981, when the first Comprehensive Plan was adopted by Spokane County. It is due to politics and county commissioners restricting any growth. Thirty-eight years later that is still the case. In the 1970s, Otis Orchards tried twice to incorporate. That community effort was defeated. Ever since then it has been in a deep freeze held by zoning rules and given no sewer lines. These two things politically deny any change of living uses. The area is five-acre minimum rural zoning. Soon worn-out sewers, overburdened roads and general development will take over. When that happens, the area will turn urban. Incredibly, there are lots of urban things already there. It has a modern library, decent schools, a wonderful fire department, and

a very functional grid road system north of Liberty Lake. You can't beat Consolidated Irrigation, which has unlimited water available. And Otis Orchards has a rich history. But the reality is that the area is old, so it needs to have planning and direction to make sure it goes the right way once it grows. Otis Orchards will eventually become the real future growth area in the eastern county area. It has at least 12 square miles of totally empty development land. It has not messed up the land use yet, but confused development is coming fast. There is a lot of open land and a lot of potential. Does everyone want another 12 square miles of sprawling dense-packed housing and planned cookie-cutter development running north? Otis Orchards represents the best place for newer, large and reasonably priced quality uses. For example, it would easily offer land to build future campuses for large companies to locate. It is an affordable and open area. If a Microsoft or a Google wanted to come here, they would definitely look seriously at Otis Orchards as a quality living area. Development is sneaking in anyway. It just is not obvious. The

OCTOBER 2019 • 47

growth area is being chopped away by people able to get special favors and urban designation. They are good at what they do -- getting things passed and using these for their uses. Just look at the Euclid corridor. Ten years ago, it was rural and not in any growth area. It is now developing with the new Spokesman printing plant and the just-opened Katerra laminated beam plant next door. All that land use is newly designated urban. It was politics that granted the land change. These Euclid uses are all uses that are less dense and attractive to larger corporate users. I wonder if there is ever an area that says to growth management, "We like it like it is and do not want growth." Then what happens? That may be the fate of growing north. Otis Orchards may be developed in a way that defeats and change. It may become "gentrified" into very expensive horse ranchettes. Why doesn't Liberty Lake government take a serious look at this very future Otis Orchards? Let Liberty Lake residents know that there is an Otis Orchards north of them, and it is going to change either by planning or by default. Change is coming, and we are at a crossroads. Gene Cohen Otis Orchards


48 •

FOR LIFE! OCTOBER 2019 For New Patients

The Current

FREE TeethWhitening for Life

for New Patients

CALL TODAY

With Purchase of a New Patient Exam, Necessary X-rays & Recommended Cleaning. Offer expires 10/31/2019

22106 E. Country Vista Drive Suite D • Liberty Lake

www.SimondsDentalGroup.com

Dr. Erin Merrifield • Dr. Dr. Enoch Ross • Dr. Ross Simonds • Dr. Amanda Roper

SPA-LIDAYS SOCIAL SUN, NOV 17 / 4:30-7PM NORTHERN QUEST PAVILION Join us for our fifth annual shopping and social extravaganza. Tickets include a donation to Project Beauty Share, hors d’oeuvres, wine and bubbles, 20% off all products and services purchased that night, plus a chance to win fabulous prizes. Tickets $25 / VIP $75 Includes a swag bag Purchase tickets in La Rive Spa, northernquest northernquest.com or call 509.481.6108

Profile for The Current

October 2019 Current  

The candidate race is on

October 2019 Current  

The candidate race is on

Advertisement