Page 1

MAY

2019

GREATER SPOKANE VALLEY

PRSRT STD ECRWSS U.S. Postage Paid Permit #010 ZIP CODE 99019

FREE

A VALLEY-WIDE COMMUNITY NEWSMAGAZINE

Did you know ?

Ten things you may not know about your hometown, page 10

CANDIDATES DECLARING FOR CITY ELECTION PAGE 8

RENOVATION BEGINS, HORIZON MOVES STUDENTS PAGE 26

DULUTH TRADING OPENS 50TH STORE IN VALLEY PAGE 24


2 • MAY 2019

The Park Bench

Tip of the Hat Bryant a catalyst for good causes By Craig Howard Contributing Editor When she was a member of the Central Valley School District Board of Directors, Kay Bryant made it a point to visit campuses throughout the district. One day, Bryant was strolling through the halls of an elementary school when she saw a mom walking with her children outside of a book fair. “The kids were asking for books but the mom told them she couldn’t afford them,” Bryant recalls. So, the lifelong reader decided to do something about it. Bryant founded Books for Kids in 2009, a program that makes sure all kids have something to read. Last year, the effort, sponsored by Greater Spokane Valley Rotary, was responsible for distributing over 2,500 free books to students at

NEWS half-a-dozen schools in the Greater Valley area. Rotary provides the money and local librarians and reading specialists buy the books. When not handing out complimentary literature, Bryant can be found giving away shoes. As a board member with Soul to Soles, Bryant visits Head Start and Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program sites across the area with fellow volunteers, providing shoes and socks at no cost to kids from low-income families. Last year, the group distributed nearly 1,500 pairs of shoes and socks. The habit of taking initiative is not new to Bryant. When she joined Spokane Valley Rotary in 1992, she was only the second woman to be part of the service club. She forged a long and successful career in human resources – spending nearly 27 years as HR manager for Community College of Spokane – starting out when the field consisted primarily of men. Born in Odgen, Utah, Bryant spent her formative years in Eugene, Ore. Her dad worked as an optician, and her mom was a homemaker. Bryant is the oldest of three kids and remains close with her sister and brother. At Eugene High School, Bryant remembers being “a high achiever” who just missed out on being

valedictorian. She participated in sports, debate and theater while excelling as an honors student. “I wanted to learn all I could and be the best I could,” she said. She graduated in 1956 and enrolled at the University of Oregon in her backyard while working parttime on campus at the registrar’s office. Initially she had a goal to be an elementary school teacher. After a year of college, Bryant married her high school sweetheart, Curt, a baseball standout who had earned a scholarship to Arizona State University. The young couple moved to Tempe, Ariz., where they welcomed their first of five children. A move to California and a return to Oregon followed. Kay and Curt would have five kids, and Kay worked various jobs along with her role as a mom. The family moved to Spokane in 1968, settling in a rented home just in time for one of the most severe winters in recorded history. “It was a record-setting snow,” Bryant recalls. “But I didn’t let it do me in. We sledded and enjoyed some country living.” Shortly after the family moved to Deer Park, Curt was injured working at Kaiser Aluminum. Bryant dug in and become the sole breadwinner, latching on as a clerical supervisor with the Spokane Regional Health District in 1971. She stayed there

Photo by Craig Howard Kay Bryant is a longtime member of Greater Spokane Valley Rotary and a former member of the Central Valley School District Board of Directors. She started Rotary’s Books for Kids program and is a board member with Soul to Soles, a local effort that provides free shoes to less fortunate kids at distribution events like one last month at the Head Start in northwest Spokane (above).

The Current for seven years before being hired as a human resource assistant with Community Colleges of Spokane (CCS). The position would be the start of a long and successful career in human resources for Bryant, who served as HR manager for CCS over a span of nearly 27 years. “There was something new almost every day,” Bryant said. “I could be of help to employees and administration. I saw mediation as a win-win – you’re getting people together and helping them understand each other.” While working in the field of education, Bryant made sure to continue her own pursuit of learning. She taught courses in human resources and went back to school, eventually earning her bachelor’s degree from Eastern Washington University at the age of 67. Bryant retired from CCS in 2003 but continued working part-time as an HR supervisor with a senior living facility. She retired “officially” two years ago. Along with a giving heart and stellar work ethic, Bryant is also known for her trademark hats. Her collection numbers in the hundreds and recalls a bygone time when formal wear was more the norm than a novelty. Besides volunteerism and Rotary, Bryant stays busy these days with gardening, reading, swimming and a recently purchased RV. She has six grandkids and two great-grandchildren. Q: You were 67 years old when you earned your bachelor’s degree. Why was that important for you to go back to school to get a college diploma? A: Higher education was always important to me. However, after one year of college, I married and for many years my priorities were financially taking care of my family responsibilities. When the Community Colleges of Spokane offered classes to employees at a reduced tuition fee, I began taking night and on-line classes at SCC, SFCC and EWU until I finally achieved my goal of obtaining a bachelor’s degree. Even though by that time it made little difference in my career advancement, I achieved it for myself. Q: Have you always been motivated to learn and achieve? Where do you think that came from? A: As long as I can remember, I have desired to learn as much as possible either by formal classes or reading. Every day

See BRYANT, Page 3


The Current

BRYANT

MAY 2019 • 3

NEWS

Continued from page 2

there is something new to learn. Reaching goals and achieving, even in small ways, brings me selfsatisfaction. Even more important is if I can encourage someone else in becoming all they can be. Q: During the time you served as a member of the Central Valley School District Board of Directors, what did you learn about the field of education that maybe you didn’t know before? A: One part of the educational field I was not familiar with prior to being a school board member was the complex, challenging financial aspects of public education. School board members and administrators must always juggle the finances available with the responsibilities in providing an excellent educational experience for children. Q: You broke new ground as the only the second woman to join Spokane Valley Rotary in 1992 after Norma Ventris. What was that experience like? A: A few of the male members were not happy about the decision by the International Rotary Board to include women in the membership. I tried to make sure those members who were not supportive knew my reasons for joining the group – to be of service to others. Q: What have you enjoyed most about being part of Rotary? A: I have enjoyed being a member of Rotary mainly because it allows me to serve my community and be a part of international projects that make a difference. I alone cannot make much of a difference but being a part of an organization devoted to serving others makes my small contribution matter. Q: You had an extensive and distinguished career in the field of human resources. In your opinion, what does it take to be a successful HR director? A: It is important for those in positions in human resources to be compassionate, genuinely like and respect people, understand rules and regulations and be a mediator between the administration and the employees. Being able to resolve problems in a win-win manner for everyone is key to success. Q: You’ve called this area home for 50 years. What are some of the most significant changes you’ve seen in the Spokane Valley during that time? A: The most obvious change is the increases in housing, either

residential or apartments. At first, I had some concerns about Spokane Valley becoming a city, but I didn’t like the idea of the Valley one day becoming a part of Spokane. When Spokane Valley officially became a city, I became involved in several community focus groups and have been very proud of what our city has accomplished. Q: You have been part of unique causes that have provided many thousands of books and shoes to local kids, many of them from lowerincome homes. What are some of the most rewarding aspects of these efforts for you? A: The most rewarding aspect of the Books for Kids program, sponsored by the Greater Spokane Valley Rotary Club, is being at the schools when the books are distributed and seeing the joy and enthusiasm of the children as they choose their free book and understanding that special book is theirs to keep. The satisfaction I personally receive from being a part of the Soul to Soles organization is to see what it means to each child who receives a new pair of shoes and socks. The happiness and self-worth a new pair of shoes provides to these children is hard to describe unless one can actually see the joy in the eyes of each child. They can run faster, jump higher and dance with joy. The “thankyous” we receive from parents and grandparents assure us that we are making a positive impact in the lives of families. Q: Caring for the community seems to be part of your dayto-day approach to living. What advice would you give to those who may not necessarily see this as a priority? A: My best advice to others about being involved in giving to others in the community is that any effort either monetarily or time and effort is insignificant to the rewarding feelings of bringing a smile to a face or lightening the load of someone else during their life journey. Q: Finally, I have to ask you about the hats. Where did it start and why? A: One day I was returning from a business trip in Seattle, and I had a couple of hours before I needed to be at the airport. I stopped at a mall and just started looking around. I saw a hat and when I tried it on, I thought it looked good so I bought it. I don’t know if I was subconsciously influenced by both my grandmother’s love of hats, but that purchase began my love of hats.

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4 • MAY 2019

City to address declining road conditions

By Bill Gothmann

Current Correspondent The condition of Spokane Valley’s roads continues to decline, as evidenced from a comparison of three different consultants engaged by the city. The trend was a major discussion point again at an April 2 City Council meeting, with members and staff pledging to continue looking into how to stem the decline in street conditions over the next few months -- and how to fund these efforts. Reports from consultants tell the tale of the decline. In 2012, JUB Consultants found that arterials had declined from an Overall Condition Index (OCI) of 67 in 2008 to 64 in 2011. Residential roads had remained the same at 71, primarily because, at the time, many of them were being repaved by the city’s Septic Tank Elimination Program, whereby sewers were being installed in most streets. OCI expresses the condition of the road, its age, and the type of materials used and is identified as a number between zero and 100.

NEWS

and by funds from the city budget, primarily real estate excise taxes. This system works well for the city. Maintenance is funded by gas taxes received from the state and by the city’s own funds. Preservation funds come primarily from city funds, although preservation can be part of some grants.

Funding the $5 million maintenance budget is increasingly a problem. At one time, the gas tax and the phone tax each provided about half the revenue. However, gas taxes are estimated to be about $2 million and the phone tax is estimated to be about $1.7 million this year. About $200,000 comes from other sources. This leaves a hole of about $1 million in the maintenance budget. Funding the preservation budget has been a problem since the city incorporated in 2003. The city has attempted to partially plug this hole with a $1 million contribution from the general fund and enacting a $1.5 million street wear fee on Waste Management trucks. In addition, some one-time transfers were made from excess funds at the end of the year. According to NCE, to keep the PCI at 70 will require a road preservation budget of $10 million per year. Since existing revenue

is $5.3 million, this leaves the city short $4.7 million per year. A second alternative is to permit the PCI to drift to 65. This would require a budget of $6.9 million per year and, with existing revenue, leaves a shortfall of $1.6 million. However, after a five-year period, with the PCI drifting to 65, additional funds will be needed to keep it at 65. Generally, the annual cost to maintain a given condition increases as the pavement condition rating decreases. The NCE report also recommended changes in the city’s approach to pavement management. Dr. Linda Pierce of NCE recommended increasing the frequency of pavement condition assessment to every three years. The city currently assesses arterials every four years and residential streets every six years. She also suggested procuring more sophisticated pavement management software and using more pavement rehabilitation strategies such as chip seals, slurry seals or microsurfacing. Tourism venues In an effort to increase tourism, the city has narrowed its focus to three tourism venues it may wish to support: fairgrounds and stadium district, an outdoor sports complex and the CenterPlace west

The Current

lawn expansion. The funding for the venue or venues would come from an existing hotel/motel tax that annually provides $390,000 and now contains an estimated $2.6 million. City staff reported on what the possible financial effects of the three venues would be. The fairgrounds project involves demolishing an existing building and constructing a 50,000 squarefoot multipurpose building, increasing the capacity of the County Fairgrounds by 10-30 events per year. It would cost $8.4 million and would require financing a 30-year bond at $364,883 per month. The proposal would yield an annual net positive cash flow of $49,358. Although staff finds it difficult to find a location, the sports complex would provide four baseball fields and eight softball/youth baseball fields with 75 parking spaces per field. It would cost $27.9 million, would require a bond payment of nearly $2 million per year, and would result in a negative annual cash flow of nearly $1.7 million. There has been some discussion about making this a joint venture with the county. City staff plan to schedule a Council meeting with representation from the Spokane

See COUNCIL, Page 5

In 2016, Infrastructure Management Services found the conditions of all city roads had declined from a Pavement Condition Index (PCI) of 80 in 2010 to 75 in 2013 to 71 in 2015. The PCI is expressed as a number between 0 and 100. It evaluates the physical condition of the road and is the most frequently used index. A third consultant, NCE, this year evaluated the PCI of the city’s streets, concluding as follows: major arterials, 71; minor arterials, 67; collectors, 68; local roads, 70; overall system, 69. The city identifies three categories of road activity: construction, maintenance and preservation. Construction is when the road is initially installed. Maintenance consists of snow plowing, street sweeping, clearing of weeds along the sides and patching. Preservation includes crack sealing, overlays, and other types of treatments to extend the life of the street. The Council has been briefed that every $1 spent on road preservation prevents spending $12 in reconstruction later. Construction is funded by grants from state and federal agencies

Contributed Graphic Among three options for investing tourism funds, the Spokane Valley City Council is considering building an outdoor sports complex. The possibility of doing this as a joint project with Spokane County is being explored as well, and one site that has been studied is this area near the HUB Sports Center and the new Selkirk Middle School.


The Current

COUNCIL

MAY 2019 • 5

NEWS

Continued from page 4

County Parks Department.

The Centerplace West Lawn Phase II project provides expanded utilities, walks, trails, plaza construction, gateways, performance areas, restroom and storage buildings, perimeter fencing and furnishings. It will cost about $2.2 million, which could be taken from the existing $2.6 million hotel/motel fund and require no bond payment. Homelessness programs City and county staff discussed the many ways in which the City of Spokane Valley is participating in addressing homelessness. Major funding comes from three sources: The U.S Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Washington State Homeless Housing and Assistance Act (HAAA), and the Washington Department of Commerce (WDOC). HAAA gets its funds from courthouse document recording fees. In Spokane County, there are two agencies which administer such programs: The City of Spokane for itself and the county for all regions other than the City of Spokane. Spokane Valley could have become its own administering agency but decided to join the county’s consortium. In so doing it avoids having to hire additional staff to abide by the rather complex requirements of the funding sources. In addition, previous studies showed that the City of Spokane Valley and the County Consortium both receive more funds than if the city were to become its own administering agency. The County Consortium’s board, the Housing and Community Development Advisory Committee (HCDAC), has 17 members. Three members represent Spokane Valley, four are selected at large, and 11 represent cities and towns within the county. Because Spokane Valley is so large compared to the other cities, the parties worked out an agreement whereby 20 percent of the funds are set aside for Spokane Valley. HCDAC receives proposals for coordinated entry, targeted prevention and diversion, temporary shelter, rapid re-housing, transitional housing, permanent supportive housing, stable independent voucher housing, low-income infrastructure and lowincome social service programs. Each of these is pre-screened by the staff to assure the proposals meet funding agency regulations. HCDAC

then recommend to the County Commissioners which proposals to accept. In 2018, out of about $7.3 million received by the county for homelessness and community needs, Spokane Valley received nearly $1.2 million. Because of funding agency requirements, Spokane Valley is not eligible for some programs. Recently, the City of Spokane and Spokane County have formed a Continuum of Care council to coordinate their two efforts to meet the needs of all within the county. Spokane Valley also has representation on this council. Co-response police time

team

saves

Last October, the Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs (WASPC) provided a grant whereby Frontier Behavior Health Professional Holly Keller rides along with Spokane County Deputy Dan Moman as a Crisis Co-Response Team. The mission of the team is to increase safety to the public and to those in crisis. They also provide diversion from the criminal justice system and emergency health departments and connect resources to those vulnerable in our community. The results of the grant program were presented to Spokane Valley City Council for evaluation. Instead of having law enforcement officers spend 3-4 hours waiting to have an emergency health department attend to the mental health needs of an offender, the team averages 12 minutes from doors to beds. Instead of an officer spending time trying to stabilize a situation, the health professional is able to stabilize the crisis in an average of 47 minutes. The team is also working with “high utilizers.” “Bill” has made over 200 calls to emergency services in the past two years, but now, since they are working with him, has greatly reduced his calls for service. Thus far, the team has made 265 contacts: 87 percent of these contacts were diverted, 11.6 percent resulted in emergency detentions, and only 1.1 percent were arrested. This has resulted in an estimated savings of 114 hours. There has been no use of force beyond hand-cuffing and soft restraints. Spokane Valley Police Chief Mark Werner expects the grant to be continued because of its success. Budget amendments approved Council gave final approval to amendments to the 2019 budget that were discussed in last month’s

See SV CONT., Page 8

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6 • MAY 2019

NEWS

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The Current

MAY 2019 • 7

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By Spokane Valley Police Chief Mark Werner The maps provided below depict where citizens have reported Vehicle Thefts, Thefts from a Vehicle (also known as vehicle prowling), Burglaries and Thefts. As you view the map each circle will contain a number indicating how many instances Spokane of a particular crime were reported at that location. Thefts from a vehicle is often under reported as people often feel nothing can be done or they only lost a small quantity of loose change. However, the Spokane Valley Police Department and the Spokane County Sheriff’s office analyze this data to determine high crime areas and where to allocate resources. I encourage citizens who have been a victim of crime to call 911, if the crime is in progress, or Crime Check at 456-2233, if not in progress, to report a crime.

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Prepared By: Regional Intelligence Group 9 Spokane County Sheriff

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Prepared By: Regional Intelligence Group 9 Spokane County Sheriff

Safety Tip The Month

of

‘VIPs’ sought to help solve crimes In an effort to solve crimes or locate evidence of crimes faster and more effectively, Spokane County Sheriff’s Office and Spokane Valley Police is looking for business and private partners for a voluntary Video Identification Program (VIP). This type of information would help investigators know where to start first, possibly leading to suspect information, vehicle description or other needed information that could immediately aid in the investigation, according to a news release. Deputies would continue to go door to door and make contact to ensure they would gather complete evidence, but “with the VIP Program, we would know where video might be within minutes instead of hours,” the release stated. To sign up, go to spokanecounty.org/1080/sheriff and click on the VIP icon.

( !


8 • MAY 2019

SV CONT.

under the engineer’s estimate.

Current. These amendments include: $62,456 to fund Council salaries and benefits implementing the findings of the Independent Salary Commission, $143,744 in increases negotiated with the employees’ union, $16,300 in election costs to pay for postage for ballots distributed to city voters, $120,000 to replenish the Winter Weather Reserve Fund for higher than expected snow removal costs, and about $7.1 million transferred from the general fund to the Capital Reserve Fund representing the 2017 year-end fund balance in excess of 50 percent of recurring expenditures.

Council awarded a $371,520 contract to W.M. Winkler for constructing a sidewalk, curb and gutter and to widen the east side of Wilbur Road between Broadway Avenue and Boone Avenue. There will also be some stormwater improvements. The bid was $67,055 below the engineer’s estimate. There were five bids on the project.

Continued from page 5

Portion of Argonne Road to be repaved Council awarded a $220,000 contract to Inland Asphalt Paving Company for road preservation of Argonne from Broadway to Valleyway. This was $8,000 under the engineer’s estimate. The project will provide a 2¼-inch grind and inlay, provide minor full pavement removals and patches, and minor stormwater improvements. Plans call for single-lane closures during the day and double-lane closures during the night, with temporary driveway closures. Construction is expected to occur from mid-April to mid-May. University approved

Road

project

Council approved the interlocal agreement with Model Irrigation District No. 18 to partner with them on the University Road, 16th to Dishman-Mica project. Model will reimburse the city for utility work costs as well as a percentage of several shared project costs. Council awarded the $3.2 million construction contract to N.A. Degerstrom Inc. This was $500,000

TELL ME ABOUT CREDIT UNIONS .

Bid awarded project

for

sidewalk

Knox Avenue project awarded Council awarded a $375,985 contract to N.A. Degerstrom for the Knox Avenue project. This will install a new sidewalk, curb and gutter, and widen the pavement on the south side of Knox between Sargent and Hutchinson. The bid was $91,540 below the engineer’s estimate. Estimates are coming in lower because, with the addition of extra help, staff is able to push these projects out earlier in the year. Vacation of streets near I-90 Circle M Properties has requested that the city vacate 60 feet of Baldwin Avenue, 225 feet of University Road and 20 feet of Glenn Road between I-90 and Nora Avenue. Council approved sending this request to the Planning Commission for a public hearing to be held on May 23. Arbor Day Society Former Planning Commissioner Marcia Sands asked the city to consider joining the Arbor Day Society. There are four requirements for Tree City USA recognition. A board or department must be appointed and several have volunteered to do this. The city must pass a tree care ordinance that specifies how the city will care for its own trees. There must be a community forestry program

The Current

NEWS

with a budget of at least $2 per capita to be used for planting, care, and removal of city trees. Sands indicated the city is already spending for this care. There must be an Arbor Day observance and proclamation. Council briefs

• Council discussed four items with federal lobbyist Bennett Resnick of Cardinal Infrastructure for the city’s federal agenda, listed in order of priority: Pines Road/ BNSF Grade Separation Project, Sullivan Road Corridor Projects, Argonne Road Corridor Projects and Barker Road Corridor Projects. • Council approved applying for a Community Economic Revitalization Board (CERB) grant. The grant would study how to support businesses along the Appleway Trail such as seating, signage, landscaping and parklets. • The Council awarded the $1.2 million Mission Avenue Sidewalk & Preservation Project, University to Union, to Inland Asphalt Company. • Council discussed a proposal to do electrical inspections by the city, by Spokane, or a private company. Because Washington Labor and Industries (L&I) has made improvements in its system, staff and Council felt the best alternative thus far is to leave it with L&I. • Council approved placing the vacation of portions of Tschirley Road, Long Road, Rich Avenue and Greenacres Road on the Planning Commission’s agenda with a public hearing. • The city is applying to Washington State Department of Transportation for a Local Bridge Program grant to resurface the Sullivan Road northbound bridge over the Union Pacific Railroad. The program is federally funded.

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Candidates surfacing for SV positions By Nina Culver Current Contributor

It may be early in the year, but that hasn’t stopped people from signing up to run against Spokane Valley City Council incumbents in the 2019 election. Council members Arne Woodard, Sam Wood and Brandi Peetz have terms that are expiring and all have filed paperwork with the state’s Public Disclosure Commission indicating they plan to run to retain their seats. Candidate filing week through the Spokane County Elections Office is May 13-17, and prospective candidates can file in person or online to run for an elected office. However, those who file with the PDC ahead of time can immediately begin to raise money for their campaign, and all three incumbents have begun raising money. Woodard has raised the most so far, with more than $10,000 on hand. Each incumbent has attracted at least one challenger. Accountant Lance Gurel has filed to run against Woodard, as has Albert Merkel, who works as a senior contract negotiator for Coordinated Care. Timothy Hattenburg, a retired teacher who unsuccessfully ran against Senator Bob McCaslin in 2004 and Representative Matt Shea in 2008, is running against Sam Wood. Spokane Valley Planning Commissioner Michelle Rasmussen is challenging Peetz. Merkel ran unsuccessfully against Mayor Rod Higgins in 2017 but said he was able to get a good share of the vote. He said he’s concerned about the direction the council is taking. “Right now, I think there’s a dangerous majority block on the

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The Current

CANDIDATES

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Continued from page 8 council that doesn’t even give the minority the time of day,” he said. This isn’t the first time someone has accused some members of the council of ignoring minority members. In 2016, then-council members Dean Grafos and Chuck Hafner resigned after complaining that they were being excluded from council business and that then-city manager Mike Jackson was improperly fired. The city is growing, and mismanaged development is a problem, Merkel said. He faults Woodard for being too prodevelopment and removing too many rules, such as eliminating the green space requirements for mixed use projects. Merkel said he knows he’s at a disadvantage in terms of fundraising, but said he plans to reuse his old signs to save money. “I don’t think this election will be based on money,” he said. “I’m trying to run a campaign based on ideas.” Gurel, who has no prior political experience, said he’s running because he wants to be more involved in his community. “Running for political office is not a bucket list thing of mine,” he said. “I just realized if I want things to grow in the community the way I want them to I need to get involved.” He worked in construction and as a pipeline welder before he went back

Want to run for office?

Candidate filing week is May 13-17 in Spokane County. How to file Candidates must be a registered voter in the district they are filing. Candidates can file for office in person at the Spokane County Elections Office, 1033 W. Gardner, during business hours May 13-17 or online at www.spokanecounty. org/177/elections 24 hours a day from 9 a.m. May 13 to 4 p.m. May 17. Some elected positions require the payment of a filing fee. City council job description In addition to attending City Council meetings, setting policy and serving on city committees, council members typically serve on various community organization boards of directors and represent the city at public events.Offices up for election in 2019 • City of Spokane Valley: Council positions currently held by Arne Woodard, Sam Wood and Brandi Peetz • City of Liberty Lake: Mayor (incumbent, Steve Peterson) and four Council positions (currently held by Cris

to school for his accounting degree when he was in his 40s. He’s lived in Spokane Valley for the last six years. “I’ve lived all over the country,” he said. “We love Spokane Valley.” He’s been attending council meetings and said he decided to run against Woodard because Wood already had a challenger, and he didn’t want to run against Peetz. “She seems like a good council member, someone I would rather serve with than run against,” he said. Gurel said he believes he can make a difference and plans to spend a lot of time walking the neighborhoods introducing himself to voters. “I’m planning on going through several pairs of shoes,” he said. Peetz began serving on the council in 2017 to fill a vacated term. She has a degree in criminal justice from Gonzaga University. Woodard, a retired real estate broker, has served on the council since 2011 and has previously served two terms as deputy mayor. Wood, a certified appraiser, has been on the council since 2016. A look at the PDC documents shows that support for some of the council candidates is already clear. Hattenburg, who has previously run for elected office as a Democrat, has received donations from former Mayor Tom Towey and Chuck Hafner. Hafner and Grafos, along with former councilman Bill Gothmann, have donated to Peetz’s campaign. Rasmussen has received donations from Higgins, Woodard and council member Pam Haley.

Kaminskas, Dan Dunne, Shane Brickner and Bob Moore) • City of Millwood: Council positions currently held by Kate McLachlan, Andy Van Hees and Shaun Culler • Town of Rockford: Council positions currently held by Clinton Stevenson, Micki Harnois, William Benson • Town of Fairfield: Council positions held by Jamie Paden, George Davidson, Valerie Rogers and Emily Thomas • Spokane Valley Fire Department: Commissioner positions currently held by Patrick Burch, Ron Schmidt and John Guarisco • Central Valley School District: School board positions currently held by Keith Clark, Debra Long and Cindy McMullen • East Valley School District: School board positions currently held by Todd Weger and Laura Gates • West Valley School District: School board positions currently held by Bob Wentworth, Adam Mortensen • Freeman School District: School board positions currently held by Bill Morphy, Jim Tippett and Angela Keebler

MAY 2019 • 9

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COVER STORY

10 • MAY 2019

The Current

Ten lesser-known tidbits from the pages of local history By Josh Johnson Current Contributor Have you heard of the “Empire Tower”? Did you know that long before Roller Valley, Dishman was home to the “largest roller skating rink west of the Mississippi River”?

File Photo Modern-day Roller Valley isn't too far away from the historical site of the Dishman Roller Drome, which billed itself as the "largest roller skating rink west of the Mississippi."

Photo courtesy of Spokane Valley Heritage Museum In this 1906 photo, farmers on the Morrison Ranch harvest hay grown on the fertile bed of what was once Saltese Lake.

File Photo The East Sprague Drive-in was the region's largest drive-in theater, with room for 1,000 cars.

Spokane Valley’s history is home to many such stories. Here are 10, pulled from newspaper archives and direction from Jayne Singleton and the Spokane Valley Heritage Museum.

1

A Spokane Valley Space Needle

Thirty years ago this month, Hank Grinalds held a press conference at Spokane Valley’s Redwood Plaza to announce intentions to expand the facility – straight up. He unveiled architectural renderings of the “Empire Tower,” which would stretch 482 feet above the 11700 block of East Sprague Avenue. The expanse would include a two-story, 11,000-square-foot office section at about 240 feet, an observation deck at 416 feet, and a 225-seat revolving restaurant atop that. The plans bore resemblance to Seattle’s Space Needle, which is 605-feet tall. While the developer had the funding squared away, his business sense never allowed him to embark on the project until tenants were lined up. There was also the matter of looming height restrictions on building construction higher than 60 feet. While what he called a “25-year dream” never came to fruition, Grinalds’ legacy lives on, as he donated millions of dollars to set up local endowment funds for Valley Hospital Foundation and the Spokane Valley Rotary Club, among others, before he died of cancer in 1995 at the age of 67.

2

Is there gold buried at Plante’s Ferry?

There are a few accounts circulating out there about a 155-year-old Walla Walla bank robbery. The accounts usually have two robbers, usually have them being tracked down by authorities, usually have them captured by

a river, and usually have a secret confession that the loot is buried by the river but was never retrieved. One account says the gold is buried along the Columbia River near Wallula, Wash., but our favorite – as recounted by museum director Singleton as well as in 1981 Spokane Chronicle and 2007 Spokesman-Review stories – says the site of the capture was along the Spokane River while waiting for Antoine Plante’s ferry. In

that account, the loot is $80,000 in gold, and several people have already tried to recover it, including men who dug a 20foot trench in 1912 that ended up taking the life of a cow who stumbled upon it. Legend? Maybe, maybe not. Just please don’t go digging up our park to find out.

3

Movies found home in the Valley

Did you know no less than five movie theaters have come and gone in the Valley? 1920s: Opportunity T h e a t e r (also known as Appleway Theater) showed silent movies in the same building that now houses the Spokane Valley Heritage Museum. 1 9 3 9 : Dishman Theater opened. Modern

This rendering of the Empire Tower was printed in the May 17, 1989, issue of the Spokane Chronicle following a press conference announcing the idea.

for its time, its huge vertical sign broadcast its name on both sides. The first movie shown was “King of the Turf.” The building still stands today. 1946: East Trent Drive-In (then known as Motor-in Theatre) opened with a showing of “Doll Face.” Located in the 11000 block of East Trent, it was the first drivein theater in the region. 1949: East Sprague Drive-In, remembered as Spokane’s largest drive-in theater, could hold 1,000 cars. It opened with a double bill of “This Time for Keeps” and “Force of Evil” and enjoyed a great location at the curve of the Sprague exit of Interstate 90. The redesigned Sprague interchange is cited as a reason for its closing in 1993. 1983: Like the U-City Mall, East Sprague Cinemas 6 was Spokane Valley’s destination theater before development of the current Spokane Valley Mall area. It was located in the 11000 block of East Sprague, but closed in 2000.

4

Which came first, Spokane or its Valley?

Think

Spokane

Valley

was

developed as Spokane grew? Actually, it’s just the opposite. Spokane Valley was home to the area’s first settler, Antoine Plante. His ferry business started in 1854, and nearby homes, stores and even a post office followed. All this was in place by the time Spokane’s famous founding father, James Glover, arrived on the scene in 1873.

5

Much of Spokane built with Valley stone

The Great Fire of Spokane in 1889 destroyed much of downtown Spokane Falls. As a 2014 Spokesman-Review story recounted, however, it also sparked the town’s revival: “The rickety wood-framed town of 1888 had become the sturdy brick-built city of 1890” thanks to widespread reconstruction using brick or stone. According to Singleton, Spokane can thank Empire Granite Co. of Spokane Valley for much of the granite and stone. As many as 35 teams a day hauled stone to Spokane from the quarry located near present-day Dishman. In fact, portions of Gonzaga University and

See DID YOU KNOW, Page 11


The Current

COVER STORY

DID YOU KNOW

MAY 2019 • 11

Continued from page 10

Lewis and Clark High School were constructed with stone from the quarry.

6

Where there’s a Wills, there’s a stay

A framed Maury Wills jersey is among the artifacts on display in a new Spokane Valley Heritage Museum exhibit called “Take Me Out to the Ballgame.” Wills, the seven-time Major League Baseball All-Star and 1962 National League MVP, is among dozens of former Spokane Indians players who moved on to make big waves in the big leagues (Tommy Lasorda, Steve Garvey, Sandy Alomar Jr. are among many others). Unlike most others, however, Wills planted roots. After being assigned to Spokane in 1958, he was called up full-time to the Dodgers midway through the 1959 season. The Wills, however, didn’t want to leave their new home, and the family of eight settled in Spokane Valley – though Maury spent most of the year traveling with the Dodgers. Maury’s son, Bump, was a standout athlete at Central Valley High School who went on to play second base for the Texas Rangers and Chicago Cubs. Like his dad, he was a switch hitter with a penchant for stealing bases.

7

The Valley’s largest lake no longer exists

The Saltese Flats of Greenacres below Mica Peak used to be a lake – even larger than Liberty Lake. In 1894, Peter Morrison began draining the lake to take advantage of nutrient-rich soil for growing Timothy hay. Morrison spent years digging canals to drain the lake. The largest, Saltese Creek, still exists, winding past Valley Real Life church and through the Turtle Creek neighborhood before eventually flowing into Shelley Lake.

8

How a high school came to be called University

In 1912, the first university to be founded in the Valley was started by Rev. B.E. Utz. The school was originally intended to train Christian ministers, but most of the students

File Photo Children reference a map locating the 55 species of animals that once lived in Walk in the Wild Zoo, which closed in 1995. who attended during its twodecade existence studied various subjects among the school’s fouryear liberal arts programs. Called Spokane University, it succumbed to the Great Depression in 1933. The lasting impact of the college was lending the name “University” to the nearby thoroughfare and neighborhood. In fact, the 160acre Spokane University location at Ninth and Herald streets would eventually become the site of the first University High School (19602002) and present-day Valley Christian School.

9

Lots of room to roller skate

Between the aforementioned theater and attractions like a 5,000-seat open-air boxing ring, Dishman certainly had a claim to being the entertainment hub of the Valley in the 1920s-1950s. One attraction suspected of leaning on some level of hyperbole was the Dishman Roller Drome, which marketed itself as the “largest roller skating rink west of the Mississippi River” and featured

“The Floating Floor.” Singleton suspects the claim of largest skating rink was difficult to substantiate. This isn’t to say A.T. Dishman’s Roller Drome didn’t impress -- “It was big,” Singleton emphasized -as many things he did seemed to have a touch of grandeur. Dance and skating competitions were held there – even a masquerade and costume ball.

10

present-day CenterPlace, and Mirabeau Park.

YMCA

But that wasn’t Spokane Valley’s first zoo. That distinction goes to Evergreen Zoo, which was started by Art Warsinski at Sprague and Vista in the late 1920s. The location provided a home for animals that had lived in the zoo in Manito Park. Warsinski cycled through various ideas for the site, and the zoo apparently did not last long.

We bought a zoo! (Twice)

It’s been 24 years, but old-timers walking past the waterfall and pond at Mirabeau Point Park may remember when that spot was home to Tiger Lily and Kasey, a pair of Bengal tigers who attracted plenty of attention during their days at Walk in the Wild Zoo. Once named to Parade Magazine’s list of “10 worst zoos in America,” Spokane Valley’s zoo really wasn’t that bad. Yes, it struggled with limited resources and relied heavily on volunteers throughout its history. The zoo officially operated between 1974 and 1995 on 240 acres of land that largely overlaps

Photo courtesy of Spokane Valley Heritage Museum Dishman’s Empire Granite Co., pivotal in providing stone and granite to rebuild Spokane after the Great Fire of 1889, is shown in the foreground of this circa 1920s photo.


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The Current

Calendar of Events COMMUNITY EVENTS

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May 4-5 | 2019 Spring Coin & Stamp Show – 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place, Spokane Valley. Inland Empire Coin Show hosting more than 25 regional dealers of U.S. coins, world coins, tokens, stamps, currency, supplies and more. Hourly door prizes, free appraisals. Admission $2, children 12 and under are free. For more, call 595-0435 or email afranke@ pullman.com.

ACT 2 Senior Classes | Affordable classes offered by Community Colleges of Spokane to those who are retired or planning to retire. A wide range of courses from geology and history to exercise and art are offered at CenterPlace, 2426 N. Discovery Place, as well as other locations throughout the area. For more, search for “Act 2” at scc. spokane.edu.

May 8 | “Discover Dishman Hills: The Wild Heart of Spokane” – 7 p.m., Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main Ave. This lecture and discussion geared toward adults is led by Jeff Lambert, executive director of the Dishman Hills Conservancy. Dishman Hills has over 3,000 acres of conservation land, protected for recreation, education and wildlife habitat. Lambert discusses the fiveyear conservation plan and shares upcoming opportunities for you to join free and informative guided nature walks and hikes. For more, visit scld.org. May 9 | Spring Tea – 12:30 p.m. at Tri-County Grange, 25025 E. Heather Lane, Newman Lake. The Newman Lake Ladies Aid hosting this annual fundraiser to support the local Public School Milk Fund and Christmas Families. This year’s theme is “America: Land of the Free; Home of the Brave.” A $5 donation is requested per person for lunch; items will be available for sale and an auction will be held. May 18 | Liberty Lake Farmers Market opens – 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday through Oct. 12, 1421 N. Meadowwood Lane (Town Square Park), Liberty Lake. For more, visit libertylakefarmersmarket.com. May 27 | Memorial Day Salute and Breakfast – 8 to 10:30 a.m. (program at 9 a.m.) at Pavillion Park, Liberty Lake. Annual breakfast organized by the Liberty Lake Centennial Rotary to remember those in the military and support Inland Northwest Honor Flight. May 29 | Millwood Farmers Market opens – 3 to 7 p.m. every Wednesday through Oct. 9, 8910 E. Dalton Ave., Millwood. For more, visit farmersmarket.millwoodnow. org. June 7 | Spokane Valley Farmers Market opens – 5 to 8 p.m. every Friday through Sept. 13, CenterPlace, 2426 N. Discovery

Baha’i Fireside Conversation | 7 to 8 p.m., third Thursday of the month, Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main Ave. Discussion of Baha’i teachings, history and perspectives on resolving the challenges facing humanity. All are welcome. For more, call 599-2411. Café Card Club | 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Tuesdays, On Sacred Grounds, 12212 E. Palouse Hwy., Valleyford. Play pinochle, cribbage, or hearts. For more, call 951-7039 or email onsacredgrounsrising@gmail.com. Catholic Singles Mingle | Meeting times and locations vary. This group, with no dues, is for single adults of all ages. More at www.meetup.com/ Catholic-Singles-Mingle. Free Last Sunday Lunch | Spokane Valley United Methodist Church, 115 N. Raymond Road, Spokane Valley - 12:30 p.m. on the final Sunday of every month in the church’s Fellowship Hall, Room 115 Grange Meeting and Dessert | 6:30 p.m., third Wednesday of the month, Tri-Community Grange, 25025 Heather St., Newman Lake. The public is welcome for this community-based service organization. For more, call 2262202. Men’s Weekly Bible Study | 7 a.m. Tuesdays. Millwood Presbyterian Church, 3223 N. Marguerite Road, Millwood. The men’s weekly Bible Study meets in the Reception Hall with different members sharing in the leading of the study. All men are invited to join. More at www. milwoodpc.org. Rockford Crochet Class | 10 a.m. to noon, Saturdays, Harvest Moon, 20 S. First St., Rockford. Free classes. We have crocheters, knitters, embroidery, quilting and needlepoint. Come and share what you are doing. For more, call 2913722. Rockford Historical Society | 11:30 a.m. second Friday of the month (February to November), The Harvest Moon, 20 S. First St.,

Rockford. For more, call 291-3193. Spokane County Library District | Locations include Argonne, Fairfield, Otis Orchards, and Spokane Valley. Special events and weekly activities for all ages including book clubs, children’s story times, classes, Lego club, teen anime club and writing clubs. More at scld.org. Spokane Valley Eagles | 16801 E. Sprague Ave. Breakfast served Sundays 9 to 11:30 a.m. Lunch served Thursdays 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. followed by bingo from 1 to 3:30 p.m. More at www.foe3433. com. Spokane Valley Partners Food Bank | Weekly distribution takes place Wednesdays and Thursdays at 10814 E. Broadway Ave. by appointment. Appointments are available during the following days/ times: Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., Thursday, 11 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. (reserved for age 60 and over and physically-handicapped people with limited mobility). Address verification required. To make an appointment, call 927-1153, ext. 10, Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 1 p.m. Spokane Valley Quilt Guild | Meetings at 7 p.m. on the first Tuesday of February, April, June, August, October and December at Valley Assembly of God Church, 15618 E. Broadway Ave., Spokane Valley. Open to all interested in sharing ideas and skills of our quilting craft. Participants can access a comprehensive library, engage experienced teachers and participate in community service projects. More at svqgspokane.com. Spokane Valley Senior Citizens Association | 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays at CenterPlace, 2426 N. Discovery Place. Activities include bridge, billiards, book club, Red Hat Ladies, Mahjongg, ACT II classes, foot care, Medicare assistance, monthly excursions to Northern Quest Casino, Meals on Wheels location and more. Annual dues are $25/single or $45/couple. For more, call 926-1937 or visit spokanevalleyseniorcenter.org.

MUSIC & THE ARTS May 3 | “Jazz Under the Stars” – 6:30 to 9 p.m. in the Central Valley High School Commons, 821 S. Sullivan Road. This annual Jazz Concert, Dessert and Silent Auction benefits CVHS Band programs. Auction items include Coeur d’Alene Resort packages, Spokane


The Current

Symphony tickets and gift baskets. Come listen and dance to the awardwinning CVHS Jazz band. Includes special performances by Greenacres and Evergreen middle school jazz programs. Tickets are $15 at the door or $10 in advance. For more, email cvmbAuction@hotmail.com or call 999-9880. May 15-25 | “Our Town” – 7:30 p.m. May 15-17 and 22-25 at Central Valley High School Theatre, 821 S. Sullivan Road. Join the CVHS Theatre Company in its final, familyendearing production of Thornton Wilder’s greatest and best-known work as a playwright. Doors Open 30 minutes prior to show, and tickets ($10 to $14) can be purchased at cvtheatre.com.

RECURRING Pages of Harmony | 6:30 to 9 p.m., Wednesdays, Thornhill Valley Chapel, 1400 S. Pines Road. Four-part, a cappella harmony, men’s barbershop chorus. More at pagesofharmony. org. Spirit of Spokane Chorus | 6:45 p.m. Tuesdays, Opportunity Presbyterian Church, 202 N. Pines Road. Make new friends by joining this women’s chorus, specializing in four-part, a cappella harmony in the

MAY 2019 • 13

COMMUNITY

barbershop style. More at 218-4799.

HEALTH & RECREATION Thursdays starting May 2 | Grief and Healing Support Group – 9:30 to 11 a.m., Spokane Valley United Methodist Church, 115 N. Raymond Road. Six-week group offers support to those grieving whether loss is recent or deeper in the past. For more information, contact Margie Manfred at 924-7262. May 7 | “A Community Connected - Addressing the Opioid Crisis Together” – 5 p.m., Riverside Place, 1110 W. Riverside Ave., Spokane, auditorium (north side of building). Join the Spokane Regional Opioid Taskforce for an inspiring evening where attendees will learn how to become a part of the solution to address Spokane’s opioid crisis. Admission is free. Tony Hoffman, Olympic coach, world-ranked pro BMX race and recovered opioid addict, is the keynote speaker. His story is one of addiction, recovery and hope. For more information, call 324-1500.

May 10 | Proving Grounds Live Amateur Cage Fighting – Doors open 6:30 p.m., fights begin at 7 p.m., HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave., Liberty Lake. Live MMA cage fights presented by Warrior Camp, tickets $20 general seating, $30 preferred. For more: hubsportscenter.org. May 10-11 | May Mania Pickleball Tournament – HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave., Liberty Lake. Mixed doubles Friday, men’s and women’s doubles 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. For more: hubsportscenter.org. May 11 | Dads & Dudes Night – 6 to 9 p.m., HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave., Liberty Lake. Fathers and sons (or nephews or grandsons or …) have a ball playing basketball, soccer, baseball, pickleball, table tennis, martial arts and more. Door prizes. Pre-register at hubsportscenter. org at $15 for dad and dude ($3 for additional dudes). Registration is $20 and up after May 4. May 18 | Boating Education Class – 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., Sheriff’s Training Center, 6011 N. Chase Road, Newman Lake. Hosted by the Spokane County Sheriff’s

Office Marine Unit, the class is free and open to the public 12 years and older and covers material necessary to pass the state exam required to operate boats (state law requires this for anyone born after 1954). The exam is offered at the conclusion of the class, and participants leave class with all the documentation needed to mail away to Washington State Parks & Recreation for the $10 card. Preregister at eventbrite.com by searching “boating education” and clicking on the event or contact Deputy J. Ebel at 477-7608 or jmebel@spokanesheriff.org for more information.

RECURRING Divorce Care Recovery Support Group | Mondays 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Eastpoint Church, 15303 E. Sprague Ave. Learn how to heal from the deep hurt of divorce and discover hope for your future. DivorceCare for Kids (ages 5-12) meets at the same time and location. Cost is $25 for workbook. More at 892-5255 or eastpointchurch.com. Military Sobriety Support Group | 10 to 11:30 a.m., Spokane Vet

See CALENDAR, Page 14

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14 • MAY 2019

CALENDAR

Continued from page 13 Center, 13109 E. Mirabeau Parkway, Spokane Valley. For more, call Steve at 893-4746. GriefShare Support Group (Mondays)| 6:15 to 8 p.m. Mondays, The ONE Church, east entrance, 15601 E. 24th Ave., Spokane Valley. Most recent program began Feb. 20, but join at any time. Designed to help cope with loss, whether recent or years ago. For more, call Sue at 2941664 or Jere at 710-3354. GriefShare Support Group (Thursdays) | 10 a.m. Thursdays, Spokane Valley Church of the Nazarene, 15515 E. 20th Ave. Most recent program began Jan. 17 and runs 13 weeks, but join at any time. If you have lost a loved one and are dealing with grief, stop by to share or just listen. For more, call 926-1545. Yoga in Rockford | 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays, Rockford Park, 20 W. Emma St., Rockford. In case of inclement weather, classes will be held at Dave’s Autobody, 8 W. Emma St. Mindful

Music

&

Movement

| 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Wednesdays, Willow Song Music Therapy Center, 21101 E. Wellesley #102, Otis Orchards. Specifically designed for those living with chronic health issues such as Parkinson’s, dementia, COPD, MS, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, cancer. $10 donation suggested. Facilitated by board-certified music therapist, Carla Carnegie. For more, visit willowsongmusictherapy.com or call 592-7875. Decreasing Anger Group | 3 to 4:30 p.m. Tuesdays, the Vet Center, 13109 E. Mirabeau Parkway, Spokane Valley. Eligibility: combat veteran from all eras, military sexual trauma survivors. For more, call Steve at 893-4746 to make an intake appointment. HUB Sports Center | 19619 E. Cataldo Ave., Liberty Lake. Various activities and events occur throughout the week including: • Pickleball drop-in: 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday; 10 a.m. to noon Tuesday and Thursday; 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday and Sunday. $3/seniors, $5/nonseniors. • Classes including Kenpo Karate, Taekwondo, Homeschool PE and Fit for YOUR Life. See hubsportscenter.

org for cost and times.

CIVIC & BUSINESS Wednesdays in May | SCORE Small Business Classes – Wednesday mornings May 1 (starting a business), May 8 (business plan 101), May 15 (marketing and sales), and May 22 (financial management), SBA Training Room, 801 W. Riverside Ave. 4th Floor, Spokane. Cost is $25 if pre-registered. SCORE Spokane offers a variety of low-cost workshops designed to encourage the success of emerging and small business owners. Free business mentoring is also available. For more, visit spokane.score.org. May 2 | Greater Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce 2019 Business Showcase – 2 to 6:30 p.m., Mirabeau Park Hotel and Convention Center, 1100 N. Sullivan Road, Spokane Valley. This annual event features more than 70 exhibitors from all industries. Includes free parking and admission. For more information, call 924-4994 or visit www.spokanevalleychamber.org.

RECURRING Spokane Valley City Council | Regular meetings held the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 6 p.m. in Council Chambers at Spokane Valley City Hall, 11707 E. Sprague Ave., Ste. 101. Council study sessions are held the first, third and sometimes fifth Tuesdays at 6 p.m., also in Council Chambers. Millwood City Council | Regular meetings at 7 p.m. on the second Tuesday of each month at Millwood City Hall, 9103 E. Frederick Ave. Spokane Flag Museum | Sponsored by the Sons of the American Revolution and the Fairmount Memorial Association, details the rich history of the American flag, Monday-Friday 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Saturdays 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Pines Cemetery, 1402 S. Pines Road, Spokane Valley. For more, call 926-2753 or visit fairmountmemorial.com/ south-pines-cemetery. Spokane Valley Kiwanis | 6:45 a.m. Tuesdays, Valley Hospital Education Center, 12606 E. Mission Ave. More at spokanevalleykiwanis. net. Greater Spokane Valley Rotary | Noon to 1 p.m. Wednesdays, Darcy’s, 10502 E. Sprague Ave. More at svrotary.org.

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MAY 2019 • 15

brought to you by Student of the Month

Athlete of the Month

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Along with maintaining a 4.0 grade point average, University High School senior Hailey Coleman is a regular on the honor roll and found time to establish U-Hi’s Writing Club this year. She specializes in fiction writing. Coleman has also coached the math team at Horizon Middle School the last three years, leading the squad to state the past two seasons. She has taken 10 AP classes including calculus and statistics. Coleman is also in Spanish 4 and enrolled in the AP Capstone Diploma program, a demanding twoyear curriculum that hones skills in research, evidence-based arguments, collaboration, writing and presenting. Coleman also contributes to community service projects through her church, including visiting residents of assisted living facilities and preparing transitional packets for kids in foster care. The senior plans to attend Brigham Young University after high school.

Fraser Robertson has lettered in varsity soccer all four years at University High School. The native of Scotland was named to the All Greater Spokane League second team last year and was third overall in points. He had a hat trick in a win against Rogers last season. Robertson has played club soccer with River City, FC Spokane and the Shadow. He registered a hat trick in the semifinal and final of a club soccer tournament last season. The senior co-captain tallied both goals in U-Hi’s 2-0 victory over Rogers on March 22. In the classroom, Robertson is a member of the National Honor Society and lettered in Knowledge Bowl. He also serves as senior ASB sergeant at arms. The recipient of the Presidential Scholarship at Montana State University, Robertson plans to major in computer engineering.

Many people know Tom Towey as mayor of Spokane Valley from 2010 through 2013 but the lifetime Valley resident is also a Navy veteran, active community volunteer and accomplished marathoner. Towey currently volunteers with SCRAPS (Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service) and SCOPE (Sheriff Community Oriented Policing Effort). He also serves as sergeant at arms for American Legion Post 241. The West Valley High graduate earned a degree in business administration from Spokane Falls Community College and worked at Rosauers for 32 years. Towey will compete in his 51st marathon later this year. As mayor, he introduced a welcome letter for new Valley businesses. He was part of the city’s Planning Commission prior to his election to City Council. Tom and his wife Karen have been married for 53 years. They have two children and three grandkids.

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to get air ventilation. Turn off any appliances such as gas-fired furnace or a running generator. After the home has gotten ventilation, reset the carbon monoxide detectors. If the detectors do not sound again, call a qualified technician to inspect and repair any problem. Should the alarm sound a second time (and no one is showing signs of carbon monoxide poisoning), vent the home and call SVFD. SVFD provides free home fire safety inspections that include checking on CO alarms. For more information, call 9281700. Electrical problems – On March 20, SVFD Engine 6 responded to a report of electrical problems at the 4400 block of East Sprague Avenue. Crews found the owner/ manager of the unit near some camping trailers at the back of the business. The crew was told the cable lines were melting, and lights were surging in some of the trailers and the home behind them. Engine 6 contacted dispatch to have Avista respond to this location, and Engine 6 waited for Avista. Once Avista arrived, crews noticed the neutral side of the power line that fed the home and the trailers in that part of the business had broken, likely causing the electrical problems.


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The Current

MAY 2019 • 17

Courageous people ‘go to the roar’ By Randy Russell Guest Column Courage can be found across our region, our state, our nation and our world. Every day we see people – from children to senior citizens – act with courage. A few examples include people fighting a serious illness, educators, single parents, business leaders, disabled citizens and those individuals who put their life on the line every day to help and serve others. Each month, this paper supports Partners Advancing Character Education (PACE) by publishing a guest column connected to one of PACE’s character traits. For the month of May, the PACE character trait is courage. Courage is displaying integrity in spite of obstacles and challenges. One of my mentors and dear friend, Harry Amend, has lived and served in the Inland Northwest for most of his life. He grew up and

then raised his family here. Those of us who have had the privilege of knowing Harry as a teacher, coach, baseball scout, counselor, administrator, superintendent, boss, friend and mentor have truly been impacted and influenced by him. We are all better people because of him. One of the many lessons I’ve learned from Harry is about “going to the roar.” This essentially means running toward a situation to help as best as one is able. Many people lead and many people serve. Harry has stated people with courage, regardless of the situation or the circumstances, always “go to the roar.” Emergency medical technicians, firefighters, law enforcement officers, and those serving in the military are excellent examples of people who “go to the roar.” These fine men and women have a call to duty, a surplus of courage, and are selfless. They have a desire to serve those around them, protect peoples’ and animals’ lives, are willing to put themselves in danger to protect others and are always willing to lend a hand or help out. We are so fortunate that their courage helps so many of us. In August 2016 the Yale Road Fire

in Valleyford burned approximately 6,000 acres. People lost their homes and animals. This tragedy impacted the entire Freeman community. In June 2017, tragedy struck the Freeman community with the loss of Freeman High School sophomore Justin Werner. On Sept. 13, 2017, the Freeman community – our students, staff and parents – had another tragedy. We lost another student, Freeman High School sophomore Sam Strahan, and it has had a lasting impact for people on a local, regional, state and national level. In all of these situations, we saw many people “go to the roar” as they came to Freeman to help us out. As difficult as it is to have a tragedy occur, the support to help us during these extremely difficult situations is a reminder that there are many people with courage who just wanted to help and serve us. As we celebrate the PACE Awards Banquet this May, we are going to highlight many outstanding students and their inspirational educators. This is one of the best events of the school year, and you will see many community members at this event celebrating our youth, their character and their courage.

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We look forward to celebrating the good character of the students in our community! Randy Russell has served as the Freeman Superintendent since 2011. Russell is a Montana native with degrees and certifications from Whitworth University and the University of Idaho. He has taught and served in administration roles at various schools in Spokane and Coeur d’Alene. Russell also serves as a member of the PACE Board of Directors.


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Relocated Veterans Services Center specializes in support By Benjamin Shedlock Current Correspondent During the March 1 opening of the new Spokane County Regional Veterans Services Center, more than just ribbon was cut. The ceremony represented barriers being removed for area veterans looking for a wide range of services. “We are so proud of our new center,” said Cathrene Nichols, director of the center. “It’s going to be a win-win-win for our veterans.” The center has officially moved to Spokane Valley from its former home in the Spokane County Regional Health District building just north of downtown Spokane. The expanded center, located at 1111 N. Evergreen, will continue offering veterans employment, housing, transportation, behavioral health and emergency services. But the new location will be more visible and accessible and allow the venue to grow. “I was excited from the beginning

About and for Valley seniors for this new facility because it provides our veteran citizens an easily accessible opportunity to obtain the services they need and deserve,” said Spokane County Commissioner Mary Kuney. According to Nichols, the center’s visible new location will help expand its reach. The previous location was on a high floor and did not have signage on the outside of the building. “We’ve been able to go from what looked like a community services office to a beautiful facility that honors and respects (veterans’) military service,” she said. “Hopefully we can connect even stronger.” Nichols believes the new location will help the center “be more regional” and attract veterans from North Idaho. The accessibility of the new center will also enhance services to veterans. In the downtown area, Nichols reported a lack of parking because of all the other county services concentrated in that area. The relocated space is located just off I-90 and on major bus routes. To provide a range of veteranspecific services, it is operated as a public/private partnership with the Spokane County Office of the Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs and the WestCare

Foundation. The department provides a wide range of services related to health, education, employment and finances for veterans. WestCare provides person-centered and trauma-informed care “across the continuum of health and human services,” according to its website. Because the space is larger, Nichols said, the center will be able to expand its services through grants. The center is in the process of hiring grant-funded staff and has plans to hire more. Despite the widespread excitement, the decision to move the center was not easy. The upcoming end date of the lease with the county, which concluded on Dec. 30 of last year, threw the center’s needs into sharp focus. “There was concern about moving away from downtown,” Nichols said. Working with local broker 4 Degrees Real Estate, the center reviewed “many factors and looked at a lot of facilities downtown and on the north side” of Spokane, said Nichols. In those locations, the center’s staff did not find the parking they needed to accommodate expanded services or buildings that were move-in ready. Cost was also a factor. “Prices were so much higher (in Spokane) than they were out in the Valley,” Nichols said. Since the move, however, Nichols has received “nothing but positive feedback, especially when folks see the new facility.” Veterans who live in the area have stopped in just because they noticed the building. “Everyone has been absolutely thrilled,” Nichols said. That includes leaders in Spokane Valley.

Submitted Photo A new location for the Spokane County Regional Veterans Services Center opened on Evergreen March 1 after previously being housed in the Spokane County Regional Health District building. The space and ample parking are allowing for expanded services and better access.

“Our city is very open and looking for ways to be supportive (of veterans),” said Spokane Valley City Council Member Linda Thompson. “Having a nice, beautiful place for them to come and good accessibility is very important.” Thompson noted that the Valley is also home to the Spokane Vet Center, an access point for federal

Veterans Affairs services and counseling near Mirabeau Point Park. “It’s something we all as citizens of this community and nation need, to embrace our veterans,” she said. Serving veterans in Spokane Valley is not just part of Thompson’s professional duties, but it is also a personal passion and professional interest. Thompson’s son-in-law serves as a major in the Washington National Guard to put himself through Washington State University. Thompson hears from him about his responsibility to soldiers who have experienced substance abuse and mental health issues. As a substance abuse prevention professional who currently serves as the executive director of the Greater Spokane Substance Abuse Council (GSSAC), Thompson knows veterans face unique challenges seeking help with behavioral health treatment. “That stigma of not wanting to go for help when it’s needed because of concerns for their Army career is of utmost interest in my work with GSSAC,” she said. Thompson believes the Veterans Services Center is poised to give back to those who serve. “There is no judgment from those at the center,” she said. “There is just an attitude that this is about health, not about shame or being embarrassed.” The center provides more than behavioral health services, but Thompson believes a holistic approach is key to supporting veterans’ overall health. According to Thompson, people struggling with substance use do better when they have a good job, stable housing and a sense of community. If you know a veteran who is struggling with behavioral health or other challenges, Thompson encourages you to reach out to them, give them encouragement and connect them with the center. For more information about the Spokane County Regional Veterans Services Center, call 477-3690 or visit spokanecounty.org/1122/ Veteran-Services.


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MAY 2019 • 19

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Hulbert is used to seeing his athletes soar U-Hi pole vault coach has worked with state champs, Olympian By Steve Christilaw Current Contributor Reg Hulbert knows it’s coming – that moment when a young athlete suddenly gets it. He’s seen it before, and he knows what it will mean. Hulbert is back teaching the pole vault at University High School

this spring after taking a five-year break, and he has a dozen young Titan vaulters to work with in his 31st year coaching. And if that weren’t enough, he has a few more that he works with two days a week at Freeman High School. There comes a point with young vaulters when all the lessons Hulbert teaches them fall into place, when

they trust what he’s told them and simply launch themselves skyward. “It will all come together at once, and you’ll see them improve two feet in one day,” he said. “It just clicks.” It’s a powerful moment for the vaulter and satisfying one for the coach. “You want them to get to the point where they’re looking at their feet as they’re going up instead of looking at the bar,” he said. “You aren’t going to make it if you’re looking at the bar. You get them to do that and then we can start teaching them to bend the bar. That’s when things really start to take off. If you bend the bar it can really shoot up.” That moment is coming soon for some of his young U-Hi vaulters. Hulbert first came to University as part of a deal – he’d work with the school’s vaulters if he could train alongside them for his master’s competition. “They said ‘Deal!’” he laughed. “That worked great. We worked out together, and it was a long time before one of them could outvault me. I cleared 14 feet to set the master’s record, and it was a while before one of them could beat that.” Coaching careers have traditional landmarks, and some of those landmarks are bigger than others. Reg Hulbert’s more than that.

are

something

Coaching a league champion is a landmark. Coaching a state champion is another. Hulbert has done both. And then some. Brad Walker first caught the coach’s attention as a volunteer pole vaulter as a Horizon Middle Schooler. At first, Walker would train in Hulbert’s backyard. By his freshman year, he cleared 10-feet6.

Photo by Steve Christilaw Longtime pole vault coach Reg Hulbert works with University High School student Nych Ciferri during an April practice. Hulbert has coached many successful Titan vaulters over the years, including Olympian Brad Walker.

“That was a good mark for a freshman,” Hulbert said. “It takes time to learn how to vault. It’s usually their junior year before you really start to see them put it all together.” Before he finished his Titan career, Walker cleared 16-feet. At

the University of Washington, he went on to win two NCAA Indoor Championships and earn AllAmerica honors four straight years. Overall, he won five USA Outdoor Championships and two more indoors. Along the way he won a World Championship, set the US record with a personal best vault of 199¾ and competed in two Olympic Games. Through it all, Walker looked to Hulbert for advice. “I cannot tell you what a thrill it is to see one of your kids compete like that,” Hulbert said. “It is just amazing. “Brad and I talked a lot, even though he had other coaches. My thing has always been the mental aspect. That’s what we talked about.” For all the records Walker has held through his career, the current assistant track coach at Washington State was denied one fundamental mark. He doesn’t hold the U-Hi school record. That one belongs to Tyson Byers. “Tyson was a freaky-good vaulter, even as a freshman,” Hulbert said. “He was a former gymnast, so he was really comfortable with the whole concept of being upside down. He caught on fast.” As a senior, Byers won the state Class 4A title with a record 17-0 vault, an inch shy of his school record 17-1. Noah Martin was a dual-threat during his U-Hi career, clearing 15feet in the pole vault and 7-3 in the high jump. “Noah was one of the last vaulters I coached before I left,” Hulbert said. “I’m working with his younger brother now, and he’s even better. He’s freaky good.” Hulbert and Walker remain close. They live a couple houses away from each other and help work on each other’s car. “Brad is coaching at Washington State, and he’s working with an elite woman, Katie Nageotte, who is ranked No. 3 in the world at 16-1¾,” Hulbert said. “I’ve been working with her a little, too.”


The Current

LIBRARY

SCLD seeks levy restoration for maintenance and operations By Jane Baker Spokane County Library District

Spokane County Library District is asking voters to consider a measure to restore the property tax levy rate that funds daily operations and maintenance of its 11 libraries to keep library services at existing levels throughout Spokane County, increase digital materials and replace outdated building heating and cooling systems. The restoration levy will be on the Aug. 6 primary election ballot. This measure would restore the property tax levy rate that funds daily operations and maintenance of its libraries to 50 cents per $1,000 of assessed property value. Currently, the levy rate is at 43 cents per $1,000 assessed property value. The levy tax rate proposed is a 7 cent per $1,000 of assessed property value increase. For the owner of a home with a $235,000 assessment, the annual cost would increase $16.45. The levy needs a simple majority (over 50 percent voter approval)

to pass. The last ballot proposition for maintenance of facilities and to sustain and enhance essential library services was in 2010. Property taxes are 93 percent of the library district’s funding for operations. Passage of this levy is necessary for long-term sustainable funding of the Airway Heights, Argonne, Cheney, Deer Park, Fairfield, Medical Lake, Moran Prairie, North Spokane, Otis Orchards, Spokane Valley and The BookEnd libraries. If approved, the library district will repair or replace outdated HVAC systems, update safety and security in all facilities, as well as maintain library services at current levels. The funds would also pay for an increase in the digital collection of eBooks, audiobook downloads and streaming offerings. Demand for digital materials at the library district has increased 2,700 percent in the past 10 years. The library district has identified an operational need to bring services to those who are not able to visit the library themselves. To address this

Lecture sheds light on wonders of Dishman Hills

By Erin Dodge Current Guest Contributor Nestled between Spokane and Spokane Valley south of the I-90 lays the “Wild Heart of Spokane.” Trailheads lead you to natural wonders where you can experience a high diversity of rock formations and geologic features, native trees, plants and flowers, birds and butterflies and find evidence of large mammals such as moose,

elk, deer and bear. You may know the area as the Dishman Hills. For anyone wanting a handson experience with the area, Jeff Lambert, executive director of the Dishman Hills Conservancy, shares: “A guided walk introduces you to the correct route – you will not get lost and we make sure you go to the best spots. The wilderness

Contributed Photo

need, the district is also planning to add another vehicle to expand mobile services with emerging technologies to extend services to rural communities within the district’s service area. The library district serves all of Spokane County with the exceptions of the city of Spokane and the city of Liberty Lake. The levy is integral to maintain core library services at existing levels for 280,000 citizens. If the measure fails, the district will shift available funds to facility repairs and maintenance, reduce story times and other programs, acquire fewer new digital resources and begin determining where and when community libraries will be closed. Over 1.3 million visitors came to district libraries last year, checking out 2.5 million items. Over 84,000 people attended the more than 3,400 free events, which range in topics from financial literacy and educational offerings to story times and after-school programs. The district has completed a facilities’ needs assessment and financial forecast for the immediate future. Based on this analysis, the district has determined it necessary to put a levy rate restoration proposition before the voters.

views are surprising, especially given that the hills are surrounded by urban development.” You can learn about upcoming guided nature walks and hikes during Lambert’s lecture “Dishman Hills: The Wild Heart of Spokane” at Spokane Valley Library on Wednesday, May 8, at 7 p.m. Lambert will also talk about the five-year conservation plan and ways to get involved as a volunteer, including planting trees and shrubs, building trails and managing weeds. Dishman Hills has over 3,000 acres of conservation land, protected for recreation, education and wildlife habitat. The conservation lands, however, are not contiguous. Some of the undeveloped lands surrounding and in between the Dishman Hills Natural Area, the Glenrose area and the Iller Creek area are privately owned. The Dishman Hills Conservancy is now working to add 1,200 acres and three trailheads toward the goal of connecting the conservation and recreation areas for public use. “Donations of cash, stocks, and real estate help fund conservation acquisitions, stewardship and education and are the best way to invest in the future of the Wild Heart of Spokane,” said Lambert. You can learn more about the natural beauty of Dishman Hills and mission of the conservancy at www.dishmanhills.org.

MAY 2019 • 21

Marketing Plans for Entrepreneurs SCORE Business Workshop

Create a modern day marketing plan that is: • Flexible • Nimble • Your roadmap to success For entrepreneurs & small businesses ARGONNE LIBRARY Thursday, May 9, 12:30pm Register at www.scld.org/score-business. Workshop available at no cost thanks to the generosity of the Friends of the Spokane County Library District.

www.scld.org


The Current

22 • MAY 2019

West Valley softball soaring By Josh Johnson

Current Contributor

at University High School Theatre

Heading into a rivalry doubleheader against East Valley in late April, the West Valley High School girls fastpitch softball team was enjoying an April to remember. Not only undefeated in Great Northern League play, the veteran team also was finding an offensive gear that had to please first-year coach Brian Ostby. The Eagles scored double-digit runs in all seven games, including a combined 42 runs in a doubleheader April 24 against Pullman, games won 19-4 and 23-12. The solid play of returning all-league infielders Kilee Imada (a homer and double in the first game) and Jillian Taylor (five hits, including three doubles, in the second game) were just a part of the potent office. Senior Trinity Moore added a triple and homer to the offensive fireworks. India Wells and Rilee Homer lead the pitching rotation, picking up six of the seven April wins.

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Freeman baseball in Northeast A race with Colville

David and Christina Lynch

David Brewster

Heading into a pivotal Northeast A League doubleheader against Deer Park in late April, the Freeman High School boys baseball team was cruising through an unblemished month. Perhaps there was no more impressive win than the 6-5 victory April 23 over Colville to pull the two teams even atop the league standings. Jace Phelan struck out 10 over five innings, only allowing one run in that span against a team used to scoring double-digit runs. In the top of the seventh inning, however, the Indians put up four runs to pull even with the Scotties, 5-5. That set the table for Jake Amend, who picked the perfect time to collect his first hit of the game, a bases-loaded, walkoff single. Phelan and Ryan Hayek added three hits apiece, the only other Freeman hits allowed against the stingy Colville defense. GSL fastpitch softball coming down to the wire

See SOFTBALL, Page 23


The Current

SOFTBALL

Continued from page 22 There is a lot of merit in the adage, “one game at a time,” but it’s hard not to look ahead to a rematch between University and Central Valley that closes out both schools’ regular season girls fastpitch softball schedules. Central Valley won the first game between the Valley rivals in extra innings on April 12. The Bears capitalized on 16 hits to score 14 runs, and still needed a walkoff single from Julia Andrews in the bottom of the eighth inning to come away with a 14-13 win. Suheyla Tanak and Gianna McCoy both earned three hits, including a double each, during the game. Nevertheless, the Titans hold the upper-hand in the league race with the rivalry loss their lone blemish, while the Bears have lost twice in league. During a nine-game stretch to start league play, the Titans won eight times, with six of those victories picked up by ace pitcher Tammya Campbell, who set the tone with a complete game, fourhit shutout in the league opener against Mead and never looked back. Makayla Marshall and Alyssa Benthagen have been on fire at the plate for the Titans. Marshall’s three-run, first-inning home run against a dynamic Shadle Park team April 19 proved to be the difference in a 7-4 victory, while Benthagen homered in both the first and second innings in a victory over Rogers April 16.

Street sweeping under way Street sweeping to help keep stormwater drainage systems functioning has begun in Spokane Valley. Sweeping will be weekdays from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. and is expected to continue through July. Community members are asked to keep leaves and debris from their property out of the road and to remove items such as basketball hoops and bicycles to help street vehicles complete sweeping more efficiently. Community members can view a map of street sweeping areas at spokanevalley.org/ StreetMaintenance. Areas shown in orange on the map reflect locations where street sweeping is currently under way. For more info, visit the website or call 720-5000.

MAY 2019 • 23

News Droplets Grants to replace woodburning devices expire in June Spokane Valley-area homeowners interested in replacing an old, inefficient wood-burning stove or fireplace insert are encouraged to apply now before the program is set to expire in June, announced the Spokane Regional Clean Air Agency.

The JAKT Foundation. Enhancing a Vibrant Spokane Valley Community Through Local Events.

“This grant provides an instant rebate of up to $1,000 to help preapproved applicants offset the cost to replace their old wood-burning device,” said Lisa Woodard, the program's coordinator. To be eligible for the program, applicants must reside within the Smoke Control Zone (covering most of the Valley) and regularly heat with a wood-burning stove or fireplace insert that was made prior to 1995 or is non-EPA-certified. Residents can learn more about the program and apply online at www. spokanecleanair.org.

Spokane Valley CenterPlace • July 11 – 13, 2019 • CraveNW.com

Minor injuries after boxcutter assault on STA Bus Alerted by numerous citizens reporting that the digital sign on an STA bus read, “Call Police,” Spokane Valley deputies responded at 9:10 a.m. April 12 to the scene near the intersection of Appleway and Elizabeth in Spokane Valley. Deputy Tim Jones arrived and contacted the bus driver and occupants of the bus. He was informed a male, later identified as 50-year-old Paul D. Mattingly, cut the throat of another passenger unprovoked, causing minor injuries. Mattingly walked off the bus when it stopped, prior to Deputy Jones’ arrival.

Spokane Valley CenterPlace • September 27- 29, 2019 • SpokaneOktoberfest.com

A male waved Deputy Wall down near 2nd Avenue during his search. As Deputy Wall pulled up to contact the male, he observed Mattingly lying on the north shoulder of 2nd Avenue in the dirt. The male told Deputy Wall drove by Mattingly and noticed him on the ground. When he contacted Mattingly, Mattingly told him to call the police. Mattingly was detained without incident. He was advised of his right and declined to answer questions. During a search for weapons, a dark-colored folding knife/ boxcutter, wrapped in a bandanna, was located in his pocket. Mattingly was transported and booked into the Spokane County Jail for Assault 1st Degree, a felony.

Spokane Valley CenterPlace Parking Lot Fridays, 5 - 8pm, June 7th - September 13 th • SpokaneValleyFarmersMarket.org


24 • MAY 2019

Duluth opens doors to the Valley

BUSINESS Pugliese said that the retail emphasis supports the company’s successful online and catalog business, which will continue. One of those longtime shoppers is Spokane resident Mickey Strong, who attended the grand opening and reported being a catalog customer for 20 years. He said he really appreciates Duluth jeans because the triangular gusset makes it much more comfortable for long-distance driving. He and his wife take frequent road trips to visit grandchildren. Strong said he also likes the T-shirts and cold weather jackets. Another shopper, Sona Griffith

By Linda Ball Current Correspondent Build it, and they will come. People came in droves April 11 for the grand opening of Duluth Trading Co.’s brand new store – the 50th in the company’s chain of brick-and-mortar locations – at 16314 E. Indiana Ave., Spokane Valley. Duluth Trading Company styles itself as a men’s and women’s casual, workwear and accessories store. It took Spokane-based Baker Construction and Development a little less than six months to build the 15,000-square-foot building visible from I-90, Project Manager John Spilker said. He said this was a new prototype for Duluth in that this is the first building with a mechanical well inset in the roof to stage the HVAC equipment. A bright red vintage pickup truck in mint condition greets shoppers who enter the store. Spilker said there was some concern about getting the truck inside, but the crew arranged to drive it right through the opening before the doors were installed. The April 11 grand opening featured two lumberjack shows outside, with chainsaw carving, pole climbing and other events to delight the crowd. Duluth Trading spokesperson Melodie Mendez said there is already a huge concentration of online and catalog customers in the Spokane area. After analyzing the market

The Current

of Spokane, said she owns a vest made by Duluth that belonged to her late father. She said it still looks like new despite being at least 15 years old. Bonnie Ervin, who came from North Spokane for the grand opening, is a longtime online Duluth shopper. She wore Duluth clothing to the grand opening and said while it’s convenient to shop online, it was nice to browse the product in person. Ervin, who brought along friend and Duluth newcomer Annette Baker to the grand opening, said both she and her husband are impressed with the quality of the Duluth product.

Mickey Strong shops at the Duluth Trading Co. grand opening April 11. The Spokane resident has been a Duluth catalog shopper for 20 years. in the area and with the northeast area of the Valley booming, the location seemed ideal. “We know there’s a huge community of hard-working people here, so it seemed like a good fit,” Mendez said. She said Duluth opened more than a dozen stores coast to coast in 2018. “We couldn’t be more excited to open our 50th Duluth Trading Store in Spokane Valley,” CEO Stephanie Pugliese said. “This store is a milestone for us as it represents the halfway mark toward reaching our goal of 100 retail stores over the next few years.”

A vintage red truck greets shoppers as they enter the new Duluth Trading Co. in Spokane Valley. Local contractor Baker Construction and Development arranged to have the truck parked inside the newly constructed building before the doors were installed.

Photos by Linda Ball A young customer is awarded a freshly chainsaw-carved chair as part of the grand opening festivities April 11 at Spokane Valley’s new Duluth Trading Co. store.

What type of store is Duluth Trading Co.?

The company was originally founded by two brothers, Bob and Dave Fierek, in Duluth, Minn. The first product was called the Bucket Boss, a tool organizer for construction workers. The company has switched hands a couple of times since and is now based in Mt. Horeb, Wis., about 30 minutes from Madison. In 2002, it introduced its longtail T-shirts, also called no yank tees, which were designed to eliminate unsightly plumbers’ crack. In 2005, women’s clothing was introduced. Nearly all of the products in the store are Duluth’s own exclusive brand, although the store carries a few third-party brands, particularly in shoes, with Keen as one example. One of Duluth’s brands, Alaska Hard Gear, is geared toward seasonal wear for men, such as fishing wear that wicks moisture away. Firehouse is made from thicker fabric and is

designed for wearing when hiking in brush. “Duluth is a problem-solving company,” Mendez said, adding the company has more than 6,000 five-star reviews on its underwear line, Buck Naked, its most popular, breathable underwear. Armachillo, another underwear line, is also designed to keep you cool. Mendez said Duluth’s marketing development team, product developers and feedback from customers inspire the clever branding. Duluth carries some active wear, including Noga pants for women, a heavier yoga pant design. New for women is a special gardening selection including fun short bib-overalls with lots of pockets for tools. Also new is a men’s travel-wear selection, featuring non-wrinkle fabrics. Duluth also carries personal care items such as Duke Cannon soaps and its own apothecary line called Spit and Polish, which includes beard oil and cologne for men and knuckle wax for anyone.


The Current

MAY 2019 • 25

Business Droplets

Brand It turns 10 Brand It Advertising is celebrating a decade in business in Spokane Valley. The full-service agency founded in March 2009 by owners Dan and Lisa Mathews and now boasts a 13-employee team and accounts both local and national. The Mathews began with an inhome office and now occupy 7,000 square feet in a renovated building at 122 N. Raymond Road, Suite 2. “The growth of Brand It Advertising wouldn’t have even been imaginable without support from family, friends, our clientele and a dedicated, hardworking team,” Dan Mathews said. “The agency has its eyes on the future and we’re executing strategic and calculated growth initiatives. We look forward to another 10 years.” For more information, visit branditadvertising.com

“We’re proud to present this high honor to Greg Ernst in recognition of the outstanding work being done at Lone Wolf HarleyDavidson,” said Mike Kennedy, Vice President and Managing Director for the United States.

SCLD librarian honored Library Journal, a trade magazine for librarians, recently recognized a Spokane County Library District team member as one of the publication’s “Movers and Shakers.” Amber Williams, managing librarian for strategic initiatives at the Library District, was one of 54 librarians recognized nationwide. Among Williams’ accomplishments: the implementation of a food program providing nutritious snacks to youngsters in the library and a teen boot camp at The Studio -- the audio/visual lab at Spokane Valley Library – that has attracted 77 teen participants and five teen interns over the past two summers. Whether it’s feeding hungry children, launching a video creation studio, bringing renewal to a dilapidated park, or heading up a countywide poetry slam, Williams sees her role in simple terms: “I build community.”

Amphenol Telect completes merger Dan and Lisa Mathews are celebrating 10 years since starting Brand It Advertising.

Harley dealer honored Lone Wolf Harley-Davidson, 19011 E. Cataldo Ave. in Spokane Valley, has earned the prestigious Silver Bar & Shield Circle of Achievement Award for 2018, continuing an annual streak since its founding in 2008. Presented by Harley-Davidson Motor Company, this award is given to the top three dealerships in each U.S. sales market. Lone Wolf Harley-Davidson earned the award based on motorcycle and related product sales performance, customer service and satisfaction, and operational measures.

Liberty Lake’s Amphenol Telect has merged with All Systems Broadband and is rebranding under the name, Amphenol Network Solutions. Company headquarters will remain in Liberty Lake, where Telect was founded and has operated for the past 36 years. The company will also maintain a significant presence in Raleigh, N.C., where All Systems Broadband’s Product Development Center resides. The two companies collaborated frequently in the past to provide high quality solutions for joint customers, according to the merger announcement. The Liberty Lake company remains a division of Amphenol, one of the world’s largest manufacturers of interconnect products and providers of network solutions.

CONNECT.

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the 2019

BUSINESS

SHOWCASE

The Greater Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce Business-to-Business Trade Show highlights regional businesses. Attendees can get information on new products and services while businesses can generate leads and network. Featuring: • 70+ exhibitors representing marketing, financial services, business products and services, health care, employee benefits, higher education, transportation/storage, janitorial and more! • ‘Fireside Chat’ with local business leader • Complimentary appetizers & no-host bar from 4:30 p.m. to 6 pm. • Great networking & opportunities to make new business connections • Tons of door prizes • No charge for admission or parking

INNOVATE.

Business Showcase Thurs., May 2nd, 2019 Mirabeau Park Hotel Exhibit hours: 2:00-6:00 p.m. Fireside Chat at 5 p.m. No-host bar & appetizers at 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Admission is Free! New Members: FEBRUARY Copiers Northwest DeVries Moving Packing Storage Empire Eye Physicians Gravis Law, PLLC Sculley’s Automotive

Lemonade Day May 18th

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1421 N. Meadowwood Ln. Liberty Lake, WA 99019 | 509-924-4994 | www.spokanevalleychamber.org


The Current

26 • MAY 2019

Safety scroll

source. Remember, even a pilot light can set vapors on fire.

How fire safe is your home? From the Spokane Department

Valley

Fire

Make fire safety a “family business” by involving the entire family in a fire safety inspection. Here’s a comprehensive checklist to use as a guide. Check for fire hazards in your home and correct any problems right away. Remember, the Spokane Valley Fire Department provides free home fire safety inspections and installation of free smoke detectors. For more information call 928-1700 or visit www.spokanevalleyfire. com. In the kitchen, matches should be stored out of reach of children. Make sure there are no overloaded outlets or extension cords and no curtains or towel racks close to the range. Flammable liquids (cleaning fluids, contact adhesives, etc.) or aerosols need to be stored away from the range or other heat

Check to ensure that there are no attractive or frequently used items stored above the range where someone could get burned reaching for them (especially small children in search of cookies or other goodies). There should be no worn or frayed appliance or extension cords. In the living room, family room, den and bedrooms, matches and lighters should be stored out of reach of children. If you smoke, use only large ashtrays (small ashtrays are too dangerous). Empty ashtrays frequently (when all signs of heat and burning are gone). Fireplaces should be kept screened and cleaned regularly. Replace worn or frayed extension cords or other electrical cords. No extension cords should run under rugs or carpets or looped over nails or other sharp objects that could cause them to fray. Heating equipment should be kept 3 feet away from curtains, furniture and papers. Ensure there are no overloaded outlets or extension cords.

In the basement, garage and storage areas, no newspapers or other rubbish should be stored near the furnace, water heater or other heat source. Don’t store oily, greasy rags, except when kept in labeled and sealed non-glass containers (preferably metal). No gasoline should be stored in the house or basement. It should be stored away from the house in an outbuilding and only in safety cans that have flame arresters and pressure-relief values. Don’t keep flammable liquids near a workbench or pilot light or in anything other than labeled, sealed metal containers. This includes varnish, paint remover, paint thinner, contact adhesives, cleaning fluids, etc. There should be no overloaded outlets or extension cords and all fuses should be of the correct size. Do you allow unsafe habits in your home? These guidelines may help your family become more safety aware: Never put cigarettes out in potted plants. Potting soil is highly flammable. Wear close-fitting sleeves while cooking, no loose sleeves, shins, blouses or skirts that may catch fire. Never leaving cooking unattended. Never play with matches or lighters. Never use gasoline to start a fire in the grill or add lighter fluid to an already started fire. Smoke alarms are critical to fire safety in the home. They are inexpensive, easy to install and save lives. Make sure to follow these important smoke alarm tips: Buy multiple alarms – install one smoke alarm in the living areas on every floor of your home, including the basement. Also install an alarm outside every sleeping area – and one inside as well if you sleep with your door closed Install alarms – smoke rises so alarms are meant to be mounted high on a wall or on the ceiling. Always position smoke alarms at the bottom of closed stairways. Don’t install a smoke alarm too near a window, door or forcedair register where drafts could interfere with proper operation. Test alarms – make sure everyone sleeping in your home can hear your smoke alarms. Test alarms monthly. Replace batteries – at least twice

Horizon remodel begins; students move to old U-Hi By Nina Culver

Current Contributor Students at Horizon Middle School in Spokane Valley will not come back to their school for nearly two years as an extensive remodeling project begins. A groundbreaking ceremony to mark the start of the construction project was held at the end of March during a few rain showers, and Central Valley School District Superintendent Ben Small joked that it wouldn’t be a proper groundbreaking without rain. Students began attending classes in the old University High School on Ninth Avenue after spring break and will be there for the next year and a half. The former school is now owned by Valley Christian, but a clause in the sale contract allows the school district to lease back a portion to house the students during construction. The old high school has been named “Horizon North” and an open house was held before the students moved so they could familiarize themselves with the school campus. The Horizon students will be in three of the buildings at the site and use a gym that is in the same building as Valley Christian’s gym. Spring sports will be played at Horizon while construction is under way, and students will be shuttled to Horizon from Horizon North after school and parents will pick them up from Horizon. Meals will be prepared off-site and transported to Horizon North every day.

See HORIZON, Page 27

a year. Never take the batteries out of your smoke alarms. Replace alarms every 10 years – smoke alarms wear out. Know the age of your alarms (look at back of alarm for manufacture date) and replace alarms that are more than 10 years old. This applies to both battery-powered and hardwired units. Three of five home fire deaths result from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms. Be sure to install, test and replace smoke alarms in your home.


The Current

MAY 2019 • 27

HORIZON

Continued from page 26 Construction on the middle school on South Pines Road was originally slated to start this summer. “We’ve had to move the construction up a bit,” Small said. “We wanted to get back in in the fall of 2020.” The project, estimated to cost $29.5 million, is being paid for by a construction bond approved by voters in early 2018. The size will increase by just over 8,700 square feet, and the completely remodeled and expanded building will be able to house 600 students, an increase of 120 students. A new entryway will be built on the south side of the building, and there will be security upgrades throughout. Quite a few windows will be added to increase the natural light, and new furniture will be purchased. The parking lot will also be upgraded to improve traffic flow. NAC Architecture designed the renovations, and the general contractor for the project is LK Clark Construction. The current building has been in use since 1982. Some sections of the exterior are peeling away, but there’s a lot more than cosmetic issues going on. Small said the building has “fairly substantial” HVAC problems and there are issues with the roof.

Photos by Nina Culver Central Valley School District Superintendent Ben Small, far right, leads a group of district dignitaries in a ceremonial groundbreaking on an extensive remodeling project on Horizon Middle School. “The building is getting tired,” he said. The school looks a bit too much like a bunker, and Small said he’s excited to be getting more windows in and taking out the giant earthen berms on the south side of the building. “We want to establish a better learning environment,” he said. “We’re excited to get construction under way.” Small said that schools have an important role in the community beyond educating students. Right after he arrived in Spokane, the grounds of Horizon Middle School were put to use as a fire camp for firefighters battling a blaze in the Ponderosa area. “School buildings have a significant place in our community,” he said.

The expansion and modernization of Horizon Middle School was on display at the groundbreaking event in this rendering by NAC Architecture.

Horizon principal Josh Wolcott praised his staff for working tirelessly to move the school early and thanked the community for approving the project. “We’re excited for this day,” Wolcott said. “Thank you for overwhelmingly approving this as

part of the bond.” School board chairman Keith Clark said he was particularly excited to see improvements come to Horizon Middle School, which his children attended over a 20-year span. “Our family has been a member of this Horizon community for a long time,” he said. Members of the school choir and band performed during the groundbreaking ceremony, and shovels full of dirt were tossed. But doing a simple ceremonial dirt toss wasn’t enough for Small and Wolcott. Both clambered on top of one of the giant berms and got to work, enthusiastically raining down shovels full of dirt. Small praised the students, staff and parents for their efforts to move the school across town and go on what he called an extended field trip. “This will be an adventure for our students and staff and our parents to move to the old University High School, but the move will be worth it,” he said.


The Current

28 • MAY 2019

Celebra ng our Students! Later this month, over 400 students, families, educators, businesses and community leaders will gather for the PACE Awards to celebrate 50 excep onal students of good character. We are deeply grateful to our sponsors for making this event a reality. Launched in September 2010, the PACE program promotes the importance of good character through partnerships with schools, businesses, public agencies, residents, faith-based organiza ons and community service groups. PACE has grown to include over 200 partners and 50 schools all working together with families to promote good character across the Spokane Valley.

2019 PACE Awards Thank You to Our Sponsors! Platinum Venue Sponsor

R

2019

PACE AWARDS

Gold Sponsors

Silver Sponsors

MAY 23, 2019

Bringing Character to Light

Spokane Valley Sunrise Club

Award Sponsor

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Bronze Sponsors JOIN US! PACE schools and partners promote monthly character traits through mul -faceted communica on, mo va on and educa onal programs. Becoming a PACE partner is free and easy! We'll supply posters and a monthly e-newsle er full of ideas to recognize and celebrate good character in your own organiza on!

www.pacecommunity.org | 558-5530

facebook.com/PartnersAdvancingCharacterEduca on RESPECT RESPONSIBILITY CITIZENSHIP CARING FAIRNESS HONESTY DILIGENCE TRUSTWORTHINESS COURAGE INTEGRITY GENEROSITY GRATITUDE

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Architects West Friends of the Spokane County Library District Itron Kiwanis Club of Liberty Lake (3 tables) Liberty Lake Lions Club (2 tables) Quality Hardwood Floors of Spokane, Inc Simply Northwest Spokane Valley Ear, Nose, Throat and Facial Plastics Spokane Valley Kiwanis University of Washington West Valley School District

GeoEngineers Horizon Credit Union Inland Power & Light Scott Ralph, DDS

Air With a Flair Leo's Photography NBS Promos Spokane Valley Screen Printing

Please be sure to pick up a copy of the June issue of The Current for special coverage of the PACE Awards and a list of recipients.


The Current

MAY 2019 • 29

GREATER SPOKANE VALLEY

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We're looking for a few good 5-person teams to race a bed! Very affordable entry fee. All proceeds go to charitable causes sponsored by Liberty Lake Lions. This Bed Race occurs in Sept, so we are scouting new teams now. Decorate your own bed OR have one provided by the nonprofit, Sleep In Heavenly Peace, for a small additional fee going directly to them. SHP provides beds to children who've never had one. We need YOU! Call for more information 509-869-7657 or 509-220-1557.

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SOPHIE THORN

Correction policy The Current strives for accuracy in all content. Errors should be reported immediately to 242-7752 or by email to editor@valleycurrent.com. Confirmed factual errors will be corrected on this page in the issue following their discovery.

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Advertising information

BECU

Display ad copy and camera-ready ads are due by

Central Valley Theatre

9 12 5

g re e n s t o n e h o m

Index of advertisers

Following are the local advertisers in this issue of The Current.

Healthy Living Liberty Lake

26

Spokane County Library District 21

Inland Empire Utility CC

12

Spokane Gymnastics

JAKT Foundation

23

8, 15

Liberty Lake Family Dentistry

5

30

Liberty Lake Farmers Market

14

5 p.m. on the 15th of the month for the following month’s issue. Call 242-7752 for more information.

Cornerstone Pentecostal Church 30

Northern Quest Resort & Casino 32

Advertising integrity

Garden Expo

PACE

28

Greenstone 13

Revive a Roof

31

Horizon Credit Union

Simonds Dental Group

Inaccurate

or

deceptive

advertising

is

never

knowingly accepted. Complaints about advertisers should be made in writing to the Better Business

12

15

29, 32

17

Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce 25 Spokane Valley Summer Theatre 22 Stateline Plaza

9

Waste Management

3

Service Directory

30

Bureau and to advertise@libertylakesplash.com. The Splash is not responsible for the content of or claims made in ads. Copyright © 2019 All rights reserved. All contents of The Current may not be reproduced without written permission of the publisher.

Dr. Ross Simonds Dr. Amanda Roper Dr. Cliff Cullings Dr. Erin Merri�ield 22106 E. Country Vista Dr. Suite D

893-1119

www.LibertyLakeDental.com

Of note: This thank you message was produced by The Current’s advertising team, which works its tail off on behalf of partner businesses, helping them share their messages through advertisements. This is an independent function from The Current’s editorial team, which has its own evaluation process to determine the community news stories and features it pursues. For more information about a win-win partnership that expertly markets your business to thousands of readers (while making this home-grown community newspaper possible), email advertise@valleycurrent.com. With story ideas, contact editor@valleycurrent.com.


The Current

30 • MAY 2019

SERVICE DIRECTORY BICYCLE REPAIR AND SERVICE

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EVENT & MEETING FACILITY

Come and Pray with Us! Services: Sunday @ 11am & Tuesday @ 7:30pm Prayer: Monday-Saturday 6am-9am www.spokanecornerstonechurch.org 21326 E Mission Ave, Liberty Lake WA

HAVE AN EVENT COMING UP? The Tri Community Grange Event Hall is an affordable location for parties, receptions, dances, reunions and meetings. Full kitchen, stage, piano, tables and chairs, NEW AC, handicap accessible, large parking lot and free signage Meeting Times: 6:30 pm the first Wednesday of every month. Phone: 509-270-6089

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Want you business to be part of our Service Directory? Contact Danica at 242-7752 or advertise@libertylakesplash.com We look forward to hearing from you!

Our Town May 15, 16, 17, 22, 23, 24, 25 Presented with special permission of Samuel French New York/London


The Current

EVHS welcomes agricultural program into curriculum

ON THAT NOTE

MAY 2019 • 31

care of the animals to make sure the consumer is getting a quality, safe product. Lucero said all of the students are encouraged to participate in career or leadership development events such as potato evaluation, livestock evaluation, horse evaluation, agricultural issues and employability skills. April 30 through May 4, the class will participate in the 84th Annual Junior Livestock Show and Sale at the Spokane County Fairgrounds.

By Linda Ball

Current Correspondent East Valley High School instructor and program advisor Leah Lucero grew up participating in the Future Farmers of America (FFA) program, owned her own horse and even had some pigs. She understood the opportunities it provided for kids and the doors it could open. Now Lucero has an FFA presence in her own professional backyard. At the start of this 2018-19 academic year, Livestock Production and Management, a new elective course, was offered to East Valley students for the first time. “I talked about this for years, and all the pieces fell into place,” Lucero said. Lucero has taught at EVHS for 18 years and has been advocating for the program, which can lead to careers in ranching or veterinarian science. She said that nearly 10 of the girls in the class have their own horses, but only a few come from real “farm” families. The goal of the Livestock Production and Management class is to instruct the students in how to establish and manage animal enterprises, including selecting, breeding, feeding, caring for and marketing beef and dairy cattle, horses, pigs, sheep, goats and poultry. In addition to classroom activities, the kids participate in supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs.

Contributed Photo East Valley High School Sophomore Gwendolyn Skeen advanced to state competition in the employability skills competition. Each student enrolled in the class is required to have a supervised agricultural experience. It can be as simple as growing a vegetable in a pot all the way up to raising beef cattle. As a result, students can apply for FFA proficiency awards based on their project. It is recommended that the student choose a project that will align with their career preference and that it not be a hardship on the student’s family. Other project stipulations include being educational or financially beneficial, showing potential for growth and expansion, involving their parent or employer and being supervised by the instructor. While membership in FFA is not mandatory for those enrolled in the

class, it’s encouraged. Twenty of the 26 in the class are members of FFA. The National FFA is the largest youth organization in the country where students can take part in leadership activities, network with other FFA members from across the nation and take part in fun activities and competitions. EVHS is paying for each student’s annual FFA membership fee. Lucero said the school wanted to remove any financial barriers to allow any student in the class to participate. Ranchers from the Washington Cattlemen’s Association have spoken to the group. Lucero said they don’t sugarcoat the fact that these animals will wind up on the meal table. Rather, they are teaching students how to take good

The students will also attend the 89th Washington State FFA Convention held at Washington State University May 9-11. Lucero said this is their chance to put into practice what they have learned. For many, the goal is to be a veterinarian. At the state convention, veterinarian science program students will have the opportunity to be tested on their knowledge of the field or practice public speaking. Lucero said the goal is to advance to the national convention, which requires placing first in their category at state level competitions. So far, one East Valley team placed fifth in district competition debating the reintroduction of the grizzly bear into the Northern Cascades. They may go to state as a wild card. Sophomore Gwendolyn Skeen placed second in districts competing in employability skills and will go to state. In the competition, she had to create a cover letter, resume, submit an application and go through a 10-minute job interview with a panel of judges. Skeen said she really enjoys the class because it is educational and fun. She said her career goals are agriculturally based, either as a veterinarian or physical therapist with animals, although speech therapy is of interest to her as well.

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The Current

32 • MAY 2019

MOMMA NEEDS A NEW . . .

Pair of shoes from Windfall? Manicure from La Rive Spa? Whatever she likes, Northern Quest is packed with ways to show your appreciation this Mother’s Day. Wrap up all her favorite things with a Northern Quest gift card good for shopping, gaming, dining, concerts, spa, hotel and golf, too! Buy online or at your favorite Northern Quest venues.

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May 2019 Current  

Did you know? Ten things you may not know about your hometown

May 2019 Current  

Did you know? Ten things you may not know about your hometown

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