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MARCH

2018

GREATER SPOKANE VALLEY

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A VALLEY-WIDE COMMUNITY NEWSMAGAZINE

Robotics Renaissance - Technology, engineering drive premier programs at area schools, page 12

KATERRA BRINGS HIGH-TECH CONSTRUCTION TO VALLEY PAGE 31

TREEHOUSE FRAMES SUPPORT FOR FOSTER KIDS PAGE 34

INTERNATIONAL INFLUENCE BOLSTERS ZAGS PAGE 39


2 • MARCH 2018

NEWS

living in Steptoe, north of Colfax and driving a school bus on weekday mornings. While she was frequently mistaken as the parent of an undergrad, Harnois did well in class, graduating in 1996 with a degree in social sciences. She also learned to network, joining two committees in Whitman County – planning and solid waste – that would bring lessons benefiting her ensuing career.

The Park Bench

Zoned for Success – Harnois makes impact in Spokane Valley, Rockford

Harnois also latched on with a wastewater treatment plant as a lab technician while at WSU, adding to her diverse resume. By 1998, she was enrolled at Eastern Washington University in the school’s graduate planning program. She had taken a class at Eastern in planning one summer while still a WSU student and worked on a project for the design review committee for a project the city of Spokane was tackling on the South Hill. It turned out land zoning and planning would be her future.

By Craig Howard Current Editor

There are currently just over 100 listings on the city of Spokane Valley’s official directory. Scroll down the list of names, titles and programs and you will not find many folks who have been here since the city incorporated in 2003. Micki Harnois is one name that has carried over each year. Currently a planner in the city’s Community and Public Works Planning division, Harnois began her tenure with Spokane Valley in February 2003 while working for Prothman Co., a consulting firm brought on to help the new city establish some administrative and logistical roots. A native of Spokane, Harnois had worked with Spokane County in the same capacity for two years before the vote to incorporate Spokane Valley narrowly passed. With Harnois’ department at the county losing some 40 percent of its workload, staff would need to be reduced. Even though Harnois had a stellar work history, the moves were based on seniority and she soon found herself looking for work. The new city to the east was a logical transition. Harnois has seen plenty of change in 15 years with Spokane Valley. Her department has featured as many as eight employees and now finds itself down to four. The more spacious residential lots under the old county regulations are gone, replaced by higher density. Harnois was part of the team that started the permit center and is known as an expert at answering a diverse range of zoning questions from both homeowners and developers alike. When it comes to inquiries about dividing property, Harnois is the city’s version of Siri. Just around 15 miles from Spokane Valley, in the southeast sprawl of Spokane County, Harnois

The Current

Harnois’ first job in the field was with Chelan County in central Washington where she gained valuable experience. In 2000, she was hired by Spokane County.

Micki Harnois has worked for the city of Spokane Valley since the incorporation year of 2003. In addition to her work in the Community and Public Works Building division as a planner, Harnois is a longtime member of the Rockford Town Council and a former mayor. Photo by Craig Howard has also been a pivotal figure in the town of Rockford. She is a longtime member of the Town Council in the community of some 500 residents and served as mayor from 2010 through 2013. Harnois was a catalyst in the effort to have Rockford, Latah and Fairfield included on the route of the Palouse Scenic Byway, a tourist attraction that follows seven different highways in the Palouse region. In 2011, Gov. Christine Gregoire officially signed a bill that expanded the Byway to include the southeast Spokane County communities. A savvy and effective collaborator, Harnois currently serves as Association of Washington Cities director of District 1 which includes five Northeastern Washington counties. She is also part of the AWC Small Cities Advisory Committee and has contributed to the Southeast Spokane County Fair for the last 20 years as a volunteer. Along the way, Harnois says she has learned about “the challenges of being rural in an urban county.” Her priorities as a leader in Rockford have included promoting economic

development and working to secure funding sources to pay for infrastructure improvements. The oldest of eight children, Harnois moved often with her family growing up. As a freshman, she enrolled at Lewis and Clark High School in Spokane with an enrollment of 1,000, then transferred to Post Falls High School (enrollment 200) before finally graduating from Liberty High School with a class of 45 students. Harnois married at 19 and worked on a farm between Fairfield and Latah with her husband. They raised wheat, barley, peas and lentils. When harvest season arrived, Harnois drove the grain truck. At 30, Harnois enrolled in Kinman Business School in Spokane and earned an associate’s degree in accounting. While in school, she worked part-time jobs in Fairfield. She would eventually land at Rockford Grain Growers for seven years before heading back to college – this time as a student at Washington State University. When she enrolled at WSU at the age of 40, Harnois was

Harnois is the mother of two grown children and grandmother to three. She is a member of Spokane Valley Toastmasters – a group that she credits for the strides she has made as a public speaker. She has also contributed to the Rockford Women’s Club and Rockford Lions. Q: You grew up in more traditional urban/suburban settings. What is it about a more rural lifestyle that has appealed to you as an adult? A: I love the quietness of the country. I have an 11-acre pasture in front of my house where I can watch the neighbor’s Belgian horse graze. This is what helps me relax when I am home. If I want to be around people I can go downtown and socialize. Neighbors help each other and watch out for you. It was also a great place to raise my sons and to share with my grandsons. Q: What advice would you give to someone who is considering the pursuit of education later in life? A: I believe that we should always be learning as it keeps our minds active. I have the privilege of working with young adults and I know it keeps me “young at heart.” I wouldn’t have this opportunity if I hadn’t gone back to school. Q: What was it about land use planning that resonated

See HARNOIS, Page 3


The Current

HARNOIS

MARCH 2018 • 3

NEWS

Continued from page 2 with you enough to want to go into that field? A: When I was on the Whitman County Planning Commission, I learned about the importance of preserving our agricultural lands but also allowing for controlled growth. I knew that with my farming background that I could empathize with property owners but yet work with them to prepare for positive future development. Q: What has been the most rewarding aspect about working in this area? A: Sometimes property owners will come in and think that their land can’t be built on or developed. I enjoy sitting down with them and brainstorm about their options – whether it be with a residential structure or dividing their property. Q: Tell us about your recollections of that first year as an employee with the newly incorporated city of Spokane Valley. Was it daunting, invigorating or maybe a little of both? A: That was the most exciting and memorable time in my life. It was exciting to be the first planner in the city’s permit center. I spent most of the time preparing for the official opening day of March 31, 2003. We had to create application forms and permit templates among many administrative tasks. The City Council adopted the existing Spokane County Comprehensive Plan and Zoning Code instead of having a building moratorium in place until the city was fully prepared to accommodate its citizens. I presented at many public hearings regarding zone changes until the standards were changed to reflect desired urban development. Q: You’ve been a part of Rockford municipal government for many years now. What are some of the primary differences between representing a town like Rockford and working for a city like Spokane Valley. What about some of the similarities? A: They are similar as they are municipalities, city and town, and most regulations apply. For example, I am in the middle of a comprehensive plan amendment for a rezone for a property in Spokane Valley. At the same time, I am leading my fellow Rockford council members in the update of the town’s comprehensive plan document. At Rockford council

public hearings, we get less than a dozen people in attendance while at Spokane Valley there can be 100 or more, depending on the topic. Q: How gratifying was it to see the section of Highway 27 become part of the Palouse Scenic Byway? What do you think it has meant to the community and the residents to have that distinction? A: It was an honor to be there when Gov. Christine Gregoire signed the bill allowing Rockford, Fairfield and Latah to be a part of the Byway. This was an economic development strategy that I was encouraged to pursue by my Eastern Washington University professor Bill Kelley. This project was also strongly supported by former Spokane County Commissioner Mark Richard. The communities are just beginning to explore opportunities that the Byway will offer. All of our events will soon be posted on the Palouse Scenic Byway website.

13th Annual

Father Daughter Dance 2018

Q: Say you’re talking to someone who has never visited Rockford. What is your elevator speech? A: Rockford is a farming community located 15 miles south of the city of Spokane Valley. We are the gateway to the Palouse, where you will find the nation’s most fertile soils which produce crops distributed around the world. The Rockford Lions Club has a car show in August, the Southeast Spokane County Fair is held in September and the annual Frog Regatta is held in April. We are located in the state’s high-ranking Freeman School District. There are also several options for dining and lounging and the antique gift mall are located in our downtown. We are a small community of 500 and we have a heart and soul of thousands. Stop in sometime!

Doors open at 6:30pm @ The Mirabeau Park Hotel Dancing, Prizes and Fun for Everyone!

Q: We know that Spokane Valley has a brand new City Hall. What are some other major changes you’ve seen in your 15 years there?

Dance and Dinner at the MAX: $100 Per Couple

A: The new City Hall was very much needed and is state-of-theart. It is safe, comfortable, roomy and inviting. I see pride in many of the customers as they have a city hall of their own like most cities. Secondly, CenterPlace and Discovery Park were built and the city now has its own vehicle maintenance division as well as an Economic Development department. The staff has increased in numbers throughout most of the departments. The technology updates for staff are amazing.

SATURDAY, MARCH 3, 2018 7 TO 9 P.M.

Space is Limited - Reserve Your Tickets Now! Dance: $50 Per Couple Additional Daughters $20 Each

Family Fun for Everyone: $180 Overnight Stay and Breakfast for 4 Dance and Dinner for the Couple

To Purchase Tickets Visit: www.libertylakekiwanis.org


4 • MARCH 2018

CV, Freeman, WV celebrate ballot victories By Craig Howard Current Editor It turned out to be a proeducation election last month. A dozen school districts in Spokane County ran funding initiatives on Feb. 13, with several placing more than one request on the ballot. While voter turnout was tepid at just under 37 percent, ballots ran strongly in support of schools. Out of all the maintenance and operations levies, capital levies and capital facility bonds held in Spokane County school districts, each earned enough votes to pass. “In a general sense, I think it says how important education is to our community,” said Kim PearmanGillman, co-chair of the citizen’s committee that campaigned on behalf of the Central Valley School District’s $129.9 million bond that passed with just over 70 percent. The final numbers represented the second bond victory for CVSD in the last three years. The district had not passed a capital facilities vote since 1998 before a win in

NEWS

February 2015. The latest passage will mean funding for a third high school in the area of 16th Avenue and Henry Road to the southwest of Liberty Lake.

“We are very pleased with the results,” said CVSD Superintendent Ben Small. “With a high bar of 60 percent to reach in order to pass, we are grateful for anything higher. We believe we have built trust with our Central Valley community to deliver on our promises. We will continue to earn that trust in this next phase of projects.” The district purchased property for the high school in 1980. It will be built to house 1,600 students. The timeline for construction is addressed on the CVSD website, stating “school design will begin immediately following voter approval.” The school is expected to complete by 2021. Last month’s bond will also mean a new middle school in the River District area of Liberty Lake near the HUB Sports Center. Renovations to Horizon Middle School are also part of the funding picture, increasing student capacity from 480 to 600. Finally, upgrades to heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems at Broadway, Progress and University elementary schools, as well as Summit School,

Helbig brings team approach to city engineer role Current Correspondent

Helbig was born in Wisconsin but grew up in the Denver area. While pursuing a math degree at Regis University in Denver, he observed water and sewer maintenance, asking himself, “Who designed this?” Deciding he could do it better, Helbig changed his focus and completed a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering at Washington State University, followed by a year of graduate work. After working as a hydrologist for the U.S. Geological Survey, Helbig decided to go into the private

CVSD also passed its School Programing and Operations Replacement Levy by just over 70 percent. The levy – representing nearly 12 percent of the district’s budget – will raise roughly $54 million over the next three years and provide funds for technology, textbooks, transportation, sports, music, drama, textbooks, special education, utilities and more. The levy will mean $1.50 per $1,000 in assessed property value over three years starting in 2019. In the Freeman School District, voters supported two initiatives – a Replacement Education and Programs Levy (nearly 65 percent) and a Capital Levy for Safety, Security, Technology and Infrastructure Improvements (just over 60 percent). In Washington state, levies require a simple majority, or any margin above 50 percent, to pass. Capital facility bonds call for a super majority, or any percentage of 60 or over, for approval. In Freeman, school levies have earned passage going back over 30 years.“We’re very appreciative,” said Freeman Superintendent Randy Russell. “The people of this community have been so supportive for decades but you never take anything for

He then became the engineering director of the Port of Olympia, one of 75 ports within Washington. This all-county port district designs and manages marine, real estate, airport, industrial and commercial facilities.

By Bill Gothmann Collaboration and teamwork form the mantra for Bill Helbig, Spokane Valley’s new city engineer.

are included.

Spokane Valley City Engineer Bill Helbig sector and was part of a consulting firm for over four years. He then formed a consulting firm with three of his colleagues with a focus on stormwater and water resources. Hoping to go into the public sector, Helbig joined the city of Auburn (Washington) as senior project engineer where he spent over seven years designing transportation, utilities, parks, stormwater and traffic engineering projects. In December 2000, Auburn downsized their staff by 20 percent and Bill was let go.

After seven years, Helbig decided he wanted to return to municipal projects and was hired by Spokane Valley last year as the city engineer. Whereas his work at the Port of Olympia had an indirect effect on citizens, Helbig noted, “It is nice to get back into municipal works. What I do, there is a direct benefit to citizens.” In this role, Helbig is in charge of capital projects, development engineering, traffic engineering and utilities, reporting to Deputy City Manager John Hohman. Helbig is quick to point out, however, that there is extensive collaboration with other departments. Bill’s wife, Genia, grew up in Eastern Washington, graduating with a nursing degree from WSU. She currently works as a cardiac nurse on the west side of the state

The Current

granted. We feel very fortunate to have that support.” Russell said funds from the capital levy will address areas that have been paid previously out of the district’s general budget. “I believe the district has been good stewards of the taxpayers’ money but also good stewards of our buildings and our programs,” Russell said. The pair of levy approvals will translate to a lower tax rate for Freeman property owners beginning in 2019 ($2.75 per $1,000 of assessed property value) compared to the rate from the previous levy ($2.80 per $1,000). West Valley School District also walked away with a pair of ballot wins, tallying nearly 70 percent of votes for its Replacement School Programs and Operations Levy and nearly the same margin for a Replacement Technology, Safety, Security and Facilities Improvement Capital Levy. The projected tax rate in West Valley in 2019 will be $2.21 less per $1,000 of assessed property value compared to the levies approved in 2015. The rate is expected to be at $2.50 per $1,000 beginning next year, compared to the current amount of $4.71 per $1,000.

but is hoping to find work at a hospital in this area while working on selling their home in Pierce County. Bill and Genia have three grown children – Jason, Tim and Adam. Bill says he and his wife have always wanted to get back to Eastern Washington, especially for the outdoors. Helbig likes the collaborative, team-oriented and flexible approach within the city of Spokane Valley where community development, engineering, maintenance, legal and other departments work together to solve problems. “Being a young city, nothing is set in stone,” Helbig said. Helbig sees this career stop as an opportunity to put together a great, synergetic organization. His approach is to find good people and let them do their work. He notes he has been very impressed with the staff and their devotion to customer service. “Spokane Valley is moving in the right direction,” he said.


The Current

NEWS

Hill retiring from SCRAPS after 32 years

By Staci Lehman Current Correspondent There are about to be some big changes at Spokane Regional Animal Protection Service (SCRAPS). After over three decades of calling the agency home, Director Nancy Hill is retiring. Sunday, Feb. 4 marked Hill’s 32nd anniversary working for SCRAPS, now located on East Trent Avenue in Spokane Valley. “I like to say I was born there,” Hill says. Hill wasn’t born there, but her love of animals goes way back. “My mom was allergic to cat and dog fur so I never got to have pets,” she said. “I was always taking care of the neighbors’ animals.” Even so, Hill’s original plan wasn’t to work in the animal field. She grew up in Oklahoma and went to school for environmental science, initially working for the forest service in the Idaho panhandle. After being laid off due to budget cuts, Hill was hired by a parks department in Northern Utah and placed at a park that also had a zoo. “Within six months they had an opening for a zookeeper and I said, ‘Can I do that?’” Hill recalls. From there, Hill moved to Connecticut with her husband after his job change. While there, she literally herded cats at a cat sanctuary that had 400 feline residents. The East Coast had little appeal for Hill after having spent time in the Northwest so she and her husband packed up and moved to Spokane. While looking for a job, she saw an ad for an animal protection officer at SCRAPS. Hill started at the agency in February 1986 and spent about 10 years in that position before being promoted to executive director in 1995. Now she says she has accomplished everything she set out to do, so retirement is the next step. “I had a lot of career goals,” Hill said. “The biggest was that I believed we needed regional animal protection.” Hill worked with the city of Spokane and several smaller jurisdictions to sign on with SCRAPS in 2014. Cities like

Liberty Lake, Millwood and Spokane Valley had already been under the agency’s umbrella. Today, SCRAPS covers around 99 percent of Spokane County and, to address the expanded service area, moved into a bigger building, another one of Hill’s goals. She also wanted SCRAPS to have its own veterinary clinic but didn’t have the budget for it for many years. Recently she was able to get an $85,000 grant from the ASPCA to fix that, supplemented with funds from SCRAPS’ Hope Foundation to remodel the clinic interior. Hill’s final goal was to find a suitable successor and feel confident in a succession plan. That started to come together a couple years ago when she met Lindsey Soffes, SCRAPS’ current shelter operations manager. Hill said she first thought Soffes could be a candidate for director when she was interviewing for the shelter job. “In the interview she was so amazing,” Hill said. “I thought ‘This could be the next me.’” Hill believes Soffes is perfect for the role because she has the ideal mix of education and experience, having worked as an attorney until realizing she wanted to make a difference in the lives of animals. “It takes a special skill set for that,” said Hill of the director’s position. Spokane County CEO Gerry Gemmill, one of the people Hill reports to, is also confident in Soffes’ abilities, saying she has the passion to lead the agency – although he is sad to see Hill go. “Nancy has built probably one of the most premier animal control agencies around,” Gemmill said. “And she deserves all the credit. If I could clone her I’d do so in a second.” Hill says her focus on making a difference will live on after her retirement in other kinds of volunteer work but first she wants to have some fun. “All the stuff I never had time to do,” she said of how she plans to spend her time initially after retiring on March 22. And while she is looking forward to this change, it is also hard to leave something she has dedicated her life to. “This has been my life,” she said. “And it’s been a great life. I don’t regret any of it.”

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The Current

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The Current

MARCH 2018 • 7

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By Spokane Valley Police Chief Mark Werner The maps provided below depict where citizens have reported Vehicle Thefts, Thefts from a Vehicle (also known as vehicle prowling), Burglaries and Thefts. As you view the map each circle will contain a number indicating how many instances Spokane of a particular crime were reported at that location. Thefts from a vehicle is often under reported as people often feel nothing can be done or they only lost a small quantity of loose change. However, the Spokane Valley Police Department and the Spokane County Sheriff’s office analyze this data to determine high crime areas and where to allocate resources. I encourage citizens who have been a victim of crime to call 911, if the crime is in progress, or Crime Check at 456-2233, if not in ( progress, to report a crime. !

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1 2 3 4+

Prepared By: Regional Intelligence Group 9 Spokane County Sheriff

Safety Tip The Month:

of

The Spokane County Sheriff’s Office continues to receive reports of scammers trying to lie, intimidate, trick and threaten people into giving up their hard-earned money or personal information, leaving them vulnerable to identity theft. The following have been reported; Summons, Jury Duty or Failure to Appear Scam, Utilities Company Scam, and Publisher’s Learning House Scam. We, law enforcement (IRS, any sheriff’s office, police department or state patrol) will never call and threaten your arrest “unless you pay us right now.” If you get a call like this, it’s a scam. Hang up and report the phone call to Crime Check at 456-2233. Don’t be victimized by these predatory criminals. Check their stories out. Understand once you give this type of information or access to anyone, you are taking a huge risk with your money and identity.


8 • MARCH 2018

Spokane Valley City Council Report – March 2018 By Bill Gothmann

Current Correspondent Garbage rates will also fund streets As discussed in the February issue of the Current, a new contract for garbage collection with Waste Management goes into effect on April 1. On Jan. 9, the Spokane Valley City Council discussed whether the $1.5 million that citizens will receive in savings under the new contract should be spent instead on city streets. On Jan. 30, the issue was before council to take action. To avoid confusion, the entire contract with its changes was up for approval. There were several changes made to the Jan. 9 proposal. The contract’s 1 percent administrative fee was rolled into a city fee of 12.5 percent. Because of this, the city fee will be used for “impacts associated with solid waste contract management, solid waste planning, and maintenance and preservation of streets impacted by solid waste services.” With few exceptions, customers under the revised city fee contract will pay about the same as they now pay for collection service and less than their county neighbors. Customers will be required to use Waste Management’s collection carts. The revised contract was approved by a 6-1 vote. Some illegal lots to permit development Under the present system, only “legal lots” are permitted to

The Current

NEWS

be developed. To be legal, a lot must be developed from either a nonresidential binding site plan or a residential subdivision. However, some sellers just divide the lot and record it with the county. In addition, there are older lots that pre-existed the subdivision requirements. A new city code amendment would permit the city to approve development on these lots under certain conditions. In addition, the amendment addresses lots where one house is behind another with an access road for the rear house. These are known as “flag lots.” The proposal also removes the existing ability of the city to designate a future acquisition area (for a new road, for example) limiting development within that area. Council approved to advance this to a second reading. Option 5 selected for Barker grade separation Last August, a contract was approved for David Evans and Associates (DEA) to analyze six options for the Barker grade separation project and recommend one of them. DEA selected Option 5. In this option, a traveler going north on Barker would cross a new bridge over the BNSF railroad, then meet a relocated Trent Avenue at a new intersection north of the present Trent. This new intersection would be either a signalized intersection or a roundabout, to be determined in the next phase of the project. The access to Wellesley and northeast to Trent would occupy their present track. However, because of the new Barker Bridge, Trent would have to be elevated about 10 feet and Barker about 32 feet. The project is expected to cost $19 million with construction to be done in 2020 to 2021. About $13 million has been received in grants and $3,630,321 dedicated by the city. The city is seeking additional grants to make

up the difference. There was discussion about whether a fourth leg into the roundabout should be provided to service the Del Rey neighborhood. It was noted that the area is not located in Spokane Valley, but the county and therefore it is not necessary to spend city funds to support such a project there. Staff further noted that a fourth leg to the roundabout could be constructed at any time. There was consensus to have staff move forward supporting Option 5 and staff will return with the Phase 2 Consultant Design Contract. Legislator recommends renaming Appleway Trail City Manager Mark Calhoun observed that Rep. Matt Shea has submitted a bill to the state legislature renaming the Appleway Trail the “McCaslin Trail.” Council Member Linda Thompson stated, “I am concerned about the legislature renaming something in our city.” Council Member Sam Wood stated, “I agree with Linda (Thompson), I object to the state coming in to tell us what to name that trail.” Council Member Arne Woodard disagreed, believing that by the state being involved, there would be more certainty about the future of the trail. There were also concerns about what the cost would be and who would bear the cost. Council instructed staff to compose a letter to the legislature to delay the process until 2019 to give council time to study the issue. Later, the bill was revised to direct the city of Spokane Valley to rename the trail. This bill has passed out of the legislative committee. Street standards given minor update Council approved a change to the city’s street standards that removes future acquisition areas, provides move flexibility to developers about

what traffic analyses are required for infill development and provides for maintenance of sidewalks when owners refuse to do so. Future acquisition areas had been reserved on private land for possible future roads without the city actually paying for the land. Such standards limited the use of the property by property owners. However, the staff stated that such a requirement was “not practical” and should be removed. The Federal Highway Administration requested that provisions be included in the city’s code about what happens when a property owner refuses to make a repair to a sidewalk. The new provision requires the owner to repair the sidewalk and, if this is not done, the city will repair the sidewalk and charge the owner. A developer is required to do a traffic study if the project affects traffic in the area. However, some areas have already had a traffic study and only an abbreviated study need be performed. There were also many minor changes to the code including updating the document to reflect the recent change in the city’s organization. Council approved advancing the update to the second reading. Maintenance and street sweeping contracts approved Council voted unanimously to renew the road maintenance contract with Poe Asphalt Paving by one year. This $1,366,663 contract is for minor paving of potholes and other small road maintenance jobs. They also voted to renew the street sweeping contract with AAA Sweeping for one year at $490,200. Spokane Housing reauthorized

Council voted unanimously to renew an agreement with the

See SV COUNCIL, Page 9

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The Current

NEWS

MARCH 2018 • 9

The Spokane Valley City Council gathers each Tuesday evening to discuss matters related to the state's 10th largest jurisdiction. From left to right: Council Member Sam Wood, Council Member Brandi Peetz, Council Member Arne Woodard, Mayor Rod Higgins, Council Member Ben Wick, Deputy Mayor Pam Hayley and Council Member Linda Thompson. Photo by Danica Wick

SV COUNCIL

Pre-Law Enforcement Academy proposed

The SCSO is proposing a local pre-academy that would allow candidates to begin their training immediately in this community. Under the present system, candidates spend one week in preacademy training, 18 weeks in the state-run academy, four weeks in post-academy training and 18 weeks training with a field training officer. Under the proposed system, candidates would spend one week in pre-academy training and 22 weeks training in “academy plus coach car training platform.” This latter training would provide information in communication and behavior observation, crisis intervention and community oriented policing while having trainees go in a patrol car with a “coach,” giving them reallife experiences. The new system is expected to save $492,480 per year in training costs and reduce the training from 41 weeks to 23 weeks.

The Spokane County Sheriff’s Office (SCSO) is proposing a PreLaw Enforcement Academy in an effort to relieve staff shortages within the Spokane Valley Police Department and the SCSO. Under the present system, officer candidates need to wait six months or longer until the state runs its academy. In addition, the system can require candidates to spend 18 weeks on the west side of the state. This lengthy process results in many candidates quitting.

In a study “trying to fix a broken map,” consultants found that the current 100-year flood plain map of the Saltese Basin is incorrect. WEST consultants determined a new base flood elevation, decreasing the flood plain on some properties, increasing it on others and taking some properties out of the flood plain. This is important to residents because they will have

Continued from page 8

Spokane Housing Authority (SHA). This organization, operating independently from the city and costing nothing to the city, is charged with providing affordable housing for the entire county, mostly through federal grants. The new agreement provides for each of the three entities, the city of Spokane, the city of Spokane Valley and Spokane County, to have two members on its board of directors. These six members will then choose a seventh member. SHA owns about 850 housing units throughout the county. One of the largest is the Valley 206 project in Spokane Valley providing 207 units. They also provide about 5280 units of rental assistance over six different counties.

Redo of Saltese Flood Map may require expensive flood insurance

to buy expensive flood insurance if they build within the 100-year flood plain. Current code permits development within a flood plain if the structures are raised above this base flood elevation. Staff will now be working with residents affected by the study. Sprague to be refurbished between Sullivan and Corbin Because of deterioration, Sprague Avenue, from Sullivan to Corbin, needs to be refurbished. The city is planning to grind and inlay 2.5 inches of hot mix asphalt, update some pedestrian ramps, make storm-water improvements, and make upgrades to the signal system at the Flora Road intersection. Paving will be done at night, but some lanes will be closed and some temporary restrictions may be required at the Flora intersection. Because this will affect businesses within the area, the contractor will provide a public liaison to work with residents to address any concerns. The project is funded by a $1,531,050 federal grant and $446,223 of city funds. The bids will come before Council on March 27. Construction will start on June 18 and be completed in mid-August. Wellesley project to require more funds In 2016, the city was awarded a grant to provide curb, gutter, sidewalk and ADA-compliant ramps at crossings on Wellesley from

McDonald to Evergreen. However, the street does not meet the city’s width standard of 44 feet at certain parts and would require widening. This was unanticipated in the grant. Several alternatives were presented to council and they elected to come up with an additional $129,000 to bring the street up to standard. Staff will return with a plan to provide these funds. False fire alarm fees to go into effect March 15 In order to reduce the cost of the city of responding to false alarms, council in 2016 approved a new in-house false alarm reduction program that reduced costs to residents from $125 to $65 per incident, eliminated registration costs, provided an opt-out and simplified administration. After suspending the false alarm reduction program while to develop its in-house program and database, the city will start up the new system March 15. Council Briefs: • Mayor Rod Higgins noted there is confusion about duplexes. At the present time they are considered a single-family dwelling. Staff said they will return with a report. • Council approved using vehicle “wraps” instead of unique paint jobs to change the color of its police vehicles.


The Current

10 • MARCH 2018

The 2018 community yearbooks distribute April 2018 I’M A BUSINESS! I’M A RESIDENT!

HOW WE HELP YOU

HOW CAN I GET A COPY? A record 17,000 combined copies will be distributed this year, most by direct mail. If your neighborhood doesn’t receive one by direct mail, but you want a copy, we can direct you to a nearby business that distributes them free of charge. Just email josh@peridot.info.

“Many community businesses feel like their marketing efforts go out like white noise into a black hole. Our anticipated yearbooks for Spokane Valley and Liberty Lake not only deliver neighborhood business information to the right mailboxes, but they are welcomed inside — so that you can be confident local consumers find value in your message.” — Josh Johnson, Chief Storyteller, Peridot Publishing

SAY THANKS! Are you thankful for that neighbor who always shovels the sidewalks, that volunteer who puts in so many hours at the food bank, that teacher who has invested so much in your kids — or even the local server who always nails your favorite order — then say thanks publicly in the 2018 Yearbooks. It’s simple and free to spread the gratitude! Fill out the form at peridot.info or email josh@peridot.info a thank you note of 250 words or fewer.

PHOTO CONTEST

HOW MUCH Businesses can be a part of the Yearbook for as little as $70. There are great discounts to be in both Liberty Lake and Spokane Valley. Learn more at peridot.info or contact us today!

fast facts about the 2018 yearbooks

While these publications have literally been around for years and years, they are being rebranded with the “yearbook” term in 2018 to reflect their longtime role as a community keepsake celebrating local names and faces.

www.peridot.info josh@peridot.info 509.999.4567 PO Box 731 Liberty Lake, WA 99019

Unlike spam, junk mail or social media ads, we aren’t trying to trick anyone into a “click” or “open.” By celebrating the community with glossy photos, local stories and ways to give back, this publication is known for its shelf life. Indeed, this is the community’s annual yearbook — a keepsake, not the latest marketing bait. If you are a part of Spokane Valley and Liberty Lake, we would love to spotlight you in our trusted section featuring community businesses and organizations. We will be printing a record 17,000 publications this year, 7,000 for the Liberty Lake Yearbook (which is mailed to every home and business in that community) and 10,000 of the Spokane Valley Yearbook (which is mailed to nearly 9,000 Valley households as well as distributed through the Valley Chamber and local businesses).

One of the highlights of our Yearbook is the great community photos, most of which are submitted by residents like you. Do you have a photo of the community to share? You could win $100! Email josh@peridot.info or visit peridot.info for more.

NEW NAME, SAME GREAT PUBLICATION

HOW WE REACH THEM

Advertising Deadline: March 23 | Distribution: April 2018

MENTORS WANTED 2018’s community spotlight is mentoring in local schools. In partnership with Communities in Schools of Spokane County, our yearbooks will provide inspiration and invitation to raise up mentors to work with at-risk students in Spokane Valley schools through this established and respected PrimeTime Mentoring program. If you want more information about how you can invest in local kids over the convenience of a lunch hour, let us help connect you (email josh@peridot.info for more) — or check out the Yearbook when it comes out in April!

MORE LOCAL CONTENT THAN EVER! While the Yearbooks are trusted for local information, the great local content makes this so much more than a directory. It’s a one-stop, glossy source for photos, food, Q&A, fun, history, quizzes, maps and much more — all original and customized to Liberty Lake and Spokane Valley.

Love your community!


The Current

Spokane Symphony heads to church with Baroque series By Tyler Wilson Current Correspondent Expect the Spokane Symphony Orchestra to sound a little different when they present Venice-flavored Baroque-period music at two local churches this month. Spokane Symphony music director and conductor Eckart Preu said the celebration of Baroque music is best heard inside a church setting. “There is something in the DNA of every piece of music that we know that comes from the Baroque period,” Preu said. “The churches are the right fit. The seating is more appropriate as the acoustics are totally different.”” The Spokane Symphony will present their second in a series

MARCH 2018 • 11

of Baroque music, this one titled “Venice - The Magical City,” on March 17-18 at the Westminster Congregational United Church and the Spokane Valley Church of the Nazarene. The concerts will feature iconic works from Venice-based composers from the Baroque period, generally considered to range from about 1600 to 1750. Key composers of the period include Johann Sebastian Bach, Antonio Vivaldi, George Frideric Handel, Claudio Monteverdi, Tomaso Albinoni and many others. Preu said the music of the time was literally made to be heard in churches – generally smaller spaces that couldn’t accommodate a huge number of musicians. In turn, the performances this month will feature a scaled-back ensemble of about 40 musicians, Preu said. “They wanted a clean, beautiful, flexible sound,” Preu said of the era. “Romantic music was more about the (composers) themselves and their suffering and their own tragedy, while Baroque music is much more objective. There are objective feelings of trauma or joy (in the music), and it’s a collective

feeling.” Violinist Mateusz Wolski, a featured performer for the Venice concerts, said Baroque music stands in contrast to romantic music in the way composers and musicians focused on tonality and manipulated the limitations of the period’s instruments and performance spaces with musicians “experimenting with the harmonies. “It doesn’t use the full range of the instrument, but once you know when it was composed, you find a tremendous amount of creativity and imagination going into making things interesting,” Wolski said. “It looks so simple on the surface, but once you dive into it, you have to put your magnification on,” Wolski continued. “It’s insanely refined stuff.” Wolski described Baroque music as being beautiful but also intellectually complex, comparing it to the intricacies of black-andwhite photography. “When you limit an artist because of technology, say before the color film was developed, they had to rely on the composition so much

more,” Wolski said. “There was no saving the picture with splashes of color. We’re not doing big posters full of color. You are coming to a smaller gallery showing where you will check out these really clever, intricate pieces. It can stir tremendous emotions.” Adding to the sound will be the Spokane Symphony Chorale – a collection of about 80 singers that will celebrate the connection between orchestral music and church choirs of the time. Both aspects often went hand-in-hand in performances of the time period. “Chorale music was a very important part of music making in general,” Preu said. “People still sing in churches for a reason. Your body is the instrument. Singing is something that makes you euphoric.” Focusing on the music of Venice also serves to show how musicians influenced each other and grew the creative movement at an exponential rate. “It’s absolutely amazing if you think about how they influenced each other,” Wolski said. “When you have a vibrant city where one guy does something and someone else hears it and they can get an idea, it creates this atmosphere where amazing things happen.” Preu said he hopes the concerts will expand people’s knowledge of the music. “There is too much good music out there, so I see my function as helping people discover some things and then go and research and find more things on their own,” Preu said. “It’s all about helping people enlarge their playlists.” Concerts are set for 7 p.m. Saturday, March 17 at the Westminster Congregational United Church of Christ at 411 S. Washington St. in Spokane, and at 3 p.m. Sunday, March 18 at the Spokane Valley Church of the Nazarene, at 15515 E. 20th Ave. in Spokane Valley. Each concert features the same lineup, just performed at different locations.

The Spokane Symphony will present a special concert of Baroque music, titled. "Venice - The Magical City," on March 18 at the Spokane Valley Church of the Nazarene. A similar event will take place on March 17 at the Westminster Congregational Church of Christ in Spokane. Photo courtesy of Spokane Symphony

Tickets are available individually or as part of a Baroque Chamber Concerts subscription. Individual and season tickets can be purchased at the box office at Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, located at 1001 W. Sprague Ave., by calling 6241200, or available online and at all TicketsWest outlets. Individual tickets are $36. More information at SpokaneSymphony.org

www.


12 • MARCH 2018

Robotics growing in popularity among area schools By Staci Lehman

Current Correspondent West Valley is not the only local school district that excels in robotics.

COVER STORY

West Valley students compete for robot supremacy By Staci Lehman

Current Correspondent You can now take the three R’s of education – reading, ‘riting and ‘rithmetic – and add engineering, machining, leadership, marketing and project development. At least that’s what the students in West Valley High School’s robotics program are learning. The program, in its 12th year and growing in numbers annually, is a completely different kind of learning approach from sitting at a desk.

Spokane Public Schools includes robotics in their elementary after school programs, as well as in preengineering courses at several middle schools. A strong robotics program is also featured at the alternative school, On Track Academy.

“It’s changing everything in how kids learn,” said West Valley shop teacher David Leinweber, who helps with the machining of parts for the robots and building props for their “playfield.”

The East Valley School District offers robotics education as well, particularly for fifth and sixth graders at the K-6 STEAM (Science Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics) School.

“Everybody has their niche,” said Leinweber. “You don’t have to be a techie.”

West Valley’s team consists of about 30 students from grades nine through 12, all bringing different strengths to the team.

West Valley’s program is part

of the statewide FIRST (For Information and Recognition of Science and Technology) Washington STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) program and the nationwide FIRST Robotics program. FIRST is not like the show “Battle Bots,” where two robots are put in a ring to combat each other. It is almost the complete opposite. While building a robot is the main objective, the technical part is only one component. Students also learn about delegating work duties, team-building, time management, fundraising and many other reallife skills. “We have 10 core values, most of which are not technical,” team advisor Eric Groshoff said of the program. Students write a business plan and use a project management approach to completing the tasks involved in successfully building and competing with their robot in a specific time period. Here’s how the program works

The Current

– each year, students at various schools that participate in the FIRST program are given six weeks to build a robot that carries out a specific task. Those six weeks are then followed by six weeks of competition. This year the robot – West Valley’s is named “Chuck” – must lift and carry 1-foot cubes, and strategically place them on a wooden device that looks like a giant scale. Sound easy? Not when you’re starting from scratch with literally a pile of electronic and metal pieces. On a recent Friday when other students had the day off for a district planning day, members of West Valley’s robotics team were working to complete their robot by the deadline. Despite a lack of workplace experience, the operation ran extremely smoothly, thanks to a team approach. “There are eight or nine different teams,” said Charlene Jackson, a senior who is one of the managers of the marketing team. In the corner of one room, a team of students was putting together a circuit board while two students

See ROBOTS, Page 13

Central Valley School District features the MINDS-I robotics program in the traditional high schools and the VEX Robotics program at Spokane Valley Tech (SVT), a technical and career-centered high school. Salvatore Lorenzen, Advanced Engineering Applications instructor at SVT, teaches robotics to students in his upper-class engineering courses and also facilitates an after-school robotics club for underclass students. “There are about 15 to 20 kids in the club,” said Lorenzen. “They form teams of three or four and each team builds a robot for that year. One of my teams got an invitation to the state competition in March.” Lorenzen says the VEX program is less expensive than the FIRST Robotics program, with a starter robot kit costing around $1,200 to $1,500.

The robotics program at West Valley High School is now in its 12th year and includes around 30 students. The 12-week curriculum involves creating a robot that carries out a specific task, followed by competition with similar programs at other schools. Contributed photo


The Current

ROBOTS

Continued from page 12 from another team, on the other side of the room, manufactured parts. In another room, several students worked on promotional items for an upcoming competition and in the lunch room (which doubles as the program’s practice field when food isn’t being served), more students practiced controlling a prototype robot to hone their skills and determine what improvements are needed to be made on the final Chuck. “We’re on our fourth robot right now,” said Sadie Langford, a West Valley sophomore and one of the managers of the robotics program’s marketing team. Multiple ‘bots are made throughout the year, for practice and to “play defense” against the final robot. An amazing amount of time goes into all of this. “Last year we had over 3,700 hours,” said Jackson. Team members don’t get class credit for being in the program and work on their robot every Saturday during the six-week building period. Stress management is another important lesson taught by this program, as many participants are also taking advanced placement classes, participating in sports and One of the biggest lessons to come out of the competition part of the program is the importance of building relationships. Students start out on teams with their schoolmates but switch to other teams for each round of the competition. So participants are often competing against their former teammates as the

COVER STORY

MARCH 2018 • 13

competition progresses. This has also gone a long way to teach about diversity. “We’ve had people who don’t speak English,” said Langford. “It was hard, but we figured it out.”

Possibly the biggest challenge is funding the robotics program. Each robot has $2,000 worth of electrical components and that’s just a fraction of the cost. Student travel is the most expensive part. All in all, it costs approximately $31,000 to run the robotics program each year. Luckily, Groshoff says the West Valley School District and private companies both see the value and make a large dent in that with donations of both money and supplies. “About half of that is paid for by local community and private donors,” said Groshoff. “Just last week I was handed a $1,000 check from a local construction company.” “Haskins Steel has been a huge contributor,“ added shop teacher Leinweber. While the company doesn’t completely donate materials, it gives the school a big discount. The value of which will come back to the community. “Some of these kids have gone on to the community college’s machine program,” said Leinweber of the students working on the lathe and other machines.“ “Ninety percent of our alumni go into an engineering program,” said marketing team member Langford. “We even have a former student at Stanford,” added team member Jackson. After college, the West Valley robotics program still helps students get ahead.

This year's project at West Valley High School consists of having a robot lift and carry 1-foot cubes and place them on a wooden device resembling a giant scale. Contributed photo “Boeing guarantees you an interview if you have FIRST Robotics on your resume,” said Leinweber. “They don’t guarantee you a job but they guarantee you an interview.” Before they can get to college though, the students have to get through six weeks of competing with their robot. At each competition, six robots will be maneuvering at the same time on a field the size of a basketball court. That sounds like a big area but when all are trying to accomplish a task at the same time, the key is to avoid colliding with another ‘bot and damaging either or knocking them over.

Students in West Valley's robotics program learn about team-building, delegation, time management and fundraising. In addition to the high-tech aspects of the work, skills like leadership, marketing and project development are needed for a successful team. Contributed photo

Upcoming competitions for the team include at West Valley High School on March 23 and 24, which is open to the public. Pacific Northwest districts follow that, and if the students make it through that

round, they go to the FIRST program championships in Houston, Texas where they compete with teams from all over the world. And have a good chance of getting to this year. “We went the past two years,” said Jackson.

Recruiting Robotic Reinforcement

If building robots and competing with them sounds like fun, the West Valley High School team could use your help. Funding is the biggest need, but mentors are also needed, particularly those with technical skills or who can teach the students about marketing and outreach. Programmers and judges are also needed. Information on how to donate time, money or materials is included on the team’s website at www.chuck2147.com.


COMMUNITY

14 • MARCH 2018

The Current

Calendar of Events Saturday March 24th 2018

Cabin Fever Gardening Conference Centerplace Regional Event Center 7:30 a.m.-3:15p.m. Tickets $75 online at: www.MGFSC.org or by phone at: 1-800-838-3006

Hallett’s Market and Cafe

COMMUNITY EVENTS March 1 | March for Meals “Mall Crawl,” 8 to 10 a.m., Spokane Valley Mall. Individuals, groups and teams are invited to participate in this event to support of Greater Spokane County Meals on Wheels. Sponsors are needed to provide prizes and awards; volunteers are also needed. Call 924-6976 to sign up or find out more. Cost is $15 per person. Prizes will be awarded every 10 minutes and trophies will be given to individuals and groups. Visit www.gscmealsonwheels.org to learn more about this cause. March 2-4 | Custer’s Arts and Crafts Show, Spokane County Fair and Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St., Spokane Valley. Over 300 Northwest artisans display and sell fine art, crafts and specialty food. One admission fee covers all days. Cost: $7/adult; free for children 12 and younger. Call 477-3033 for more information. March 8 | Green Thumb Thursday, 3:30 p.m., Otis Orchards Library, 22324 E. Wellesley Ave., Otis Orchards. Drop by the seed library to create biodegradable pots, plant seeds so they’ll germinate and craft something with seeds. Call 8938390 or email sstewart@scld.org for more information. March 10 | Central Valley Bear Booster Club Fundraiser, 6 to 11 p.m., The Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St., Spokane. This second annual event will feature silent and live auctions as well as dinner and dessert. Tickets are $40 each and are available at the CVHS office or by contacting Scott Gabbert at 710-4011. All proceeds support students at Central Valley High School.

Personalized Fudge Eggs Fudge Fudge with Nuts Rocky Road Peanut Butter Chocolate Bunnies White Chocolate Lambs Easter Candy Easter Baskets Mr. Bubbles Sparkling White Wine

Join Us for Our 40 Anniversary Celebration April 21st, 2018 th

14109 E Sprague Ave #2 Spokane Valley, WA 99216 www.hallets.com www.facebook.com/hallettsmarket

March 28 | Argonne Book Club, 2 p.m., Argonne Library, 4322 N. Argonne Road. Gatherings are on the fourth Wednesday of each month. More information is available on the book club’s website: webpage at www.scld. org/book-clubs.

RECURRING ACT 2 senior classes | Affordable classes offered by Community Colleges of Spokane to those who are retired or planning to retire. A wide range of courses from geology and history to exercise and art are offered at CenterPlace,

2426 N. Discovery Place, as well as other locations throughout the area. “Focused Fitness on Dishman Mica,” a yoga class, is now part of the schedule. More at www.sccel. spokane.edu/ACT2. Baha’i Fireside Conversation | 5 to 6 p.m., third Friday of the month. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main Ave. Discussion of Baha’i teachings, history, and perspectives on resolving the challenges facing humanity. All are welcome. More at 599-2411 or www.bahai.us. Inland Empire Blues Society monthly meeting | Oct. 13 at 7:30 p.m., Bolo's 116 S. Best Road. Café Card Club | 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Tuesdays. On Sacred Grounds, 12212 E. Palouse Hwy., Valleyford. Play pinochle, cribbage, or hearts. More at www.onsacredgrounds. com. Catholic Singles Mingle | Meeting times and locations vary. This group, with no dues, is for single adults of all ages. More at www. meetup.com/Catholic-SinglesMingle. DivorceCare Recovery Support Group | Mondays 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Eastpoint Church, 15303 E. Sprague Ave. Learn how to heal from the deep hurt of divorce and discover hope for your future. DivorceCare for Kids (ages 5-12) meets at the same time and location. Cost is $25 for workbook. More at 892-5255 or eastpointchurch.com. Military Sobriety Support Group | 10 to 11: 30 a.m., Spokane Vet Center, 13109 E. Mirabeau Parkway, Spokane Valley. Call Steve at 8934746 for more information. Grange Meeting and Dessert | 6:30 p.m., first Wednesday of the month, Tri-Community Grange, 25025 Heather St., Newman Lake. The public is welcome for this community-based service organization. For more information call 226-2202 or see us on Facebook. Men’s Weekly Bible Study | 7 a.m. Tuesdays. Millwood Presbyterian Church, 3223 N. Marguerite Road, Millwood. The men’s weekly Bible Study meets in the Reception Hall with different members sharing in the leading of the study. All men are invited to join. More at www. milwoodpc.org. Pancreatic Cancer Action Network | 6:30 p.m., the first Monday of each month. Liberty Lake Municipal Library, 23123 E.

Mission Ave., Liberty Lake. More at www.pancan.org or 534-2564. Rockford Crochet Class | 10 a.m. to noon, Saturdays. The Harvest Moon, 20 S. First St., Rockford. Free classes. We have crocheters, knitters, embroidery, quilting and needlepoint. Come and share with us what you are doing. Call 2913722. Rockford Historical Society | 11:30 a.m. second Friday of the month (Feb. to Nov.). Harvest Moon restaurant, 20 S. First St., Rockford. More at 291-3193. Spokane County Library District | Locations include Argonne, Fairfield, Otis Orchards, and Spokane Valley. Special events and weekly activities for all ages including book clubs, children’s story times, classes, Lego club, teen anime club and writing clubs. More at www.scld.org Spokane Valley Eagles | 16801 E. Sprague Ave. Breakfast served Sundays 9 to 11:30 a.m. Lunch served Thursdays 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. followed by bingo from 1 to 3:30 p.m. More at www.foe3433. com. Spokane Valley Partners Food Bank | Weekly distribution takes place Wednesdays and Thursdays at 10814 E. Broadway by appointment. Appointments are available during the following days/times: Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Thursday (reserved for advanced-age seniors — age 60 and over — and/or physicallyhandicapped people with limited mobility): 11 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Address verification is required. To make an appointment, call 927.1153 ext. 10, Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 1 p.m Spokane Valley Quilt Guild | Meetings are held at 7 p.m. on the first Tuesday of February, April, June, August, October and December at Valley Assembly of God Church, 15618 E. Broadway, Spokane Valley. Open to all interested in sharing ideas and skills of our quilting craft. Participants have can access a comprehensive library, can engage experienced teachers and participate in community service projects. More at www.svqgspokane.com

MUSIC & THE ARTS


The Current

MARCH 2018 • 15

COMMUNITY

March 2-11 | “Narnia, the Musical,” Salvation Army Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Road, Coeur d'Alene. Presented by CYT North Idaho. Based on the 1950 C. S. Lewis tale ”The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe.” Showtimes are Friday-Saturday at 7 p.m., Wednesday and Thursday at 9:30 a.m. and noon and SaturdaySunday at 3 p.m. Tickets are $12$15. Call (208) 667-1865 or visit www.kroccda.org.

Spokane Valley Camera Club | 7:15 p.m., third and fourth Monday of the month (September through April). Liberty Lake Sewer and Water District building, 22510 E. Mission Ave., Liberty Lake. All levels of ability—students through experienced photographers—are invited to learn. Social events include field trips and workshops. More at 951-1446 or www.sv-cc. org

March 18 | The Spokane Symphony presents “Venice The Magical City,” their second concert in a series of Baroque music at Spokane Valley Church of the Nazarene, 15515 E. 20th Ave., Spokane Valley. Tickets are available individually or as part of a Baroque Chamber Concerts subscription. Individual and season tickets can be purchased at the box office at Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, located at 1001 W. Sprague Ave., by calling 6241200, or available online and at all TicketsWest outlets. Individual tickets are $36. More information at www.SpokaneSymphony.org

HEALTH & RECREATION

March 22-25 | “The Sound of Music,” INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd., Spokane. The spirited, romantic and beloved musical story of Maria and the von Trapp family will once again delight audiences with its Tony, Grammy and Academy Award winning best score. Tickets are $37.50-$77.50 at www.ticketswest. com or by calling 279-7000.

RECURRING Pages of Harmony | 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., Wednesdays. Thornhill Valley Chapel, 1400 S. Pines Road. If you enjoy singing, you will love the four-part, a cappella harmony of this men’s barbershop chorus. More at www.pagesofharmony.org. Spirit of Spokane Chorus | 6:45 p.m., Tuesdays. Opportunity Presbyterian Church, 202 N. Pines Road. Make new friends by joining this women’s chorus, specializing in four-part, a cappella harmony in the barbershop style. More at 2184799. Spokane Novelists Group | Noon to 4 p.m., second and fourth Saturday of the month. Otis Orchards Community Church, 23304 E. Wellesley Ave., Otis Orchards. A support/critique group for writers. Open to anyone with an interest in writing fiction (no memoirs, nonfiction, poetry, etc., please). Participants should bring 5-10 pages to read aloud and 6-8 copies for others to read along and critique. More at 590-7316.

March 24 & 26 | 2018 NCAA Division I Women’s Basketball Championship Spokane Regional, Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. All-session passes are on sale: $54.00/adult; $39.00/ youth and senior. Visit TicketsWest. com to reserve seats or call 2797000.

RECURRING Yoga in Rockford | 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Rockford Park, 20 W. Emma Street, Rockford. In case of inclement weather, classes will be held at Dave’s Autobody, 8 W. Emma Street. Wednesday mornings | Mindful Music & Movement class, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Specifically designed for those living with chronic health issues such as: Parkinson's, dementia, COPD, MS, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, cancer. Supporting body, mind and soul. $10 donation suggested. Facilitated by board-certified Music Therapist, Carla Carnegie. Willow Song Music Therapy Center. 21101 E. Wellesley #102. Otis Orchards. For more information, visit www. willowsongmusictherapy.com or call 592 7875. Tuesday afternoons | Decreasing Anger Group, 3 to 4:30 p.m., the Vet Center, 13109 E. Mirabeau Parkway, Spokane Valley. Eligibility: Combat veteran from all eras, military sexual trauma survivors, Contact Steve at 893-4746 to make an intake appointment. HUB Sports Center 19619 E. Cataldo Ave., Liberty Lake. Various activities and events occur throughout the week including: • Pickleball drop-in: 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Mon. through Thurs.; 10 a.m. to noon Tues. and Thurs. and 6 to 8 p.m. Wed. and Sun. $3/seniors ($5/non-seniors) •

Classes including Kenpo Karate

See CALENDAR, Page 16

CenterPlace Regional Event Center Beginning at 5:30 pm Tickets: $50.00 per person Sponsor tables are available Come dressed up as your favorite carnival or circus character or semi-formal/business attire

www.Valleyfest.org 509.922.3299

NOW ENROLLING! Why Choose Pioneer School?

∙ Accredited by the Washington Board of Education since 1980 ∙ Grades K-5 ∙ State-certified teachers ∙ Full and Half Day Kindergarten!

∙ Small Classroom Sizes ∙ Thematic Approach to Teaching ∙ Regular Field Trips & Events Outside the Classroom ∙ Achievement Scores Consistently High Among Students ∙ Hands-on Learning ∙ Family Atmosphere ∙ Convenient Valley Location ∙ Large, Tree-shaded, Fenced Playground

(8:30 a.m. -12:30 p.m or 8:30 a.m. - 3 p.m.) A Non-Profit Educational Organization

Limited openings for gifted and highly capable students in grades K-5. Enroll by March 20th, 2018

CALL NOW 922-7818 618 N. Sullivan Rd.

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www.pioneerschool.com Non-Discriminatory


The Current

16 • MARCH 2018

CALENDAR

Continued from page 15 and Zumba Aerobics. See website for cost and times.

CIVIC & BUSINESS Feb. 3-March 10 | Photo editing class, 10 a.m. each Saturday, Otis Orchards Community Church,

23304 E. Wellesley Ave., Otis Orchards. Call 926-9552 for more information.

RECURRING Spokane Valley City Council | Regular meetings are held on the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 6 p.m. in Council Chambers at Spokane Valley City Hall, 11707 E. Sprague Ave., Ste. 101. Council study sessions are held the first, third and sometimes fifth Tuesdays at 6 p.m., also in

GREATER SPOKANE VALLEY

Council Chambers. Millwood City Council | Regular meetings at 7 p.m. on the second Tuesday of each month at Millwood City Hall, 9103 E. Frederick Ave. Flag Museum | Sponsored by the Sons of the American Revolution and the Fairmount Memorial Association, details the rich history of the American flag, Mondays-Fridays, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Saturdays, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Pines Cemetery, 1402 S. Pines

Road, Spokane Valley. For more information: 926-2753 or www. fairmountmemorial.com/southpines-cemetery Spokane Valley Kiwanis | 6:45 a.m. Tuesdays. Valley Hospital Education Center, 12606 E. Mission Ave. More at www. spokanevalleykiwanis.net. Greater Spokane Valley Rotary | Noon to 1 p.m., Wednesdays. Darcy’s, 10502 E. Sprague Ave. More at www.svrotary.org.

You Can Read The Greater Spokane Valley Current Online!

A VALLEY-WIDE COMMUNITY NEWSMAGAZINE

Follow Us on Facebook To See it First! www.facebook.com/ValleyCurrent

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The Current

Time to cast ballots for the best kids’ books

LIBRARY size, line spacing, white space, meaningful illustrations and so on), must be of interest to students in grades 1–3, and published two to three years before the award year. Sasquatch Book Awards: Nominees are fiction written for an audience in grades 4–6 with a copyright year of 2016 or 2017.

By Gwendolyn Haley

Towner Award: Nominees are outstanding nonfiction for grades 2–6. Each year a slate of 10 books is selected.

Spokane County Library District It’s award season again and not just for movies and music. Here in Washington state, kids and teens have the opportunity to vote in five different readers’ choice book awards in March and April. At the Spokane County Library District, we think that letting kids have a voice in selecting the best books written for them is a winwin. Kids win because they are the audience for these titles (why should a committee of adults tell them what book is “the best” of the year?). Parents and teachers win because they have a list of proven favorites to offer kids. Research has demonstrated that kids are much more motivated and invested in reading when they get to choose books themselves.

SCLD celebrates St. Patrick’s Day with festive agenda By Erin Dodge

Current Guest Correspondent March is bursting with lively entertainment and engaging learning at the Spokane County Library District. Three local musical groups play Irish and Celtic music to get you ready for St. Patrick’s Day. And a local brewer discusses the history and science of the Pacific Northwest’s beer craft. On Saturday, March 3, from 2 to 3 p.m. at the Argonne Library, the Howling Gaels perform lively

MARCH 2018 • 17

So, read and vote! Here’s a quick rundown of the awards. Washington Children’s Choice Picture Book Award: Nominees for this award must be in picture book format (fiction or nonfiction), a great read-aloud for kids in grades K–3 and published within the current or previous two years. OTTER Award: Nominees are transitional chapter books (including traits that support transitional readers like font jigs and reels, love songs, airs and traditional Irish songs sure to get your feet tapping. The group includes two soloists on violin and tin whistle and a masterful rhythm section of bouzouki, bass and traditional Irish percussion. Floating Crowbar plays a high energy mix of Irish instrumental music and songs drawn from traditional and contemporary sources played on uilleann pipes, flute, whistle, banjo and mandolin as well as fiddle and guitar. Come and hear this expressive quartet at Spokane Valley Library on Wednesday, March 7, from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Broken Whistle plays gentle traditional ballads and sparkling contemporary reels with compelling vocals as they celebrate the energetic beauty of Celtic music, on three fiddles and an upright bass with rich vocal harmonies and a

Evergreen Teen Book Award: Books are nominated by librarians, teachers and students each year, representing a mix of titles with teen appeal for students in grades 7–12 and narrowed down to short list of 10. You can find a complete list of the nominees for these readers’ choice awards in the most recent copy of our program guide Engage at your local library or online at www.scld. org/engage. We have plenty of copies of each of the nominated titles so that kids can read and find their favorites. Kids can vote online at www.scld.org or at any of or libraries to help chose the winning books for these five awards. wide variety of acoustic instrument combinations. Catch them live at Otis Orchards Library on Saturday, March 10, from 2 to 3 p.m. Beer enthusiasts can discover the history and science behind the beverage in March. Adam Boyd leads these discussions of beer’s historic beginnings, popular beer styles across the globe and the science behind the making of the unique libation. Boyd is the brewer at Iron Goat Brewing, the and host of Good Brews Radio. The Science and History of Craft Beer program is at Otis Orchards Library on Tuesday, March 6, from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. and at Spokane Valley Library on Thursday, March 22, from 7 to 8 p.m.

Random Fandom Trivia Night FOR ADULTS

Harry Potter Show what you know!

Hogwarts, Hermione, & hexes? Tom Riddle, transformations, & trolls?

Bring your knowledge & eats.

Cosplayers welcome.

SPOKANE VALLEY LIBRARY Friday, March 23 6:30–8:30pm

To find additional program dates at other libraries throughout Spokane County, check out the programs and events guide, Engage, online at www.scld.org/engage.

www.scld.org www.scld.org


The Current

18 • MARCH 2018

T h e N a t i o n a l ly A w a r d - W i n n i n g C e n t r a l V a l l e y h i g h s c h o o l T h e a t r e D e p a r t m e n t P r o u d ly P r e s e n t s

Disney’s

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Purchase your seats now at cvtheatre.com

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Brought to you by

Waffles were created in the middle ages. The batter was poured between two metal plates with wooden handles and cooked over a fire. Some were similar to the basic grid pattern we know today, others were fancier designs, like a coat of arms. The earliest printed recipe was found in a French cookbook from the late 1300’s. Francois I, king of France loved waffles so much he had a set of waffle irons made in pure silver. The word waffle shows up in the English language in 1725. It comes from the Dutch word for “wafer”. Thomas Jefferson is credited with bringing the first waffle iron to America. It wasn’t really because many of the Pilgrims had their own versions but this was a beautiful, tiny French maker that influenced many future designs. The patent for the waffle iron was submitted by Cornelius Swarthout in 1869. It was a cast iron stove top version.

Aren’t you glad that at the St. Louis World Fair in 1904, the ice cream vendor ran out of cups and had a waffle vendor help him out and ice cream cones became a thing. GE made a prototype of an electric waffle iron in 1911 but it didn’t go into production until 1918. The Dorsa brothers created Eggo mayonnaise in 1932. Of course that logically led to creating Eggo waffles which just for an added bit of trivia were originally called Froffles a delightful combination of “frozen” and “waffles”. Brussels native changed the name of Brussels waffles to Belgium at the 1962 Seattle World Fair because he didn’t think Americans would know where Brussels was located. In 1971, Bill Bowerman used a waffle iron to create the soul for the first Nike sneaker sole. The shoe was called the Waffle Trainer. Patrick Bertoletti holds the world record for eating 29 in ten minutes, in 2007.


The Current

20 • MARCH 2018

Liege waffles is richer denser and sweeter. It is adapted from brioche dough.

More Waffles and their Origin

Bergische waffles are specialty waffle in Germany. They are crisp, always heart shaped and usually served with cherries and cream or pudding.

Brussels or Belgium waffles are generally thicker and fluffier. They are usually leavened with beaten egg whites and/or yeast.

Flemish waffles include yeast and orange blossom water.

Banana Bread Waffles

Combine: 2 cups Flour, 1 T Baking Powder, ¼ tsp. salt, ¼ tsp. cinnamon, Pinch of nutmeg. In a separate bowl, mash 2 bananas. Add: 1 egg, 1 T olive oil, 1 ½ cups milk of your choice Whisk until thoroughly combined. Add to dry ingredients all at once. Stir just until combined. Mixture will be lumpy. Let sit while your waffle iron preheats. These are a little dense but make a great snack, no butter or syrup required!

Pandan waffles from Vietnam have pandan flavoring and coconut milk so they have a distinct green color.

Hong Kong waffles are sold on the street as a snack. They are soft, sweet and come in many flavors used cut in quarters and rolled to eat with peanut butter.


The Current

MARCH 2018 • 21

509-315-5433 2515 N. Locust Road Spokane Valley 99206

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By Aaron Best EWU Head Football Coach To be consistent at anything in life, the characteristic of diligence must be present. To care and act as such, one must have diligence at a foundational level. This characteristic has multiple ways to describe its definition. The partial definition of the word as an “energetic effort” certainly stood out because of its close association with the word “care.” To show or use diligence at a high level, you must care about whatever it is you are attempting to do or accomplish. Diligence is not something you can obtain overnight or even over the course of a week or month. The characteristic of diligence is ingrained in you over the course of many hours, months and even years. This is certainly not a short-term-driven trait. The longer the endeavor takes, the more diligence must be present to exhibit what is necessary to finish the job you started. In the “staircase” of success, diligence is one of the foundational stairs in your climb to success. Diligence is authentic and genuine. It certainly is difficult to be diligent about something that does not motivate you. As a coach, teacher, mentor, parent, friend and family member, diligence is one of the most important traits to exemplify to the people we come into contact with on a daily basis. Those folks know we are passionate about everything that we take on in all of those roles. If it is not something we are passionate about, diligence will undoubtedly be absent based on the low level of “energetic effort.” The student-athletes at Eastern Washington University we are around as coaches on a daily basis are challenged to show high levels of diligence both on and off the field. The fact our student-athletes chose to be part of our special program

is the first step in identifying their individual passion as a student and football player prior to coming on campus. After they find themselves on campus as Eagles, the diligence in which they work will be something we as coaches manage and enhance. We will challenge the coaches’ and players’ diligence at times, but diligence is something we feel is displayed at an authentic level. In other words, diligence can’t be created, just fostered. The desire must first come from the student-athlete and then we enhance their desire by challenging them in other ways. Lastly, diligence is not a characteristic you can turn on and off. You either have it in situations or you don’t. Regardless of what you do in life, you will face challenges and obstacles. Diligence is the best tool in your toolbox to help you navigate these challenges and obstacles, as it will provide you with the ability to care about what you’re doing enough to persist and fight through it and come out the other side as a better person. To be the best at something, diligence must be part of your recipe. Whether it is intrinsic or extrinsic, you can show and present diligent traits in both ways to those with whom you surround yourself with. Aaron Best enters his second season as the head football coach at Eastern Washington University in 2018. He is a longtime Eagle and member of the Cheney/Spokane community: He played football at EWU from 1996-1999, graduated from EWU in 2001 and has been a part of football at EWU for 21 years as a player, student assistant, graduate assistant coach, assistant coach and head coach. Aaron highly values his partnership with PACE, as he will be a part of the upcoming West Plains PACE Awards for the second consecutive year.

coaches are passionate about gymnastics and focus on ENROLL Our teaching quality gymnastics in a safe, fun and encouraging environment. Classes run year-round with three 13-week sessions TODAY! (Fall, Winter and Spring) and one 10-week summer session.

Ninja Zone • Bitty Bee Academy and Flippin’ Fun Movie Night • Parent’s Night Out • Open Gym for All Ages • Parkour and Breakdance Classes • CompetitiveTeams • Gymnastics Birthday Parties

Animal Facts

Cut them out and collect them all! YAK - Asia - Up to 7 feet tall at shoulder - Horns can grow 40 inches long - More domesticated than wild - They have a large lung capacity which allows them to live at the highest elevation of any mammal - Secretes sticky substance to keep fur matted for insulation - Their milk is pink


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22 • MARCH 2018

Jane was born in New York City to two parents who coincidentally also loved to write. Her father was a police reporter, then a journalist for several newspapers before moving the family to Hollywood to do publicity work. Her mother didn’t work outside the home in California but she did write short stories and created puzzles that she sold. The family moved back to New York City just before America entered WWII. When her father was deployed to England the rest of the family lived her grandparents in Newport News, VA. After her father was wounded in the war, the family lived on Central Park West where Jane was a very active little girl. She sang, danced, played piano and created a newspaper with her brother for the apartment building that they sold for five cents a copy. She went to Music and Art High School until her parents moved the family to Westport, CT where while attending high school she won debate awards, captained the basketball team, sang, was involved in Spanish and Latin clubs and of course, was the editor of the school paper. Accepted at many colleges, she chose Smith where she won awards for poetry, writing, journalism and wrote the lyrics for the class musical which she also starred in. After graduation it was back to New York City working as an editor. My 22nd birthday was very special as it was also the day my first book, Pirates in Petticoats, was published. Since then, she has written over 300 books. She has been called the Hans Christian Andersen of America and the Aesop of the twentieth century. She has won many awards including two Caldecott Medals, two Nebulas, two Golden Kites, two Christophers, several honorary doctorates, and so many other awards there isn’t space for us to list them all.

Author Spotlight

Jane Yolen

The Emperor and the Kite 1968 ages 4-8

The smallest princess seems to get lost in the crowd of her large family until her father is kidnapped. She singlehandedly saves him which in turn saves the entire kingdom. This book won the Caldecott Honor for its illustrator Ed Young. He used a Chinese papercut technique which was quite unusual at the time. Definitely worth a look see.

The Girl Who Loved the Wind 1972 ages 5-9 An original fairy tale set in Persia about a young girl who is kept sheltered from the outside world. Finally the wind teaches her about reality and that most things in life have good and bad. It is also illustrated by Ed Young, clearly this is a winning combination. When you read this it’s easy to see why it has been printed in many languages and won several art awards.

Dragon’s Blood: The Pit Chronicles 1982 ages 12 and up

The first in a four book series that follows a young slave boy who trains a dragon to try to win his freedom. It is set on a fictional planet and our middle schooler gave it a big thumbs up. The series has won many awards and has been printed in several languages.


The Current

Student of the Month University High School was powerful in the paint this basketball season thanks to Tanner Christensen. The 6-foot10 center led the Titans with averages of 16 points and 10 rebounds per game. In a playin game last month against Central Valley, Christensen scored 28 points and pulled down 12 rebounds, propelling U- to victory. The senior was named to the 2017-18 All Greater Spokane League first team. Last summer, Tanner was part of an Eastern Washington Elite squad that reached the final eight in a 32team AAU tournament in L.A. He will continue his basketball career on scholarship at the University of Idaho after serving a two-year mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In the classroom, Christensen maintains a 4.0 grade point average and is a member of the National Honor Society. He is also an Eagle Scout.

Citizen of the Month

Thanks you for all you do in our community

MARCH 2018 • 23 When not studying calculus or physics, University High senior Mallory Carbon can be found on the stage as part of a school or community play, choreographing a large dance number or organizing an event to benefit pediatric cancer awareness. Carbon is a 4.0 student and member of the National Honor Society who has been in the U-Hi theatre program all four years, appearing in 14 productions. She has also participated in shows through Spokane Civic Theatre, Christian Youth Theater and Lake City Playhouse. Carbon is the school’s salutatorian and senior class president. She also volunteers with the local branch of the American Childhood Cancer Organization. Each year, she helps to organize a holiday party for families at U-Hi. Her older brother Mitch is a cancer survivor. Carbon will have taken eight AP classes by graduation. She will major in computer science or physics in college.

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Serving the Spokane Valley for 60+ years! Forming leaders for the future!

Athlete of the Month After graduating from Eastern Washington University, Leanne Donley was not looking for work as an educator; then her vocational path took a pivotal turn after she volunteered at a transitional school for homeless students. She would return to EWU for a degree in education, then begin a distinguished teaching career that has spanned over two decades. When she received the district’s Meritorious Service Award in 2013, Donley was recognized for her “dedication, professionalism, leadership and care for students.” She has been at CV since the 1994-95 school year and served as the longtime advisor of the student leadership program. In 2014, the Greater Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce honored Donley as CVSD’s Educator of the Year. She serves as an advisor for the Unifed program that unites athletes with and without disabilities on the same playing field. Donley is also the mother of two children.

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The Current

24 • MARCH 2018 Brought to you by

Evergreen

About and for Valley seniors

Spokane Bridge Center finds new home in Valley By Craig Howard Current Editor Lea Rogers likes the lighting and comfortable chairs. Brenda Simpson appreciates the improved parking. Charlie Bennett is glad to have a venue “that is just dedicated to bridge” and Donna Wyatt claims “it’s the best place we’ve ever had.”

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In addition to the spacious quarters, the building features an electronic scorekeeper and dealing machine. Lessons are offered here and games are played daily. Previously, SBC was housed in a building near the Spokane Arena that is also home to a bingo hall. Rogers, who began playing bridge at 30, hopes that the new venue will help bolster the club’s membership. “There’s room for more,” she said. Rogers touts the bridge’s social aspects as well as its reputation as a thinking player’s game.

Such are the reviews for the new home of the Spokane Bridge Center (SBC), a long-standing club for local enthusiasts of the card game with roots that can be traced back centuries. There are around 250 members of SBC in the Spokane/North Idaho area. The club, established some 60 years ago, now meets in a space at 1427 N. Argonne Road near Mission in Spokane Valley.

“It’s a good social outlet for people who are retired, alone or whatever,” she said. “But it’s also not just a game for older people. It’s for everyone. I like the mental challenge. You’re constantly learning something new. There’s no ‘know it alls’ in bridge.”

“This is a great place for us,” said Bennett, who helped in negotiations for the five-year lease on the 2,500-square-foot site that the club moved into last fall. “A lot of people pitched in and make this happen. We’re glad to be here.”

“We’ve rented all kinds of places and lost them or moved for one reason or another.”

Wyatt is a Spokane Valley resident who says SBC’s new home feels more stable than other sites where the club has met in the past.

Simpson arrived in Spokane Valley in 1968 and found an organization called the “Welcome Wagon” which helped her establish bearings and social connections in her new community. Bridge was part of the agenda. A past president of SBC, Brenda teaches lessons at the club and also is a regular on vacation cruises in the same capacity. “We have pleasant neighbors,” Brenda says of the commercial area where the club is now located, adding that SBC members patronize restaurants and other retail sites near their new home. In early February, SBC hosted a sectional tournament that drew players from as far away as the TriCities and Canada. The event filled the venue’s 27 tables with over 100 players at a time.

The Spokane Bridge Center has moved from a building near the Spokane Arena to a new home base in Spokane Valley on Argonne Road. The club includes around 250 members. Photo by Hayley Schmelzer

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There is a table fee for those who play here which helps cover the club’s rent. Yearly dues go to the American Contract Bridge League, the parent organization and national sponsor founded in 1937 and based in Mississippi. Spokane resident Virginia Sykes

Members of the Spokane Bridge Center have appreciated improved lighting, comfortable chairs, upgraded parking and amenities like an electronic scorekeeper at their new home on Argonne Road. Photo by Hayley Schmelzer took up bridge nearly 30 years ago, starting at the age of 50. She and her husband moved to the Inland Northwest from California last June and were familiar with SBC from previous stays in Spokane to visit relatives. “You don’t have to be an expert to play bridge, you just have to want to learn,” Sykes says. “Really, you can learn to play bridge in an hour and spend the rest of your life mastering the game.” SBC boasts several players who have won national championships, although some, like Wyatt, appreciate the game and club more for their social facets. “I’m not a particularly competitive person,” Wyatt says. “This keeps me active. Some of us go out to dinner on Thursday nights after playing. It’s not just bridge, it

becomes a social gathering.” On a chilly Tuesday last month, around 40 members gathered at the club to escape the cold and play their beloved game. SBC “directors” get there about an hour before play starts at 11 a.m. The are responsible for setting up the game, keeping score and making sure the rules of bridge are followed. “Bridge has rules that rival the U.S. Constitution,” says Bennett, who has been a bridge enthusiast for the past 54 years. Around half of the club’s membership is currently active, Bennett says. SBC will host an open house on March 4 from 1 to 3 p.m. All are welcome. To learn more about SBC, contact Brenda Simpson at 926-6973 or email her at bsbridge@aol.com.


The Current

MARCH 2018 • 25

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The Current

26 • MARCH 2018

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Top-ranked EV hoops squad soars into postseason By Steve Christilaw

Current Correspondent In a season where all five girls’ basketball programs in the Spokane Valley reached the playoffs and four reached the regional tournament, two do so as the No. 1-ranked teams in the state. And they reside at either end of Sullivan Road. While Central Valley has suffered one defeat in three seasons, East Valley has happily flown under the radar to enter the state 2A state tournament as the top-ranked team, according to the RPI formula the WIAA uses for seeding. The Knights road through the

playoffs has been unusual. By winning the regular season Great Northern League championship, East Valley wound up biding its time rather than building up momentum. The Knights regional battle with White River at University High on Feb. 24 (after press time) was just the team’s second game in 22 days. In fact, the playoff road has seen them deal with two 11-day layoffs while the rest of the district took turns facing each other on the court. “Having that kind of time off is tough because you still want to maintain your competitive edge but at the same time you don’t want to get anyone hurt,” EV coach Rob Collins said before the regular season finale. “Thankfully we’ve gotten used to it over the last few years.” Being the No. 1-ranked team in Class 2A is new for East Valley. But not all that new.

The Knights haven’t really left the big stage for several years. Lewis-Clark State basketball player and Hannah Burland, LC State volleyball recruit Jordan Phelan, along with the Bastin twins, Maddie and Skylar, led EV to backto-back state tournament trophies, including a third-place finish in 2016. Last year, with the two leaders off to play college sports, the Knights rallied around Elle Burland, Hannah’s cousin and the fifth starter on those state tournament teams, and returned to the state playoffs, falling short of the tournament with a first-round loss. “People thought we were going to fall off after we graduated Hannah, Jordan and the twins,” Collins explained. “Then they thought we were going to fall off when we graduated Elle. The truth is we have a good core group of kids and they’re playing pretty well. We’ve had different kid step up

when other kids haven’t had their “A” game. We’ve had as many as four girls score in double figures and there have been a few times when two of our post players, not our primary posts, have stepped up and combined for 30 points and 18 rebounds.” Team captains Syd Moore and Emily Fletcher lead a team that suffered just one loss during the regular season – an upset defeat to Clarkston in a game where the Knights struggled to get untracked. For good teams, a loss like that in the latter stages of the season can be a good thing, and it has been for the Knights. After an 11-day respite, Brie Holecek scored 18 points and Genesis Wilkinson scored another 10 to lead the team to a 64-46 win over West Valley in the district championship game to put an exclamation point on a 19-1 league record. In the regular-season finale at Pullman, Wilkinson scored 18 points and Holecek added 14 in a 63-53 win over the Greyhounds. Over her last three games Holecek has tallied 53 points. Wilkinson has scored 34. West Valley lost to Prosser in the crossover game with the Central Washington Athletic Conference, 53-44. Collins said one of the primary keys to the team’s success has been the way the team approaches each season. “We do what we believe in and we try to do it better than everybody else,” he said. But that’s more of an overarching philosophy than it is a cookie-cutter game plan. Instead, Collins tailors his approach each year to fit the strengths and weaknesses of his roster.

The East Valley girls' basketball team began the 2018 post-season as the No. 1 squad in the state among 2A schools. The Knights were 19-1 during the regular season, earning the Great Northern League championship. Their only loss was by two points to Clarkston on Jan. 9. Contributed photo

“We don’t always do the same thing ever year,” he said. “We always have the same philosophy and the same thoughts on things. But I look at our kids and do what’s best for the kids we have at that time. We don’t change a lot, but we change a little. We make small adjustments.” And it works.


The Current

Valley Sports Notebook By Mike Vlahovich

Current Sports Editor Greater Spokane Valley schools had their share of winter state tournament successes, wrapped up March 3 by six basketball teams who were still in the picture after the Current went to press. Top-ranked Central Valley’s girls’ basketball squad was hurtling toward the 4A title that eluded them a year ago. Likewise, Freeman boys were attempting to take that one last step following back-to-back state runner-up seasons. Joining them were East Valley girls who at the time were ranked first, University and Freeman girls and West Valley boys. Wrestlers bring home medals You couldn’t have done much better than Freeman at state 1A wrestling, coming as they do from inarguably the toughest league in Washington. The Scotties finished third with 116 points, behind fellow Northeast A League state champ Deer Park (159) and runner-up Colville (136). A number of those points came from the 138-pound class where

Final Point Traveling in Court – The case against the Euro Step By Mike Vlahovich

Current Sports Editor Just what is the “Euro Step” phenomenon? It’s become the latest offensive weapon passed down from NBA foreigners; a legbreaking thing of basketball beauty enabling offensive players an advantage and easier access to the hoop. Unless it’s a mirage, in my day the Euro Step would have been called for traveling.

SPORTS

last year’s third placer Logan Holt beat junior teammate Nolan Doloughan in the title match. Defending champion Hunter Nees finished second this year at 128 pounds. Brandon Iris was also second at 182. Garrett Trevino, seventh last year, moved up to third, wrestling at 220 pounds and Cody Tardanio took fifth at 170.

East Valley placed sixth in the 2A tournament. Winston Scott reached the finals at 195, placing second. Sophomore Avery Sundheim took third at 120; Isaiah Irvin was seventh at 145 and Zachary Bowsky took eighth at 138. West Valley had two placers – Logan Reiser, third at 220 and Scott Bray, sixth at 182. The Eagles’ Jasmine Fryer finished second in the all-school encompassing girls’ classification. Terrell Sanders was generously listed at more than 150 pounds, including helmet and shoulder pads, when he rushed for some 1,800 yards and scored nearly 30 touchdowns during the football season. The University senior reached the state 4A finals at 126. He lost by an agonizing 3-2 score for the title. Tim Westbrook was third for U-Hi at 113 and Neftali Lopez sixth at 285.

Mona Lisa look on his face. I hoped I’d read it right. My take was his tongue was stuffed into his cheek and that he agreed. It wasn’t the only issue he addressed during the brief discussion about the evolving game. A ball handler now will bar his non-dribbling hand against a defender and on a drive subtly or not-so subtly nudge his foe to clear a path to the hoop. It’s a physical move that resembles the way we protected the ball back in the day when basketball was considered a “noncontact” sport. About the only foul of similar consequence was to willingly sacrifice your body nobly taking a charge which at that time was a badge of honor.

So, I took my confusion to Central Valley boys’ basketball coach Rick Sloan and sought validation for my observance.

But that was in the Stone Age (or stone hands age in my case) when high schoolers didn’t or maybe couldn’t dunk. Say you did have the springs to dunk, it was disallowed during games back then, even in college.

Was it traveling? “No,” he deadpanned. I saw a facetious

The game has advanced incrementally since its founding,

CV placers were junior Zak Stratton, third at 170 pounds; sophomore Braxton Mikesell, fifth at 220 and Bradley Wiggs sixth at 145. Gymnasts at state University’s Anna Johnson took 17th in the all-around on the first day of state gymnastics, including 17th on bars and a tie for 19th tie during floor exercise. Titan teammate Pam Styborksi was 11th on beam during Saturday’s individual finals and 12th the day before. Central Valley’s Victoria Axtell finished 12th on vault. Other Titan participants were Stacey McNeely, Autumn Gallagher and Justine Jordan. Rebekah Ross and Chloe Robbins represented CV. Freeman winters well Besides Freeman wrestling, the Scotties basketball team was unbeaten at 21-0 heading into state. Michael Coumant and Dylan Oja were the team’s the leading scorers. The girls’ basketball team, with only one senior, was a state qualifying upstart. Five on varsity are sophomores and three are freshmen. The team had a 14-9 record entering state. No Freeman player averaged over six-plus points per game, led by freshman Anna Chisolm and senior Isabelle

when you barely moved on the court and launched one-handed step shots at a hoop made from a peach basket. The game became quicker and the jump shot became standard. Fast breaking became the vogue and the game is played above the rim. The basic fundamentals we learned 50-plus years ago are still the foundation of game – dribbling, defending with your feet, blocking out on rebounds, proper shooting form. The 3-point arc became the next innovation, stretching defenses and adding another threat the outside shooting. Conditioning techniques changed how the game is played. Players are better, bigger, faster, stronger, jump higher, shoot better. The non-contact game is non-existent. Today’s players have taken the game to another of level size and strength and macho posturing. The dunk is ever more spectacular. Bodies are bigger, faster, stronger and the better to knock a foe into the cheap seats. The 3-point shot puts more stress on defenses.

MARCH 2018 • 27

Miller, but eight had double figure efforts. Knights in familiar place East Valley’s girls entered state ranked number one among 2A schools with a 21-1 record. Genesis Wilkinson was averaging over 12 points per game and Brie Holecek and Faith Adams were key players in the team’s balanced lineup. University girls at state Jay Kennedy couldn’t have asked for more. The first-year coach has the Titans (16-8) into the round of 16 for the first time since 2014. The team came through in the playoffs paced by Ellie Boni’s 16.5 regular season scoring average (plus games of 18, 20 and 15 in the playoffs.) Claire Dingus averaged 12.1 (with playoff games of 22, 15 and 16.) Kinsey Barrington and Jasey Ramelow were also double figure scorers. WV at state, what else? Football semifinalists and now top-16 state basketball qualifiers. Not a bad season so far for Collin Sather, Connor Whitney and Cletis Hydrick of West Valley. Sather averaged more than 15 points, Hydrick over 14 and Whitney over 12 points per game. The Eagles (16-8) won four of their final five games to get there.

According to Wikipedia, the Euro Step was brought from Lithuania by Sarunas Marciulionis who played with the Golden State Warriors and three other NBA teams, although people contend Elgin Baylor and Julius “Dr. J.” Erving used a form of it back in the day. As more and more foreign players come to the U.S. the more it’s utilized. The general definition is that the player picks up his dribble, takes a step in one direction then quickly steps the opposite way. Gonzaga University’s Killian Tillie has it mastered. A New York writer defined as – “a crafty way to distribute the two steps allocated to a player after he stops dribbling and it goes right to the edge of being a traveling violation.” It is a thing of beauty and I thoroughly enjoy it – but today’s athletes are so gifted the defense doesn’t really need one or two other issues to deal with. And I still contend, there’s an extra step in the Euro Step and that, my friends, is traveling.


The Current

28 • MARCH 2018

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The Current

An historical look at Saltese – the other lake

By Jayne Singleton Spokane Valley Heritage Museum Prior to 1894, the Spokane Valley had two lakes on the south side of the Valley. Before the influx of miners, fur trappers and settlers, the Spokane Valley was part of the ancestral homelands of the Coeur d’ Alene Tribe. Chief Andrew Seltice, Sub-Chief Quinn-mo-see and Peter Wildshoe all lived in the areas around Saltese and Liberty Lakes. With a growing number of miners and settlers stopping at the two Lakes, Chief Seltice decided to seek protection for his family at the Mission in DeSmet, Idaho. He lived out his life there and is buried in the Mission Cemetery. Quinn-mo-see remained with his family at Saltese Lake until about 1891. His name, like Chief Seltice’s, is spelled and pronounced various ways. Saltese Lake was approximately 1,400 acres and slightly bigger than Liberty Lake. A beautiful sight to behold according to James Glover. Glover entered the Spokane Valley by way of the Mullan and Kentuck trails. He was headed to Spokane

HISTORY Bridge to purchase the bridge and store from Charlie Kendall (namesake of Kendall Yards). After departing from the California Ranch in May 1870, Glover arrived at the top of the ridge south of the Saltese area and described the pristine beauty of Saltese Lake, “A mighty purty lake it was.” The bridge and store had already been purchased by M.M. Cowley, so Glover headed toward the falls to develop Spokane. Sometime between 1866-78, Daniel Courchaine, a native of Canada, came to the area and after buying land from the Native Americans and built his home that is still standing today. He married one of Joseph Barnaby’s daughters, Mary. Daniel and Mary’s property included a large barn and milk house. The milk house was built next to a Spring and Daniel used the spring water to keep the milk cool. Daniel and Mary owned a large amount of land in the Saltese area. With arrival of more settlers such as the Linkes, Morrisons, Coxs, Saltzs, Simms, Pughs and others, a school was needed and built on land donated by the Courchaines. Constructed in 1894 and called the Saltese School, the building is still on 32nd Avenue, just west of Barker Road. Two other schools were built around the same time in the Saltese area, the Quinnemossa

School and the Lone Fir School. The Lone Fir was moved to Progress and Sprague in the late 1940s to be used as a Kindergarten for the Central Valley School District. The Quinnemossa School burned down in the 194’s. Residents of the area formed the Saltese Literary Society and met regularly in the Saltese School to discuss issues of the day. By 1892, Peter Morrison owned thousands of acres. Using horses to dredge canals, the Saltese Lake was drained by channeling most of the water to Sink Lake (now known as Shelley Lake). The channel is still visible as you head south on Barker Road just past the Turtle Creek development. Morrison succeeded in growing the finest Timothy Hay and shipped it all over the Northwest by box car. The Morrison homestead is still standing and the ranch operated by Peter’s grandson, Bud Morrison. The growing Saltese community recognized the need for a cemetery and formed the Saltese Cemetery Association in 1892. According to the records held at the Spokane Valley Heritage Museum, the first officers of the association are listed as: Menelious Chapman (president), Daniel Courchaine (vice president), Marcus Cox (treasurer), John Watkins (secretary) and Joseph Cox. The cemetery was established on land that was previously used for Native American burials.

MARCH 2018 • 29

To date, there is no evidence of a general store or Church in the Saltese community. Religious practices were most likely met by Catholic missionaries, who traveled by horse or walked to minister to the needs of the faithful. St. Joseph’s Catholic Church was completed in 1892 and perhaps some Saltese residents made the journey across the Valley to attend that church. Supplies and provisions were readily available at Spokane Bridge. A store and bridge were established by 1865. Supplies could also be traded for with the miners, military, fur traders and settlers following the Kentucky Trail to Spokane Bridge which led through the Saltese area. Development has gotten a foothold in the Saltese Flats and the Saltese Meadows. Large homes are replacing most of the old homesteads, but the Morrison, Linke and Courchaine places are a reminder of the early pioneers who lived beneath the soft whisper of the wind among the pines. Mica Peak stands like a sentinel above the lake that was. Saltese is one of the most beautiful, historic places in the Spokane region. Today, the lake bed is still visible and as you drive around it. Just imagine the determination of Peter Morrison as he undertook the rare venture of draining a lake. How surprised he might be to learn that Spokane County is restoring a portion of Saltese Lake.


30 • MARCH 2018

Timber facility, jobs coming to Spokane Valley By Tyler Wilson

Current Correspondent Katerra, a global construction technology company, is opening a new factory in Spokane Valley specializing in high performance, mass timber products. The 250,000-square-foot manufacturing facility near Interstate 90 and Barker Road will specialize in the production of cross-laminated timber (CLT), which Katerra touts as an efficient, economical and environmentallyfriendly building material used for a variety of construction projects. Katerra is currently hiring for at least 100 positions for various projects in the Spokane area, including the construction of the timber facility, according to Robin Clewley, vice president of Marketing and Communications for Katerra. Roles include superintendents, project managers, general laborers and more.

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The Current

“The construction positions we are currently hiring in Spokane are permanent due to the breadth of work we have in the region,” Clewley said. Clewley said the Spokane area serves many of Katerra’s needs as the company continues to expand. “We chose Spokane Valley because of its proximity to timber, its access to railways and interstate freeway and the talent and knowledge of the people in the area,” Clewley said. Construction on the timber facility is expected to be completed sometime in 2018. Hiring for positions within the facility will begin as construction nears completion. Clewley said Katerra expects to hire about 150 people for positions at the factory. “We will be looking for people in quite a broad spectrum, everything from manufacturers to engineers, janitors, general laborers,” she said. Katerra announced the plant in September, generating a celebratory response from local economic development groups like Greater Spokane Inc.

Katerra will be opening a 250,000-square-foot manufacturing site in Spokane Valley near I-90 and Barker Road later this year. The global construction technology company specializes in high performance, mass timber products. Contributed photo “We couldn’t be more pleased that they’ve chosen the Spokane region,” said GSI CEO Todd Mielke in a press release. The facility will occupy 29 acres of a 52-acre site in Spokane Valley. The site will serve to scale production of CLT materials in the United States in an effort to help the material be broadly adopted within

the construction industry. Katerra hopes the manufacturing presence in the area will also stimulate growth in the larger supply chain and associated industries, which includes design, engineering and construction. In a press release announcing

See KATERRA, Page 31


The Current

BUSINESS

MARCH 2018 • 31

Katerra is hiring for a variety jobs at its new Spokane Valley location, including superintendents, project managers, general laborers and more. The company expects the facility to house around 150 employees. Contributed photo

KATERRA

Continued from page 30 the facility, Katerra chairman and co-founder Michael Marks touted CLT as a material that “creates beautiful spaces, is designed for manufacturing, and is sustainable all at the same time.” Katerra is developing several mass timber products for residential and commercial building projects and has partnered with the Washington State University Composite Materials and Engineering Center to help develop and test their product lines and systems. Katerra cites mass timber as lightweightbut-strong and easy to install, generating almost no on site waste. Founded in 2015, Katerra has already made a significant impact on the construction industry, with offices in Spokane, Seattle, San Francisco, Phoenix, Atlanta, and many more sites, including overseas. The company specializes in developing groundbreaking building technology, as well as innovative design, manufacturing and construction methods and materials like CLT.

A pair of construction projects in the greater Spokane area in 2017 – Pine Valley Ranch and River House Senior Apartments – utilized Katerra materials. While Katerra is very much an international company, it also has serious ties to the Inland Northwest. Co-founder Fritz Wolff is the son of Alvin J. Wolff who founded a Spokane residential real estate brokerage company by the same name in 1949. Fritz, who attended Gonzaga University, began working out of the firm’s Spokane Valley offices in 1967 at the age of 19.

serves as architect and contractor. One of Katerra’s first local CLT projects will be construction of a new hospitality center in association with the Ronald McDonald House, Community Cancer Fund and the Kootenai Health Walden House. The center will provide housing for Ronald McDonald House families while their children receive local medical services, as well as lodging

for Walden House adult outpatients and families who are receiving treatment at Kootenai Health. The hospitality center is projected to be completed by 2019. For more information on Katerra and their products and services, visit Katerra.com. Click on the “Let’s Talk” tab to learn more about and apply for local positions currently available within the company.

The company website describes Katerra’s model as “bringing fresh minds and tools to the world of architecture and construction” and “applying systems approaches to remove unnecessary time and costs from building development.” In just two years, the company has already brought on more than 1,000 employees and ranks as one of the top 25 multi-family general contractors in the U.S. Utilizing an end-to-end construction services model, Katerra will supply CLT to many projects in which the company

Katerra specializes in the production of cross-laminated timber, an efficient, cost-effective and environmentally friendly building material. Katerra factories produce a variety of building components such as lighting, truss assemblies, cabinetry and wall panels. Contributed photo


The Current

32 • MARCH 2018

SVFD Report – March 2018 From Current News Sources

Spokane Valley Fire Department (SVFD) crews responded to a total of 1,213 emergency calls from Jan. 23 to Feb. 19. Incidents included: • Alarm activation – Jan. 25 – Shortly after 7 p.m., SVFD crews responded to a smoke alarm activation in the 16100 block of East Broadway Avenue. They arrived and investigated the thirdfloor apartment which was the source of the alarm. They found the maintenance man airing out the apartment of candle smoke, which had triggered the smoke alarm. The apartment occupant was not at home but had left candles burning unattended. • Apartment fire – Jan. 26 – SVFD crews, along with Spokane County Fire District 8 and Spokane Fire Department units, responded to a structure fire in the Pines Village Apartments, 512 N. Pines Road, at 1:50 p.m. Firefighters arrived to find smoke coming from the window of one apartment in the one-story building. They confirmed the resident of the burning apartment was out and immediately contacted the neighboring units for search and evacuation. Crews also took an offensive approach to the fire, entering the apartment and quickly knocking down the flames, keeping the fire from spreading to neighboring apartments. The resident was transported to the hospital as a precautionary measure. Fire investigators determined the cause of the fire to be cigarette smoking and oxygen (O2) use, a potentially fatal combination. The elderly resident narrowly escaped injury after her neighbor heard her screams and pulled her out of the burning apartment. Damage is estimated at up to $25,000. • Hazardous materials response – Jan. 28 – Shortly after 3 a.m., SVFD

crews responded to a report of a natural gas odor at the intersection of McDonald and Broadway. Upon arrival, crews pulled into the Advent Lutheran Church parking lot and could smell a strong gasoline odor. They saw gasoline in the parking lot coming from two church vehicles and observed gas being siphoned from each of the vehicles, although no one was in sight. Firefighters requested a law enforcement response. They removed the siphoning equipment and cleaned up the gasoline leak. • Unauthorized burning – Jan. 31 – Shortly before 2:30 p.m., SVFD crews responded to the 300 block of South Steen Road to investigate a report of unauthorized burning. Upon arrival, firefighters observed an unattended illegal burn approximately 10 feet from the rear of a mobile home. The fire was inside a fenced area containing multiple animals. Firefighters yelled to see if anyone was present and the occupant appeared, saying he was burning sticks from the tree. Firefighters observed two piles of scrap wood and construction debris near the fire. The occupant was educated to the facts that burning yard and construction debris, as well as scrap wood, is illegal. He agreed to extinguish the fire. • Cooking fire – Feb. 6 – SVFD crews responded to a report of an apartment fire shortly after 5:30 p.m. in the 15700 block of East Fourth Avenue in the Homestead Apartments. Upon arrival, firefighters found the apartment occupant hollering from his balcony that the fire was out. Crews investigated and found an extinguished cooking fire. The man said he smothered a grease fire with a wet cloth and took the pan from the stove to set it on an outside concrete walkway. Firefighters set up fans to help ventilate the apartment. No injuries were reported. • Motor vehicle accident – Feb. 9 – Shortly after 3:15 p.m., SVFD

crews responded to a report of a two-car head-on collision on East Trent Avenue near the Starr Road intersection. Firefighters arrived on the scene and assessed four individuals for injuries, including a 65-year-old female who was transported to the hospital with non-life threatening injuries. The woman was one of two passengers in a Mazda headed eastbound on Trent when a Ford truck headed westbound on Trent swerved to the left to avoid a braking car. The Mazda sustained heavy front-end damage and front and side airbag deployment. All three in the Mazda were wearing seat belts. The 18year old driver of the truck refused medical treatment. • Vehicle fire – Feb. 14 – SVFD crews responded to a reported truck on fire in the middle of the road in the 500 block of South McKinnon Road shortly before 4 p.m. Firefighters arrived to find a pickup truck with the cab and engine compartments fully involved in flames and no sign of the driver. They quickly extinguished the fire. The truck owner arrived on the scene with two friends to help him tow the truck to his house on the next street. The man said he was using the snowplow on the truck when the transmission malfunctioned. He left the truck and walked to his nearby home and while he was gone, the truck caught on fire. The cause of the fire appears to be mechanical in nature. • Service call – Feb. 15 – Shortly after 1 p.m., SVFD crews responded to a reported lockout near the car wash vacuums at 307 N. Sullivan. A woman had accidentally locked her keys and child in the mini-van she was in the process of cleaning. Firefighters quickly unlocked the door. The child was unharmed. Important Reminder “Change Your Clocks, Check Your Alarms” – As daylight savings time returns on March 11, be sure to test your smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) alarms to ensure they are in good

Liberty Lake Children‛s Academy

(509) 922-6360 922-6360 (509) Paid for by Friends of Mary Kuney P.O. Box 13103 Spokane Valley, WA 99213

working order. Press the test button and replace batteries as needed. According to the U.S. Fire Administration, smoke detectors should be tested at least once a month and batteries should be replaced at least once or twice a year. Check the age of your alarms. Smoke detectors should be replaced every 10 years. By the numbers: • Fires* - 50 • Emergency medical service 1,002 • Motor vehicle accidents - 77 • Hazardous materials - 14 • Building alarms - 56 • Service calls - 13 • Vehicle Extrication - 1 *Brush, commercial, residential, rubbish, vehicle fires and unauthorized burning About SVFD - Spokane Valley Fire Department serves the cities of Liberty Lake, Millwood, Spokane Valley and unincorporated areas of Spokane County including the communities of Otis Orchards, Pasadena Park, and the area surrounding Liberty Lake, with a combined population of 125,000 across approximately 75 square miles. SVFD firefighters and paramedics responded to more than 17,280 emergency calls in 2017. Established in 1940, SVFD is an Accredited Agency by the Commission on Fire Accreditation International (CFAI), one of only a handful in the state of Washington. SVFD operates 10 stations providing fire suppression, emergency medical services, vehicle extrication, hazardous materials response, special operations rescue, fire investigation, fire prevention, commercial property inspection, CPR and fire safety training. SVFD provides free fire safety inspections and installation of free smoke detectors. For more information call 928-1700 or visit www.spokanevalleyfire.com.

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The Current

WV students earn allstate music recognition

By Michelle Valkov Current Correspondent You could say West Valley High School has some noteworthy students singing and playing among Washington’s best this year. A collection of WV musicians and vocalists were selected to participate at an annual event hosted by the Washington Music Educators Association (WMEA) last month. WMEA all-state high school bands, orchestra and choirs traveled to Yakima Feb. 15-18 for the prestigious gathering. A total of 2,090 students state-wide applied for the opportunity and 1,030 were selected to participate. Lily Goodwin, a West Valley High School sophomore who began playing the trumpet in fifth grade, was one of the band students selected for all-state. Band director Jim Loucks encouraged Goodwin to audition for the all-state band. “I got second last year in the solo ensemble competition and that encouraged me to try to excel at something I’m good at and maybe I can go far with it,” Goodwin said. West Valley choir students Haley Jo Burghart, Evan Hager, Ruby Rieser, Alex Rodriguez and Sumara MilamSloan, were selected to participate in WMEA all-state as vocalists. Burghart, a senior, mentioned she is extremely honored to be one of those selected for this year’s AllState Treble Chorus. “In an organized choir, I usually sing anywhere from four to eight hours a week,” she said. “I’m constantly practicing, which sometimes doesn’t involve looking directly at a piece of music. Most of the time it’s working on technics with warm-ups or even just listening to recordings of myself and of the choir and finding things I can do to help support my section.” Singing in choirs since she was in Kindergarten, Burghart said she loves choir because it’s a community. “No matter where life takes you, that community will always be there,” she said. Burghart said the all-state singing schedule is intense. Everyone has a steady focus and savors the experience. Despite how challenging things get, Burghart said the students there collaborate and bond. Later on, they reconnect at different vocal events where it’s always fun.

MARCH 2018 • 33

“It’s my first time going to allstate and I’m ecstatic,” said Rieser with the WVHS choir group. Practicing about five hours a week, Rieser, a junior, has been with the choir for three-and-a-half years. Her father is a musician and an inspiration to her own musical path. Meanwhile, her mom is also supportive of the journey – sometimes, literally. “My mom has supported my musical dreams by letting me go on all the music-related trips may it be for orchestra or choir,” Rieser said. Rodriguez, another statequalifying choir student, said his inspiration for singing was seeing how it affects the world and brings people together. The senior’s favorite part of choir is being able to be with like-minded people who all become like a family. Rodriguez also acknowledged that the all-state schedule is tough. The state visit this year was his second. Students started their day around 6 a.m., caught the bus, grabbed breakfast and practiced until late in the evening. Getting enough sleep ended up being the toughest part of the trip for some. Hager, a sophomore, has been in choir since seventh grade and was convinced by the choir president, Burghart, to join. 17-year-old junior, Samara MilamSloan said she was “definitely nervous, excited, honored, and proud, but mostly honored,” to be a part of the competition. Like Rieser, she comes from a very musical family and there is nothing she loves more than singing. “This year’s symphonic choir was amazing thanks to our director, Professor Dilworth,” Rodriguez said. The choir’s start may have been rocky on Friday, but they quickly learned all the songs. Burghart said that Saturday night everyone got to mingle at the college fair, and then got to watch a Jazz choir in concert. “That was a lot of fun,” Burghart said. In October, high school students all over the state send in their recordings to the WMEA. From those recordings they pick the top 700 to 720 students and place them into two choirs: Treble, which is the female ensemble, or the Symphonic Choir, which is boys and girls, bass, tenor, alto and soprano. “We then get our music and have about two to three months to practice with recordings before going to the site of the conference,” Burghart said. By the end of the weekend, Burghart said her voice was strained but the experience of being among the state’s musical best was rewarding.

Valley Chamber

HIGHLIGHTS

CONNECT. CONNECT.

EMPOWER. EMPOWER.

INNOVATE. INNOVATE.

Inspiring Greater Learning The Greater Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce is leading a collaborative set of initiatives, The Big 5, to serve as a beacon and compass for economic prosperity and community vitality. Greater Learning, one of The Big 5 initiatives, is focused on integrating business and education to create the workforce of the future. Join us in building that workforce through Lemonade Day! Lemonade Day is a national educational initiative that introduces youth to entrepreneurship: teaching them how to start, own, and operate their own business – a lemonade stand. On Saturday, May 19th, you will see lemonade stands in front of chamber member businesses across this great valley!

G R E AT E R S P O K A N E VA L L E Y

Saturday, May 19 For more information and to get involved, visit lemonadeday.org/ spokane-valley or contact georgia@spokanevalley chamber.org

New Members: JANUARY 7 Wonders Beauty AllStar Glass Company ALSCO Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre Colonial Life – Branden Campbell Columbia Electrical Supply Emily Farish Acupunture Enterprise Truck Rental Go Pro Floors LLC

The success of this initiative relies on members of the community coming together to train the next generation of entrepreneurs, civic leaders, and

Lean on Purpose

engaged citizens.

Spinal & Sports Care Clinic

Michael Terrell - Landscape Arch. Roger Duval Financial Planner Safeway – Liberty Lake Sculptured Gardens SocialRestaurant, LLC

Sponsorships are available.

Waddell & Reed Washington Vision Therapy Center

1421 N. Meadowwood Ln. Liberty Lake, WA 99019 | 509-924-4994 | www.spokanevalleychamber.org


The Current

34 • MARCH 2018

Established in 1988, Treehouse is a nonprofit in Washington state that provides reinforcement to foster youth. The program expanded to Eastern Washington two years ago and now supports students at Central Valley, East Valley and West Valley high schools. The staff at the Treehouse home office in Seattle is pictured above. Contributed photo

Treehouse branches out to support local foster youth

By Jamie Borgan Current Correspondent For youth in the foster care system, seemingly simple things like obtaining a pair of shoes to play basketball on a high school team can be a tremendous barrier. Thanks to the expansion of Treehouse, a Seattle based nonprofit that works with youth in the foster care system, students in Eastern Washington are now getting a better chance to overcome those barriers. Treehouse was founded in 1988 by a group of social workers who worked for the state and wanted to be able to provide more comprehensive support for children in the foster care system, reinforcement beyond what the state could offer. The grassroots group originally used simple fundraising strategies like bake sales and car washes to be able to provide youth in foster care birthday presents and schools supplies, items that while easy for many to come by, were not readily available to youth in foster care. Treehouse has since grown to

serve more than 7,500 youth statewide and has launched a variety of programs, mainly schoolbased, to give youth in foster care the supports they need to be successful. In 2012, Treehouse launched a program to specifically target high school graduation rates for youth in foster care called “Graduation Success.” Statewide, graduation rates hover at around 49 percent for foster care youth versus 82 percent for youth overall. After five years of operating its Graduation Success program, Treehouse has seen the graduation rate of its participants jump to 89 percent. Seeking to spread its beneficial influence, Treehouse established a presence in Eastern Washington two years ago and in the 201718 school year began operating its programs in East Valley, West Valley and Central Valley high schools. Currently, Treehouse has five advocates and five Graduation Success coordinators operating here, according to Ernest Henderson, regional Treehouse manager serving Eastern Washington. In announcing the introduction of Graduation Success to Eastern Washington in October 2016, a Treehouse press release noted that the program was put in place “to support the hundreds of youth in foster care in the Spokane area who equally deserve to succeed in

school and in life.” “Thanks to this proven track record and the support of our state’s legislature, we are now thrilled to be expanding the Graduation Success program into the Spokane and Tacoma school districts,” the release went on. “The success of Graduation Success is dependent on strong community partnerships with schools, child welfare, local agencies, legislators and community supporters of kids in foster care.” Staff in this area now serve 130 to 150 students through their Graduation Success program and another 200 in their Advocacy program. Their Advocacy program supports kids in Kindergarten through 12th grade, while Graduation Success focuses on youth eighth grade and beyond. The focus of Treehouse is on longterm success of participants and programs are available to youth until age 26. When surveyed upon graduation, 63 percent of youth involved in the Graduation Success program plan to go on to college or some other vocational training. The Graduation Success program is relationship-based, says Henderson. Staff work one-onone with youth and emphasize two basic components, a “check and connect” approach where staff and students meet to check in about how things are going for students as well as a student-centered planning component, where

students set goals and work with staff to overcome barriers to those goals. Henderson says the program is creative and adaptive in working with youth to “remove any barriers” to their progress. Henderson himself spent time in the foster care system as a youth. He’s also been a foster parent and recognizes the importance of safe, stable adults for all youth. His staff comes with strong backgrounds in education, social work or other youth-centered work. The results speak for themselves; as Henderson states, they’ve nearly doubled the graduation rate for youth in the program. “That’s why I’m so happy to work here,” he says, citing the dedication his team brings as a huge factor in their success. As a relative newcomer in the social service world of Eastern Washington, much of Henderson’s focus is on building up a network of stakeholders to support the work of Treehouse as they expand their impact in the region. Henderson is already heartened by the inroads they’ve made here and the numbers they’ve been able to impact here in a short period of time. “I think we’re really making a difference,” he says. For more information about Treehouse, visit www. treehouseforkids.org or call 206767-7000.


The Current

Millwood Council hears opposition to park on South Riverway By Mary Anne Ruddis Current Correspondent It may not exactly be picnic-going weather outside – but in Millwood, the topic of greenspace is drawing plenty of attention. The Feb. 13 Millwood City Council regular meeting opened and established that a quorum was present despite the absence of Council Members Dan Sander and Brian Ellingson. The public comments portion of the meeting was moved to the top of the agenda following the Pledge of Allegiance. Turns out plenty in attendance wanted to comment on the city’s proposed park on South Riverway. The council heard from six residents who spoke mainly about the much-discussed plans for the park. All of speakers expressed opposition for various reasons, including safety concerns, a potential increase in crime, property value impact, litter and garbage and the option of spending money

MARCH 2018 • 35

that could be better used elsewhere for a public park. The City Council is still reviewing the Planning Commission recommendations for the project as well as past public comments and has not yet made a decision as to when to place the issue on a future agenda. Matt Gillis from Welch Comer & Associates presented the Argonne Road Congestion Relief Design Contract for approval. The city had requested a plan to study Argonne Road and receive recommendations to widen the road where possible as well as right of way acquisition mapping. Widening Argonne to relieve traffic congestion from Empire to Liberty requires coordination with Inland Empire Paper, the railroad and other properties possibly including City Hall by extending down to Frederick. City attorney, Brian Werst reviewed the contract and noted that it was pretty standard and as a condition of funding it is not subject to revision. It is on par with similar funding arrangements with (Washington Department of Transportation) WSDOT in the past, and presented no apparent liabilities for the city. The council voted to authorize the mayor to move forward to execute the Argonne Road Congestion Relief Design contract with Welch Comer.

The city also approved purchasing a radar trailer. The funds were already allocated in the 2018 budget. Recently the city has been renting the radar trailer for approximately $800 per month and found that it has been effective for traffic control. Two quotes were received from three companies queried. Intermountain Sign & Safety quoted $7531.13, National Barricade & Sign Company quoted $8649.50, and no quote was received from Arrow Construction Supply. The system has the capability to give good data on traffic counts as well as to deter speeding. The purchase will go forward with Intermountain Sign & Safety. The city received comments back on the water system plan that was submitted to the Department of Health. Staff is working to get them completed and submit back to the agency. With the milder weather, street maintenance has included filling potholes. Streets are being inventoried for crack sealing in the spring. City Hall signs have also been refurbished and made more visible. The staff is working with Welch Comer on several other projects, including the Millwood Trail, Argonne center turn lane, design on widening Argonne, sidewalks

Join Our Team!

on Marguerite and work on the railroad crossing that will go out to bid. The next public meeting to discuss traffic calming on Empire will be March 20 at 6 p.m. At the treasurer’s request, former City Clerk/Planner Tom Richardson’s retirement was officially added to the minutes so that he could be removed as a signatory on the bank checking account. The bank requires a copy of the official minutes. The council voted to add City Clerk/Planner Christina Janssen as the third signatory on the account. Richardson retired at the end of 2017. Janssen is working on the comprehensive plan and gathering statistical data on an ongoing basis. In November, council requested that the planning commission provide a recommendation on residential lot coverage. The current zoning requirement is that 65 percent of the lots must be open spaces. That recommendation is expected at the next planning commission meeting and will be presented to the council in March. The City Council and planning commission members are scheduled for training on parliamentary and other procedures on May 11 at City Hall from 9 a.m. to noon. Millwood City Council regular meetings are the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. at Millwood City Hall, 9103 E. Frederick.

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We are Liberty Lake’s Community newspaper. Focusing on community news and interests since The Splash was established in 1999. Over 9,000 copies are distributed monthly, free of charge, to all those in the Liberty Lake area, with over 5,500 mailed directly to homes.

We are the Valley-Wide Community newspaper. Focusing on community news for Spokane Valley, Rockford, Millwood and surrounding area. Over 25,000 copies are distributed monthly free of charge from Rockford to Greenacres, with over 15,000 mailed directly to homes in Spokane Valley.


36 • MARCH 2018

OPINION

The Current

EDITOR/PUBLISHER

Ben Wick

Danica Wick

ben@libertylakesplash.com CO OWNER

danica@libertylakesplash.com

EDITOR

Craig Howard

craig@libertylakesplash.com OFFICE MANAGER GRAPHICS

Paula Gano

paula@libertylakesplash.com

Hayley Schmelzer

hayley@libertylakesplash.com

CIRCULATION Larry Passmore circulation@libertylakesplash.com CONTRIBUTORS

Steve Christilaw, Bill Gothmann, Craig Howard, Staci Lehman, Mary Anne Ruddis, Michelle Valkov, Mike Vlahovich, Tyler Wilson The Valley Current P.O. Box 363 Liberty Lake, WA 99019 Phone: 242-7752; Fax: 927-2190 www.valleycurrent.com The Current is published monthly by or before the first of each month. It is distributed free of charge to every business and home in the greater Spokane Valley area. Copies are located at drop-off locations in Spokane Valley, Liberty Lake and the surrounding area.

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Publishing House

Announcements, obituaries, letters to the editor and story ideas are encouraged. Submit them in writing to publisher@valleycurrent.com. Submissions should be received by the 15th of the month for best chance of publication in the following month’s Current. Subscriptions Subscriptions for U.S. postal addresses cost $12 for 12 issues. Send a check and subscription address to P.O. Box 363, Liberty Lake, WA 99019. Subscriptions must

be received by the 15th of the month in order for the subscription to begin with the issue printed the end of that month. Correction policy The Current strives for accuracy in all content. Errors should be reported immediately to 242-7752 or by email to editor@valleycurrent.com. Confirmed factual errors will be corrected on this page in the issue following their discovery. Advertising information Display ad copy and camera-ready ads are due by 5 p.m. on the 15th of the month for the following month’s issue. Call 242-7752 for more information. Advertising integrity

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knowingly accepted. Complaints about advertisers should be made in writing to the Better Business Bureau and to advertise@libertylakesplash.com. The Splash is not responsible for the content of or claims made in ads. Copyright © 2016 All rights reserved. All contents of The Current may not be reproduced without written permission of the publisher.


The Current

Valley Chamber takes flight with Boeing presentation By Steve Christilaw

Current Correspondent The Greater Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce hit a milestone about 90 minutes before the start of its February Business Connections luncheon at the CenterPlace Regional Event Center. Ironically, it came prior to a presentation to the luncheon by The Boeing Company. Katherine Morgan, chamber president and CEO told the gathering that she’d received a call before heading to the Feb. 16 gathering – the sort she likes to receive. “It was a call to tell me that we had one more new member,” she said. “I think it’s fitting that we get to this number before turn the microphone over to Richard White from Boeing. Because we are now at 747 members.” White, Government Relations manager for Boeing, offered a brief history of the company, beginning with the background of company founder Bill Boeing. Boeing, he explained, moved to the Pacific Northwest to manage his family’s lumber holdings, learning the business from Friedrich Weyerhauser himself. He covered the company’s shift to airplanes prior to World War I,

MARCH 2018 • 37

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discussing how it manufactured furniture during lean times prior to the age of passenger aircraft. Today, he explained, single-aisle passenger jets are manufactured at the Renton plant. Double-aisle, wide-body jets are built in the Everett plant. Everett now includes a facility to manufacture the new composite, carbon-fiber wings that will be featured on the company’s new generation of aircraft, including the 777x. But it’s important to remember one fact, he said.

The Current is committed to serving the Greater Spokane Valley area through excellent community journalism. We can’t do it at all without you, our readers, and we can’t do it for long without support from our advertisers. Please thank our business partners and look to them when offering your patronage. Our sincere appreciation to the following businesses for their foundational partnerships with The Current and its partner publications:

“We don’t make money selling airplanes – we make money delivering airplanes,” White explained. From that standpoint, the company is turning out planes at a record pace. A new wrinkle in the production line is a new finishing facility in China. A major portion of the company’s production goes into filling orders for aircraft in Asia and will continue to going forward. Having a facility for installing seats, cabin panels and paint closer to the delivery site makes financial sense.

ENRI

THE

Evergreen SE

The largest single export from the United States is and will continue to be Boeing jets, both figuratively and literally. Asia, and specifically China, will continue to drive the company’s growth.

NI

OR

lifestyle Fountains

LIVING COMMU

NI

YO U WAN T

TY

Spokane Valley Kiwanis • George Gee AutomotiveT H E Liberty Lake Family Dentistry • Stateline Plaza

White told the luncheon that Boeing’s outlook is strong, not just for the Western Washington facilities.

YO

Waste Management • Spokane County LibrarySpokane District New homes in Spokane, Valley, Libe

g re e n s t o n e h o m

“Our future looks bright,” he said. “And Spokane is no different than our plans for the rest of the company.”

Index of advertisers

Following are the local advertisers in this issue of The Current.

Hallett’s Market and Cafe

14

Simonds Dental Group

AutoCraft 28

Jim Custer Enterprises

28

Spokane County Library District 17

Banner Fuel

Katharine Olson, DDS

8

Spokane Gymnastics

21

3

Spokane Model Train Show

38

Amaculate Housekeeping

36

5

BECU28 Central Valley Theatre

Richard White, Government Relations manager for The Boeing Company, spoke at last month's Business Connections luncheon hosted by the Greater Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce. Photo by InSpirit StudioZ

quality

18

Kiwanis of Liberty Lake Liberty Lake Baptist Church

38

Liberty Lake Children’s Academy 32

Cornerstone Pentecostal Church

8

Eagle Rock RV and Boat Storage

28

Liberty Lake Family Dentistry

Evergreen Fountain

25

Master Gardeners

Friends of Mary Kuney

32

5 14

Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce 33 St. John Vianney School

23

Stateline Plaza

38

Valley Synthetics

23

Valleyfest 15

Naomi 30

Wish Upon a Star Events

Greenstone 16

Peridot Publishing

10

Gus Johnson Ford

Pioneer School

15

Service Directory

40

40

36 38

Of note: This thank you message was produced by The Current’s advertising team, which works its tail off on behalf of partner businesses, helping them share their messages through advertisements. This is an independent function from The Current’s editorial team, which has its own evaluation process to determine the community news stories and features it pursues. For more information about a win-win partnership that expertly markets your business to thousands of readers (while making this home-grown community newspaper possible), email advertise@valleycurrent.com. With story ideas, contact editor@valleycurrent.com.


The Current

38 • MARCH 2018

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The Current

ON THAT NOTE

Cultural mix translates into winning formula for Zags

why I chose this program,” Tillie said. “It was the best fit for me and my game.” Freshman guard Jesse Wade is one of 10 American-born players on the roster which includes representation from 10 different states. After having served a twoyear mission in France for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints, Wade is fluent in the native language spoken by Tillie and redshirt freshman Joel Ayayi.

By Craig Howard Current Editor

Silas Melson is adding more sushi to his routine these days. Corey Kispert can deliver salutations in French despite never studying the language and Rui Hachimura is honing his English between breakaway slam dunks and holding court with a conflux of Japanese media.

“It’s awesome to be able to talk French with them,” Wade said. “It’s just cool that people from all different backgrounds can come here and form a brotherhood.” Tom Hudson started calling Gonzaga games on the radio in 1996. He says most people underestimate the transition foreign players have when grasping a new lexicon on the court and in the classroom.

Welcome to the Gonzaga University men’s basketball cultural diversity program – or, in the vernacular of at least a few Zags on the current roster – “Bienvenue a Zagland.” It has become popular during televised broadcasts of Gonzaga games in the last dozen years or so to include a world map with dots corresponding to the countries represented on the squad. While some call it a mix of sports and geography, Zag fans simply recognize it as a winning combination. The program has qualified for the NCAA tournament 19 straight years and, last season, reached the national championship game. This year’s lineup includes Hachimura from Japan, Killian Tillie and Joel Ayayi from France and Jacob Larsen from Denmark. Just in case there is any confusion, the Gonzaga media guide includes a helpful pronunciation guide with insight for those don’t want to trip up on Larsen’s first name, for instance – pronounced “YOCK-ub” not “JAY-kub.” Ken Katayama is one of several media representatives from Japan assigned to cover Hachimura this season. Some of the Zags’ games have been televised in the Far East and Katayma says there is a growing sense that one of Japan’s native sons will soon be playing in the NBA. There is also anticipation that Hachimura will lead the national team at the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo. “Last season, I think Rui was just getting familiar with the difference between the U.S. and Japan,” Katayama said. “This season, Japanese people are excited. We are focusing on Rui. I don’t worry about him. He looks like he’s become part of the team.” Melson came to Spokane from

MARCH 2018 • 39

Gonzaga sophomore Rui Hachimura is the program’s first player to hail from Japan. He continues to draw media attention in his home country as a talent that many say has the potential to play in the NBA. Photo by Craig Howard Portland in 2014, well aware of the international tenor of the program. Asked how many languages he’s heard on the practice court over the years, the senior pauses.

led the way, bringing in players like Karnowski, Domantas Sabonis from Lithuania and Canadian standouts such as Kevin Pangos, Robert Sacre and Kelly Olynyk.

“Let’s see – Lithuanian, French, Danish, Japanese and there’s more,” Melson says. “I don’t know, maybe around seven?”

Kispert, a freshman from King’s High School in Edmonds, has learned a few words in French and says the blend of personalities is a plus.

When Przemek (SHEM-ik) Karnowski, starting center on last year’s national runner-up team, would return to his native Poland during the off-season, Melson recalls his accent being heavier upon his return. Same with Tillie now when he comes back from France. Melson said the melting pot of cultures, dialects and approaches to basketball makes the Zags stronger. “I love that part about this program,” he said. “We get a lot of guys from overseas and they bring different insights and experiences. Like you talk to Rui about experiences in Japan and it’s interesting. “This program is really welcoming.” While Gonzaga featured a handful of foreign-born players like John Rillie and Axyl Dench from Australia in the 1990s, it wasn’t until the arrival of Rony Turiaf in 2001 that the team began to develop a reputation for international recruiting. Longtime assistant coach Tommy Lloyd has

“It definitely makes us appreciate different backgrounds off the court – it challenges us socially, which is good,” he said. “On the court, European players bring an entirely different element to the game of basketball and I think our offenses cater to them really well.” Redshirt freshman Zach Norvell Jr. came to Spokane from Chicago and, like Melson, has learned to appreciate sushi, now calling it one of his top five foods. When it comes to navigating any language barriers, Norvell Jr. said teammates always pitch in. “I feel like we do a good job of communicating and passing along the message,” he said. “If someone doesn’t understand, we help them understand.” Tillie passed on schools like Utah and Georgia Tech to follow in the footsteps of his countryman Turiaf and other Zags from Europe. “The success of other European players at Gonzaga, it was really interesting for me and I think that’s

“From a basketball perspective, I think that gets overlooked a lot,” Hudson said. “It’s not like you’re just asking where to get dinner in English. I mean they’re using terminology that has nothing to do with day-to-day life. It’s a challenging situation. You’re also coming here and you’re going to college-level classes. You’re not just learning how to speak basic English.” Hudson remembers Karnowski’s first appearance on the radio being nerve wracking for the Polish native. “Can you imagine being 19 years old, putting on a headset and talking in your second language on the air like that?” Hudson said. “But you see these players develop as people. I mean look at someone like Shem (Karnowski) who couldn’t speak much of the language when he got here and eventually he becomes an ambassador for the program, the guy who spoke for the team. It’s a pretty neat deal.”

Representatives of three continents and four countries are represented in this picture of the Gonzaga University men’s basketball bench from earlier this season. From left to right: Joel Ayayi (France), Jesse Wade (U.S.A. - Utah), Jacob Larsen (Denmark), Killian Tillie (France), Rui Hachimura (Japan) and Zach Norvell Jr. (U.S.A. Illinois). Photo by Craig Howard


The Current

40 • MARCH 2018

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March 2018 Current  

Robotics Renaissance; Technology, engineering drive premier programs at area schools

March 2018 Current  

Robotics Renaissance; Technology, engineering drive premier programs at area schools

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