Page 1

JUNE

GREATER SPOKANE VALLEY

2018

PRSRT STD ECRWSS U.S. Postage Paid Permit #010 ZIP CODE 99019

FREE

A VALLEY-WIDE COMMUNITY NEWSMAGAZINE

THE

DEBATE OVER

DENSITY

Robust housing development means many things for Spokane Valley, page 12

INDIANS VIE FOR A NEW RECORD PAGE 47

CURRENT SALUTES THE CLASS OF 2018 PAGE 32

LOCAL LACROSSE MAKING STRIDES PAGE 28


2 • JUNE 2018

The Park Bench

Stability Training – Coblentz nears one-year mark as SVP director

By Craig Howard Current Editor On the outside, Cal Coblentz may not match the image of a warm and fuzzy nonprofit leader. The former Air Force survival instructor looks like he still could conduct drills. Squarely built with a Patrick Stewart hairdo and a half goatee accessory that wouldn’t have passed muster in his military days, Coblentz appears he should be coaching linebackers instead of greeting those in line at a food bank. Don’t be fooled by the seemingly tough exterior, though. The executive director of Spokane Valley Partners Food Bank & Family Services (SVP) is quick with a smile and a friendly word. He carries a dry wit and interacts graciously with clients, staff and volunteers, often generating a smile on the other end of a conversation. Above all, Cal Coblentz is a people person. “I absolutely love my job,” said Coblenz, who will celebrate his oneyear anniversary as director in July. “I love the corporate management aspect of planning, strategizing and helping to make programs more proficient and efficient. But the most rewarding aspect of my job is the daily connection to people.” Coblentz took over as SVP lead after Jennifer Schlenske announced she would be moving with her family to the Puget Sound area. Nearly 40 applicants expressed interest in the job. Coblentz was one of two to advance to the final interview stage. After the hire, SVP Board Member Pat Dockrey described Coblentz as “a low-key guy and a good listener.” Dockrey said the new director’s flexibility would also be an asset. Fellow Board Member Nancy Nelson was impressed that Coblentz seemed “ready for a challenge.” Nearly a year into the role, Coblentz has not disappointed. His trademark exuberance has also not faded, despite the rigors of managing the only dedicated community center serving all of greater Spokane Valley. “This has been such a great

NEWS opportunity to lead,” he says. “I want to build a team that really loves being here. We have important work to do. Let’s not fail at it.” Established in 1951, SVP serves residents in need, from Otis Orchards to Fairfield, from Latah to Newman Lake. The food bank is the agency’s calling card, complemented by a clothing bank, emergency assistance, representative payee services, community gardens, cooking classes and more. Coblentz has overseen some significant change in his 10 months here, including a rebranding effort and the addition of the Inland NW Diaper Bank. His background in development has proven helpful and will continue to come in handy with fundraisers like a collaboration with Spokane Civic Theatre in June and the 20th annual SVP Golf Scramble in July. Originally from the Midwest, Coblentz grew up in Ohio and Indiana as part of a family that stressed hard work, accountability and faith. When he was in the ninth grade, Coblentz moved with his family to Southern California. After high school, he started a landscape business and later volunteered for a year in Hutchinson, Kansas, helping underprivileged kids. “It was a cool experience,” Coblentz said of his volunteer work. “I was always taught the importance of living outside yourself and doing something positive for your community.” At 22, he enlisted in the Air Force and was sent to the Inland Northwest. He would spend the next 14 years based out of the Fairchild Base, meeting his future wife, Teri, during his time here. Cal and Teri are proud parents of four grown children. “I’d never been to Washington state but I’d read about it,” Coblentz recalls. “I remember flying in. It was autumn and I could see all the trees and the lakes.” Coblentz went back to school while living in Spokane, attending community college and Eastern Washington University. When he moved to Alaska, he enrolled at the University of Alaska-Anchorage, eventually earning his bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s in divinity from Liberty University. He is currently working on his doctorate through George Fox University. Even though Coblentz had experience working as a pastor in Alaska, he decided to pursue a career in the nonprofit field after earning his master’s. He returned to Spokane with his wife and was hired at the Sinto Senior Activity Center in January 2013. While there, he increased annual independent revenue by 21 percent in the aftermath of severe reductions in federal funding.

As he approaches his one-year mark as SVP director, Coblentz says he is savoring the rewards and challenges of his work. “We know this place is special and there’s a reason for us to be here,” Coblentz said. “It was established by the community as a component of the community.” Q: What kind of impact did your work with less fortunate kids in Kansas after high school have on your career progression? Do you see in parallels to that experience and the work you are doing today? A: I was 18 years old and it was really the first opportunity I had to see generational poverty. I didn’t know anything about solutions or causes, I just loved the kids and they demonstrated hope that is nurtured through community and compassion. It helped reinforce my commitment to life and changed my ambitions. Q: Your parents seem to have influenced you quite a bit growing up. How would you characterize the impact they had on the person you are today? A: My parents grew up in the Great Depression and epitomized a practical lifestyle and work ethic. Both stopped formal education at the eighth-grade level, yet they were both brilliant and successful. They weren’t trapped by possessions but placed value on relationships, especially family. I see myself making the same choices they did, choices that favor family over money and choices that consider the well-being of other people over my own ambition. Q: For many years, you taught survival tactics in the Air Force. These days, you help people learn a different set of survival skills. What impresses you about the individuals and families you

The Current

serve? A: In the military, we built upon that will to survive by equipping them with skills that improved their opportunity to live and maintain their honor. In our work at Spokane Valley Partners it’s still clear that some have a stronger will to elevate out of their circumstances than others. Poverty and homelessness have many causes, but we see the strength of character in people that simply refuse to give up and will do whatever is needed to protect and take care of their families. It’s extremely fulfilling to be part of the solution, to help equip the strength of their will to succeed. Q: As you approach the end of your first year as director, what are some of your impressions of the community's support for your efforts here? A: I’m very goal driven and my board tells me that perhaps I need to slow down and pace myself. We have an audacious vision for our organization and it is very humbling to see the community rally around that vision. I had an epiphany at about the seven-month mark when I realized that Spokane Valley Partners belongs to the community. We are unique in that we were not started by a founder, we were started by the community to meet a variety of community needs. That demonstrated the commitment of our community to the cause and it continues nearly 70 years later. Q: What were the main reasons behind the agency's name change? A: Spokane Valley Partners has had several name changes through the years that reflected growth and adaptation to need. We still receive donation checks made out to Valley Food Bank. When I was interviewed

See TRAINING Page 4

Cal Coblentz is nearing completion of his first year as executive director of Spokane Valley Partners Food Bank & Family Services. The Air Force veteran led the Sinto Senior Activity Center in Spokane before being hired to take over in the Valley, overseeing a community center that was established in 1951. Photo by Craig Howard


The Current

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for the job I loved the value this organization placed on community by placing “partners” into the name. That flows both ways, the community’s commitment to us and our commitment to the community. We recently went through a rebranding, changing our logo and adding the tagline, “Food Bank and Family Services.” It seems that some people still thought Spokane Valley Partners was a dating site, so the tagline helps quickly direct their minds to our mission. We never want to stagnate around our history. We want to adapt to need. Q: There are quite a few nonprofits throughout Spokane County who are working to help disadvantaged residents achieve greater stability. How would you describe the collaboration that takes place between these various agencies? A: That is the mindset of the nonprofit community in Spokane. My heart melts for the mission of many of our great nonprofits and it compels me to help in any way possible. Several nonprofits that provide transition services to vulnerable teen moms or single moms know they have a blank check with us to help with resources. Multiple times, I’ve mentioned a need and other nonprofits have directed resources toward our mission. I believe our local governments do a good job encouraging collaboration among nonprofits and our community leaders like Catholic Charities, Inland Northwest Community Foundation, Salvation Army, Second Harvest, Northwest Harvest, our churches and civic organizations all place value on working together for the common

good. It’s inspirational. My philosophy as a corporate leader is to find our necessary niche that complements our network of organizations instead of attempting competition. Q: What are your hopes for the inaugural Valley Homeless Connect scheduled for this September? A: Several things. First, for the Valley to recognize that we have a homelessness challenge. Our Valley schools alone identify about 800 homeless students. The Spokane Valley Connect event is Sept. 14 at Opportunity Presbyterian Church. It will be a resource event for individuals and families to come and take care of many needs at one location. Everything will be offered at no cost through our great partnerships. There will be back to school supplies, sports physicals, immunizations, great food, lots and lots of vendors and opportunities. We are hoping to meet some needs and to get a clearer picture of what the need is. Q: You've lived in many places throughout your life but have said you consider the Spokane area your home. Why? A: Well of course for the weather! We love the seasons without the harshness and I love the mountains and the forests. After living in Fairbanks, Alaska for a dozen years, Spokane is warm! My wife Teri is a native of Spokane Valley and some of my family moved to Spokane after I was stationed here in the Air Force. This is where our family lives. But more than that this is the community that we love. We are continuing to establish relationships with people and seeing neighborhoods become transformed for the good. All my

See COBLENTZ Page 6

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As executive director of Spokane Valley Partners Food Bank & Family Services, Cal Coblentz has plenty of support from the agency's board of directors. The board's executive team is picture clockwise from lower left: Nancy Nelson (president), Brian Singer (secretary), Pat Dockrey (vice president) and Lindsey Myhre (treasurer). Photo by Craig Howard


The Current

NEWS

Candidate filings set stage for election season

By Craig Howard Current Editor Vicky Dalton is well-aware of the challenges associated with a summertime ballot. The longtime Spokane County auditor is already gearing up for the Aug. 7 primary election that will include a new feature thanks to a pilot program introduced by King County. After the Puget Sound quadrant showed an increase in ballot returns with the benefit of pre-paid postage, the state of Washington is following suit, with both the Secretary of State and Governor’s offices pitching in funds so all counties will have the same opportunity. “It’s just for one election cycle only,” said Dalton, who noted that King County’s experiment showed an increase of 5 to 7 percent on ballot returns with the free postage. While Dalton is enthused about the new approach, she also knows that counties throughout the state will need to move quickly on changes like reprinting envelopes and working to access the proper permits from the post office. “It’s a lot of work,” Dalton said. “Spokane County will make it but I’m not so sure all the other counties will be ready in time for the primary election.” The Spokane County Elections Office transitioned to solely mail-in ballots in 2006, waving goodbye to voter booths and neighborhood election sites. By that time, Dalton says, around 70 percent of ballots were being mailed in anyway. Dalton said it will be interesting to see how the pre-paid postage feature affects ballot response this summer. “Turnout in the primary always tends to be lower than the general election but this year, things are going to be a little different.” Candidates for this year’s ballot were required to file by May 18. Races already gathering attention locally include Democrat Lisa Brown challenging Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers for the seat in Congress she has held since 2005. Rodgers, a Republican, currently

represents the 5th District, which includes Spokane County and the eastern third of the state. Sen. Maria Cantwell, who has represented Washington in the U.S. Senate since 2001, will face 28 challengers on the primary ballot. Susan Hutchinson, former state GOP chair, is considered by many to be the incumbent Democrat’s most serious competition. On the state legislative front, a pair of incumbent 4th District representatives will face challengers. Rep. Matt Shea, a Republican, is opposed by Ted Cummings, a Democrat for the Pos. 1 seat. Shea’s fellow Republican Rep. Bob McCaslin, Jr. will face Democrat Mary May in the Pos. 2 race. Two of the three county commissioner positions will be contested on the ballot. Mary Kuney – who was appointed to replace Shelly O’Quinn last year after O’Quinn left to oversee the Inland Northwest Community Foundation – will be challenged by Rob Chase in District 3. Chase will wrap up his second fouryear term as county treasurer in December. The winner will complete O’Quinn’s unexpired term of two years. Incumbent Commissioner Al French, a Republican, is opposed on the ballot by Democrat Robbi Katherine Anthony for District 3. As in the past, voters can only cast primary ballots for candidates in their own district. The county commissioner races open up to the entire electorate for the Nov. 6 general election. That process is set to change by the 2022 election cycle when Spokane County will transition to a five- commissioner system. The new format will have commissioners running in their own districts on both the primary and general election ballots with a quintet of leaders in place beginning in 2023. A Republican and a Democrat will by vying for Chase’s treasurer post this year as Michael Baumgartner (R), currently a state senator, will face off against David Green (D). Other contested county races include assessor – Leonard Christian (R) against Tom Konis (R) – and clerk – Tim Fitzgerald versus Michael A. Kirk (D). Ballots for the primary election will be mailed out July 20. General election ballots go out Oct. 19.

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NEWS

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children have gone to college here, Francis each to a different university. We root for them all! Q: Finally, where would you (1 alley S p rin gs Wellesley! V (! ( like to see this agency a decade ! from now? A: I mentioned that we have ! ( an audacious vision for SVP. That Frederick vision needs to be shaped by need. (1 ! I want us to identify that part of the ! ( 1 ( ! community need that we are most ! (! Mission ( Sha rp suited to meet and expand into that Spokane solution. Our newest program is i A lk the Inland NW Diaper Bank, which ( met a need when Inland NW Baby ! (1 (1 ! ! 2nd 3rd dissolved at the end of last year. In 1 1 ! ( ( ! 5th Hartson the first two months of operation we are already distributing 10,000 ! 16th ( diapers a month throughout four ! ( counties. We’re about at capacity for resources we can distribute ( ! 29th 31st at our campus, but we see there is more need in the rural areas 37th of Eastern Washington and are beginning to strategize our role ! (! 144th ( nrose to mobilize into those areas. I believe our organization has done 57th a fantastic job with the role the community has given us. Now 65th it’s time for us to take more of a leadership role within the nonprofit sector. Thank you all for helping us get there! 0 0.75 Havana

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COBLENTZ

The Current

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6 • JUNE 2018

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The Current

JUNE 2018 • 7

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By Spokane Valley Police Chief Mark Werner The maps provided below depict where citizens have reported Vehicle Thefts, Thefts from a Vehicle (also known as vehicle prowling), Burglaries and Thefts. As you view the map each circle will contain a number indicating how many instances Spokane of a particular crime were reported at that location. Thefts from a vehicle is often under reported as people often feel nothing can be done or they only lost a small quantity of loose change. However, the Spokane Valley Police Department and the Spokane County Sheriff’s office analyze this data to determine high crime areas and where to allocate resources. I encourage citizens who have been a victim of crime to call 911, if the crime is in progress, or Crime Check at 456-2233, if not in progress, to report a crime.

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Prepared By: Regional Intelligence Group 9 Spokane County Sheriff

-Liquid pharmaceuticals -Intravenous solutions -Injectables, needles

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8 • JUNE 2018

Spokane Valley City Council Report – June 2018 COMPASSIONATE COMMON SENSE CONSERVATIVE ENDORSED BY Kim Wyman

WA Secretary of State

Ozzie Knezovich

Protecting Your Family and Your Tax Dollars

Spokane County Sheriff ★ Prioritizing Public Safety ★

Al French

★ Building a Strong Economy ★

★ Making Spokane County Government Work for You ★ County

Commissioner

electmarykuney.com

Tim Fitzgerald

Spokane County Clerk

Vicki Horton

Spokane County Assessor

Steve Peterson

Mayor of Liberty Lake

Shelly O’Quinn

former Spokane County Commissioner

Kate McCaslin

former Spokane County Commissioner

Protecting Your Family and Your Tax Dollars ★ Prioritizing Public Safety ★ ★ Building a Strong Economy ★ ★ Making County Government Work for You ★

electmarykuney.com ELECTMARYKUNEY.COM Paid for by Friends of Mary Kuney P.O. Box 13103 Spokane Valley, WA 99213

By Bill Gothmann Current Correspondent An epidemic of opioids Spokane Regional Health District Health Officer Dr. Bob Lutz opened his written presentation to the council with the following alarming statistics, “According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there were an estimated 63,632 drug overdose deaths in the U.S. in 2016. This translated to 174 deaths per day (115 opioid related), or one death every 8.3 minutes. Of this number of overdose deaths, 42,249 (66.4 percent) were due to opioids – 19400 from synthetic opioids, 15,500 from heroin and 14500 from natural/semisynthetic drugs. The death rate from synthetic opioids doubled between 2015 and 2016. These values represent more deaths than during the peak of the AIDS epidemic. “Unintentional injuries” are now the third leading cause of mortality in the U.S. after heart disease and cancer. The CDC estimates the total economic impact of prescription opioid misuse alone in the United States is $78.5 billion a year, including the costs of healthcare, lost productivity, addiction treatment and criminal justice involvement. Physicians recognized the pain reduction benefits of these substances, especially for cancer patients, but were slow to recognize the addictive side effects. As the body gets used to these substances, its chemistry changes, and it requires more and more to get the same high, bringing it closer to deadly levels. Furthermore, as prescription drugs are restricted, people turn to illegal drugs. The latest statics show that in Spokane County physicians prescribed 85 doses per 100 population. There were 125 deaths in Spokane County, 49 from methamphetamine, 22 from heroin and 54 from opioids. To address this crisis, Washington state has developed an Opioid Response Plan. The legislature has passed legislation and Spokane formed its Opioid Task Force. It focuses on public awareness, community and provider education, hospital policies, diversion control, pain-patient support, harm reduction, policy development and enforcement and addiction treatment. Dr. Lutz noted that about 10 percent of those who need treatment are in treatment and about 70 percent of addicted

NEWS

patients want to be treated but have no access to treatment. To learn more about the Spokane Regional Health District’s Opiod Treatment Program, call 3241420 or visit www.srhd.org. The following is an excerpt from the health district’s website regarding the program: “The Opioid Treatment Program provides services for adults dependent on opioids (heroin, morphine, hydrocodone, oxycodone, etc.). The program uses a medication assisted approach in which individuals experience a decrease in withdrawal symptoms and cravings typically associated with opioid use. The work of the Opioid Treatment Program is important because it curbs the negative, community-wide effects of opioid dependency. Additionally, the Opioid Treatment Program promotes improved work, school and family life for those dependent on opioids. Stipulations for enrollment in the program include: 18 years of age and older, an opioid dependency for at least one year, U.S., state or federal photo identification, no illicit benzodiazepines. If you do not have insurance, are unemployed, or have low income – contact your local Community Service Office to see if you are eligible for publiclyfunded treatment. Call 227-2200 to find out more.” KREM Marketing Solutions selected as consultant In 2012, the city selected MDI Advertising to improve the city’s image concerning permitting and economic development. In 2016, the city selected Atlas Advertising to develop a five-year comprehensive marketing strategy that defined three components: community engagement, destination tourism and economic development. The city is now in the third year of that strategy. To implement these strategies, the city published a request for quote (RFQ) for a marketing consultant, resulting in six companies responding. Five of these were interviewed. After

The Current

reference checks, the committee selected KREM Marketing Solutions as the most qualified. Under the $125,000, one-year agreement, KREM will develop media campaigns, design supplementary materials and review the city’s communication tools such as web site, social media and newsletter. Since the funds are within the 2018 budget and within the city manager’s authority, no further council action is required. Staff will provide an update to council in October. Contract for Pines-Grace intersection In 2012, the city started looking at alternatives for the PinesGrace intersection due to its great number of collisions. Designs for this intersection have gone through a number of iterations. The final design provides left turn lanes by narrowing the lanes to 11 feet from 12 feet and improves sight distance by widening the Pines sidewalk on the southwest corner, moving the curb 2 feet to the east. The project also provides stormwater improvements. The city received two bids for the construction phase of the work, one from National Native American Construction, Inc. of Coeur d’Alene for $614,015 and the lowest bid from Award Construction, Inc. of Ferndale, Washington for $608.893.50, which was $90,207.50 above the engineer’s estimate. With bids received, the total cost of the project will be $1,031,489 for design engineering, right-of-way acquisition, construction, 5 percent contingency and construction project engineering. This will require an additional $160,389 more than planned and the city plans to obtain the extra funds from its Real Estate Excise Tax fund. Council unanimously approved the construction contract award. Storm drain cleaning contract awarded As discussed in May’s edition of the Current, storm drain cleaning is essential to keeping the city’s

See SV COUNCIL Page 9

The Spokane Valley City Council approved the reconstruction of the BroadwayArgonne-Mullan intersections last month. The project will mean new traffic signals, replacement of sidewalks, ADA ramp upgrades and improved turning access for motorists. Contributed image


The Current

JUNE 2018 • 9

NEWS

SV COUNCIL

Continued from page 8

dry wells functioning efficiently. In 2006, AAA Sweeping was awarded the contract. The contract was renewed in 2010. In 2018, the city advertised a Request for Bid for the contract and two responded. AAA Sweeping was the lowest bidder in an amount not to exceed $202,587.50. According to staff, “AAA Sweeping has provided a good level of service throughout the past storm drain cleaning contracts.” Council approved the contract. It calls for up to four additional oneyear terms with a yearly inflation opener “but shall not be increased or decreased by more than the percent change in the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) or 3 percent, whichever is smaller.” Broadway-Argonne-Mullan Contract Awarded Council approved the reconstruction of the BroadwayArgonne-Mullan intersection with a concrete pavement 10 inches thick. This increases turning radii at intersections, provides new traffic signals, replaces sidewalks, updated stormwater facilities and upgrades ADA ramps. Council awarded the contract to ACME Concrete Paving Inc. in the amount of $1,699,437.25. The engineer’s estimate was $1,999,107.76. As noted in May’s edition of the Current, the tentative schedule calls for construction to begin midJune and end mid-September. Mission Avenue improvement, Flora to Barker The Mission Avenue project will provide a two-lane road from Flora to Barker with sidewalks, bike lanes and stormwater improvements. It will provide left turn lanes at Long and at Barker. Mission will be shut down for 90 days. From mid-June to mid-August, traffic will be rerouted to Alki and Montgomery. From mid-August to October, traffic will be rerouted to Barker, Appleway and Flora. Grants will provide $3,191,217 and the city will provide $1,142,117 for the $4,333,334 project. Council awarded the $2,966,440 construction contract to the lowest bidder, MDM Construction. This was about $695,000 under the engineers estimate. Generator coming to City Hall The City Hall design included the future installation of a generator in case the power to the building was disrupted. It included natural gas piping to a future generator located within the fenced vehicle parking area at the southwest corner of the building. On May 8, staff presented a number of alternatives and decisions and costs for council to consider for such a generator.

Should it power only the main floor plus server, the main floor and the server and all lighting or the whole building? Council decided the main floor plus the lights which would require a 250-kilowatt generator. Council then had the choice of a 250- kilowatt note that this also includes the server room. There were three choices of generators: natural gas, diesel or a dual gas/ diesel having total project costs of $150,000, $125,500, and $195,500 respectively. The advantage to the dual fuel unit is that it would come on line immediately and, if one source of fuel is disrupted, would have an alternative source. It also extends the life of the diesel fuel up to four days. Maintenance of the unit would cost $2,250 per year. Council chose the dual fuel unit. Staff will bring this back for specific action. 2018 budget amendment approved Staff discussed amending the 2018 budget to include changes since it was adopted on Nov. 14. A $7,000 increase for the Office of the City Attorney is required due to increased ability to process code enforcement cases with the additional half-time position that was approved within the budget. $490,000 is to be transferred from the general fund to the winter weather reserve fund bringing it back to $500,000. This is necessary primarily to cover January, February, and March 2017 winter expenses. senior plans examiner position is changed to an engineering technician II position at no cost. Parks Capital expenses are increased by $233,000 due to increased costs for the Sullivan

to Corbin section of the Appleway Trail because the bids were greater than expected, as discussed in the January, 2018 council meeting. A new City Hall generator is added at a cost of $200,000. Finally, $2,795,429 is transferred from the general fund to the capital reserve fund. This represents the 2016 year-end fund balance of revenues in excess of 50 percent of recurring expenditures. Later, council will have to decide what projects can be supported with this “extra” money. There are adequate funds to meet all these obligations. A public hearing was held and council approved the amendments. 2019-2014 Transportation Improvement Plan (TIP) The city is required to develop and maintain a long-range plan for transportation. Some of the items listed include intersection improvement for Broadway and Argonne/Mullan, Eighth and Carnahan, Pines and Mission, Mirabeau and Mansfield, Sullivan and Wellesley, Pines and 16th and Sprague and Barker. Improvements to the Barker corridor are also anticipated. Sidewalk and trail projects are to include Wellesley – McDonald to Evergreen, Mission – Union to Bowdish, Wilbur – Boone to Mission and Broadway to Boone and the Appleway Trail – Evergreen to Sullivan. Reconstruction/ preservation is planned for Park Road – Broadway to Indiana, Argonne – Indiana to Montgomery, Evergreen – Mission Connector to Indiana, and Mullan Road south of I-90. Pines and Barker grade separation projects are planned. Finally, the Argonne/I-90 Bridge needs improvement. All the above

projects are planned and the city will be looking for grants to fund these improvements. On June 5, there will be a public hearing on this list of projects, followed by a resolution. Property donated to city The Gothmann family has offered to give to the city approximately 11 acres of land close to the intersection of Saltese Road and Henry roads in memory of Myrna Gothmann, who recently passed away. The property is heavily treed, has Quinnamose Creek flowing through it and has power, water, and septic system. It is located about 3 miles outside the city limits and would be used as a recreational amenity for the residents of thecCity as well as the surrounding areas. It is assessed at around $190,000. The Gothmann family has requested that, if the city accepts this donation, it be named “Myrna Park.” Council advised the city manager to accept the gift. AARP calling for grant applications Staff reported that AARP is accepting grant applications and wishes to submit a request of $14,000 for four additional benches along the Appleway Trail. Council gave consensus to staff to submit the application. Railroad infrastructure and safety grant available Staff recommended submitting the Pines/BNSF Grade Separation project for a grant offered by the Federal Railroad Administration. Because engineering and rightof-way elements have not been completed, the city is eligible only for project engineering funding. The city would ask for $1,760,000

See SV COUNCIL Page 24


The Current

10 • JUNE 2018

Valley Chamber

HIGHLIGHTS

CONNECT.

EMPOWER.

INNOVATE.

Ahead of Their Time Our June Business Connections Breakfast features a Liberty Lake company that came on the scene far ahead of its time, and achieved explosive success! Founded through an entrepreneurial spirit in 2009, Gravity Jack saw massive potential in Augmented Reality (AR) technology and the impact it would have on our everyday lives. In an industry that was virtually nonexistent, Gravity Jack was quick to file for several key patents that would cement their authority within the tech space. Their vision has since allowed them to be a source of innovation for some of the world’s top brands and government agencies. Gravity Jack continues to push for a world where technology and the human experience intersect seamlessly by continuing to develop their own object detection and tracking platform for enterprises, Adroit.

Business Connections Breakfast Friday, June 15 7-9:00 a.m. CenterPlace 2426 N Discovery Pl Spokane Valley New Members: APRIL Arbor Crest Wine Cellars Bekins Northwest Cavalier – A Film Company Daybreak Youth Services Design I.T. Solutions Eastern Washington University Mass Mutual – Matthew Kinzel Morning Star Foster Care Old Stone Creek Paragon Investigative Services Plumb & Associates LLC Servicemaster Restore by Covington Spokane Symphony The Lighthouse for the Blind

Get more information and register at: spokanevalleychamber.org

Young Life Spokane Valley

1421 N. Meadowwood Ln. Liberty Lake, WA 99019 | 509-924-4994 | www.spokanevalleychamber.org

SVFD Report – June 2018

From Current News Sources Spokane Valley Fire Department (SVFD) crews responded to a total of 1,502 emergency calls from April 17 to May 17. Incidents included: • Motor vehicle/pedestrian accident – April 18 – Firefighters were called to the 300 block of South Sandy Beach Lane at 4:50 a.m. They arrived to find a newspaper carrier who slipped and fell while delivering newspapers and was run over by her own car. Firefighters treated injuries to the woman’s lower legs before she was transported to the hospital. • House fire – April 20 – Shortly after 1:30 p.m, firefighters responded to a residential structure fire in the 1100 block of North Girard Road. They discovered a fire on the back deck of the small home that was extending into the eaves and attic. Firefighters quickly extinguished the fire. One resident was inside, asleep when the fire started. She escaped safely after a tree pruner working next door spotted the fire, called 911 and rapped repeatedly on the door until she answered. Damage is estimated at $30,000. The cause of the fire was improper disposal of cigarettes on the back deck. • House fire – April 26 – SVFD and Spokane County Fire District 8 firefighters responded to a residential structure fire in the 300 block of North Molter Road shortly after 2:30 p.m. Firefighters took an offensive approach to the fire, working inside the first floor and basement of the home as well as outside on the home’s roof to locate the source of the smoke and extinguish the smoldering fire. The SVFD fire investigator determined the cause of the fire was the failure of an attic ventilation fan motor. The fan and motor appeared to be over 20 years old, possibly original to the home. One of the two residents was outside in the yard, smelled smoke and noticed smoke coming from the roof vents of the home. He quickly went inside to alert his wife and together they safely evacuated with their two dogs and called 911. Damage is estimated at $1,000. • Extrication – April 29 – Shortly after 1:45 a.m., SVFD crews responded to a report of a trapped driver inside a one car

rollover accident on I-90 near milepost 288. The car was on its side on an embankment about 80 feet from the roadway. Crews arrived to find extrication was not needed as the 24-year-old driver was out of the car. He was transported to the hospital with non-life threatening injuries. • Balcony fire – May 4 – SVFD firefighters responded to a reported balcony fire in the 25000 block of Hawkstone Loop shortly before 3:30 p.m. They were met by the apartment occupant who said there had been a fire in a bucket used for cigarette butts. A neighbor had poured water into the bucket and they had thrown the bucket away in the dumpster. Firefighters retrieved the metal bucket to ensure the fire was out. They then advised the apartment occupant to avoid placing the bucket near combustibles on the balcony (the bucket had been under a table with a plastic tablecloth). There was no fire damage to the balcony. • Service call – May 5 – Shortly before 11:45 a.m., SVFD firefighters were called to the Liberty Lake Portal building at 23403 E. Mission Ave. in response to a 10-year-old child trapped in an elevator on the second floor. The inner elevator car door was open but the outer car door was stuck. Firefighters accessed the elevator room to get the elevator key which was not the correct size and would not open the doors. They contacted the elevator company and a maintenance worker quickly arrived with a key to open the door. The child was unharmed. The elevator was placed out of service. • Unauthorized burning – May 12 – SVFD crews responded to the 3400 block of South Pines Road and found a homeowner burning door trim and baseboard in his exterior fire pit. The man was informed of the codes and that it is illegal to burn lumber as well as yard waste and garbage. He apologized and extinguished the fire. • Motor vehicle accident – May 13 – Shortly before 1 a.m., firefighters responded to a single car crash in the 9700 block of East Broadway. Crews arrived to find an SUV partially through a fence between two houses. The 46-year-old female driver refused medical treatment after initially asking for an evaluation. • Electrical fire – May 15 – SVFD crews responded to

See SVFD Page 11


The Current

SVFD

Continued from page 10

a reported commercial fire at Car Toys, 428 N. Sullivan Road at 4:15 a.m. Crews found a smoldering fire inside a wall. Firefighters opened up the wall and extinguished the fire. A passerby reported the fire, as the building was unoccupied at the time of the fire. The cause of the fire was the failure or mechanical damage behind an electric wall outlet. Edgecliff Fire Station #6 Open House – June 9 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. SVFD invites the community to join us for free family fun at our fire station located at 6306 E. Sprague Ave. Tour the fire station, try on firefighter gear, take pictures, meet your firefighters, get an Operation Family ID child safety kit and enjoy tasty treats. Visit www.spokanevalleyfire.com for more information. By the numbers: • Fires* - 77 • Emergency medical service 1,229 • Motor vehicle accidents - 96 • Hazardous materials - 11 • Building alarms - 62 • Service calls - 15 • Vehicle extrication - 5 • Water rescue - 6 • Rescue Task Force - 1 *Brush, commercial, residential, rubbish, vehicle fires and unauthorized burning About SVFD - Spokane Valley Fire Department serves the cities of Liberty Lake, Millwood, Spokane Valley and unincorporated areas of Spokane County including the communities of Otis Orchards, Pasadena Park, and the area surrounding Liberty Lake, with a combined population of 125,000 across approximately 75 square miles. SVFD firefighters and paramedics responded to more than 17,280 emergency calls in 2017. Established in 1940, SVFD is an Accredited Agency by the Commission on Fire Accreditation International (CFAI), one of only a handful in the state of Washington. SVFD operates 10 stations providing fire suppression, emergency medical services, vehicle extrication, hazardous materials response, special operations rescue, fire investigation, fire prevention, commercial property inspection, CPR and fire safety training. SVFD provides free fire safety inspections and installation of free smoke detectors. For more information call 928-1700 or visit www.spokanevalleyfire.com.

JUNE 2018 • 11

Safety Scroll Learn Before You Burn approach critical to summer safety

By Chief Bryan Collins Spokane Valley Fire Department During the summer, more people are eating and entertaining in the great outdoors. Weekdays and weekends, meals are cooked on outdoor grills, kids are running through sprinklers and people gather around backyard fire pits to roast marshmallow s’mores. An increase in outdoor residential recreational fires during the summer months results in more calls about smoke and illegal burning activities to the Spokane Valley Fire Department. This is why we are asking residents to “Learn Before You Burn!” By planning ahead and learning about where, what and when you can – and cannot – burn a residential fire, you will play a role in helping us be available to respond to more emergent calls. The term “residential fires” includes campfires, cooking fires, backyard barbeques, fire pits and patio warmers that burn charcoal, natural firewood or manufactured logs/pellets. Other types of fires, such as disposal fires for yard/ garden debris, lumber/building materials and garbage are never allowed. Here are the important requirements for you to consider when planning to have a residential fire: • Keep it small, not tall: Fires must be less than 2 feet tall (height), and 3 feet across (diameter). Don’t burn on windy days. • Fuel it right: Only “approved fuels” may be used: charcoal, natural gas, propane, firewood. Firewood must be dry, clean, and natural (untreated) or manufactured logs. Recreational

fires cannot be used to dispose of anything, including paper, lumber, outdoor yard debris or garbage. • Stay clear of structures: Wood-fueled "open fire pits" must be at least 25 feet away from all structures – including fences and other combustible material. • Stand guard and extinguish: A person capable of extinguishing the fire must attend it at all times. The fire must be completely extinguished before leaving it. • Ask first: Permission from a landowner, or owner's designated representative, must be obtained before starting a recreational fire. Other rules may apply to your fire, including homeowner association covenants and rental agreements. • Be a good neighbor: It is always illegal to cause a nuisance to your neighbors with excessive smoke and odor. If smoke from your recreational fire bothers your neighbors, poses a threat or causes damage to their property, or otherwise causes a nuisance, you must put it out immediately. If this is a concern in your area, consider purchasing gas or electric devices instead of wood

burning units. • Mind the burn ban: Most recreational fires are prohibited during a burn ban. Specific contained fires, such as barbecues and chimneas, may be allowed depending upon the burn ban type. Local fire officials can restrict outdoor burning based upon fire danger. State and local air quality agencies may restrict outdoor burning based on air quality concerns. SVFD also wants you to stay safe around your recreational fire this summer. Always have a water hose and/or fire extinguisher nearby and never let children play with fire or leave them unsupervised near a fire. Fire is fast; tragedy can occur in mere seconds. For more information on rules and regulations on residential burning, fire pits and burn ban restrictions, please visit our website at www. spokanevalleyfire.com or call us at 928-1700. You can also visit the Spokane Regional Clean Air Agency website at www. spokanecleanair.org.

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COVER STORY

12 • JUNE 2018

Upturn in Development multi-family in progress housing Permits Issued presents new chapter for Valley

12007 E Coyote Rock Dr New 12 Unit Apartment Bldg by Riverside Place at Coyote Rock 300 Block of S Marigold Ln, 6 Duplexes By Gordon Finch Homes 18000 Block of E Shannon, 5 Duplexes B y Paras Family LLC 17900 Block of E Shannon, 6 Duplexes B y Paras Family LLC 10700 Block of E 11th, 5 Duplexes B y Diamond Rock Construction 1100 Block of S Robie, 3 Duplexesv B y Diamond Rock Construction

Construction Applications Received

2700 Block of N Cherry 120 Unit Apartment Complex By Winter Heights

Subdivision Applications Received 17605 E Cataldo Ave - 2 2 lots, Williow Valley 5105 N McDonald, 27 lots out of 8 acres, G enevieve Estates – Phase II

Duplex Permits Year

Spokane Valley

Spokane

Spokane County

2013

4

9

76

2014

26

5

67

2015

17

6

86

2016

24

6

35

2017

37

8

19

2018

28

23

2

By Staci Lehman Current Correspondent Spokane Valley is experiencing some growing pains. Like the rest of Spokane County, the housing inventory in the city is severely limited, homes are being purchased just hours after going on the market and rental prices are skyrocketing. That could change, though, with an influx of multifamily housing being constructed, some considered of the affordable housing variety. “They’re responding to a need in our community” said Joel White, executive officer of the Spokane Home Builders Association (SHBA). “Right now, the need is multi-family.” White said that more multifamily units were built in our area than single family units in each of the past two years. Even so, more are still needed. “We’re actually way behind what we should be building,’ he said. “There’s a demand and they (apartments) meet the price point. In Spokane and Spokane Valley

our median income is low.” Jenny Nickerson, Spokane Valley’s assistant building official, says the number of permits requested for multi-family housing projects started increasing about five years ago and has steadily increased with a slight spike in July 2016 just before international building codes were updated. While city officials say that additional multi-family housing is one of their economic development goals, Nickerson doesn’t believe the recent increase is a result of recruiting. “It’s market driven,” she said. “The market drives it and we respond with our permitting processing.” Recent apartment construction includes projects on Indiana Avenue between Sullivan and Flora Road, on Sullivan just north of Trent Avenue and townhomes on Appleway Avenue near the Spokane Transit Valley Center. Those homes were constructed by the Community Frameworks program and are considered affordable housing. They also aren’t at full build-out yet. “I know there are additional lots in that development that can be developed but haven’t requested permits yet,” said Nickerson. In addition to those existing developments, several new ones are in the works or in the proposal stage. One of those is on the former site of the Painted Hills Golf Course, with a reported 580 proposed units. A total of 300 of those will be single-family homes

Single Family Residential Permits Year

Spokane Valley

Spokane

Spokane County

2013

110

269

551

2014

151

213

421

2015

167

312

526

2016

175

342

769

2017

129

314

816

2018

35

89

286

The Spokane Valley housing market is running parallel to the rest of Spokane County with dwindling supply and rising sales and prices. In March, only around 1,000 homes were on the market in Spokane County, down 20 percent from the same time last year. Meanwhile, prices are up an average of 7 percent. In Spokane Valley, that market includes the following types of homes, according to NeighborhoodScout. com: Single family (60.3 percent), apartment complexes (22.7 percent), mobile homes (6.3 percent), townhomes (6.2 percent) and small apartment buildings (4.5 percent). Photo by Danica Wick

The Current

A traffic scoping meeting was held last month to discuss the potential impact of Spokane Valley Elks Apartments, a 322unit multi-family housing project on 12.49 acres in Spokane Valley. Contributed photo and 280 multi-family units. The plan also includes retail, office space and 30 acres of green space. Developer Dennis Crapo of Diamond Rock Construction, Inc. has several projects proposed, including developing a former Christmas tree farm into townhomes and duplexes. Under the proposal, the site of Bergman’s Tree Farm near 32nd and Adams would have 78 town houses and duplexes. “That new multi-family development at 32nd and Highway 27 is a desirable spot,” said White of the project. “You’ve got services and you’ve got transit.” Crapo also has a development in the works in the Ponderosa neighborhood, where he has proposed to change zoning from single-family residential to corridor mixed use in order to build 60plus apartments and a retail use building on about five acres. The site of the former Elks Lodge at 2605 N. Robie is another Crapo project. For that 12-acre site, he has planned a 322-unit development to be known as the Spokane Valley Elks Apartments. What all three of Crapo’s projects, and the projects of other developers, have in common is that neighbors are concerned with the change in character they could bring to their neighborhoods. Some potential issues include a drop in property values and increased traffic. A study attached to the proposed Elks development says traffic could increase by over 800 trips per day on Pines Road. “It boils down to density and traffic,” White said. “There’s some legitimate concerns about

See HOUSING Page 13


The Current

JUNE 2018 • 13

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HOUSING

Continued from page 12 transportation. That’s where, if the city engineer says this is acceptable, I don’t know what more the developer would be expected to do.” Developers do take on some of the responsibility of mitigating the traffic that their projects generate through trip fees. “We currently don’t have impact fees adopted,” said Nickerson. “The way our development regulations read is that curb, gutter, swale and sidewalk improvements may be required, as well as intersection improvements considered.” While those items make developments of any kind more expensive, increasing the density of the area can add unexpected expenses in other areas. “That will add costs if we get enough new kids to generate another bus route to get those kids to East Farms Elementary,” said Kelly Shea, superintendent of the East Valley School District. At this point, Shea says the influx of multi-family housing is not a huge concern because the district can currently handle additional students. “We’re not growing at a rate that is putting intense pressure on us to build new schools,” he said. “We used to have enrollment over 5,000 and now we just reached 4,000, so we have space.” Shea says this is because most of the district’s parameters fall outside the Urban Growth Boundary (UGA) that mandates where urban development can take place in an attempt to control developmental sprawl. “Any development we get in East Valley is primarily on the west side of the district because that is in the UGA,” Shea said. That does present an issue at schools on the west end of the district, particularly Trent Elementary, which is already at

capacity. Some children are being bused from there to East Farms Elementary and new elementaryage students who enter the district will also be bussed. Shea says a bigger issue for the district related to the increase in apartment complexes is the higher mobility rate. Because apartments are often transitional housing for some families, he says at schools like Trent, it is fairly common to have one-third of the students turn over during the course of a school year. This can impact a student’s sense of stability and continuity while presenting challenges

to teachers who are trying to acclimate new students. As for why so many apartment units are being built now, Nickerson says it’s not just demand but timing. “As you may be aware, there’s not a lot of vacant property in Spokane Valley,” she said. As large tracts of land become available, developers have been snapping them up. White of SHBA agrees. “I think it’s a land availability issue and access to jobs,” he said. “The city of Spokane has very little jobs and the city of Spokane Valley

has put out that they’re very friendly and open to housing.” Also, with an aging baby boomer population and a shift in lifestyle priorities – not everyone wants to mow a yard anymore – many people are adding to the demand for alternatives to single-family homes by deciding to live in apartments, duplexes or townhomes. And now they have more options. White notes distinctive design features like high ceilings and chandeliers that now can be found in such properties. “There’s some beautiful rentals being built,” he said.


COMMUNITY

14 • JUNE 2018

The Current

Calendar of Events COMMUNITY EVENTS June 1 l Mig-Tastic Evening, Friday 5:30 - 7 p.m. Come see our newest exhibit and listen to a brief history of the MiG. Cost is $20 for adults $10 for those under age 18. Includes admission to museum, presentation and reception. Honor Point Museum, 6095 E. Rutter Ave, Spokane, WA June 2 l Neighbor Days/Open House Felts Field, Free family event open to the public from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Vintage aircraft and more ! Felts Field, 6105 E Rutter Ave Spokane, WA June 9 | Fairfield Flag Day – This unique community tradition goes back to 1910, 39 years before National Flag Day was established in the U.S., making it the nation’s longest running celebration of Flag Day. The family-friendly agenda includes the Fireman’s Pancake Breakfast, a fun run, children’s parade, Grand Parade, local craft vendors, lunch served by the local high school, along with food and coffee vendors. Bringing your own chairs and blankets is recommended. Fairfield is located 30 miles southeast of Spokane. More at www.fairfieldflagday.com. June 9 │Edgecliff Fire Station #6 Open House – 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., 6306 E. Sprague Ave. The Spokane Valley Fire Department invites the community to join us for free family fun. Tour the fire station, try on firefighter gear, meet your firefighters, get an Operation Family ID child safety kit and enjoy tasty treats. Visit www. spokanevalleyfire.com for more information. June 22-23 | Liberty Lake Kiwanis Yard Sales, citywide – 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday, June 22 and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on

Saturday, June 23. Along with close to 300 sale sites, this year’s two-day schedule will include halfa-dozen food trucks and local artisans at Pavillion Park displaying crafts, paintings and other original creations. An interactive map of the Yard Sales homes will be included on the Kiwanis website at www. libertylakekiwanis.org. June 30 | Newman Lake Fire Auxiliary Hot Dog and T- Shirt Sale – 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Newman Lake Fire Station #1, 9324 N Starr Road. This is the auxiliary’s largest fund raiser of the year with proceeds benefiting Newman Lake Fire and Rescue, a volunteer fire department. The Blood Mobile will be there from 9 to 12:30 p.m. Call Linda Rivers at 991-7106 to make an appointment Wednesdays through Sept. 26| Millwood Farmers Market – 3 to 7 p.m. Located in front of Millwood Presbyterian Church, 8910 E., Dalton off Argonne. Featuring food and farm vendors, artisan crafts, music and more. Market accepts token System, WIC, senior vouchers, EBT and Fresh Bucks programs. For more information, visit millwoodfarmermar.wix. com/market. Market runs each Wednesday through Sept. 26 other than July 4. For more information, visit www.millwoodpc.org/ millwood-farmers-market/. Saturdays through Oct. 13| Liberty Lake Farmers Market – 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Town Square Park, 1421 N. Meadowwood Lane. This popular open-air market features local food and farm vendors, artisan crafts and baked goods, music and more. The venue is open each Saturday through Oct. 13. For more information, visit www. libertylakefarmersmarket.com. The Rockford Historical Society’s Pioneer Museum will be open on Fridays and Sundays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., from Memorial Day until the Southeast Spokane County Fair in

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September. The museum is located at 10 S. First Street in Rockford. For more information, call 291-3193.

Center, 13109 E. Mirabeau Parkway, Spokane Valley. Call Steve at 8934746 for more information

RECURRING

Grange Meeting and Dessert | 6:30 p.m., first Wednesday of the month, Tri-Community Grange, 25025 Heather St., Newman Lake. The public is welcome for this community-based service organization. For more information call 226-2202 or see us on Facebook.

ACT 2 senior classes | Affordable classes offered by Community Colleges of Spokane to those who are retired or planning to retire. A wide range of courses from geology and history to exercise and art are offered at CenterPlace, 2426 N. Discovery Place, as well as other locations throughout the area. “Focused Fitness on Dishman Mica,” a yoga class, is now part of the schedule. More at www.sccel. spokane.edu/ACT2 Baha’i Fireside Conversation | 5 to 6 p.m., third Friday of the month. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main Ave. Discussion of Baha’i teachings, history, and perspectives on resolving the challenges facing humanity. All are welcome. More at 599-2411 or www.bahai.us. Inland Empire Blues Society monthly meeting | Oct. 13 at 7:30 p.m., Bolo's 116 S. Best Road Café Card Club | 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Tuesdays. On Sacred Grounds, 12212 E. Palouse Hwy., Valleyford. Play pinochle, cribbage, or hearts. More at www. onsacredgrounds.com Catholic Singles Mingle | Meeting times and locations vary. This group, with no dues, is for single adults of all ages. More at www. meetup.com/Catholic-SinglesMingle. DivorceCare Recovery Support Group | Mondays 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Eastpoint Church, 15303 E. Sprague Ave. Learn how to heal from the deep hurt of divorce and discover hope for your future. DivorceCare for Kids (ages 5-12) meets at the same time and location. Cost is $25 for workbook. More at 892-5255 or eastpointchurch.com. Military Sobriety Support Group | 10 to 11: 30 a.m., Spokane Vet

Men’s Weekly Bible Study | 7 a.m. Tuesdays. Millwood Presbyterian Church, 3223 N. Marguerite Road, Millwood. The men’s weekly Bible Study meets in the Reception Hall with different members sharing in the leading of the study. All men are invited to join. More at www.milwoodpc.org. Rockford Crochet Class | 10 a.m. to noon, Saturdays. The Harvest Moon, 20 S. First St., Rockford. Free classes. We have crocheters, knitters, embroidery, quilting and needlepoint. Come and share with us what you are doing. Call 2913722. Rockford Historical Society | 11:30 a.m. second Friday of the month (Feb. to Nov.). Harvest Moon restaurant, 20 S. First St., Rockford. More at 291-3193. Spokane County Library District | Locations include Argonne, Fairfield, Otis Orchards, and Spokane Valley. Special events and weekly activities for all ages including book clubs, children’s story times, classes, Lego club, teen anime club and writing clubs. More at www.scld.org Spokane Valley Eagles | 16801 E. Sprague Ave. Breakfast served Sundays 9 to 11:30 a.m. Lunch served Thursdays 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. followed by bingo from 1 to 3:30 p.m. More at www.foe3433. com. Spokane Valley Partners Food Bank | Weekly distribution

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CALL: 509-924-2885

18317 E Appleway Ave Spokane Valley, WA 99016 • Across From the Water Tower


The Current

JUNE 2018 • 15

COMMUNITY

takes place Wednesdays and Thursdays at 10814 E. Broadway by appointment. Appointments are available during the following days/times: Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Thursday (reserved for advanced-age seniors — age 60 and over — and/or physicallyhandicapped people with limited mobility): 11 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Address verification is required. To make an appointment, call 927.1153 ext. 10, Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 1 p.m Spokane Valley Quilt Guild | Meetings are held at 7 p.m. on the first Tuesday of February, April, June, August, October and December at Valley Assembly of God Church, 15618 E. Broadway, Spokane Valley. Open to all interested in sharing ideas and skills of our quilting craft. Participants have can access a comprehensive library, can engage experienced teachers and participate in community service projects. More at www.svqgspokane.com

MUSIC & THE ARTS June 1 | Reception for Inland Northwest Juried Landscape Art Exhibition – 4 to 9 p.m., Jundt Art Museum, Gonzaga University, 200 E. Desmet Ave., Spokane. This display showcases art that celebrates Inland Northwest landscape-based objects created by artists from the region. It runs through Aug. 11. Hours are Mondays-Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 6 | “Hello Dolly” fundraiser benefiting Spokane Valley Partners – 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., meet and greet with raffle prizes; curtain call at 7:30. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St., Spokane. All proceeds benefit the programs at Spokane Valley Partners. Purchase $35 tickets at https://give.classy.org/hellodolly. Visit www.svpart.org or call 9271153 for more information. June 14 | Dallas Holm concert – 7 to 9 p.m., Valley Assembly of God, 15618 E. Broadway, Spokane Valley. Free admission. To learn more, call 924-0466.

RECURRING Pages of Harmony | 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., Wednesdays. Thornhill Valley Chapel, 1400 S. Pines Road. If you enjoy singing, you will love the four-part, a cappella harmony of this men’s barbershop chorus. More at www.pagesofharmony.org. Spirit of Spokane Chorus | 6:45 p.m., Tuesdays. Opportunity Presbyterian Church, 202 N. Pines Road. Make new friends by joining this women’s chorus, specializing

in four-part, a cappella harmony in the barbershop style. More at 2184799. Spokane Novelists Group | Noon to 4 p.m., second and fourth Saturday of the month. Otis Orchards Community Church, 23304 E. Wellesley Ave., Otis Orchards. A support/critique group for writers. Open to anyone with an interest in writing fiction (no memoirs, nonfiction, poetry, etc., please). Participants should bring 5-10 pages to read aloud and 6-8 copies for others to read along and critique. More at 590-7316. Spokane Valley Camera Club | 7:15 p.m., third and fourth Monday of the month (September through April). Liberty Lake Sewer and Water District building, 22510 E. Mission Ave., Liberty Lake. All levels of ability—students through experienced photographers—are invited to learn. Social events include field trips and workshops. More at 951-1446 or www.sv-cc. org

HEALTH & RECREATION June 5 and 18 | Pre-diabetes screening, INHS Community Wellness Center, 501 N. Riverpoint Blvd., Spokane. This simple blood test provides information about a person’s average levels of blood glucose, also called blood sugar, over the past three months. Immediate results are provided and can be discussed at the time of appointment with a registered dietitian and/or a certified diabetes educator. For more information, call 232-8145 or visit www.inhs.info. June 5 | Quit for Good – Tobacco Cessation class. Have you tried quitting smoking before without success? INHS and Providence Health Care are teaming up to provide a free four-week program designed to help you have longterm success in quitting tobacco. Tobacco cessation tools will be available to you as well as tobacco cessation experts. The class includes Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) while supplies last when NRT is not covered by participant’s health insurance. This is a live, interactive webinar. Log in information will be emailed with your registration confirmation. For more information, call 232-8145 or visit www.inhs.info. June 15 | Healthy Kids Day – 5:30 p.m., Spokane Valley YMCA, 2421 N. Discovery Place, Spokane Valley. This free community event will feature crafts, face painting, climbing wall, outdoor movie, booths from local community services, a jumping house and more. First 300 kids receive a free shirt. To learn more, call the YMCA

10814 E Broadway Spokane Valley, WA 99206

Your theatre in Spokane Valley!

Mark Twain’s

Is He

? D A E D Adapted by David Ives June 8 - 24, 2018 Get tickets and find more information about Ignite! including volunteer opportunities, audition notices, and improv at

igniteonbroadway.org Mark your calendars for Ignite's 2018 Annual Meeting and Open House, June 12 at 6pm. Join us as we wrap up the year and talk about what's coming up for Ignite! at 777-9622. June 15 | Opening Night for Spokane Indians’ baseball – 6:30 p.m., Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana, Spokane Valley. See the hometown team take on the Boise Hawks in the 2018 Northwest League opener. A fireworks display will follow the game. For tickets, call 343-6886 or visit www. spokaneindians.com. June 17 | Dad’s Day Dash – 9 a.m., Manito Park, Spokane. This sixth annual run is a chipped and timed event with prizes for top men and women placers as well as corporate teams. The event is a fundraiser for SNAP, Spokane County’s nonprofit community action agency. Complimentary food after the race courtesy of Yoke’s. To register, go to www.snapwa. org/5k.

cancer. Supporting body, mind and soul. $10 donation suggested. Facilitated by board-certified Music Therapist, Carla Carnegie. Willow Song Music Therapy Center. 21101 E. Wellesley #102. Otis Orchards. For more information, visit www. willowsongmusictherapy.com or call 592 7875.

RECURRING Yoga in Rockford | 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Rockford Park, 20 W. Emma Street, Rockford. In case of inclement weather, classes will be held at Dave’s Autobody, 8 W. Emma Street.

June 26 | Medicare informational presentation – 1 to 3 p.m., Liberty Lake Library, 23123 E. Mission Ave. Are you turning 65? Confused about Medicare insurance? Want to save money on prescriptions? Then come to our Medicare 101 to learn all you need to know and then some

Wednesday mornings | Mindful Music & Movement class, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Specifically designed for those living with chronic health issues such as: Parkinson's, dementia, COPD, MS, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, cancer. Supporting body, mind and soul. $10 donation suggested. Facilitated by board-certified Music Therapist, Carla Carnegie. Willow Song Music Therapy Center. 21101 E. Wellesley #102. Otis Orchards. For more information, visit www. willowsongmusictherapy.com or call 592 7875.

Wednesday mornings | Mindful Music & Movement class, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Specifically designed for those living with chronic health issues such as: Parkinson's, dementia, COPD, MS, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue,

See CALENDAR Page 13

Tuesday afternoons | Decreasing Anger Group, 3 to 4:30 p.m., the Vet Center, 13109 E. Mirabeau Parkway, Spokane Valley. Eligibility: Combat veteran


The Current

16 • JUNE 2018

POP-UP LIBR ARY

Summer Celebration Saturday, June 16, 10am–6pm

Enjoy a day of entertainment and exploration at our Pop-up Library next to Balfour Park on Sprague Ave, west of University Rd. Play giant sidewalk games and build with giant blue blocks from the Imagination Playground. Touch and explore big trucks. Hear Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! by Mo Willems and other funny stories, while on a Spokane Transit bus. Listen to great folk music performed by local tribute band, The Willows. Tasty treats and tacos will be available for purchase around lunchtime from local food trucks. At the Pop-up Library, you can also check out books and get a library card. All ages

NEXT TO BALFOUR PARK (SPOKANE VALLEY) ON E SPRAGUE AVE, WEST OF UNIVERSITY RD Sponsored by

SPECIAL EVENTS Friends of the Library Used Book Sale ($3 bag sale) 10am–3pm Touch some big trucks 10am–6pm Touch-a-Bus Storytime with Spokane Transit 11am–12pm The Willows, a tribute to Peter, Paul & Mary 2–3pm


The Current

Libraries celebrate summer with musical montage

By Gwendolyn Haley Spokane County Library District Summer at the library is our busiest time of the year. In 2018, we have a lineup that features marvelous melodies and terrific tunes. Family favorite musician Eric Herman kick offs seven weeks of musical fun for elementary students in grades K–5, starting June 18. Kids and their families can hear stories and songs from Ghana with Habiba's Village, Salish songs and stories with LaRae Wiley and experience puppets and songs with Oregon performer Red Yarn. Traveling Lantern Theater performs the “Life of Mozart,” and

LIBRARY local favorites Mobius Science and Spokane Taiko Drummers round out the lineup. Our preschool storytimes always feature fun activities, and this summer we have special “Music and Movement” sessions to get everyone moving. Celebrated children's musician Jim Gill closes out our summer, with an all-ages concert at CenterPlace Regional Event Center in Spokane Valley. Gill's energetic banjo and silly songs get everyone up on their feet, dancing and singing along. Throughout summer, those grades 4 and up will find plenty to do at the library. Radical Rick brings his Extreme Science fun with a handson “Science of Sound” workshop. Tweens can try out their baking skills in our “Meal in a Mug Challenge” or test their mettle in our “Escape Room Challenge.” We have handson art with paint and plaster and

even sewing classes for teens. Adults can be part of the summer music scene too. Concerts are scheduled around the county, both in the library and out at area parks. Acoustic bluesman Lyle Morse, tribute band The Willows, dance band Sidetrack, and local fan favorites The Plaid Cats will be performing. Continue the musical exploration with PoetryMusic, a world-class, chamber jazz duo dedicated to performing poetry, sung and set to music, and finally you won’t want to miss folksinger Adam Miller. You’ll find information about these events and more in ENGAGE, the programs and events guide for the library district, available at your local library and online at www.scld. org. The library might just be the cure for the common summer. Stay in tune!

ROCK SUMMER READING ONLINE SUMMER READING June 1–August 31, 2018 Summer is perfect for reading & exploring.

Make vacation reading a priority to avoid summer slide By Gwendolyn Haley

Spokane County Library District Last summer my family was busy with summer activities – camps, road trips and camping vacations. We scheduled highly educational and enriching activities for our youngest daughter but we did not make reading a high priority. When she started school in the fall, her teacher told me that she had definitely lost ground with reading. I was horrified. How could I have let this happen? I know all about “summer slide.” Summer slide happens when kids don’t read over the summer and actually lose ground with reading skills. As a librarian, I also know that this is especially critical for grade K–3 years when children are learning to read. So after the teacher’s report, every day, my daughter and I made reading together a priority. We found pockets of time to include it. One not-so-obvious opportunity was while I make dinner and she sits on a stool and reads to me. By the spring parent-teacher conference, my daughter shared how she had already met and exceeded her endof-the-year reading goal. Here is another path to success and the single best reading motivator for kids: My daughter

JUNE 2018 • 17

Read for 600 minutes

Visit a farmers’ market

Walk a trail

Play in the park

Visit a museum Earn badges for completed challenges! Signup starts June 1 at www.scld.org/onlinesummer-reading.

discovered books that she enjoys and picks out the ones she wants to read. Research shows that choosing their own reading material is a better reading motivator for kids than any prize. This year, I am determined to not let the summer slide creep up on us. We’ve set a summer goal for reading (600 minutes), equaling about 20 minutes a day for six weeks. That isn’t overwhelming and leaves plenty of time for family activities. Luckily, the Spokane County Library District has ways to help track and practice reading this summer. The first is their Online Summer Reading website where you can track your summer reading, earn badges for reading milestones, and more. Sign up starts June 1

at www.scld.org/online-summerreading. The Summer Reading Buddy program helps kids entering grades 1–5 become stronger readers with weekly, one-on-one reading practice with a trained adult or teen Reading Buddy. The program runs from July 9 to Aug. 3 at Otis Orchards and Spokane Valley Libraries. To participate, parents can complete the online registration by June 25 at www.scld.org/summer-readingbuddy-2018. For parents, life is busy and can be overwhelming sometimes. And at the same time, we want the best for our kids. It turns out that making sure kids are reading over the summer – and that we are reading with them – is the best way to set them up for school success.

SV

1

SPOKA NE V CHALL ALLEY ENGE

www.scld.org

HOUR


The Current

18 • JUNE 2018

CALENDAR

Continued from page 15 from all eras, military sexual trauma survivors, Contact Steve at 893-4746 to make an intake appointment.

at Central Valley Performing Arts Center PLAY IN A WEEK

Into the Woods

Stephen Sondheim James Lapine

Music and lyrics by

SUMMER COURSES

Book by

REGISTRATION IS OPEN

• Classes including Kenpo Karate and Zumba Aerobics. See website for cost and times.

Mondays in June | Financial Literacy with Dycelia Weiss – 12:30 to 2 p.m., STCU Community Education Kitchen and Classroom at Spokane Valley Partners Food Bank and Family Services, 10814 E. Broadway, Spokane Valley. Call 927-1153 or visit www.svpart.org/ food-bank/ for more information.

The Stories of Dr. Seuss Grades 3 – 6 July 23 – July 27 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Grades 4 – 8

RECURRING

Register online at

SVSummerTheatre.com

July 13 – 29 Directed by

Yvonne A.K. Johnson Music Direction by

July 25 Special Fundraiser Event

David Brewster

www.svsummertheatre.com 509-368-7897 Evening Show Time: 7:30 P.M. • Sunday Show Time: 2:00 P.M. State-of-the-art theatre • Free parking • 821 S. Sullivan Road

Mirabeau Park Hotel

• Pickleball drop-in: 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Mon. through Thurs.; 10 a.m. to noon Tues. and Thurs. and 6 to 8 p.m. Wed. and Sun. $3/seniors ($5/non-seniors)

CIVIC & BUSINESS

July 16 – July 20

Presented by

HUB Sports Center 19619 E. Cataldo Ave., Liberty Lake. Various activities and events occur throughout the week including:

David and Christina Lynch

Spokane Valley City Council | Regular meetings are held on the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 6 p.m. in Council Chambers at Spokane Valley City Hall, 11707 E. Sprague Ave., Ste. 101. Council study sessions are held the first, third and sometimes fifth Tuesdays at 6 p.m., also in Council Chambers. Millwood City Council | Regular meetings at 7 p.m. on the second Tuesday of each month at Millwood City Hall, 9103 E. Frederick Ave. Spokane Flag Museum | Sponsored by the Sons of the American Revolution and the Fairmount Memorial Association, details the rich history of the American flag, Mondays-Fridays, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Saturdays, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Pines Cemetery, 1402 S. Pines Road, Spokane Valley. For more information: 926-2753 or www.fairmountmemorial.com/ south-pines-cemetery Spokane Valley Kiwanis | 6:45 a.m. Tuesdays. Valley Hospital Education Center, 12606 E. Mission Ave. More at www. spokanevalleykiwanis.net. Greater Spokane Valley Rotary | Noon to 1 p.m., Wednesdays. Darcy’s, 10502 E. Sprague Ave. More at www.svrotary.org.


The Current

JUNE 2018 • 19

meet the chefs of brian duffy

edouardo jordan

evan tewel

Born and raised in Philadelphia, PA. His motto is “Redefining the economics of food service,” which he accomplishes with his consulting firm. He is known for Bar Rescue, Duffified Live, a judge on Food Network and Flying Fish Crafthouse.

Seattle Chef Jordan is a 2018 James Beard winner (times two!) bringing home the medal for Best New Restaurant in the country for Seattle JuneBaby and the Best Chef Northwest medal for himself.

He was raised in Spokane, WA and studied at the Inland Northwest Culinary Academy. He now oversees Table 13 and the Grand Restaurant at the Davenport Hotel.

felipe hernandez

grant hinderliter

hugh acheson

jeff bonilla

john sundstrom

Since 1990, when he had his sister teach him his family’s tamale recipe so he could utilize it to make a living, he has spread the love of tamales with his innovative recipes that have earned him the reputation as the premium tamale local in Union Gap, WA. A 2018 James Beard winner!

He joined The Marcus Whitman team in 2011 and became the produce expert by canning and pickling ingredients from local Walla Walla farms and on The Marc’s own rooftop garden. His mother and grandmother were both a strong influence in his culinary career.

He was raised in Ottawa, Canada and is the chef of critically acclaimed Athens, GA Five & Ten. He competed on Top Chef Masters and has served as a judge on Top Chef, seasons 9,10 and 11. His fresh approach to Southern food has earned him a great deal of recognition.

He has over 17+ years of experience creating many signature dishes and menus in Southern California earning him multiple awards. He is passionate about promoting environmental responsibility through a no waste process of cooking with fresh local, organic and seasonal ingredients.

He has been featured on the Food Network’s “Best of“ Show as well as ”Food Nation”. In addition to “Chefs a-field”. He opened Lark in 2003 on Seattle’s Capitol Hill. Featured on Food Network and PBS and received the James Beard Foundation “Best Chef Northwest” in 2007.

chad white

mark singson

mattias merges

steven walk

tanya broesder

Born in Spokane, WA, he trained in classic French and Mediterranean cuisine. Traveling, cooking and falling in love with Mexico and its culture, is the basis for Zona Blanca. His wild creativity, authentic sense of flavor drive his kitchen, pushing expectations and boundaries, and his own style of food.

Resides in Vancouver, Canada where he serves as the chef and founder of FAM Inc. Although he has served at many prestigious eateries, his most recent project includes hosting a series of Family Matters Pop-Ups where guests enjoy his thoughtful cuisine at a variety of different venues. Contestant on Top Chef Canada Season 6.

Since 2010 he has been chef and proprietor of Chicago’s Folkart Restaurant Management. Several establishments under his management use state of the art design and commitment to locally sourced ingredients to thrive. Also the founder of Pilot Light charity that aids teachers in using food to support teaching and learning.

By the time he was 16 he has worked his way up from a dishwasher at a steakhouse in his hometown of Alliance, Ohio. He is now the executive Chef at Coeur d’Alene Casino where he is committed to utilizing locally grown and cultivated ingredients.

She was born and raised in Iowa and attended the Western Culinary Institute and Le Cordon Blue program in Portland, OR. She was brought to Spokane after graduation by an internship at Fugazzi that led her to Masselow’s since its opening in 2010.

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Originally from Oregon, he began his career at Twigs, Luna, and Mizuna, he masterminded Ruins and found his passion.

Growing up in Post Falls, ID allowed him to start his restaurant career as a dishwasher at the Coeur d’Alene Casino Resort. After meeting his wife in Portland, OR they moved to Spokane in 2014 and he worked as the Executive Chef at Clover for three years. He always knew his ultimate goal was to open a place like Cochinito Taqueria

He has been a two-time finalist on Top Chef Canada. He has two successful restaurants along with a long list of international guest chef appearances.

Executive Chef, Big Sky Resort, hails from Croton-on-Hudson, NY. He graduated from the Culinary Institute of America and toured Europe gathering new skills that he has used at a variety of acclaimed restaurants over his 28 year career.

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The Current

20 • JUNE 2018

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The Current

Amphibians Aplenty – Rockford celebrates Frog Regatta tradition

By Derek Brown Current Correspondent The townspeople begin to line up along the verdant banks of Rock Creek, which cuts through the entire length of Rockford, hub of southeast Spokane County. They gather slowly at first, a few on the bridge on Emma Street and a handful on the trail to the east, all of them close enough to see the creek which bubbles on in front of everyone. Sitting alone under an event canopy tent is Bill Benson, current president of the Rockford Lions Club. He is the acting DJ for the Rockford Lions Frog Regatta this year. He cuts the music as more people begin to trickle in and waxes nostalgic about the origins of the event. “(The Frog Regatta) was Pete Abbey’s idea, to float things down the stream here,” Benson says over the mic. “And he shared it with the Rockford Lions Club. We do our major fundraising here and that money goes to philanthropic endeavors in our community. And it’s a fun community event. It’s become a tradition.” The annual Frog Regatta has indeed become a tradition. The entire town talks about it. People everywhere reminisce about last year’s race – who won, how many people showed up and so on. And each April, people from all over the area show up to watch the frogs sail down the creek, some faster than others. The regatta is a simple race featuring an enormous fleet of rubber frogs. Each frog is handnumbered and sold to anyone who wants one for $5. First, second and third-place frogs receive $300, $200 and $100, respectively. “The way it works is frogs are dumped in the water way up stream,” Benson says. “After the frogs make their way down to the finish line, the first three will win.” The length of the course is about a mile and takes anywhere from 30 minutes to sometimes over an hour to complete, depending on the water table, current of the creek and obstacles such as grass and mud. The Frog Regatta is put on by

JUNE 2018 • 21

The Lions Club of Rockford in partnership with Fredneck’s Saloon. What started off as a way to save a local business went on to become one of the town’s main fundraisers. “In ‘97 we flooded on New Year’s Day,” said Abbey, co-owner of Frednecks Saloon. “So the town came together and they cleaned up the bar. There was 3 feet of water in it and we got it all cleaned up and after the water went away and there was 4 to 6 inches of mud.” Later Congressman George Nethercutt came to Rockford to check on the aftermath of the flood. “After they got it all cleaned up, Nethercutt had come in to see the devastation and he said, ‘I thought you guys had a flood here,’ and my dad said, ‘If it wasn’t for this town here I would have had to have closed,’” Pete recalls. After Abbey’s father cleaned the bar he came up with the idea of having a frog race in the creek. At first, Abbey says, they did it for a community member who had had a stroke and to help repay the flood insurance. And the rest is history. Other community members acknowledge Abbey’s hard work with the event.

“Pete does a lion’s share of the work,” Benson says with a laugh and pun intended. “He developed it and then gave it over to the Rockford Lions Club.” Steve Foley, a community member who is part of the Rockford Lions Club is the MC for the event this year. He grabs the mic as more people begin to gather. The event is now packing the east side of the creek with entire families out watching the frogs. Foley grabs the mic and tells the crowd that the frogs have been released. “Everybody in the community is part of it,” Foley says. “The Lions Club obviously is now the frontrunner of it. But Fredneck’s started it, and Pete is still an active member. Actually, he sells about 50 percent of the frogs every year himself and organizes the dumping (of the frogs upstream) and picking them up when it’s done.” Abbey and the Lions Club conduct a friendly competition each year to see who can sell the most frogs. Abbey has never lost. Abbey, who runs along the creek with a half-dozen kids, keeps Foley abreast of the situation, where the frogs are, which number looks to be winning. Finally, a single frog floats

past the finish line and is netted by Tom Gibson, who shouts out, “It’s 802!” The Lions Club uses the regatta proceeds for a number of community-related causes. The club sponsors high school kids for scholarships; they also help cover the costs for kids with diabetes to attend camp. “They do glasses, hearing aids, donations to groups at schools in Plumber, Freeman, and Liberty,” Vivian Plank, Lions Club member, says. She explains that after a tragic accident involving a girl who died suddenly after falling without wearing a helmet, the foundation bought free bike helmets for kids. “INB did hot dogs, potato chips, pop and water, and free face painting this year,” Plank explains. “And brought some pigs. Everyone loves to pitch in for this. We’re trying to make it more than just the frog race.” As the race comes to an end, and the first three winners are named, the townspeople begin to celebrate another successful frog float, a Rockford tradition. “I love it,” Abbey says as the frogs come rolling in. “I enjoy it. Every year I come run with the frogs.”

The latest rendition of the Frog Regatta in Rockford took place on April 28. Winning frogs from over the years (above) earn a special distinction as part of this unique community event that benefits causes through the Rockford Lions Club. Photo by Derek Brown


The Current

22 • JUNE 2018

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F By Mahala Christensen Everyone grows up with a memory or two that shapes who they are. Those moments are pivotal points in every person’s life because they provide a basis for the values of that individual and the foundation for their sense of integrity. But what happens if that foundation is shaken or unstable? Is integrity something that can be relearned or re-established once it is lost? Some may say, ‘No, it’s something you’re born with and it can’t be taught.’ While I don’t disagree that there are elements of integrity that occur naturally in many people, I also confidently stand behind the assertion that integrity can be learned, nurtured and developed no matter the circumstance. I was blessed to grow up in a loving home with supportive parents, siblings and friends, combined with a strong faith that culminated in helping me develop my intrinsic set of positive values. There are many things that can be taken from a person but his or her sense of integrity isn’t one of them, or so I thought. My sophomore year in high school, I was involved in an accident while playing softball which caused a brain injury and ultimately resulted in severe amnesia. This amnesia stole my long-term memory, along with what felt like my entire childhood and therefore all the values on which I had built the foundation of my integrity vanished. I was left feeling lost and uncertain. It wasn’t only that I couldn’t remember people’s names or memories from my past, I felt like I had lost my internal compass. What a strange feeling, to be at odds with yourself over who you are and what kinds of decisions you should make. There were moments when I wasn’t sure if I would ever feel balanced as my whole self again. It was a long and difficult recovery through which I was aided by many medical professionals who helped me adapt and grow. With their support and the love and patience of my family and friends, I was able to

formulate a new platform of values to stand on. If I hadn’t had their support, I am certain I would have struggled miserably to re-establish my value system. Through this, I came to realize that I wanted to use my experience to help others, particularly children, who are struggling to define and establish their value system due to physical or emotional trauma. A person’s integrity is at the core of who they are and everyone should have the opportunity to develop it and feel confident about it. This is why I think it is absolutely vital that a child be surrounded by a nurturing and supportive environment in the early years of life. If a child is deprived of the kindness and love that should be provided or if they suffer in a difficult circumstance, it is all too easy for their values to become compromised and their integrity to be underdeveloped. Everyone, no matter their background, deserves the opportunity that I received – to regain balance for their values. Because of this, I am determined to become the support system that I was given. I know how important a person’s integrity is to their self-confidence and to their identity. I want to help those who are struggling with this, to reset their compass. By providing this support and relying on my own past experiences, I am hopeful that I will be able to accomplish my dream of helping children in need and become a catalyst of good in their lives. I want to help develop and nurture their sense of integrity because it is a vital element in all of our lives; it is the essence of who we are. Mahala Christensen is a senior at West Valley High School, graduating this month with a 4.0 gpa as one of three class valedictorians. She will be attending Brigham Young University in the fall. A few of her many roles include: West Valley’s ASB activities coordinator and National Honor Society vice president. Last month she was honored at the seventh annual PACE Awards for being a good character role model.

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The Current

24 • JUNE 2018

Millwood City Council Report -- June 2018

By Derek Brown Current Correspondent In May, the Millwood Historic Preservation Commission put together a packet of information for residents who are remodeling or addressing upgrades in homes that are of historic value. The packets were prepared to help community members with construction guidelines for maintaining the historic qualities of their homes. The program does not fall under city regulations but rather is meant as helpful information for those planning renovations. Also last month, the Millwood City Council laid out its plans for citizen participation, consisting of a series of guidelines for participating in council meetings. Council previously had some limited provisions that were viewed as unclear and even lax. Council passed the new citizen participation resolution which more clearly outlines how public hearings and public comments will be facilitated during municipal meetings. Stressing common courtesy and civility. the changes are intended to have attendees be more respectful to each

other, with a three- minute time limit for speaking and a sign-in sheet. The city of Millwood also welcomes its newest council member, Kate McLachlan. McLachlan’s term begins immediately and ends Dec 31, 2019. Meanwhile, MCI and the city of Millwood are still in the planning process of laying new telecommunications line throughout the city. There’s still no date when the lines will be laid out as the city is still working with other jurisdictions to work it out. The line will go through Spokane Valley, Millwood and other parts of Spokane County. This month, the city is updating its six-year transportation plan. Every year the city updates all the road and transportation projects it has on the docket. Any project not on the TIP (Transportation Improvement Plan) will not qualify for funding through the state or federal government. These projects will be discussed in June. Progress is being made on the Millwood Trail Project. The city will be awarding construction of the project to potential bidders this month. The trail is a multi-use pedestrian path that goes through the city, along the railroad right-of-way. The city expects construction to begin soon after the bid is awarded. Finally, the West Valley SCOPE Parade and accompanying festivities will take place in Millwood on June 2, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

SV COUNCIL

Continued from page 9 and match it with $440,000 in city funds. Staff noted that they are waiting for BNSF to make track and track spacing decisions, so the timing of this grant would be beneficial to the city. Council gave consensus to bring this back as a motion. Another grant opportunity for Pines Grade Crossing The U.S. Department of Transportation is requesting grant applications for its Better Utilizing Investments to Leverage Development (BUILD) program, which replaces the older TIGER grants. Funds are for roads, bridges, transit, rail, ports or intermodal transportation. Staff proposes to submit a request of $2,000,000 for the Pines Grade Crossing, with the city contributing an additional $500,000. Council agreed to submit the application. SRTC grant requests to Increase Two grants the city has requested from the Spokane Regional Transportation Commission (SRTC) will have to increase. The Mullan Road Preservation Project will need to have additional poles replaced

due to collisions, additional right-ofway purchases and updated labor and materials costs to cover recent increases in construction costs, although the length of the road being updated is less. This results in an additional $33,750 to the city and $216,250 in SRTC funds. The Barker Road north to Trent project does not have to have a grind and overlay but requires additional signal costs. In addition, increased labor, materials and right-of-way elevate the cost to the city by $81,000 and to SRTC by $519,000. There was consensus to move forward on these changes. Council Briefs • Mayor Rod Higgins and City Council honored the Central Valley girls’ basketball team with a proclamation “recognizing and applauding” their GEICO Nationals championship over Hamilton Heights Christian Academy of Tennessee in March. • Council affirmed the mayor’s re-appointment of Lori Cook to the Spokane Hotel/Motel Commission for a three-year term. • At the request of a citizen, the planning commission examined whether hotels should be permitted in industrial zones. • LA Consulting will be examining the city’s street and stormwater maintenance.

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The Current

Student of the Month In only three years of playing golf, Kellie Fitzpatrick of West Valley has become one of the better competitors in the Great Northern League. As a sophomore, she qualified for districts; her junior year, she was an alternate for state. This season, she advanced to the 2A state tournament with teammates Alyssa Amann and Alyson Leonov. In a tournament earlier this season at the Meadowwood Golf Course in Liberty Lake, Fitzpatrick set a personal record of 93, placing second overall. In soccer, the senior was the goalkeeper and captain for an Eagles’ squad that won a district title and reached the state semi-finals this season, placing fourth. She was named to All GNL second team last year. In the classroom, Fitzpatrick maintains a 3.4 grade point average. She will continue her soccer career at Johnson & Wales University in Florida.

Citizen of the Month

Thanks you for all you do in our community

JUNE 2018 • 25 Cameron Geiger spends around 400 hours a year contributing to West Valley’s award-winning robotics program. The senior has served as a team leader and been part of an effort that has qualified for the world competition the last three years. “It allows me to be creative,” says Cameron, who will continue his engineering pursuits in the fall at the University of Washington. He and his robotics colleagues also mentor at STEM camps for elementary school students. Cameron also goes out of his way to help seniors in his neighborhood with yardwork. He has been selected as salutatorian for WV’s class of 2018 and served as secretary of the school’s chapter of the National Honor Society this year. The 3.98 student has found time to play tennis for the Eagles the past two seasons, earning a varsity letter this year.

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Athlete of the Month Alissa Munoz may be serving as the interim president of the Greater Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce but there is nothing interim about her commitment to community causes. Munoz has contributed to the ALS Association as a volunteer, coordinating fundraisers and events to help those affected by the disease. She has also stepped up to support the Cheney Fire Benevolent Fund. The Vancouver, Washington native has been a catalyst at the chamber, overseeing the ambassador program, the Business to Business networking group, the member referral program and “Let’s Talk Shop,” an educational workshop series promoting entrepreneurship. Prior to the chamber, Munoz worked with Horizon Credit Union. Munoz earned her degree from Eastern Washington University in Communication Sciences and Disorders, focused on helping people with impairments and disabilities of speech, language and hearing.

SPOKANE VALLEY 2018


The Current

26 • JUNE 2018 Brought to you by

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Greenacres resident still holding court at Hoopfest

By Steve Christilaw Current Correspondent For the past 27 years, Cal Brown has been part of the world’s largest 3-on-3 basketball tournament. And for the past two decades, you will find him in the same place for those two days, overseeing a designated layer of Spokane Hoopfest. “I’m on the same street as when I started in 1991,” he explains. “You can find me on Riverside between Post and Wall, right out in front of STA Plaza.” There is irony in that post, he says. Back in the day, when he worked for Goodale & Barbieri, Brown helped open the plaza as the first building manager. “At first I was able to convince the guys at STA to bring their sweeper – the one they use to sweep out their parking garages – to sweep off the street for me,” he said. Those were the good old days, he insists. “Now I’m the sweeper,” he laughs. Brown brings his own dustpan and brooms and cleans the pavement that comprises his assigned Hoopfest area. “If there are pebbles on the street it can really cause problems, you

know,” he says. A resident of Greenacres, Brown is the kind of volunteer an event like Hoopfest hopes for – someone dedicated to doing the best job possible for the best reason possible. Because he can. He has only missed one Hoopfest – the first in 1990 that featured just over 2,000 teams. Now, the event draws around 6,000 teams on over 400 courts. Chad Smith, operations manager for the Spokane Hoopfest Association, said he appreciates the “youthful exuberance” this longtime volunteer brings to his responsibilities each June. “Cal is a fantastic marshal for Hoopfest and a mainstay at the event,” said Smith. “He has a tremendous dedication and work ethic. Cal has a tireless attention to detail and Hoopfest wouldn’t be the same without him.” And at 81 years young, Brown harbors no thoughts of slowing down. In fact, he just completed a half-marathon last month. After Brown started with Hoopfest, he began officiating basketball games through AAU and eventually as part of the area official’s association. “I really enjoyed doing that,” Brown said. “I would do games in Cusick and Northport or they would send me out to Davenport and Reardan and Ritzville. I did games in all the Greater Spokane League middle schools and the Central Valley middle schools.” After a game, coaches would sometimes drop by to tell the

At 81, Cal Brown stays in shape by running more than basketball. He has won his age group in both the Spokane Marathon and Portland Marathon and, last month, completed a half marathon. He is also a cancer survivor. Photo by Craig Howard

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Cal Brown has been volunteering for Spokane Hoopfest since 1991, the second year of the event. He serves as a court marshal, making sure things go smoothly on eight courts in his designated area. Cal and his wife Carrie live in the Greenacres area. Photo by Craig Howard officials that they had called a good game. “When they did that, I’d float home,” he laughs. He retired as a referee when he turned 80 – “I didn’t want to hear a coach or a fan or someone say, ‘He missed that call, but what do you expect, he’s 80-years old!’” Since 1998, Brown has served as court marshal for the eight courts on his favored block – supervising 17 games per court on the opening Saturday. That means a total of 136 basketball games. It’s a job Brown is ideally suited to. “You have to come to this job with a servant’s heart,” he said. “You have to have that. I mean, I pick up trash. I’m there to serve my court monitors.” He makes sure that his monitors are properly hydrated and cared for. Brown also makes it a point to protect himself from the sun. He beat a case of skin cancer awhile back and now wears his trademark Panama hat to shield himself from the rays. And he brings along a supply of First Aid supplies along with his brooms. Sometimes, he says, people don’t want to leave the court for a simple skinned knee. The bandages come in handy.

Professionally, Brown is ideally suited to the job. He was a professional mediator before retiring. “There are so many challenges involved,” he said. “One of the biggest is settling disputes. Sometimes a monitor needs a third party to intervene and settle things down and being a certified mediator that helps. The first thing I do is get them to calm down and get their mind off the monitor, who was taking all the heat.” It doesn’t always work. In one of his early Hoopfests, Brown officiated a game featuring future Gonzaga point guard David Stockton, then in middle school. The team included one of Stockton’s cousins and the son of Spokane Indians owner Bobby Brett. Stockton’s dad, Zags’ legend and NBA great John, was on the sidelines. “I made a call and as I went by, John said to me ‘Cal, you missed that call,’” he recalls. “Now, I didn’t want to turn and make it look like I was talking to him directly, but over my shoulder I said to him ‘No I didn’t. I was 2 feet away.’” “John said, ‘You were 2 feet away and you still missed the call.’ “You know,” Cal says, “at least he called me by my name.”


The Current

JUNE 2018 • 27

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The Current

28 • JUNE 2018

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Valley lacrosse wellrepresented in state playoffs By Steve Christilaw Current Correspondent For programs that have gone through a wealth of changes over the last few years, Central Valley and West Valley had extremely successful lacrosse seasons. Just two years ago, the schools were the same Spokane Valley team. For the second straight season CV cruised through its league season without a loss and reached the Washington High School Boys Lacrosse Class 4A quarterfinals, falling to Eastlake of Sammamish, 16-8 on May 19. “That’s a really good, young team,” CV coach Tim Boden said. “In fact, I would not be a bit surprised to see them win the state championship.” The Bears found themselves down, 11-1 at intermission. “It was still a great game,” said Dan Dunne, president of Spokane Valley Lacrosse. “Eastlake is a much higher-level team. They do a

fantastic job. They have an ability to run teams literally starting in the first grade. They have a lot more experience and for us to get to their level in the playoffs was a big step for the program.” Central Valley got its inaugural win in the state playoffs, edging Sumner of Puyallup, 19-18, in a first-round game at the Valley Christian (old U-Hi) field on May 12. “That win was huge,” Boden said. “We came back in the fourth quarter and took a three-goal lead with a minute-and-a-half left. To show you how good they were, we were ahead by just one goal with 30 seconds to play and held on for the win.” West Valley, a conglomerate team made up of players from the host team, East Valley, University and Freeman, reached the quarterfinals at the Class 2A level after posting a 16-1 win over Selah in the first round. At Sedro Woolley High for the quarterfinals, the Eagles lost an 1110 decision. “I would say that, as a program, we’re ahead of where Selah is and, if I had to be totally honest, I think we had a more talented team than Burlington-Edison,” West Valley coach John Taylor said. “The difference was that they have more players and were able to keep fresh

Central Valley and West Valley lacrosse teams both earned first-round state playoff wins last month. The Bears (above) finished the regular season undefeated. West Valley, which also included representatives from East Valley, Freeman and University, clobbered Selah 16-1 in its first state game before losing to Sedro Wooley, 11-10, in the quarterfinals. Photo by Craig Howard

The Central Valley lacrosse team battled back to defeat Sumner of Puyallup, 19-18, in a first-round state playoff game on May 12. The Bears saw their 2018 season come to a close a week later in the quarterfinals, falling to Eastlake of Sammamish, 16-8. Photo by Craig Howard legs in the game and they kept fastbreaking us all game long.” State-wide, Lacrosse is still a growing sport and it’s growing quickly. Two years ago, Central Valley and West Valley were a conglomerate team. Because of their numbers, CV was asked to split off and form its own school with players from within the school district boundaries. “If you are going to put together a program, you would do well to follow the model CV has used,” Taylor said. His Eagles may well have to follow that model soon. “The state governing body likes to see teams that follow school boundaries,” Dunne said. “They like to see conglomerate teams go independent after two years and this was the second year for WV.” “They may be pushing it a little fast,” Taylor said. “We may have to try fighting that. This year we had eight athletes from West Valley, two from East Valley, four from U-Hi and four from Freeman.” The future for the sport is bright, with youngsters learning the game through Spokane Youth Lacrosse and bringing a solid background and experience to their respective high school teams. “We had a solid group of freshmen come in this year, all of

them coming out of Spokane Youth Lacrosse, and that made all the difference for us this year,” Taylor said. “We won two games last year. This year we won 10 games. When things finally clicked for us, we won our last seven straight games to get into the playoffs.” Both of the teams the Eagles played in the post-season also were conglomerate teams. Selah, Taylor said, includes players from West Valley-Yakima and Eisenhower. Burlington-Edison includes players from Sedro Woolley. “Burlington-Edison’s coach told me they were going to have to split next year,” he said. “They feel they have the numbers to make it work without any real drop-off.” The greater Spokane high school league has already seen a healthy share of conglomerate teams broken up. Mead and Mt. Spokane were made to go their separate ways and Lewis and Clark and Ferris did the same. Dunne said the key to the program’s success has been the support it gets from the Central Valley School District – even though high school lacrosse is still, officially, a club sport. “I think our next step is to build girls’ lacrosse to the point where we have teams in individual schools, too,” Dunne said.


The Current

SPORTS

JUNE 2018 • 29

Valley Sports Notebook

won six of their next seven, losing a two-run game to league runnerup West Valley and later splitting a double hitter against league champion Cheney. “There were definitely signs of potential, especially when you play smart and play well,” Johnson said. “As they became more experienced and confident they really gelled.” What were the keys? A little bit of everything. Good pitching led by junior Abby Brake, who the coach said, “We probably centered our offense around.” Freshman Addie Meyer hit .517. Fellow freshman Emma Todhunter played shortstop and hit .515 with three home runs. Sophomore Katie Harvey played first, Maddie Camyn was at second, Shaelen Thompson played third and freshman Riley Weger caught. Sydney Martin was in centerfield, Madrona Beitz, EV’s lone senior was in left and Hailey McCarthy shared right with Brake when she wasn’t pitching. Johnson said the steady improvement got EV to the last week of the season pitted among the best 2A teams in the state. “Hopefully we stay hot,” he said. The Eagles’ nine parlayed a strong pitching staff, seasoned athletes and the return of a key contributor to its late run. They won their last seven games and 11-of-13 to reach the state 2A final four thanks to the return of Blake Transue. “I knew we had a pretty good team,” Aitken said. “We won the GNL last year and were a pretty good team. We had seven seniors back and had a chance to win the league.” Then Transue, the quarterback who lifted the Eagles to the state finals and was projected pitching ace broke his ankle in a fall and missed the first half of the season resulting in a lineup shakeup. Sophomore Hunter Tiffany took on that pitching role and was

backed by Jaxon Imada and George Fisher. Imada, last year’s league MVP runner-up, became the No. 2 hurler and second baseman. With Transue’s return, Conner Whitney moved down in the order, saw more fastballs and his batting average soared. “I told the guys to make the routine plays and we’ll get out of most jams,” said Aitken. Nick Jones, who had played two years on the West Valley C team, moved into the varsity lineup as No. 3 hitter and only left-handed hitter. “He was a big addition,” Aitken said. “He can hit the ball.” Freeman is making its annual trip to the class A baseball semi-finals. A report will appear in the next issue of the Current. U-Hi softball on familiar state ground Like the mailman, nothing can keep University from its appointed state softball tournament rounds. Even though the Titans struggled on the mound, rotating pitchers early, their offensive prowess is legendary and carried the team to its 18th state tournament since 1996. Senior veterans Gracee Dwyer, Sierra Apodaca, Brianna Hecker, Courtney Awbery and Hannah Click provided leadership and offense. Alyssa Benthagen swung the bat as well. Freshman Tammya Campbell was also part of the Titans’ pitching corps and got stronger as the season progressed. “Her mechanics need some work and she needs to add a pitch or two,” coach Jon Schuh. “She has come a long way since game one.” The team went 17-7 prior to state, including a signature 4-2 win over GSL champ and rival Central Valley. After losing to Hanford to begin the post-season, U-Hi came

all the way back with wins over Lewis and Clark, Walla Walla and Hanford to make its annual trip. “All I know is crazy things can happen at the state tournament,” Schuh said of U-Hi’s chances. “A team can get hot and do a lot of damage.” State qualifiers – Track and field Central Valley girls – Hailey Christopher, high jump; Lacie Hull, long jump, javelin, relay; Lexie Hull, high jump; Molly McCormick sprints/4 x 400 relay; Kassidy Keller, 4 x 400 relay; Samara Nelson, shotput/discus; Anna Pecha 800/ 4 x 400; Erica Pecha, 1,600/ 4 x 400; Aly Tolman, 4 x 400; Chloe Robbins, alternate pole vault. CV boys – Triston Kelly, discus; Ryan Kline 1,600/3,200; Correy Quinn, shot put; Gabe Romney 3,200. University – Ian Barville, 800; Rebecca Lehman, 3,200. East Valley – Kaylee HanceBrown, triple jump; Chloe Chalfant, javelin; Genesis Wilkinson, javelinshotput; Hunter Reynolds, 1,600; Will Sharp, 800; Andre Mounadir, long jump; Nathan Allred, discus. West Valley – Lala Duke, Annika Esvelt, Alex Vargas, Jake Jordan, Cody Skay, Garrett Morton, Eduar Bran; Jabriel Davis, Kobin Carver, Alyjouah Rollins, Josh Quirk, Dan Miller. Golf CV – Zach Stocker, Brayden Miles, Kami Twining, Courtney Jackson, EV – Trail Thompson; WV – Alyssa Amann, Kellie Fitzpatrick, Alyson Leonov; EV – Charity Yount; Freeman – Ryan Crosswhite, Rhea Jansen, Isabelle Miller Freeman. Tennis CV – Dean and Evan West; WV – Ava Raney; Freeman – Andy Simmerman, Sarah Simmerman, Travis Paternoster-Kolby Emtman, Owen Bryant-Daniel Gady.

Fastpitch softball faces dwindling supply of aces

I say this while looking back nostalgically with vested interest in fastpitch softball when those days there seemed to have been more depth of and better pitching a decade or two ago than today. So, I sought a couple of coaches, one current, the other who got in on the ground floor when fastpitch began and lived up to its name and discovered I wasn’t delusional or a victim of faulty nostalgia. When I was doing a story on Central Valley pitcher Kelsey Gumm I chatted with her and

Bears’ coach Joe Stanton. I later sought out University activities administrator Ken VanSickle, who ushered in the sport and handed off the baton to coach Jon Schuh in a sport that begat an amazing run of Greater Spokane League throwers, including during the Titans’ run that led to 10 straight state trips beginning in 1996 through 2005, including a state title in 2003 and state qualification again from 2010 through 2014. Both Stanton and VanSickle supported my thesis. “We don’t have as many

dominant pitchers (as back then),” said Stanton, who began coaching at CV in 2004 part of those halcyon times. “The pitching is definitely down – but I think we’d (have done) OK.” After watching Gumm throw, I’d concur. Later, by chance, I was looking up a name of one of those hurlers in The Spokesman-Review and discovered an article I wrote in 2009 that had slipped my mind. “Focus shifts away from pitching,” read the headline.

By Mike Vlahovich Current Sports Editor The last time a West Valley baseball team made it past the first or second round of a state tournament was 40 years ago when the Eagles were state champs. The last time East Valley made it to the state softball tournament was 15 years ago. The droughts are over. The Eagles baseball squad made it to the semi-finals of the state 2A tournament May 25-26 in Yakima (after presstime). Down the road in Selah, the surprising Knights’ softball club, led by first-year coach Mark Johnson, played in the 2A eight-team tournament. Their stories were similar. Both got hot at the right time. The Eagles finished second in the balanced Great Northern League with a pedestrian 7-5 record but headed to state at 17-9. The Knights finished third in softball, also 7-5 and were just 13-10 overall. This is how the improbable became the possible: East Valley – Turmoil early in the season necessitated a coaching change that, as Johnson said, is how “the interim situation came about.” “It’s been learning experience,” he said. Johnson had been assistant coach for 16 years under John Phelan in baseball when the job was sprung on him. “There’s a lot more to softball that doesn’t transfer,” he said. As far as qualifying for state, the interim coach deferred to his team. “I definitely can’t attribute that much to me, but to the girls,” he said. “They’re a great group of kids and fairly experienced in the game itself.” EV lost four straight games, then

By Mike Vlahovich Current Sports Editor “Those were the good old days.” Singers over the years have recorded their takes on those bygone times when things appeared to be better, happier and simpler.

See FASTPITCH Page 30


The Current

30 • JUNE 2018

Otis Orchards food bank steps up to plate

FASTPITCH

Continued from page 29

By Nina Culver

Current Correspondent The Otis Orchards food bank run by The Intersection Church recently celebrated a grand opening after moving to a different building on its church campus. The Intersection at the River Food Bank has been serving local residents since 2013, said the Rev. Gary Hebden. It’s housed in a pole building next to the old River of Life Open Bible Church at 22421 E. Euclid, which The Intersection owns. The church building on site is being used by another congregation. At first, just a few people showed up at the food bank, which is only open on Thursdays from 1:30 to 4 p.m. Now there are 150 to 200 families waiting in line every week even though the church doesn’t advertise the food bank. It’s not unusual for people in Spokane or North Idaho to come for food, Hebden said. “Over the last five years it’s just grown and grown and grown,” Hebden said. “It’s got to be word of mouth. There’s always a line of people waiting.” The church first opened the food bank as a way to help people in a practical way. “As a church we care about people,” Hebden said. “If we can relieve a little bit of the burden, we are happy to help them and blessed to do so.” Many food banks only allow people to visit once per month, but the Intersection at the River Food Bank doesn’t do that. Hebden says there is no limitation on the number

Mission Avenue project begins this month From Current News Sources

A project to improve safety and traffic flow along Mission Avenue between Flora and Barker is anticipated to begin June 18 and continue through the end of October. While the project is underway, Mission Avenue east of Flora Road to just west of Barker will be closed to all but local traffic, with detours posted.

The Intersection at the River Food Bank serves residents each Thursday from 1:30 to 4 p.m. Up to 200 families are waiting in line for the food bank to open each week, including families from Spokane and North Idaho. The Intersection Church has around 30 volunteers who pitch in to help at the site. Contributed photo of visits families and individuals make each month.

“We’re not going to determine your need, you’re going to determine your need,” he said. At first the church operated the food bank on its own, but it soon started collaborating with Second Harvest, which distributes donated items to food banks throughout the area. The church has 28 volunteers who keep the food bank running smoothly. They pick up donated food and operate the food bank when it is open. Hebden says the dedicated crew of helpers goes to stores referred to them by Second Harvest as well as Second Harvest itself.

The church does need financial donations to help pay for the vehicles the volunteers use to pick up food donations each day. Donations also allowed the church to upgrade the pole building the food bank is now housed in. The food bank usually has meat, milk, bread and fresh produce in addition to non-perishable items. There are some personal hygiene items available as well. Hebden said the church deliberately hasn’t advertised the food bank because it can’t accommodate many more people than they serve now. “If you get a thousand people out there, they might all get one potato,” Hebden said. Want to help?

Those who come for food regularly know to bring their own bags or boxes and though there is always a line, people are able to move through efficiently. “It goes fairly smoothly,” Hebden said.

To learn more about the Intersection at the River Food Bank and how to donate time, food or funds, or to receive help, call The Intersection Church at 924-3705.

Community members are reminded to use particular caution and reduce speed when driving through residential areas of the detours, watching for children and other pedestrians, bicyclists, and vehicles emerging out of driveways. In addition to serving the North Greenacres neighborhood, the roadway provides access to the new Riverbend Elementary School. Improvements to be made will increase safety for bicyclists, schoolchildren and other pedestrians and will enhance safety and traffic flow for vehicles as well. The project includes:

• Reconstructing the roadway for smoother, safer travel • Adding a left-turn lane on Mission at the Long intersection • Constructing sidewalks with ADA-compliant ramps and adding bicycle lanes on both sides of Mission • Installing Rapid Rectangular Flashing Beacons alerting drivers to pedestrians/cyclists in the school zone crosswalk • Posting radar speed limit signs at Barker and Flora For more information, contact Project Engineer Craig Aldworth at caldworth@spokanevalley.org or 720-5001.

Even back then I had hypothesized that maybe the “golden era of Greater Spokane League softball” – pitching in particular – was ushered in around 1998 when all four regional state 4A berths went to Spokane teams and began to fade following Shadle Park’s run with dominant pitcher Sam Skillingstad about 10 years later. There was a year when six pitchers went on to play college ball, including Skillingstad, who took the Highlanders to three finals appearances including a title. Skillingstad went on to Oregon but had her career cut short because of injury. VanSickle has remained close to the sport since its beginnings. The talent and numbers of pitchers began to decrease and now as depth declines, offense is skyrocketing. Scores like 26-1, 25-0, 25-1 have become common. Schools are involved in double digit outcomes throughout the season. Granted, hitting has improved. Moving the mound back 2 feet is part of the reason. Still the evidence of the declining pitching depth in the area is undeniable given those scores. “When fastpitch became popular, (pitchers) put in the time,” VanSickle said. There were several respected pitching coaches in the area. I sat on an overturned bucket two days a week through the winter catching my daughter for hours in this dingy, poorly lighted basement of a now-defunct Bon Marche building. She had a naturally live arm, but was raw but, in truth, likely to be called her junior year when moved up to varsity. We were guided to pitching coach Steve Fountain who taught and refined the techniques and varied pitches. How I preserved my body from injury in the gloom of that basement was nothing short of a miracle. The game has changed since then, what with the pull of other sports that function year around, select teams and travel clubs. And maybe the hitting has caught up, although you’d think that pitching would make an equal jump. There are still the Kelsey Gumms, who put in the work. Just not as many.


The Current

JUNE 2018 • 31

Congratulations Graduating Class of 2018

David Abdallah • Amariah Adams • Ashton Adams • Joshua Adams • Cristopher Aguilar-Gomez • Yaqoob Al munshedi • Raj Al-Ghani • Adam Altamirano • Ahmad Ambon • William Ames • Amanda Anderson • Brandon Anglin • Kayla Apperson • Zered Arcef • Jocelyn Arguinzoni • Maisyn Arnold • Issac Arrotta • Gurjot Atkar • Abriel Austin • Mitchell Axtell • Carissa Ball • Lindsey Ballard • Jerone Baloy Bautista • Joshua Bambock • Kaelyn Barnes • Kira Barnes • Noah Barnes • Samantha Barrie • Joba Baso • Garrett Baxter • Asia Beale • Ricky Behl • Mark Bellagio • Max Bernstein • Alexander Biglin • Cameron Bonsignore • Jeffrey Bosch • Brianne Bowden • Noelle Bowden • Mason Bramer • Taylor Brennecke • Madison Britain • Elise Brockbank • Leann Brown • Taylor Brunett • Jada Bryant • Claire Buchheit • Jacob Burch • Leona Burk • Calvin Burnett • Hunter Burton • Jason Butler • Autumn Call • Ruth Call • Autumn Campa • Holly Caravello • Calista Carlson • Kylee Carlson • Sarah Cartee • Hailey Carter • Justin Carter • Maria Casillas • Max Chadwell • Selena Chen • Lindsay Chermak • Sadie Christensen • Hailey Christopher • Kennedy Clark • Peter Cleary • Garret Cocchiarella • Austin Coker • Hannah Conant • Bruce Conley • Preston Cooper-Hawkins • Emma Cooper-Hawkins • Ty Cornell • Tucker Cousins • Brianna Cozino • Hannah Craig • Victoria Crapo • Abigail Creach • Emily Critchlow • Kambree Crossette • Kalle Crouch • Christian Curran • Britton Curtis • Mallory Daines • Saphyr Dalton • Karissa Dautenhahn • Joshua Davenport • Alexa Davis • Cameron Davis • Brianna Davydenko • Spencer Dean • Tyler Degenstein • Stacia DeHamer • Fielding Demars • Curtis Denenny III • Makenzi Denniston • Cyrus DeReu • Juan Diaz III • Jason Do • Ryan Do • Dominick Dobson • Melissa Doege • Zachary Dornack • Nathaniel Dow • Madisyn Doyle • Bryce Drager • Noah Dreves • John Dunne • Michael Duty • Kody Easley • Hannah Eckel • Gabriel Eden • Sapphire Eden • Jase Edwards • Thomas Edwards • George Eliason • Hannah Ellis • Riann Elsner III • Jamal Erdem • Hunter Ergeson • Daniel Eubanks • Rachel Fassler • Sydney Fergen • Andrew Ferrero • Nathan Fightmaster • Jonathan Finn • Emily Fletcher • Alex Ford • Molly Ford • Kaelyn Frederick • Alissa Freeman • Jordan Freeman • Tyler Fridye • Sean Fullmer • Anna Gabbert • Logan Gaffaney • Keaton Gaffney • Kyra Gaffney • Maesyn Galloway • Alexis Garcia • Odalis Garcia • Bryce Gardner • Sidney Gardner • Blair Gasaway • Alan Gass • Rachel Gerdes • William Ghosoph • Camryn Gibson • Jacob Gillespie • Robert Gleason • Austin Glenn • Hernan Gonzalez • Uziel Gonzalez • Sidney Goranson • Caleb Grabowski • Ashley Griffiths • Jacob Grisafi • Noah Groves • Mason Guerdette • Hayden Guinn • Kelsey Gumm • Isak Gust • Elizabeth Gutierrez • Sean Hagerty • Shandra Haggerty • Kevin Hail • Madison Haines • Jaiden Haley • Brayden Hamilton • Hunter Hamilton • Lexus Hamilton • Brandon Hamry • Grant Hannan • Amanda Hanson • Grace Hardesty • Austin Harrington • Allison Hartshorn • Benjamin Harwood • John Hatcher • Devin Hauenstein • Katie Hawkins • Chang He • Gabrielle Heberlein • Harrison Heckerman • Brandon Henderson • Mercy Henry • Armando Hernandez De Los Santos • Benjamin Herndon • Thomas Heskett • Orion Hickson • Madeleine Higbee • Zachary Higginson • Anna

Class celebration page 37

Central Valley High School J U N E 9 AT 9 : 0 0 A . M . G.U. MCCAR THEY CENTER 8 0 1 N C I N C I N N AT I S T, 9 9 2 0 2 Hilbert • Charlotte Himebaugh • Alyson Hinman • Nathan Hirt • Hannah Hislop • Caitlin Hodgkin • Angela Hoene • Austin Holman • Justin Holmes • Mercedes Hood • Ayianna Hopkins • Caitlin Hopkins • Alexandra Horton • James Hotchkiss • Kylee Huebschman • Lacie Hull • Lexie Hull • Justis Huston • Allie Jackson • Kylie Jackson • Logan Jackson-Brown • Alison Jacobson • Benton James • Tyler Jennen • Elsa Jensen • Jaleigh Johnson • Michelle Johnson • Nathan Johnson • Shaean Johnson • Brady Jones • Sophia Jones • Dawson Jordan • Javion Joyner • Sadie Justus • Noor Kaddoura • Pamelpreet Kang • Natalia Karptsov • Catherine Kartchner • John Keiser • Caitlin Kellar • Kassidy Keller • Dru Kellerman • Triston Kelley • Rachel Kempf • Kristina Kholostov • Ashley Kidder • Benjamin Kiehn • Grace Kienbaum • Riley Kindred • Kobe King • Haylee Kinworthy • Cassidy Kippenhan • Derek Knoll • Kirill Kolesnikov • Sami Kopelson • Brian Kovar • Madison Kramer • Dennis Kravtsov • Michaela Laabs • Alyssa LaBrosse • Emily Ladd • Jill Lambie • Anna Lamoreaux • Ian Larson • Jenna Lauer • Alina Lavrova • Krista Lehman Bosak • Nathan Leland • Jordan LeMay • Jacqueline Lemus • Desiree Lensing • Jacob Lewis • Sydney Linde • Jerry Liu • Joel Loepker • Nathaniel Lopez • Rolando Lopez • Hannah Louthian • Hannah Lundblad • Ryan Lybbert • Sara Lynn • Jerred Mace • Sydney Machovsky • Kate Madrian • Abdulhadi Mallah • Ammar Mallah • Trent Marker • Ryan Markofski • Steven Marshall • Bekk Martin • Matthew Martin • Riley Martin • Micah Mason • Noah Mathis • Ashton Matlock • Kimberlie Matteson • Noah Mayfield • Jacob McAndrews • Colton McAuliff • Lauren McCauley • Miya McClellan • Bridget McDonald • Natalie McGee • Kate McLelland • John McMahon III • Jackeline Medina • Ajnet Mejbon • Max Melville • Emma Metzger • Benjamin Michaelis • Brandon Miles • Cameron Miller • Hanna Miller • Mark Miroshin • Jordan Mitchell • Jordan Mitchell • Summer

Mizner • Victoria Modica • Noah Moffeit • Reagan Moon • Connor Moore • Daniyel Morris • Leanna Moua • Promise Mourar • Kali Mulligan • Brian Munro • Grace Nall • Peyton Nalls • Destiny Nason-Fuller • Alexandra Naves • Yevhenii Nechytaylo • Samara Nelson • J R Newton • Mai-Thy Nguyen • Sarah Nicholls • Scott Nicholson • Christian Nielsen II • Amanda Nigg • Cole Niles • Ashlee Nilsson • Britnee Nilsson • Ryan Noll • Daniel Norfolk • Tina Nye • Kathleen O’Dea • Ethan Ola • Elena Olsen • Ryan Olsen • Austin Olson • Mitchell Olson • Trey Orr • Cassandra Ortiz-Nelsen • Robert Osipenko • Gavin Ostheimer • Blake Page • Gabrielle Pagenstecher • Sarena Palacio • Adria Palmer • Anika Panattoni • Colton Panter • Madison Papich • Anna Pecha • Erica Pecha • Jacob Pedigo • Kaden Perala • John Petersen • David Peterson • Evelyn Peterson • Grant Peterson • Hannah Peterson • Brandon Phelps • Samuel Phillips • Joseph Piche • Seth Pierce • Brooklynn Pieroni • Preslee Pieroni • Lucas Potts • Holland Pratt • Taylor Pugh • Correy Quinn • Brayden Raab • Jaysn Raddatz • Christiaan Ramos • Mason Rawley • Madison Reese • Meggan Reimer • Brandon Reis • Rachel Rennaker • Jayden Richards • Nicholas Riggs • Chloe Robbins • Nicholas Rogers • Gabriel Romney • Alan Rose • Heather Ross • Izabella Roullier • Gabrielle Routt • Tyler Rowell • Luchiano Rubio • Brandon Ruegsegger • Hellen Saitoti • Carmela Salazar • Trystan Sampilo • Cole Sampson • Milan Saric • Ryne Saty • Benjamin Scanlon-Holmes • Jenna Scarcello • Sydni Schaefer • Cory Schmidt • Taylor Schwartzenburg • Mason Scott • Zoey Scott • Cailin Seimears • Connor Seimears • Sydni Seliger • Michael Semencha • Kendall Sessions • Brenna Shanks • Ryu Sharma • Jadon Sharp • Sophia Shaurette • David Shevchenko • Tatyana Sichkar • Austin Sihabout-Zabala • Luana Silveira Molinelli • Sanpreet Singh • Hannah Sipes • Aubony Slack • Jordan Smith • Zachary Smith • Megan Sola • Shianne Soles • Ashley Sommer • Andrew Sommerville • Riley Soots • Thomas Stanley Jr • Amia Stephens • Carsen Sterling • Samantha Stevens • Ethan Stewart • Zachary Stocker • Jaelyn Strand • Mariya Susina • John Swager • Melissa Sweeney • Emmaline Sylvester • Jesse Talafili • Christopher Tamayo • Marco Teslow • Ashlynn Thielen • Rylee Thompson • Angelina Thongdy-Sihabout • Shane Thornton • Bailey Tiffany • Mikaylah Tipton • Austin Tomlinson • Alexis Townsend • Daniel Troxel • Floyd Turner • Kavina Turpin • Jordyn Tuter • Grace Tyrrell • Juliana Ukrainetz • John Van Buskirk Jr • Jenna Van Sloten • Charis VanNote • Joseph Vargas • Jason Vasquez • Jennifer Wagstaff • Christopher Walsh • Troy Walton • Hannah Wampler • Jack Wampler • Logan Ward • Trevor Ward • Evanjalysta Warnock • Emily Wasson • Alexandra Weeks • Kylie Weiler • Jasmine Wengel Hood • Dean West • Evan West • Mandie West • Brittney Wheeler • Kaitlyn White • Josephine Whitsett • Bradley Wiggs • Breanna Wilde • Bryce Wilde • Aaron Williams • Alissa Williams • Bailey Williams • James Williams • Madeline Wilson • Emily Winter • Paige Wollan • Zachary Wood • Lijun Wright • Savannah Wright • Shane Yarnell • Elizabeth Yergen • Beaudry Young • Braunson Young • Alyssa Zadra • Tyler Zarecor • MaryCatherine Zartner-Isit • Hailey Zeutschel • Conner Zimbelman


The Current

32 • JUNE 2018

Ashley Ackley • Conner Alderete • Nathan Allred • David Anderson • Jabriel Anderson • Jeff Anderson • Vanessa Anderson • Jasmin Andrade-Lenz • Alexis Arredondo • Reece Ayles-Wallace • Lashana Ballard • Alejandro Barragan-Morales • Angelic Bauder • Emilie Behrens • Madrona Beitz • Nichelle Bercot • Tashianna-Emma Bercot • Chase Berezay • Haili Bowers • Mason Bowman • Zachary Bowsky • Alexis Branson • Deven Brown • Ashley Bruce • Isabella Burunov • Shelby Bushore • Noah Busse • Jacob Byrne • Jacob Campbell • Rachel Carolus • Angel Carrillo • Chloe Chalfant • Dmitriy Cherkashin • Grace Conine • Sage Cooper • Anna Cope • Kassandra Costlow • Blake Cowger • Garrett Crothers • Amber Cummings • Enleo Dahal • Ariauna Davies • Justin Davisson • Lucas Deal • Casey Denmark • Nicholas Destito • Angelica Dituri • Brekel Domino • Brandon Dunkle • Michael Dunlap • Annalise Dust • Torrey Dutton • Autumn Eaves • Garrett Edwards • Karsen Enevold • Taden Englund • Isaiah Ervin • Joselyn Escontrias Borjas • Bryce Esvelt • Chelae Everhart • Jason Fail • Emma Fairbanks • Kaleb Farman • Isabella Finnigan • Bryson Fleck • Joseph Fleckenstein • Emily Fletcher • Tessla Floyd • Garrett Forrest • Preston Forrest • Sherman Fredericksen JR • Blake Freeman • Sydney Frogge • Cheyenne Frye • Gillian Garcia • Matthew Gay • Hunter Gesik • Victor Gilley • Jason Gillingham • Cricket Glanville • Brookelynn Goodwater • Lydia Gordon • Eleanor Gorkovchenko • Colton Grace • Jaren Graham • Jacob Groscop • Alexis Grout • Toryn Hall • Zachary Halverson • Jessaup Hampton • Kailee Hance Brown • Hunter Hanley • Rishel Hartshorn • Katelyn Hay • Emma Hedemark • Megan Heidlebaugh • Ashley Held • Madeleine Henderson • Jeretta Hendrickson • Ryne Herambourg • Daniel Hicks • Cheyenne Higgins • Bailey Hoff • Landon Hofstee • Madison Honegger • Hailey Howard • Daniel Howell II • Tanner Hudson • Noah Huhs • Charvis Iakopo • Leah Jacobson • Spencer Jamison • Peyton Jennings • Ethan Johnson • Braeden Jolstead • Richard Kelley • Bethany Kelly • Christopher Kent • Maxim Kopets • Eugene Korchemniy • Payton Korling • Dmitriy Kozenya • Keaton

East Valley High School JUNE 11 INB PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 3 3 4 W . S P O K A N E FA L L S B L V D . , SPOKANE Kurtz • Nathan Lautenbach • Jazmyne LaVigne • Rebecca Lee • Savanna Ley • Shaylor Leyk • Brian Lind • Kaitlyn Lonam • Luke Lonam • Austin Luce • Cecilia Lucero • Karlee Ludwig • Nhung Ly • Nicholas Lynch • Bryce Mallet • Hope Mallet • Hunter Mansfield • Genesis Marroquin • Rafael Martinez Yepez • Matthew Mason • Wendee May • William McCarthy • Shantel Megill • Jessica Mellen • Mya Mesecher • Bradley Miller • Triston Millmaker • Tasia Mines • Alyssa Mitchell • Dale Mitchell • Meghan Mitchell • Sydney Moore • Joshua Morales • Alan Neilson • Ryliegh Newman • Nathan Nielsen • Grant Ohlstrom • Joseph Olmsted • Emily Orlowski • Jenna Pefley • Kaylee Peterson • Brock Phillips • Matthew Pinyerd • Julia Pitcher • Anthony Pitman • Jay Plunkett • Katharine Pointer • Liam Priest • Matthew Ramirez • Nolan Rasmussen • Hunter Reynolds • Jillene Richardson • Nicole

Dishman Hills High School

Robert Adams • Sarah Ali • Bryn Anderson • Paige Babcock • James Bean • Robert Beene • Memorie Berhane-Stuber • Richard Black • Steven Blackwood • Brooke Blumer • Carolyn Bordwell • Selena Bradley • Beau Braseth

Richardson • Gavin Rigsby • Shila Risinger • Allie Rogerson • Kylie Rogerson • Benjamin Rooney-Sailand • Kameron Roslak • Kelsy Ross • Praxedis Sanchez • Kathryn Scalf • Caleb Schertenleib • Jacob Schoenwald • James Scott • Derek Severin • Melissa Sherwood • Kyler Shoemaker • Cody Sinclair • Colton Sior • Alea Smith • Tyler Sowell • Hannah Spine • Donovan Steele • Alexanderia Sternod • Austin Stevens • Zane Stevens • Autumn Stewart • Rachae Stone • Lindsey Stonemetz • Nathaniel Stoner • Danna Stowell • Abigail Strunk • Andrew Strunk • Noah Stubblefield • William Syverson • Steven Thomas • Evan Thomason • Trail Thompson • Walter Townley • Harmony Tripp • Robert Tsuber • Tara Turley • Riley Turner • Alejandra Vargas • Jadea Vasquez • Robert Ward • Ty Warner • Tallon Watson • Forrest Webb • Andrew Weeden • Austin Whitcomb • Dominique Willison • Nicholas Wunder • Aletheia Youngman • Dezirae Yowell • Madison Zacher • Karena Znovets

East Valley Parent Partnership JUNE 11 INB PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 3 3 4 W . S P O K A N E FA L L S B L V D . , SPOKANE Harley Wyatt David Colombo • Emily AnnetteJoAnn Wrisley • Timothy Scott Perona • Cassandra Jewell Heath • Isaac Liam Van Tuyl • Christian Andrew Tiffany • Katie Irene Connelly

Bo Green • Kiana Harris • Chase Henderson • Kaitlyn Henry • Nathan Hooper • Peyton HurstThomas • Elijah Hutchinson • Breeanna Jennen • Garrick Kappen • Drew Keblbek • Jaquan Kinard • Drew Kuespert • Makenzie Lohstroh • Shayden Macri • Hunter Martin • Shailee JUNE 6, 6:00 PM Martin • Kylie Mathews • Hannah Mayer • F O X T H E AT R E Ahmaud McGuffey • Rashad McGuffey • Dallas 1001 W SPRAGUE, McPherson • Delaney Moore • Frank Morgan • SPOKANE, 99201 Kiara Morgan • Penelope Murphy • Sean Nesbitt • Harrison Nicoll • Janae Nunn • Olivia Pedersen • Michaela Braucht • David Brengelman • • Renee Perez • Daniel Peterson • Michelle Cade Brotherton • Vinson Bulock • Zackary Pewitt • Michelle Pewitt • Madeline Pickerel Christensen • Kendra Clevenger • Levi Cosper • Lilly Pierce • Faith Pillow • Dakotah Porter • Simon Crawford • Zachary Davis • Eric • Harley Radan • Taylor Reed • Chase Reedy Davydenko • Alexis De La O • Lizeth De La • Natalle Schlangen • Ian Shelton • Bethany O • Austin Decaro • Blake Dehnel • Matthew Skellenger • Jeremy Spencer • Ocean Stratton • Dwinell • Rain Evans • Rain Evans • Isaac Kalob Theurer-Bettencourt • Sheyne Thompson Eveland • Hope Fisette • Carlos Flores • Trevor • Taylor Valley • Tyler Vasicek • Arianna Waddell • Brandon Whitmire • Aleashiea Wilson • Ford • Scott Frazer • Miguel Garcia • Kayla Cassidy Wilson • Nicole Yeager Gardner • Parrish Germany • Shiann Gray •


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Freeman High School JUNE 9, 1:00 PM FREEMAN HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM 14626 S. J AC K S O N R OA D, R O C K F O R D Carson Atwood • Nathaniel Barron • Marissa Beckwith • Elijah Bowen • Ryan Broussard • Jackson Clark • Keegan Cottrell • Michael Coumont • Aimee Cox • Jack Cramer • Ryan Crosswhite • Autumn Cusick • Aidan Dearman • Allison Dervaes • Makena Douglas • Danielle Duarte • Erick Flack • Ericka Flory • Konner Freudenthal • Taylor Frye • Neil Fuchs • Trinity Glidewell • Ailsa Hansen • Hanna Hansen • Ileanna Hansen • Isabelle Hedges • Arieanna

Class celebration page 38

Class celebration page 40

Valley Christian School JUNE 2, 1:00 PM VA L L E Y R E A L L I F E C H U R C H 1831 S. B A R K E R R OA D, GREENACRES Veranica Alexeyenko • Jacob Allen • Julia Chen • David Karapetr • Kevin Min • Laetitia Razanadrakoto • Benjamin Riehle • Courtney Strunk • Vera Yermola

Spokane Valley High School JUNE SPOKANE COMMUNIT Y COLLEGE LAIR 1 8 1 0 N . G R E E N E S T R E E T, S P O K A N E Naoma Barnes • Kimber-Lee Beattie • Rebecca Brown • Garrett Byrd • Carissa Cady • Tate Carey • Vladimir Chebotarev • Jordan Colkitt • Kimberlee Collins • Brett Dinneen • Cierra Ervin • Savannah Getz • Dawson Gillingham • Chase Gunderson • Ciara Gunning • Sophie Hylton • Abbigayle Joy • Hannah Kaesberg • Evelina Kozak • Vladislav Kunev • Micayla Lang • Sofiya Liashedko • Ashley Matthews • Faith Nast • Jared Parbs • Davyd Rudenko • Anthony Sandhofer • Sebastien Sullivan

The Oaks Classical Christian Academy JUNE 8, 7:00 PM VA L L E Y F O U R T H M E M O R I A L C H U R C H 2303 S. BOWDISH, S P O K A N E VA L L E Y

Spokane Valley Transition School

JUNE 8, 2:00 PM SPOKANE COMMUNIT Y COLLEGE LAIR 1 8 1 0 N . G R E E N E S T R E E T, S P O K A N E Artur Anishchenko • Emily Brown • Alexis Burks • Kevin Burrill • Brandon Carvey • Lane Casey • Hannah Chaney • Ashley Clemons • Mathew Coates • Hope Colvin • Michael Courchaine • Ariez Daniels • Kelsey Erving • Karlee Friberg • Isabel Harrison • Abbigail Hartnett • Krysta Hayward • Sireena Hill • Kaitlyn Houck • Juliet Hughes • Cletis Hydrick • Patrick Kaesberg • Justin Kautzman • Khalia Kelp • Kendahl Kendrick • Levi King • Ben Kononykhin • Mariah Leander • Madeline Liberg • Emily Macomber • Lacey Morrow • Breanna Murray • Killian Nolan • Morrigan O’Shaughnessy • Tristin Payne • Brandon Price • Gabriella Reed • Jake Reinert • Brittany Rogers • Alysa Rosman • Alexander Ross • Alayna Simons • Lynn Simpson • Aschtyn Stark • Kioymi Stevens • Donnice Suiter • Cassidy Sutton • Austin Thosath • Jacob Tillinghast • Jasmyne Travis • Toni Tunison • Quantavious Ware • Gabriel Watson • Malvina Zhuk • Vitaliy Zubritskiy

Hoisington • Logan Holt • Quinlan Hopkins • Brandon Iris • Haley James • Matias Landoe • Jared Lara • William Leamond • Nathan Longhurst • Andrew Mcgill • Rhys Mcvay • Isabelle Miller • Dylan Mosset • Brayden Mueller • Hunter Nees • Shayna Nickerson • Abigail Ofenloch • Jason Ophus • Desmond Parisotto • Dylan Pavlischak • Kelsie Peery • Jimmie Pierce • Marley Pratt • Taylor Rice • Christian Rorie • Abbigail Sandborn • Madison Schock • Holly Smith • Trent Smith • Megan Stark • Emma Stevens • Annalisa Stewart • Haidon Storro • Hannah Storro • Hartlee Storro • Haylee Storro • Shilo Stuart • Cody Tardanico • Grace Tesch • Korinne Thurman • Garrett Trevino • Zachary Trumble • Hannah Vetter • Samuel Voves • Tyler Waite • Summer Warwick • Caleb Watts • Garrett Williamson • Ana Wilson • Jarett Wright • Kelly Wright

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Mica Peak High School JUNE 7, 6:30 PM EASTPOINT CHURCH 15303 E SPRAGUE, S P O K A N E V A L L E Y, 9 9 0 3 7 Macee L Ahrendt • Erin A Andrew • Taryn L Bennett • Raelyn Jennifer Benson • Saige A Bentancourt • Alyssa M Brown • Justin Patrick Brown • Ellie Justine Bruce • Rebekah D Call • Emily Taylor Carter • Scott Carter • Zeina Z Chreiki • Madison R Dial • Allison Duncan • Alanna J Fain • Shyla Gower • Khyle Kristian Graham • Kieara Lanae Graham • Nicole Marie Grzogorek • Erin Nicole Gumlock • Coleman Walter George Gunion • Lexi Harames • Phillip William Hay • Olivia Grace Hilts • Vanessa Byrne Hoang • Bailey Ann Jeffries • Wyatt Michael Johnston • Dylan Charles Kirk • Jonathan Austin Koch • Kayleigh Dallas Kyhl • Samantha Mae Marshall • Hannah K Mathews • Renae D Maynard • Jaycee L McNinch • Keith Jamison Meade • Isabelle Mulu Meafua • Shania M Milton • Megan Ann Morrison • Brianna L Najera • Elijah Thomas Niemi(Bohnet) • Kaylee Michele Oliver • Evan I Oliverson • Ian Joshua Duncan Ostman • Eliot Nathan Payne • Hunter MichaelBailey Penick • Isaiah M Perry • Troy Timothy Reynolds • Ryan Stephen Roberts • Trent Michael Rupert • Devin Eugene Rusk • Alisha Marie Sandy • Hannah Noel Schmidt • Dakota Shultz • Rebekka R Stewart-Crandell • Jesse C Stover • Brandon James Thompson • Travis Andrew Usher • Carlos Daniel Vazquez • Connor A Wellwood • Nicholas Wilson Whitcher • Aleena Nileen Whitmire • Zaraih Rashahn Whitsett • Conner Wold • Anika R Worline(Bush) • Elizabith Wright


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Jarelyn K Abrams • Aundrea Lea Adams • Victoria Shay Addicks • Genesis Durrell Adkinson-Trevino • Reedah Aguon • Natalie Rose Albers • Emily Grace Albert • Jack Raymond Albert • Sherman Carter Alexander • Trent Jason Allgood • Trevor Blake Allgood • Paige Morgan Anderson • Taylor Ann Anderson • Benjamin Jacob Angeli • Easton Lee Anglin • Cassidy Paige Anyan • Sierra Maria Apodaca • Emma Lorraine Apperson • Jayden Gabriel Artis • Thomas Atkinson • Courtney Lynn Awbery • Megan Ann Babington • Jacob Raymond Bailey • Briahna M Baker • Shelby Elizabeth Ball • Joshua Scott Ballensky • Bradley Thomas Barclay • Caleb Michael Barker • Campbell Kip Barrington • Kendall B Bastine • Joshua Mark Belcourt • Payton Lee Bello • Thomas R Benane • Taylor Lynn Bennett • Brooke Jordan Berg • Alexander Evan Bester • Polina Beymanov • Nathan K Blanchard • Alyxandria Lynnae Bledsoe • Jared Michael Block • Kamryn M Bodholt • Amelia E Boger • John Boldizsar • Jillian Marie Bowden • Madeleine Rose Braas • Mallory Kathlin Brake • Brady Lee Brinkman • Makenna Anne Britton • Jarniliya B Brooks • Aryonna Nikole Brown • Hannah Elizabeth Brown • Madison Rae Brummett • Audren Elizabeth Bruszer • Aliviah Marie Buchanan • Natalie Marie Burget • Riley Cole Burghard • Joelle Denise Burnett • Jordan Raylene Bustamante • Nicholas A Caldera • Levi Thomas Caldwell • Kaitlyn Elaine Calhoun • Brian Alex Campbell • Mallory Anne Carbon • Alexis Rae Carlson • Dylan Michael Carr • Camryn Alan Carson • Nathan Cate • Cameron Cavanaugh • Emma P Chan • Jordan Christopher Chapman • Marie Ruby Chapman • Conner Michael Charbonneau • Tristan Chavez • Alaina Pardeep Chester • Tanner J Christensen • Mason Scott Christie • Camryn Lorrell Cicchetti • Maxwell Lucas Clark • Ashley Carol Clements • Jasmine Marie Clemons • Hannah Lyn Click • Logan Samuel Coffey • Kyle Victor Cole • Emily Rene Coleman • Olan Darin Leif Corte • Tyler James Cowett • Trevor Ray Coy • Sydney J Cramer • Gabrielle Grace Crippen • Daitin Caleb Cumeralto • Savannah Nicole Cunningham • Brook Dahl • Alison L Darby • Luke Elliott Davis • Warren Grant Davis • Jordyn Lynn Davis (Erquiaga-Davis) • Parker Robert Davis-Tesky • Taylor A Day • Brian L. Decker • Ryan Johnathan Demick • Austin M. Denison • Kalani A DesautelTomeo • Morgan N DeWitt • Thomas J Dexter • Blake Russel Dickinson • Kiara Dilworth • Claire Elizabeth Dingus • Nathan Everett Doerr • Emma Elizabeth Dona • Isabelle Lea Donahue • Kobi Earl Dowland • Ethan Warren Doyle • Isabelle Paris Duffy • Rachel Elizabeth Dunham • Gracee M Dwyer • Ciara R Eagle • Santaya M. Eddy • Erica Elanzo • Terrell Michael Elgee Sanders • Alivia Lauren Ann Ellwein • Chandler J Epperly • Matthew R Evans • Jordyn M Feuz • Emma Grace Fiala • Maria Joy Figart • Aidin Matthew Fishburn • Alessya V Floryanovich • Draceryn J Fowler • Blake Matthew Franklin • Timbre A Freeman • Kaylee Kristine Gamble • Chloe Simone Gardner • Colton Joseph Garrett • Maizy M Garrett • Tessa L Garrison • Anthony M. Gates • Anna M George • Amanda Rose Gerard • Tim Gies • Ryan Patrick Giese • Alexander Stephan Gilden • Dorian Andrew Gillingham • Hunter P Gladden • James A. Glantz • Brookelynn Nikole Glatzmaier • Lauren R Green • Austin Elliott Greene • Hunter Arik Gregerson • Stephen Michael Griffith • Hallie Grace Gropp •

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University High School JUNE 9, 1:00 PM MCCARTHEY CENTER AT G O N Z A G A U N I V E R S I T Y 8 0 1 N . C I N C I N N AT I , S P O K A N E , 9 9 2 0 2 Judeashia Lr Guerrero • Justin Hacker • Alissa Lynn Hailes • Savana Rose Hania • Ashley I Harley • Denver Stanley Harris • Ashley Hartman • Gage Chatfield Harty • Ty Michael Haskew • Scott Alan Hawley • Cole Michael Heaton • Brianna A Hecker • Rylee L Hecker • Elizabeth Ann Hedt • Emma Jean Hill • Alyssa Christine Hiner • Ashley Makana Paige Hoadley • Autumn Hoadley • Kayla Marie Hofer • Morgan MacKenzie Holbrook • Chyanne Tracy Holder • Hannah Ruth Holschen • Riley Lawrence Hoover • Kyler F Horseman • Rylan Dale Hoskins • Zakary Lane Hostetler • Deric Nguyen Houston • McKenzie Louise Lynn Howard • Trystan Aaron Howard • Pierce Baldwin Hubbard • Peyton Brooke Hundeby • Bryce William Hussey • Conner J Hustad • Jeremiah Luther James • Sebastian Jacob Jansen • Alejandro Jaramillo • Jakob Zachary Jayroe • Ashlea Frances Jeffries • Justin N Jessop • Madeline Michelle Johannes • Anna Elizabeth Johnson • Daniel E Johnson • Jaydan Lane Johnson • Shaun David Jones • Taylor N Jones • Nicole Shawnte M. JonesHibdon • Abigail Grace Joppa • Drake A Jurey • Brenden Patrick Kaiser • Reed J Kannapien • Nelli Karptsov • Rebekah Lynn Kasper • Samantha Michele Kimble • JoElla Marquez King • Taylor Lindsey Mead King • Jaycie J Knudson • Austen C. Koepke • Asher Robert Koester • Svetlana Krupke • Emmalynn D Kruse • Connor Michael Kuolt • Solomon John Labere • Adam Lee Labish • Lydia Jo Lamm • Delaney Louise Langston • Emily Elizabeth Anne LaPlante • Gage W Larsen • Hannah Danielle Larson • Maiah M Laurin • Malayne K Leavitt • Mary Elizabeth Leavitt • Cameron Logan LeBaron • Morgan J’Ann Lehman • Rebecca Claire Lehman • Johanna Adaline Lenhart • Brian Lissieur • Daniel Tim Lissy • Crystal Lynn Littleford • Airim Lizett Lizarraga • Nicole Christine Locker • Cameron Edward Logan • Alexa Lee Long • Dallas Long • Gabrielle E Long • Neftali Lopez • Madison R Luke • Bradley Dylan Lyonnais • Mary Jean Lystad • Kaitlynn N.P. Lytle • Scot Robert Mackey • Kaitlynn Alexia Madison • Trenton Riley

Maher • Spencer Jones Mallonee • Courtney Paige Marshall • Gabriel Patrick Martin • Breyton B Matthews • Zachary Joseph May • Hailey Lynn Mays • Desmen Ray Kris McCoy • Johnathan R McDonald • Trinity Nicole McGilley • Madison Lorraine McGrane • Jared Lee McIntire • Summer Michelle McKean • Josh J Mclean • Alexis Genevieve McVicker • Cesar Daniel Mejia • Alexis Kohlene Miller • Emma J Miller • Anna Lillian Millhouse • Nathan Reed Milnes • Hope Angela Mitchell • Noah Mora • Nicholas Russell Morris • Sean Anthony Mortensen • Amy Nkaujgoua Moua • Elizabeth Jo Myers • Matthew Scott Myhren • Juliann Jay Nelson • Kara A Nemeth • Aybie C Nevers • Jacoblsaac Newton • Nathaniel Stephen Nordquist • Cameron James Norman • Valentine Ntaloishi • Makayla F O’Blenness • Sierra Lynn Oens • Tate Austen O’Kert • Taylor Gabriel Olp • Sophia Elizabeth Orndorff • Rodrigo Orozco • Justin Douglas Osborn • Maygan Osborn • Cameron Scott Owens • Isaiah M Page • Joseph Timothy Palmer • Shyanne Laveryn-Kathleen Parker • Luke James Parsley • Katelynn E Paulsen • Grifen Ray Peck • Noah J Pederson • Colton Dean Perrin • Erin Josephine Peschel • Dustyn Rayne Petrovich • Donovan James Phillips • Ryan Alan Phillips • Hannah McKenzie Pittman • Matthew Allen Pixley • Cassandra Brianne Potts • Christian Everton Lloyd Price • Nicholas Gottlieb Ratz • Mekenzie Ann Reinbold • Henry K Reinhardt • Abigail Kathleen Richard • Sidney Annelise Rickman • Jordyn Rae Ries • Katelynn Marie Roal • Elijah Nathaniel Roate • Abigail Marie Robb • Devyn Robinson • Tyson Paul Rocker • Rachel JuneMarie Ryan • Jonah R Saladin • Madeline Rose Sandford • Micah Henry Sandford • Trinity Elaine Schultz • Sonia Schwab • Kira Marie Schwander • Rachel Nicole Scott • Rilynd Xavier Scyphers • Julien E Sears • Colton J Sellers • Roman M Shelly • Rebecca Leanne Shepard • Rebecca L Shinkle • Dominique W Shrader • Reagan Marley Shumate • Brett Joseph Simon • Micah Simpson • Hunter S Sims • Paul M. Sipko • Maxwell C Skidmore • Sidney R Skinner (Morse) • Gunnar Louis Sly • Ethan Jamie Smart • Austin Brian Smith • Callie Kay Smith • Makayla Leanne Smith • Katelyn Deborah Smithgall • Kelly Brooke Somerlott • Jayden Lynn Soto • Shelby Ladean Spears • Savannah Sprague • Nicola Faye Stachofsky • Slater Braden Riley Steeneck • Christine Elizabeth Stephens • Canyon D Strader • Janae V Strayer • Nathanial R Strebel • Thomas Studstrup • Pamela Styborski • Tucker Ryan Surdock • Logan Chase Suwara • Boston Russell Tacke • Jacob D Talbert • Katelyn Sue Taylor • Bryan Patrick Tietz • Skylar W Truman • Christopher Jacob Trusty • Jalyn Rain Turner • Gillian Paige Tusberg • Parker Elery · Vernier • Paul Emerson Vernier • Dylan M Verran • Samantha Marie Wallace • Dylan Troy Ward • Kendall Grace Watson • Timothy Westbrook • Everette Lawrence Wheeler • Layton Bryce White • Rachel A White • Bailey Anne Wiberg • Kavon Lamontre Williams • Spencer J Williams • Jeric T S Williamson • Keegan Garrett Williamson • Amari LaTrelle Willis • Zachary Thomas Withers • Ryan Alexander Wittmier • Cody Byron Wolcott • Alexandrea Monae Woods • Tayannah Jean Wright • Daniel S Yermakov • Destiny F Zumwalt


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Class celebration page 41

West Valley High School JUNE 11 INB PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 3 3 4 W . S P O K A N E FA L L S B L V D . , S P O K A N E Jagger Aerni-Grineau • Emma Aley • Helen Aley • Dylan Almeida • Toby Andres • Caleb Atkins • Dominic Atkinson • Kiersten Baca • Aidan Bell • Audreya Bell • Madison Beniquez • Trey Bennett • Cierra Black • Charisse Bouma • Scott Bray • Reza Broten • Jaylynn Buehler • Haley Burghart • Bryson Burns • Rachel Butler • Brett Cantrell • Sydnie Carson

Valleyfest Royalty reign with character, charisma

By Kyrie Woodard Current Correspondent The 2018 rendition of Valleyfest may be a few months off, but the noble court that represents the event is now in place. Georgia Goff, a sophomore at University High School, has been named Miss Spokane Valley Queen. Valleyfest Royalty princesses are Amy Bethmann, Kylie Nelson and Krystal Bates. What does it take to earn the honor of bearing the Valleyfest name and tradition? To start – exceptional skill, poise, intellect and talent. Those selected are also doing their part to make our community a stronger place. Goff is currently in her second year as a member of the National Honor Society. She is a representative for Washington Drug Free Youth and the Spokane Guilds School as well as a member of U-Hi’s ASB board. She also volunteers with Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service (SCRAPS) and Love11, which helps economically disadvantaged groups in Spokane. Bethmann, a junior at University High, has been involved in the National Honor Society, Knowledge Bowl, community theatre and more. She helped organize the Providence

• Kannon Carver • Madalyn Cavanaugh • Mahala Christensen • Rodney Clemons Jr. • Kali Cox • Nick Crane • Meadow Creveling • Ashley Crowder • Eryn Cummins • Kaytlin Danielson • Johnathan Danker • Braden Davis • Colton Davis Shafer • Jabriel Davis • Jessen Day • Mary Deline • Riley Dymond • Riley Ellis • Josie Engeland • Cassandra Esvelt • Paeton Ferguson • Tara Fetters • Jaymee Finke • Caleb Fishburne • Kellie Fitzpatrick • Jeremiah Garza • Cameron Geiger • Carlee Glisson • Kai Gomez-Whitehead • Noel Goodwin • Daniel Gorbenko • Christopher Graham • Erika Gutierrez • Ethan Hagelstein • Karen Hagen • Tiffany Harvey • Aaron HattenEvans • Cory Hatten • Koby Hawson • Sophia Henson • Michelle Hildahl • Evin Holloway • Katie Holyk • Olivia Honnold • Chase Howat • Jackson Hylton • Medina Ibrahimovic • Jaxson Imada • Charlene Jackson • Kiarah Johansen • Chase Johnston • Derrick Jones • Nicholas Jones • Tanner Jones • Tegla Jones • Jake Jordan • Kaylynn King • Madison KingmanImus • Emalie Koestner • Shaunie Kopczynski • Kamelia Kosa • Kymberly Kratzer • Alexa Lee • Sean Levinson • Marlena Lewis • Sofiya Liashedko • Emily Logan • Malia LucasHorton • Taylor Luck • Hayleemae Martin • Lizbeth Martinez Gonzalez • Danielle Matson • Dillon Matson • Emma Mattfeld • Ruthanne Maxwell • Cameron May • Marley McAllister • Amaya McClain • Abbigayle McConnell • Jacob McCullough • Richelle McKinley • Sage McKinney • Doralicia Mendoza • Kiaundra

Sacred Heart Party and the Special Olympics event at Eastern Washington University this year. Nelson is a sophomore at Freeman High School where she participates in soccer, basketball and the Conservation Club. She has worked with Tree of Sharing and Blessings Under the Bridge to help underserved populations in the area. Bates is junior at University High and is part of her school’s debate and tennis teams, as well as color guard for band. She has also been involved in Divino’s “Canines on the Catwalk” to raise funds for different animal shelters around Spokane and Spokane Valley. The Miss Spokane Valley program, also known as the “Valleyfest Royalty Pageant,” is an annual community event which allows young women to “represent and be an ambassador for Valleyfest and Spokane Valley.” The program allows exceptional sophomore and junior girls to have the opportunity to demonstrate their talents, receive recognition for their achievements and participate in Valleyfest and other community events. Valleyfest will take place Sept. 2123, beginning with the Hearts of Gold Parade down Sprague Avenue that will include the Valleyfest Court among many other procession participants. The bulk of community celebration will occur at Mirabeau Point Park and the CenterPlace Regional Event Center where Queen Goff and Princesses Bethmann, Nelson and Bates will also appear. The Valleyfest Royalty Pageant is

Miller • Jackson Mitchell • Julie Mitchell • Tajadin Mohammed • Kade Mohr • Isela Morales • Macy Morgan • Joshua Moss • Kaitlinn Mullin • Pauline Nasset • Haley Nava • Julia Nguyen • Vivien Nguyen • Yen Chau Nguyen • Brooklyn Nickerson • Cassidy Norman • William Norris • Skyler Ogle • Anystan Osborne • Taryn Ouren • Renee Palmer • Connor Parker • Jayden Payne • Drake Pederson • Saray Peralta • Alejandro Pereyda • Tynan Perry • Tre Peterson • Jacob Petty • Michael Quindlen • Joshua Quirk • Devyn Randall • Logan Reser • Adrian Richter-Wilson • Alma Ridic • Zackary Roberts • Alex Rodriguez • Cole Rosaia • Kaylee Rose • Carlo Rosios • Chyna Russell • Colin Ryan • Collin Sather • James Scott • Miranda Scott • Aleesa Seifert • William Sennott • Kristine Shelley • Trystan Sheppard • Kelsie Sinclair • Cody Skay • Devin Smith • Parker Smith • Spencer Spittler • Austin Standon • Josiah Steele • Logan Steinman • Noah Stephens • Jared Steptoe • Willow Swim • Blake Taylor • Ciara Tennison • Gabrielle Towne • Blake Transue • Jillian Transue • Kaitlyn Tritt • Ikaika Vargas • Logan Verhage • Pleh Wah • Weston Warren • Dakota Werle • Chad Whalen • Connor Whitney • Grace Wilson • Rachel Wilson • Caitlin Wood • Noah Youseph • Andrew Zaat

a traditional showcase that provides sashes and crowns and does require self-care. However, evaluation is also “based on leadership and poise and speaking,” according to longtime Valleyfest Director Peggy Doering. As a result, the girls participating in Valleyfest Royalty competition must act as “poised leaders” Doering says and pertain to specific standards set by the Valleyfest organizers. These standards include the obtaining of a 3.0 grade point average or higher, having no criminal convictions and refraining from use of alcohol, tobacco or drugs. Valleyfest Royalty protocol also assumes that girls involved in the pageant will maintain their public image by keeping their social media clean of any illegal substances or inappropriate content. This understanding of the expectations of these young women allows Valleyfest Royalty to identify truly exceptional girls who are capable of excelling in the real world and stand as positive examples for a younger generation. All those who wish to participate in the Valleyfest Royalty Pageant must be able to complete a five-minute talent presentation, which can include a performance or presentation. Candidates also give a short speech about “What Spokane Valley means to me” and answer various questions from judges. They also must be able to attend all required events. The Valleyfest program provides formal dresses for the court after they are inducted. The program supports participants in developing daily life skills,

earning college scholarship funding, identifying individual strengths, making new friends and finding new interests. Participants also gain vast experience in individual interviews and in public speaking. Valleyfest Royalty begin their tour of events with the Lilac Festival and continue to travel through various areas of Washington, including Chewelah Fairfield and Deer Park, among other places. Though Valleyfest Royalty may seem to be simply another pageant, it is recognized as a beneficial event which celebrates female leaders in Spokane Valley’s high school community. Doering says the program helps young women achieve further success and strive to continue as both community and global leaders.

Miss Spokane Valley Queen Georgia Goff (center) and Royalty Princesses Kylie Nelson (left), Krystal Bates (back center) and Amy Bethmann (right). Contributed photo


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CONGRATULATIONS UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 2018


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2 0 1 8

Class Verse

As for other matters, brothers and sisters, we instructed you how to live in order to please God, as in fact you are living. Now we ask you and urge you in the Lord Jesus to do this more and more.. - 1 Thessalonians 4:1

Prayer for the Graduate

As we think of these 2018 Grads, we thank You, Father for getting them this far. Please help them to fully enjoy this moment in time. Graduation carries with it an unknown future. May they not get lost in the shuffle. We ask that Your presence will always be felt and appreciated in their life. May they always know You are there to offer them Your guidance, strength, and discernment as they navigate a world that is not always black and white. Let them be a light before others and an example to those around them. Lord, we ask that You will watch over and protect them in the days ahead. May they not lean to their own understanding but in all things acknowledge You so that You can direct their paths. Give them a heart for Christ and a love for others, as well as, a mind full of wisdom to guide their choices. May they sense Your love as they now face the world of adulthood. Thank you, Father. In Jesus’ name we pray, Amen.


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West Valley High School Class of 2018

Home of the Eagles!

SENIOR SIGNING DAY

Class of 2018 Signing Valedictorians 4.0 GPA

Audreya Bell will attend Seattle Pacific Uiiversity

Mahala Christensen will attend Brigham Young University

Danielle Matson will attend the University of Washington

West Valley High School celebrated our 4th annual Senior Signing Day. Nearly 100 seniors declared their plans to continue their education after high school in many different post-secondary programs, including apprenticeships, military, technical school, 2 year college or 4 year university. This is a proud tradition that inspires our unclassmen and demonstrates our seniors’ focus on their futures.

Salutatorian 3.9 GPA

Michael Quindlen will attend Eastern Washington University

Cameron Geiger will attend the University of Washington

Academic Scholars

ASB Officers Chase Howat, President Kelsie Sinclair, Vice President Kristine Shelley, Public Relations Mahala Christensen, Activity Coordinator Lillian Arch, Secretary Josie Engeland, Treasurer

West Valley High School’s class of 2018 is full of successful individuals who worked together with classmates and teammates resulting in representing our school with pride and excellence. The senior class shared many accomplishments during the 2017-2018 school year. These West Valley High School seniors excelled in the classroom, in clubs and activities, and continue to compete at a high level in district, regional, and state competitions. Their sense of EAGLE PRIDE and preparation for future success contributed to a positive school climate where all students were challenged to be successful.

Honor Cord Recipients 3.6 GPA and above

Audreya Bell Cierra Black Brett Cantrell Madalyn Cavanaugh Mahala Christensen RJ Clemons Josie Engeland Jaymee Finke Jeremiah Garza Cameron Geiger Carlee Glisson Noel Goodwin Cory Hatten Sophia Henson Michelle Hildahl Charlene Jackson Tegla Jones Emalie Koestner Shaunie Kopczynski

Kimberly Kratzer Emily Logan Malia Lucas-Horton Taylor Luck Danielle Matson Marley McAllister Doralicia Mendoza Macy Morgan Haley Nava Vivien Nguyen Yen Chau Nguyen Taryn Ouren Saray Peralta Michael Quindlen Kelsie Sinclair Parker Smith Gabrielle Towne Connor Whitney


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Cody Poffenberger Adams Elementary

Tori Layden

Evergreen Middle School

Araleigh Arnold

Johnna Ellison

Liberty Lake Elementary

Ponderosa Elementary

Marien Darling

Trynity VanGelder

R

2018

Jace Henderson

Bowdish Middle School

Kyla Ross

Greenacres Elementary

McDonald Elementary

Progress Elementary

PACE AWARD HONOREES!

Congratulations! Carmine Patrick

Preslie Young

Valerie Oliverson

Aurora Kelley

Broadway Elementary

Greenacres Middle School

Mica Peak High School

South Pines Elementary

Izabella Roullier

Katelyn Christensen

Elizabeth Nicholls

Nicholas Burlakov

On May 24, these 50 students received a 2018 PACE Award for consistently demonstra ng excep onal character and bringing character to light for themselves, their classmates, schools and community. PACE inspires and supports excep onal character through educa on, community partnerships and recogni on.

Central Valley High School

Horizon Middle School

North Pines Middle School

Spokane Valley Learning Academy

Join us for World Character Day on September 26, 2018 and “Shine On!” Learn more about “Bringing Character to Light” at:

pacecommunity.org Special thanks to Leo's Photography for the 2018 PACE portraits.

Katrina Thompson Chester Elementary

Lili Downard

Liberty Creek Elementary

Andrew Hebden

Opportunity Elementary

Claire Brock

Spokane Valley Tech


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Annie Mack

Summit School

Robin White

Sunrise Elementary

Ryan Sulpizio

JUNE 2018 • 43

Andy Sorge

East Farms STEAM Magnet School

Alexander Carlson

East Valley High School

Jaynee Chapman

University Elementary

East Valley Middle School

Terrell Elgee Sanders

Christian Tiffany

University High School

Kailey Olson

Continuous Curriculum School

East Valley Parent Partnership

Willow Burrill

Otis Orchards School

Jacob Brown Trent School

Bentley Beal

Trentwood School

Annie K. Schiene

Ramona Benson Pioneer School

Mya Desgrosellier

Valley Christian School

Madeline Johnson

Freeman Elementary

Valley Christian School

Jackson Clark

Alexis Burchfiel

Cole Clark

Naomi Meredith

Freeman High School

Freeman Middle School

Tekoa Elementary

Tekoa High School

Jacob Green

Kendall Focht

Centennial Middle School

Pasadena Park Elementary

Dakotah Porter

Eva Irish

Charlotte Framstad

Jacob Dickman

Dishman Hills High School Seth Woodard Elementary

Millwood Kindergarten Center

Casey Staley

Spokane Valley High School

Erica Heid

Ness Elementary

West Valley City School

Karissa Hill

Mahala Christensen

Orchard Center Elementary

West Valley High School


44 • JUNE 2018

OPINION

The Current

EDITOR/PUBLISHER

Ben Wick

Danica Wick

ben@libertylakesplash.com CO OWNER

danica@libertylakesplash.com

EDITOR

Craig Howard

craig@libertylakesplash.com OFFICE MANAGER GRAPHICS

Paula Gano

paula@libertylakesplash.com

Hayley Schmelzer

hayley@libertylakesplash.com

CIRCULATION Larry Passmore circulation@libertylakesplash.com CONTRIBUTORS

Kylor Allen, Derek Brown, Steve Christilaw, Bryan Collins, Bill Gothmann, Craig Howard, Mike Vlahovich, Mark Werner The Valley Current P.O. Box 363 Liberty Lake, WA 99019 Phone: 242-7752; Fax: 927-2190 www.valleycurrent.com The Current is published monthly by or before the first of each month. It is distributed free of charge to every business and home in the greater Spokane Valley area. Copies are located at drop-off locations in Spokane Valley, Liberty Lake and the surrounding area.

The Current is brought to you by

Wick Enterprizes Submitted materials

Thank you to McDonalds at Sprague and Havana As I come into the store I am greeted by the crew with Good Morning Lorraine. They aim to please which makes me feel special. They also wanted to make sure my Golden Arches biscuit is perfect and when it wasn't they bought my breakfast. I go all over this town and this is the best McDonalds by far, then followed by Indiana and Monroe. Another great restaurant that is fabulous is Orlando's. Thank you Billy, Gaspar, Shawn, Irene and Cindy for making my morning a pleasure.

Miss Lorraine White

Publishing House

Announcements, obituaries, letters to the editor and story ideas are encouraged. Submit them in writing to publisher@valleycurrent.com. Submissions should be received by the 15th of the month for best chance of publication in the following month’s Current. Subscriptions Subscriptions for U.S. postal addresses cost $12 for 12

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issues. Send a check and subscription address to P.O. Box 363, Liberty Lake, WA 99019. Subscriptions must

be received by the 15th of the month in order for the subscription to begin with the issue printed the end of that month. Correction policy The Current strives for accuracy in all content. Errors should be reported immediately to 242-7752 or by email to editor@valleycurrent.com. Confirmed factual errors will be corrected on this page in the issue

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As with all content, opinion page submissions may be edited for space, style or clarity. This is a community newspaper, so be relevant to the Valley for the best chance at publica…on. “In all debates, let truth be thy aim, not victory or an unjust interest. And endeavor to gain, rather than to expose, thy antagonist.” — William Penn

following their discovery. Advertising information Display ad copy and camera-ready ads are due by 5 p.m. on the 15th of the month for the following month’s issue. Call 242-7752 for more information. Advertising integrity Inaccurate

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knowingly accepted. Complaints about advertisers should be made in writing to the Better Business Bureau and to advertise@libertylakesplash.com. The Splash is not responsible for the content of or claims made in ads. Copyright © 2016 All rights reserved. All contents of The Current may not be reproduced without written permission of the publisher.


The Current

JUNE 2018 • 45

Love The Current? Support our partners.

2018 CV Bears Boosters 2nd Annual Golf Outing

The Current is committed to serving the Greater Spokane Valley area through excellent community journalism. We can’t do it at all without you, our readers, and we can’t do it for long without support from our advertisers. Please thank our business partners and look to them when offering your patronage. Our sincere appreciation to the following businesses for their foundational partnerships with The Current and its partner publications:

ENRI

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Enjoy the start of summer with some fun golf and great prizes, and a fantastic dinner to raise funds for athletics and activities at CV. There will be hole contests, silent auction items and plenty of fun! All for a great cause... the students at Central Valley. Golf includes free driving range, lunch, goodie bag & water. Dinner includes steak, potato, salad and one beverage.

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Index of advertisers

Following are the local advertisers in this issue of The Current.

Our coaches are passionate about

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48

quality gymnastics Healthy in a fun and safe Living Liberty Lake 24 environment. Classes run year-round HUB 20 Banner Fuel 24 with three 13-week sessions (Fall, Winter and Spring) and one 10-week Ignite! Theatre 15 Clark’s Tire and Automotive 3 summer session. AutoCraft 20

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Cornerstone Penecostal Church

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Vision Marketing

3

George Gee

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Evergreen Fountain

Greenstone 20

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Service Directory

46

Of note: This thank you message was produced by The Current’s advertising team, which works its tail off on behalf of partner businesses, helping them share their messages through advertisements. This is an independent function from The Current’s editorial team, which has its own evaluation process to determine the community news stories and features it pursues. For more information about a win-win partnership that expertly markets your business to thousands of readers (while making this home-grown community newspaper possible), email advertise@valleycurrent.com. With story ideas, contact editor@valleycurrent.com.


The Current

46 • JUNE 2018

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The Current

Spokane Indians gear up for 200K season this summer

By Craig Howard Current Editor As the 2018 Spokane Indians’ season dawns, the team can take extra pride knowing it plays in one of the top venues in all of sports. At least that’s according to the experts at Stadium Journey. When the travel guide for sports fans published its top 100 stadium experiences earlier this year, the venerable ballpark on the western fringe of Spokane Valley earned the No. 31 ranking, ahead of wellknown venues like Husky Stadium, the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum and AT&T Stadium. Among minor league sites, only Parkview Field in Ft. Wayne, Indiana – home of the longseason, class A baseball Ft. Wayne Tincaps – earned a higher rating from Stadium Journey which, in its review, recommended “catching a game at Avista Stadium if you want to enjoy a great evening out at a ballpark.” From a wide variety of concessions to the unique atmosphere and layered history, the site with a capacity of just over 6,800 fans also eclipsed Major League Baseball sites on the list like Nationals Park in Washington, D.C., and New York’s Citi Field.

ON THAT NOTE

JUNE 2018 • 47

The Spokane Indians open their 2018 Northwest League season June 15 against the Boise Hawks at Avista Stadium. The venue earned a prestigious honor earlier this year from the travel magazine Stadium Journey as it was listed as the 31st best stadium experience in the nation, ahead of major league parks in Cleveland, New York and Washington, D.C. The ballpark, on Havana Road in eastern Spokane Valley, was built to house the Los Angeles Dodgers' farm team after the franchise moved from Brooklyn in 1958. Free parking continues to be one of the many fan-friendly features here. Nearly 300 spaces were added in 2014. Photos by Craig Howard It’s no wonder then that representatives in the Indians’ front office are talking about a landmark attendance goal this season, the 60th anniversary of Avista Stadium. After falling around 3,000 fans shy of the 200,000 mark for the 2017 campaign, the team is hoping to celebrate 200K in 2018. “As a short-season operation, we’ve never hit that number,” said Otto Klein, the teams’ senior vice president. “We would be only a handful of teams to ever get there.” The season begins June 15 at home against the Boise Hawks and winds through the summer with a total of 76 games, 38 at Avista Stadium. The Indians wrap up the 2018 schedule hosting the Vancouver Canadians on Sept. 3. Klein said pre-season ticket sales point to the team reaching the ambitious attendance objective. “It would be a community

Spokane Indians' Senior Vice President Otto Klein is part of a staff that approaches 300 during the team's short-season single-A schedule. The club makes it a point to keep ticket prices affordable with mini-season ticket plans starting at $70. Singlegame seats begin at $5. Photo by Craig Howard

achievement, another reminder of what sets Spokane apart from every other minor league team in the country. We’re going to get to that 200,000 because we’re different.” In addition to the draw of the home ballpark, fans turn out for the entertainment value, Klein says. Whether it’s one of four Yoke’s $1 Family Feast Nights or fireworks displays after the game (there are 10 shows set for this year), fans don’t necessarily need to be baseball aficionados to enjoy the ballpark experience here. With the high turnover of players – the format means the better Indians’ talent likely moving up after one season, if not during the campaign – Klein said fans develop a sense of pride in what the team and sport symbolize. “You’re really rooting for the essence of what baseball means,” he said. “You’re cheering for the Indians’ brand, you’re cheering for summertime and that connection the local brand has with the community. You may not know the players but you hope they win.” Mini-season ticket sales continue to be the bread and butter for the Indians from a revenue standpoint. Options of seven, 14 or 21 games in both upper and lower box areas are featured in the plans that start at $70 and go up to $294. Single game tickets range from $5 to $24.

The Spokane Indians have been part of the local sports landscape since 1903. The franchise moved up a notch in 1958 when the Brooklyn Dodgers relocated to Los Angeles and named Spokane as its AAA affiliate. Avista Stadium was built that year. The Indians were the top farm team for L.A. until 1971 when a move was made to Albuquerque. Since then, Spokane has been part of the minor league network for the San Diego Padres, Kansas City Royals and, the current parent club, the Texas Rangers. A new manager – Kenny Holmberg – will lead the Indians from the dugout this season. As the sixth skipper since Spokane became a Texas affiliate in 2003, Holmberg brings experience as the Rangers’ minor league infield coordinator. Free parking continues to be one of the trademarks of the fan experience here. In 2014, nearly 300 parking spaces were added. The year before, a major renovation of Avista Stadium brought expanded concession areas and a new team store. Each season, the Indians employ around 275 people. Klein said the franchise is always looking to improve. “We’re very goal-oriented,” he said. “We’re always trying to reach new goals. Every year, we set our standards higher than the year before.”


The Current

48 • JUNE 2018

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June 2018 Current  

The Debate over Density; Robust housing development means many things for Spokane Valley

June 2018 Current  

The Debate over Density; Robust housing development means many things for Spokane Valley

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