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SEPTEMBER

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STUDENTS SUPPORT VANESSA BEHAN CRISIS NURSERY PAGE 4

ry

Lessons from the Farm

4-H program paves Theft way for present and future success Low 12 Page Medium High

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Prepared By: Regional Intelligence Group 9

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2 SEPTEMBER 2017

NEWS

citizen – at least for the next few months.

The Park Bench

Q: What was your first impression when learning you'd won the Harry E. Nelson Citizen of the Year award from the Valley Chamber?

Frankly Outstanding – Tombari honored by chamber for civic contributions

A: I was surprised. You do not get involved as a volunteer with the expectation of an award. Q: I'm guessing you know most, if not all, of the previous winners of this award. How do you feel to be part of this canon of outstanding citizens?

By Craig Howard

A: Flattered, honored.

Current Editor

Decades later, the words could well apply to Frank Tombari, honored as the 2017 Harry E. Nelson Citizen of the Year by the organization that Morrison once led. Like Nelson, Tombari served as chair of the chamber and has been recognized as a catalyst in the area’s economic development efforts. While Nelson made his living primarily as a newspaper publisher and Tombari as a banker, both recognized the Valley’s vast potential and made it a priority to invest their time and talents into ensuring that the community flourished. Tombari called the Valley his professional home for 20 years, starting at the University City branch of Farmers and Merchants Bank in 1989 and later on Argonne. He has been with Banner Bank since 2006 when Banner acquired Farmers. Tombari joins previous standouts from the local business community such as Joe Custer, Julie Prafke, and Max Spalding who have won the chamber’s highest honor since it was introduced in 2003. For the publicity-reluctant Tombari, news of the award had him hearkening back to his days playing rec-league softball. “It’s kind of like when you’re a third baseman and you turn a double play,” he said. “You can’t do it without other players on the infield. It’s a team effort. This award is great. I feel honored but I feel like I’m part of a larger team that cares about this community

humbled

and

Q: As a former chair of the Valley Chamber, you've seen the impact this organization can have. How do you feel the chamber is handling their mantle now?

The quote is attributed to Jack Morrison, former president of the Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce, upon the passing of his friend, Harry E. Nelson in 1959. “He had a special way of putting things together and getting people involved.”

The Current

Frank Tombari, longtime banker and community volunteer, is the 2017 Harry E. Nelson Citizen of the Year, an honor bestowed by the Greater Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce. Tombari is past chair of both the Valley Chamber and Spokane Area Economic Development Council. Photo by Craig Howard and works to make it better.” A Spokane native, Tombari is the oldest of six kids. His parents ran a grocery store in the eastern part of town, teaching him the value of a consistent work ethic. He helped at the store and mowed lawns growing up. Later, his dad became a contractor in order to spend more time with his family. Tombari attended St. Aloysius Elementary before enrolling at Gonzaga Prep, where he participated in track and football, among other sports. In 1970, he was named to the all-city squad as a punter. He graduated from G-Prep in 1971 and was accepted to the University of Notre Dame, his dad’s favorite school. “My dad was what they called a “subway alumnus,” Tombari said. “He loved Notre Dame but he had never been to the school.” Frank’s brother, John, also migrated to South Bend, Indiana while each of his remaining siblings would go on to attend other colleges, a goal that their parents had set for all the kids early on. Tombari majored in business management at Notre Dame, returning to Spokane each summer to work at a local bakery and earn money for school. After graduating from Notre Dame in 1975, Tombari thought about moving to California or going graduate school. He’d been accepted to the University of Michigan but wanted to work as well and the state’s lagging economy

was going to make that difficult. He eventually opted to return to his hometown and work full-time at the bakery. Eventually, he latched on with Old National Bank (ONB). Before long, Tombari was moving up the banking ladder. ONB promoted him to branch manager in 1977, when he was 24, a transition that included a move to Seattle. Tombari remained at ONB until 1983 when he left to work in the import/export business. After his father passed away in 1986, Tombari returned to Spokane and has been here ever since. The chamber honor is not the first time Tombari has been recognized for his civic involvement. In 2014, he was named to the Builders’ Hall of Fame by the Spokane Home Builders Association for his contributions to local development. Over the years, he has served as chair of the Valley Chamber and the Economic Development Council, an organization that later became Greater Spokane Inc. (GSI). Tombari has been part of the GSI board and is the longtime chair of a Valley Chamber/GSI joint transportation committee. Frank and his wife Shelley were married in 1990 and have four kids and two grandkids in their blended family. The Current caught up with Tombari recently to chat about banking, economic development, transportation and carrying the mantle as the Valley’s leading

A: I think that they do a great job of promoting the interest of business. Katherine Morgan has assembled a great staff and does an outstanding job as the chamber president Q: You also served as chair of the Spokane Area Economic Development Council (EDC), an entity that later transitioned to Greater Spokane Inc. where you served as a board member. What did you learn while serving with these organizations as far as the Inland Northwest's strengths and weaknesses as a hub for business and economic development? A: Both organizations are about growing jobs. The EDC was less political in its approach in that it did not really develop positions on legislative issues unless it was specific to job creation. The chamber fills the role of being an advocate for business at the local, state and federal level Q: It seems that every city in our region is focusing on consistent funding mechanisms for safe and reliable roads. In your work on the joint transportation committee, what have you found are the most effective approaches to maintaining a stable and effective transportation network? A: For the past 25 years we have been looking at our transportation needs as a system. That system has a number of components to it. There are federal highways, state highways, county highways, city arterials county roads and

See TOMBARI, Page 5


The Current

SEPTEMBER 2017 • 3

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4 SEPTEMBER 2017

NEWS

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Students turn builders to help Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery

By Staci Lehman Current Correspondent You could say students at Spokane Valley High School completed this year’s most unique and thoughtful housing project. “We wanted to do something for the community,” said student Michael Alkana. “And we knew Vanessa Behan needed a playhouse.” With the help of volunteers, teachers and parents, SVHS students built a playhouse, complete with a porch and décor, for the children supported through the Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery, a facility in south Spokane that offers 24-hour childcare for infants and children, parent education, crisis counseling and referrals to other resources. All this is to keep children safe when parents are dealing with issues ranging from substance abuse to domestic violence, homelessness or even fatigue from the responsibilities of being a parent. “I guess I just didn’t know what they did there (at Vanessa Behan),” said SVHS math teacher Emilee Noel, who organized the building of the playhouse. “So when we went and toured it I thought, ‘Oh my gosh, we have to do something for them.’” Being a small project-based, school of choice in the West Valley School District, part of the SVHS vision statement includes “engaging in ‘beyond the four walls’ learning opportunities.” The hands-on, skill-teaching playhouse construction project was one of those opportunities, except that this project literally had four walls. “We had a group of students who decided they wanted to build something,” said Noel, but they weren’t sure what it was they wanted to build. Following a trip to the nursery for a childhood education class field trip, students began figuring out what they could do for the nonprofit. They started with raising money for materials. The West Valley Education Foundation provided a grant for $1,500 and a parent donated $500. Noel and another teacher, Joni Chambers, also contributed money. The kids had a

The Current

garage sale and other fundraisers and eventually generated a total of $2,500 to build the playhouse. With the materials covered, it was time to start construction. “We had some dads come in who are professionals in the (building) field,” said Noel. “We rotated a different dad each Friday.” Those volunteers worked with the kids, not only making something that would benefit less fortunate children, but also teaching the students construction skills at the same time. Once the building was done though, the work wasn’t exactly complete. The question became how to get the large playhouse, complete with furniture, miniature kitchen appliances, flower boxes and tiny Adirondack chairs for the front porch, from the school yard at SVHS to the Vanessa Behan location on the lower South Hill. Noel called Strate (yes, there’s an ‘r’ in there) Line Crane and Rigging Co., located in Coeur d’Alene, to see if they could hire the company to move the playhouse. Staff at Strate Line not only agreed but volunteered to help out for free. So on the morning of June 13, a crane and a flatbed truck were moved onto SVHS grounds. As a crowd of students and teachers watched, the crew hoisted the house off the ground, rotated it in midair and placed it gently on the truck for the trip across town. As for the reception when it arrived at Vanessa Behan a little while later? “We were super excited to see it,” said Crisis Nursery Executive Director Amy Vega. “We brought our kids out to watch it and it was absolutely amazing. Probably my favorite part is all the students painted a tree and used their hand prints as leaves and some of the students signed their names.” Want to find out more? To learn how you can help the Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery or to find out more about the nonprofit’s programs, call 535-3155 or visit www.vanessabehan.org.


The Current

TOMBARI

NEWS

Continued from page 2 residential roads. There are two airports and transit that are part of the system as well. There are two class-one railroads that also serve the system. The system is fully integrated. If part of the system is failing, then it has an impact on the rest of the system. That is why system improvements as well as system maintenance and preservation are important to plan for from a financing viewpoint as well as a user viewpoint. We need to protect access to the system for freight mobility, for commute trips to work, school and home. We only have about six months for construction on the system, maybe eight months in a good year. Business needs to be able to survive. Employees need to be able to get to work and home. Transit needs to be able to provide service throughout the county. The airports need to be able to operate. If you do too much construction, you can shut the system down and nobody benefits from that. It is important to understanding that this is a system and that work in one part of the system can impact other parts of the system. For example, work on I-90 might move traffic onto Trent; work on Trent at the same time might move traffic onto Mission or Sprague. Will work on Appleway force traffic onto Broadway? The jurisdictions cannot operate in a vacuum. When you look at transportation has a system then it is easier to explain to a legislator how our specific request for funding impacts the system. It can be used as well to promote continuous funding for preservation and for maintenance. Q: In 2014, the Spokane Home Builders Association honored you with lifetime achievement award similar to the Valley Chamber tribute. Where do you see the future of local development headed? A: Residential development will be challenged by the growth management act and more recently, the (Washington State Supreme Court) Hirst Decision. Limited or restricted supply of lots will result in inflation in lot prices. The residential construction industry has enough challenges already in the lack of skilled help in all of the trades. Adding more government regulation on top of the lack of labor will make it difficult for the contractor to succeed and they pay good wages.

Q: With all your success and experience in leadership roles, have you ever thought about running for political office? If not, why? A: I have no interest in putting my immediate family or extended family and friends through the verbal abuse that our politicians receive. Q: You're a Spokane native who went away to college and spent time in Seattle in your early career but ultimately returned to your roots. How important is it to this area's economic development to retain local graduates who may look to establish careers elsewhere?

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Q: As you know, the Citizen of the Year award was named after the late Harry E. Nelson who, like you, contributed in many ways to local economic development and played a key role with the Valley Chamber. Harry once said the Valley is "an empire within an empire." What would you ask the namesake of this award if he was still with us?

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The Current

6 SEPTEMBER 2017

SVFD Report – September 2017

“I would be honored to have your vote! Together we can steer our city toward its bright future.” Spokane Valley City Council Position 4

www.electbenwick.org Paid for by the Citizens to Elect Ben Wick 12018 E Frederick Spokane Valley, WA 99206

By the numbers: • Fires* = 135 • Emergency medical service =1,463 • Motor vehicle accidents = 102 • Hazardous materials = 26 • Building alarms = 78 • Service calls = 30 • Vehicle Extrication = 1 • Water Rescue = 2 • Confined Space/Technical Rescue = 1 • Rescue Task Force = 1 *Brush, Commercial, Residential, Rubbish, Vehicle Fires and Unauthorized Burning Burn Ban – Outdoor recreational fires and open burning RESTRICTIONS continue due to extreme fire danger in the cities of Liberty Lake, Millwood, Spokane Valley and unincorporated Spokane County. This means any outdoor fire without a chimney – including campfires and backyard fire pits (with or without screens) – is prohibited. Open burning of fields, yard waste and garbage is always prohibited. Read more at www. spokanevalleyfire.com Spokane Valley Fire Department (SVFD) crews responded to a total of 1,839 emergency calls from July 25 through Aug. 24. Incidents include: • Balcony Fire – July 25 – SVFD crews responded to a reported second floor apartment balcony fire in the 16100 block of East Broadway shortly before 3:45 p.m. Crews arriving at the apartment complex were met by a man who said a neighbor had smelled smoke, discovered a small fire and put it out with a garden hose from the ground level. Firefighters found the area still smoldering and extinguished the remaining charred area. They dismantled the railing to ensure the fire was completely out. A potted plant above the burned area had cigarettes extinguished in the potting soil, the likely cause of the fire. Potting soil is not dirt. It is highly flammable, especially when dry. • Brush Fire – July 28 – Just before 9:15 a.m., SVFD crews responded to a reported brush fire in a field next to the railroad tracks near the 16200 block of East Lacrosse Lane. Crews arrived to find a small, slow-moving fire in a field of grass with no nearby structures. Crews were able to quickly contain and extinguish the fire. Witnesses reported seeing a hawk fly into the transmission line, ignite and fall to the ground in the field, starting the fire. Crews found a charred bird at the suspected origin of the fire. • Attic Fire – July 28 – SVFD crews responded to a reported structure fire in the 5200 block of North Burns Road just before 3:15 p.m. They arrived to find smoke coming from the roof of the home and noted a man on the second floor deck, spraying water from

a garden hose into the eaves. Fire crews launched an aggressive attack on the fire, which burned from the attic through the roof. Investigators determined that the fire started on the deck, burned up the handrail, then up the wood siding of the home and into the eaves of the attic. They observed a small amount of unburned and burned potting soil on the deck, which is highly flammable when used to extinguish cigarettes. The damage was estimated at $30,000. The Red Cross assisted two adults and three dogs who were displaced by the fire. • Service Call – Fire Hazard – Aug. 1 – Shortly after 11 a.m., SVFD crews were called by the Spokane Valley Police Department to assess the safety of a home in the 18500 block of East Courtland Avenue. A SVFD investigator was called to the scene and determined the excessive amounts of trash and family belongings inside and outside the home was a fire hazard. The items had been accumulated over many years. The resident was instructed to clean up the property with the help of local resources and was told that SVFD would be following up to ensure compliance. • Hazardous Condition – Aug. 2 – SVFD crews responded to the 600 block of North Pack Trail Lane to investigate a hazardous materials report just before 12:15 a.m. They arrived to find the family waiting in the driveway complaining of a strong liquefied propane odor inside the home. Crews went inside, confirmed the strong smell and suspected gas. Upon investigation, it was discovered that a barbecue’s propane bottle was on and a burner was turned on. The barbecue was removed from the garage and doors opened to air out the home. Annual SVFD Open House – Sept. 30 from 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. – SVFD invites the community to join the agency for free family fun at the SVFD Training Center, 2411 N. Pioneer Lane. Check out our new ladder truck, watch live fire and rescue demonstrations, take pictures in fire gear, enjoy refreshments and much more. Retired Arson Dog “Mako” will make a guest appearance. Visit www.spokanevalleyfire.com for more information. About SVFD - Spokane Valley Fire Department serves the cities of Liberty Lake, Millwood, Spokane Valley and unincorporated areas of Spokane County including the communities of Otis Orchards, Pasadena Park, and the area surrounding Liberty Lake, with a combined population of 125,000 across approximately 75 square miles. SVFD firefighters and paramedics responded to more than 16,250 emergency calls in 2016. Established in 1940, SVFD is an Accredited Agency by the Commission on Fire Accreditation International (CFAI), one of only a handful in the state of Washington. SVFD operates 10 stations providing fire suppression, emergency medical services, vehicle extrication, hazardous materials response, special operations rescue, fire investigation, fire prevention, commercial property inspection, CPR and fire safety training. The department also offers free home fire safety inspections and installation of free smoke detectors. For more information call 928-1700 or visit www. spokanevalleyfire.com.


The Current

SEPTEMBER 2017 • 7

Introducing the

Safety Awareness Channel

By Chief Mark Werner

Freya

The maps provided below depict where citizens have reported Vehicle Thefts, Thefts from a Vehicle (also known as vehicle prowling), Burglaries and Thefts. As you view the map each circle will contain a number indicating how many instances of a particular crime were reported at that location. Thefts from a vehicle is often under reported as people often feel nothing can be done or they only lost a small quantity of loose change. However, the Spokane Valley Police Department and the Spokane County Sheriff’s office analyze this data to determine high crime areas and where to allocate resources. I encourage citizens who have been a victim of crime to call 911, if the crime is in progress, or Crime Check at 456-2233, if not in progress, to report a crime.

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If you wish to minimize your risk of becoming a victim of a theft from vehicle , please do not leave valuables visible in your vehicle and specifically do not leave firearms in your vehicle. We have seen an increase in reported thefts of firearms from vehicles in the last couple of months. These firearms are often being recovered in the possession of narcotics dealers and convicted felons. We encourage you lock your valuables in your trunk out of view of potential criminals. However, if you are headed to a shopping mall, trail head or large event parking lot, I recommend doing this prior to parking at your destination as criminals are often watching as you secure your items in your trunk. Convinced you just placed something of value in your trunk and are no longer around, they will often break into your vehicle and use the trunk release button to steal those valuables.


8 SEPTEMBER 2017

Spokane Valley City Council Report

NEWS

Current Correspondent More farm animals may come to residential areas

On Aug. 15, city staff presented their research on farm animals in residential areas based upon previous council comments. Gnawing animals would be prohibited but rabbits and guinea

maintained. Bee swarming would be “minimized.” The contract with Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service (SCRAPS) would be modified to include response to complaints related to animal noise and welfare and impound services, estimated to cost over $4,500 per year. Zone violations would be handled by the city’s code enforcement official. It was noted that that city has only have one such official, who already is overloaded and that this would increase his responsibilities.

By Bill Gothmann

On July 11, the Spokane Valley City Council discussed a proposal that would allow three large animals per acre on large lots (40,000 square feet or more) in residential zones and in other zones where there is an existing residence on a large lot. In all residential zones the proposal would permit keeping one “small livestock” per 2,500 square feet, or one “small animal or fowl” per 1,000 square feet. “Small livestock” includes goats and sheep and other animals not exceeding 36 inches in shoulder height or 150 pounds.

The Current

By a 4-3 consensus it was agreed to bring this forward as an ordinance at a future council meeting. Changes to snow laws remain elusive

The Spokane Valley City Council has been discussing a proposal that would change the rural landscape within municipal boundaries, allowing for three large animals per acre on lots of 40,000 square feet or more. Contributed photo pigs would be permitted. Council could either prohibit all pigs or allow pigs only in large lots. Fence and building language would be more specific. Present building

codes must be observed. Life, health, property or safety of the public or structure’s occupants must not be endangered. Fences and structures must be adequately

removal

On Aug. 8, City Attorney Cary Driskell presented proposed changes to the city snow removal regulations, noting that this is the seventh council meeting that has addressed the subject. Under the new regulations, snow removal would be required of all sidewalks within 48 hours if over 3 inches of snow or ice is accumulated. Failure to do so could result in a fine of $51.25. A second violation would

See COUNCIL, Page 9

Candidate Forum

October 4, 2017 5:30 pm - 8 pm West Valley High School

Join Us!

Come hear what your Spokane Valley City Council candidates have to say and meet applicants for other offices vying for your vote.

Thank you to our local high schools for working together to make this event happen!


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COUNCIL

Continued from page 8 also result in a fine of $51.25 and three or more would result in fines of $102.50 for each subsequent occurrence. The cleared path must be at least 42 inches wide or the width of the sidewalk, whichever is less. Enforcement would take a twotier approach. Tier 1 would consist of sidewalks in commercial areas and on Safe Routes to Schools. These would receive the highest enforcement. Tier 2 sidewalks would be those of other residential areas and would be enforced after Tier 1 sidewalks have complied. There will be some exemptions for seniors and those with disabilities. The city would undertake an information initiative to inform citizens of the requirements and of resources for those who cannot clear the sidewalks themselves. In addition, the “bat wings” would be replaced on the four snow plows that have them and plows would go slower in lanes next to sidewalks to minimize the amount of snow plowed onto them. The city manager would have amnesty authority to suspend enforcement of these regulations when snow storms make it physically impossible to remove ice or snow. The ordinance was approved to go to the second reading by a 6-1 vote with Council Member Sam Wood dissenting. On Aug. 22, the snow removal ordinance was again on the agenda. Council, by a unanimous vote, removed it from the agenda “for further study.” Therefore, “snow or ice not removed from a public sidewalk within a reasonable time” remains a nuisance misdemeanor carrying a $500 fine.

NEWS

(SRLJC) in order to reduce costs and recidivism.

The Spokane Assessment for Evaluation of Risk (SAFER) tool is an assessment of an individual to arrive at his/her risks. It examines warrant history, failures to appear, family situation, job status and other attributes. It is used by judges to determine how to monitor an individual such as ankle bracelet, periodic phone-in, diversion to mental health professionals, jail or probation. A total of 127 staff members have been trained on SAFER and it is being used in all three court systems: municipal, district and superior. Each day, pretrial services professionals, including six new officers, evaluate recent arrivals to determine where they can best be placed. “Jails have become a mental health facility of last resort,” according to Van Wormer. The Mental Health Diversion program was designed to divert those needing mental help to appropriate resources. Since its launch in October 2016, the program has screened 450 individuals with 200 of the 400 referred to prosecutors for possible diversion of charges. A total of 89 percent of those released from jail were connected with community based services and a comprehensive treatment program. Of the 200 referred for prosecution, 24 percent were accepted for potential dismissal upon completion of the program. Presently, offenders who have mental problems are sent to either of two places: jail or to a

hospital where officers spend up to four hours getting the offender admitted. The SRLJC is advocating establishing a mental health crisis stabilization facility. Successful in other cities, such a facility permits law enforcement officers to drop off an offender they suspect needs mental health services and quickly resume their policing duties. 2018 budget revenues and expenditures presented Staff presented the first of several presentations on the 2018 budget, proposing expenditures of $77,095,593. Of this, $21,372,611 will be spent on the following capital projects: $11,041,790 in street capital projects; $2,441,300 in parks capital projects; $4,008,600 in pavement preservation; $2,919,921 in railroad grade separation projects and $800,000 in storm water management projects. Of these capital projects, $15,119,803 will be supplied through grants. The full-time equivalent employee (FTE) count will be 89.25 employees compared to 87.75 in the prior year as a result of one limited term position becoming a regular fulltime position in the Street Capital Projects Fund. This position has actually been held for years but not reported as an FTE because it is entirely funded through capital projects. The second position is for an additional, half-time attorney. The 2018 recurring revenue estimate for the general fund is $42,958,900, 3.61 percent greater than the 2017 amended budget. The 2018 recurring expenditure proposal is $40,891,379, 1.85

Bert J. Porter donates to city

percent greater than 2017. Nonrecurring general fund expenditures total $1,734,509. Major expenses are $1,000,000 for future capital projects; $400,000 for parks to add perimeter lighting to Browns Park and to start the upgrade of an outdoor venue at CenterPlace; $115,000 for Information technology upgrades including audio/visual equipment at CenterPlace; $100,000 for a generator for the police precinct and $50,000 for retail recruitment services. Staff noted that, with the declining revenue for street maintenance, more is being spent from the Real Estate Excise Tax fund on pavement preservation, leaving less for matching funds for road grants. Finally, revenues are expected to exceed expenses and the ending fund balance is expected to be about 63 percent of recurring expenses, well above the 50 percent minimum set by the council. On Sept. 12, there will be a hearing on revenues and expenditures. Final budget approval is planned for Nov. 14. Council Briefs: • An open house for the new Spokane Valley City Hall is tentatively scheduled for Sept. 30 at 9:30 a.m. • Because of equipment moving to the new City Hall, video recording of some September council meetings may be suspended. However, audio recordings will continue to be made. • Proposals were presented for changes to the public defender contract with Spokane County which would more accurately reflect costs. Net cost will be increased by $26,940 per year. However, reconciliation for years 2010-2016 will cost a total of $114,361. • Council approved a Spokane Housing Authority bond issue for affordable housing in Spokane Valley. The city incurred no liability or costs from this issue.

Bert J. Porter made a substantial donation to the city in memory of Bert O. and Ruth Porter. This $34,223 donation will be used to provide shade structures and benches to the Valley Mission Dog Park, shade structures to Greenacres Park and a giant chair to the Discovery Playground. Council and staff thanked Porter for his generosity to the city.

• Council approved a proclamation complimenting the work of 4th District legislators, Sen. Mike Padden, Rep. Bob McCaslin, Jr. and Rep. Matt Shea. • Deputy Mayor Arne Woodard asked staff to prepare a resolution to the legislature asking them for action in the Hurst decision, a decision that restricts water rights.

Council hears justice effectiveness initiatives Dr. Jacquie Van Wormer, Spokane Regional Justice administrator and Spokane County Chief Operating Officer John Dixon reviewed recent initiatives established and proposed by the 22-member Spokane Regional Law and Justice Council

SEPTEMBER 2017 • 9

Spokane Valley City Council is considering changes to the snow removal regulations that would require all sidewalks to be cleared within 48 hours if over 3 inches of snow or ice have accumulated. Fines would be levied against those who don't clear walkways. Contributed photo

• Council Member Wood asked about the Eighth and Carnahan traffic initiatives. City Manager Mark Calhoun said they will prepare a report for council.


10 SEPTEMBER 2017

COVER STORY

Life Skills Beyond Livestock – 4-H program educates, enriches students By Ben Wick

Current Publisher With a focus on positive youth development, 4-H is the largest out-of-school youth program in the country with participation in every state across the United States and Canada. The program was founded around 1902 as a result of a research project identifying the need to help educate people in rural communities on the ways of agriculture. The four H’s in 4-H are “Head” (managing

Business success started with 4-H for Woolley By Ben Wick

Current Publisher Starting with arts and crafts and expanding from there, Emma Woolley started participating in 4-H and competing at the Spokane County Interstate Fair at 13 just after she moved with her family to the Spokane area the year prior. “I started out by making arts and crafts, then went on to baking, public speaking and animal raising.” says Woolley. The public speaking demonstrations or competitions feature youth who give speeches in the 4-H barn during the interstate fair, where people can come by listen and engage. The 4-H participants are then judged on their preparedness and how they handle themselves in front of and interacting with a crowd. Woolley said the public speaking experience with 4-H and at the fair was a substantial benefit. Since completing the program in 2009, Emma has gone on to the culinary school at Spokane Community College and is now the regional vice president at Primerica Financial Services, an insurance broker and financial planning company based out of Spokane and Spokane Valley. “The public speaking experience has helped give me

and thinking), “Heart” (relating and caring), “Hands” (giving and working), and “Health” (being or living) and represent the primary values of 4-H. The 4-H program maintains its research-based history by being hosted by universities across the nation. The program has found a home at “land grant universities,” a designation given to colleges that received pre-1900s funding in order to promote the teaching of agricultural and engineering studies. At the time, most colleges were focusing on a liberal arts confidence in speaking with and in front of others, which is exactly what by job is today,” she said. “I am constantly teaching classes and organizing training for co-workers.” After getting some encouragement from fellow church members Woolley went on to participate in more of a 4-H team or group project and joined “Home Grown Hogs,” a 4-H Club based in the Mt Spokane area that helps kids and their families learn how to raise pigs. Through the experience of raising pigs (or “hogs” as most ranchers call them) kids get to not only learn responsibility by having to take care of and look after their project/piglet, but also learn business elements.

curriculum. In Washington state, the 4-H program is hosted by Washington State University (WSU) and specifically in this area through a joint effort/agreement between WSU and Spokane County at the WSU Cooperative Extension Office in the parking lot of the Spokane County Fair and Expo Center. Functioning with a “learn by doing” format, 4-H is open to students from the ages of 5 to 18 While its origins were to help train boys to be farmers and girls to be housewives, 4-H has evolved over time to support many other fields. 4-H currently has a number of science, technology, engineering and mathematics

Another side of the 4-H program and the associated community fairs is the opportunity for kids to earn some money. Most of the fairs and shows around have found sponsors to be able to offer a little prize money to associate with the judging of the projects. “I remember earning money to go to camp or for horseback riding lessons,” said Woolley. Woolley still participates in cake decorating at the 4-H building during the interstate fair to help show kids how to decorate. She highly recommends the 4-H program to anyone interested. “4-H is a community of people

The Current

(STEM) opportunities, leadership and team activities, as well as the more traditional programs such as caring for cows and pigs, cooking, and shooting sports. “Most people associate 4-H with the projects they see, but the projects are just the spark for development” says Gary Varrella, Spokane County 4-H educator at WSU. According to Varrella, approximately 1,200 students participated in 4-H youth programs in the 2016 – 2017 school year across Spokane County. Of that total, about 700 participated in the traditional 4-H clubs, 200 in special programs such as nutrition,

See 4-H, Page 11

with shared values trying to provide experiences and education to future generations,” she said. If you would like to see and support the 4-H projects from kids throughout the region and beyond, the youth animal projects are being judged during the first weekend of the Spokane Interstate Fair (Sept 8-10) with the Youth Market Sale on Sept. 10 starting at 2 p.m. in the Swine Barn. The Current encourages you to check out all of the amazing projects and consider supporting the kids by buying an animal at the sale.

They learn about the cost of baby piglets, cost of feed for their animal and ways to earn more money from their project. “The more time you spend with your project, the better you would show which would result in better or more ribbons you could win and in turn the more money people were willing to spend on the animal at the sale,” Woolley says. Woolley described the process as giving “a non-farming family an opportunity to learn and experience agriculture and where food comes from without having to dedicate your lives to it.” “Our pig projects started typically six months before the fair,” she said. “I remember learning that I really needed to pay attention to details and wanted to have a sense of pride with my project. I remember thinking, ‘I hope they like this.’”

Emma Woolley participated in 4-H as a youth, learning skills like public speaking, arts and crafts and raising animals. She now works as vice president of Primerica Financial Services and says the training she received in 4-H has been a benefit to her business career. Contributed photo


The Current

COVER STORY

SEPTEMBER 2017 • 11

4-H Report Card

The Institute for Applied Research in Youth Development and Tufts University studied the 4-H program and found that “compared to their peers, the findings show that youth involved in 4-H programs excel in several areas” including the following: Contribution/Civic Engagement • 4-H’ers are nearly four times more likely to make contributions to their communities (grades 7-12) • 4-H’ers are about two times more likely to be civically active (grades 8-12) Academic Achievement

The 4-H program was founded in 1902 after a research project identified the need to educate people in rural communities about agriculture. Some activities participants can choose to participate in pictured here are (left) dog showing, (middle) quilting and crafting (right) metal work. Contributed photos

4-H

Continued from page 10 fitness, robotics, and/or rocketry and 300 in the military family’s support services programs (i.e. camps focusing on participation from youth from military families). The 4-H program itself is primarily driven by volunteer support with over 300 trained volunteers serving Spokane County and two full-time and four part-time (grant funded) staff support members based out of the WSU Cooperative Extension Office. Participants in 4-H chose a program that they are interested in from the list of available topics which includes: Cats, Cavies, Clothing and Textiles, Dogs, Equine, Environment-Science-EngineeringTechnology, Expressive Arts, Foods and Nutrition, Large Animals, Leadership and Citizenship, Mechanical Sciences, Military Kids Clubs, Poultry, Pocket Pets, Rabbits, Robotics, Shooting Sports and Sports Fishing. While developing their projects, they learn life skills that they will benefit them well beyond 4-H. Then they present their projects to their local communities through the local fairs and festivals where they are given feedback, encouraged and rewarded for their projects while letting their neighbors know how their time has been spent.

There are also two types of animal projects. With animals like horses, llamas and dogs, the kids and animals can work together and learn together over time with a project that can last multiple years. Conversely “market animals” that are raised and utilized for food (i.e. cows, hogs, goats and lambs) involve projects that can start from birth of the animal to up to 2 years but typically start six months before their targeted fair or show.The largest non-fair show in the Spokane area is the Junior Livestock Show of Spokane which is very similar to the livestock portion of the Spokane County Interstate Fair but hosted in early May at the Spokane Fair and Expo Center.

Want to find out more? 4-H projects and clubs are open year-round. For more information about the program, with lists of the local 4-H clubs in our area see the Spokane County 4-H Youth Department website at http:// extension.wsu.edu/spokane/4h/ or contact the main 4-H office number at 477-2160. You can also stop by the 4-H Life areas at either the Spokane County Interstate Fair (Sept 8-17)) or the Southeast Spokane County Fair in Rockford (Sept. 23-24).

• 4-H young people are nearly two times more likely to participate in science, engineering and computer technology programs during out-of-school time (grades 10 – 12) • 4-H girls are two times more likely (grade 10) and nearly three times more likely (grade 12) to take part in science programs compared to girls in other out-of-school time activities. Healthy Living • 4-H’ers are nearly two times more likely to make healthier choices (grade 7) (Excerpt from The Positive Development of Youth: Comprehensive Findings from the 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development)

At the conclusion of the youth portion of our local fairs and shows, there is a multi-species market auction where all of the qualifying 4-H participants and projects go through a live auction where they get to present their project to potential buyers and where most, if not all, of the money raised goes back to the kid/family as the reward for their work and time on their project. Kids choosing which kinds of projects they want to work on or species of animals they would like show can then find and join a local 4-H club that specializes in that species and supports the education process.

Students in 4-H can showcase their skills with more than animals. Still exhibits such as jam making, displays, knitting/crocheting, and other time honed traditions can be entered at the local fair. File Photo


COMMUNITY

12 SEPTEMBER 2017

PRESENTS Weekly Girls Basketball Skills Camp Classes are held at the Fitness Center 14210 E Sprague, Spokane Valley, WA $20.00 per session and payment will be made monthly or per session.

Starts September 10, 2017

Enroll Per Session at the Fitness Center

Level 2 11:00-12:30 (4th - 7th grades) Level 3 12:30-2:00 (8th - 12th grades) To Enroll Now

call 509-499-1112 or email rsadams23@gmail.com

payments can be made per month or per session

Stars President Ron Adams is Camp Director. He will be assisted by Stars coaching staff, which includes Steve Ranniger, Katelan Redmon, Lacie Hull, Lexie Hull, Jamie Loera, Jailey Christopher and Camryn Skaife.

“ IT’S

THE LAW ”

In WASHINGTON Click or Call Two Business Days Before You Plan To Dig

www.CallBeforeYouDig.org

1-800-424-5555 or dial 811 Inland Empire Utility Coordinating Council www.ieucc811.org

The Current

Calendar of Events COMMUNITY EVENTS Sept. 8-17 | Spokane County Interstate Fair, 10 a.m. to 10:30 p.m., Sept. 8-16; 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sept. 17, Fair and Expo Center, 404 N. Havana Street, Spokane Valley. The region’s largest community fair will feature award-winning livestock, concerts, carnival rides, food and much more. For more information, go to www.spokanecounty.org/972/ Interstate-Fair. Sept. 12 | Spokane Vet Center Open House and Barbecue, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Spokane Vet Center, 13109 Mirabeau Parkway, Spokane Valley. This event will feature a local resource fair and complimentary lunch served from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. For more information, call Andrea at 444-8387. Sept. 22-24 | Valleyfest. The Valley’s signature community celebration kicks off Friday, Sept. 22 at 7:30 p.m. with the Hearts of Gold Parade down Sprague Avenue. The event continues Sept. 23-24 at Mirabeau Point Park with food, vendor booths, live music, family-friendly games and more. Visit www.valleyfest.org for more a complete schedule or see the insert in this issue. Sept. 22-24 | Southeast Spokane County Fair, Rockford. The 74th annual event will feature a community parade at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 23 preceded by a pancake breakfast. The threeday schedule includes judging of livestock, a carnival, Harvest Hoops 3-on-3 basketball tournament, games, bingo and a community worship service on Sunday at 10 a.m. Admission to the fair is free. For more information, visit www. sespokanecountyfair.com. Sept. 23 | Courageous Kids Climbing Event, 1 to 3 p.m., Valley YMCA, 2421 N. Discovery Place, Spokane Valley. The McCall, Idaho-based organization will bring their free event for children with special challenges, physical or developmental, to experience wall climbing. Climbing has been shown to help children with developmental challenges by helping them practice hand-eye coordination and enhance problem-solving skills. For more information, call Event Coordinator Jeff Riechmann at jeffriechmann@ cs.com. Sept. 30 │ Spokane Valley Fire Department Annual Open House, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., SVFD

Training Center, 2411 N. Pioneer Lane, Spokane Valley. Enjoy a day of free family fun at the SVFD Open House. Check out the department’s brand new ladder truck and motor boat. Watch live fire and rescue demonstrations, try on fire gear and tour fire engines and enjoy refreshments. Retired Arson Dog “Mako” along with Smokey Bear will make guest appearances. Visit www.spokanevalleyfire.com for more information. Oct. 6 | Family Fun Day, 1 to 3 p.m., Valley YMCA, 2421 N. Discovery Place, Spokane Valley. This free event is for those with or without a YMCA membership and will feature aquatic and gym games as well as arts and crafts, free popcorn and more. Call 7779622 or visit www.spokane.org for more information. Wednesdays through Sept. 13 | Millwood Farmers Market, 3 to 7 p.m. Located in front of Millwood Presbyterian Church, 8910 E., Dalton off Argonne. Featuring food and farm vendors, artisan crafts, music and more. Market accepts token System, WIC, senior vouchers, EBT and Fresh Bucks programs. For more information, visit millwoodfarmermar.wix.com/ market Saturdays through Oct. 14 | Liberty Lake Farmers Market, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Town Square Park, 1421 N. Meadowwood Lane. Market features local food and farm vendors, artisan crafts and baked goods, music and more. Art at the Market will take place this month, beginning Friday, Sept. 8 at noon and running through 1 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 9. For more information, visit www. libertylakefarmersmarket.com.

RECURRING ACT 2 senior classes | Affordable classes offered by Community Colleges of Spokane to those who are retired or planning to retire. A wide range of courses from geology and history to exercise and art are offered at CenterPlace, 2426 N. Discovery Place, as well as other locations throughout the area. “Focused Fitness on Dishman Mica,” a yoga class, is now part of the schedule. More at www.sccel. spokane.edu/ACT2. Baha’i Fireside Conversation | 5 to 6 p.m., third Friday of the month. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main Ave. Discussion of Baha’i teachings, history, and perspectives on resolving the challenges facing humanity. All are welcome. More at 599-2411 or www.bahai.us.

Inland Empire Blues Society monthly meeting | Oct. 13 at 7:30 p.m., Bolo's 116 S. Best Road. Café Card Club | 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Tuesdays. On Sacred Grounds, 12212 E. Palouse Hwy., Valleyford. Play pinochle, cribbage, or hearts. More at www.onsacredgrounds. com. Catholic Singles Mingle | Meeting times and locations vary. This group, with no dues, is for single adults of all ages. More at www. meetup.com/Catholic-SinglesMingle. DivorceCare Recovery Support Group | Tuesdays 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Eastpoint Church, 15303 E. Sprague Ave. Learn how to heal from the deep hurt of divorce and discover hope for your future. DivorceCare for Kids (ages 5-12) meets at the same time and location. Cost is $25 for workbook. More at 892-5255 or eastpointchurch.com. Military Sobriety Support Group | 10 to 11: 30 a.m., Spokane Vet Center, 13109 E. Mirabeau Parkway, Spokane Valley. Call Steve at 8934746 for more information. Grange Meeting and Dessert | 6:30 p.m., first Wednesday of the month, Tri-Community Grange, 25025 Heather St., Newman Lake. The public is welcome for this community-based service organization. For more information call 226-2202 or see us on Facebook. Men’s Weekly Bible Study | 7 a.m. Tuesdays. Millwood Presbyterian Church, 3223 N. Marguerite Road, Millwood. The men’s weekly Bible Study meets in the Reception Hall with different members sharing in the leading of the study. All men are invited to join. More at www. milwoodpc.org. Pancreatic Cancer Action Network | 6:30 p.m., the first Monday of each month. Liberty Lake Municipal Library, 23123 E. Mission Ave., Liberty Lake. More at www.pancan.org or 534-2564. Rockford Crochet Class | 10 a.m. to noon, Saturdays. The Harvest Moon, 20 S. First St., Rockford. Free classes. We have crocheters, knitters, embroidery, quilting and needlepoint. Come and share with us what you are doing. Call 2913722. Rockford Historical Society | 11:30 a.m. second Friday of the month (Feb. to Nov.). Harvest Moon restaurant, 20 S. First St., Rockford. More at 291-3193. Spokane County Library District


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SEPTEMBER 2017 • 13

COMMUNITY

| Locations include Argonne, Fairfield, Otis Orchards, and Spokane Valley. Special events and weekly activities for all ages including book clubs, children’s story times, classes, Lego club, teen anime club and writing clubs. More at www.scld.org Spokane Valley Eagles | 16801 E. Sprague Ave. Breakfast served Sundays 9 to 11:30 a.m. Lunch served Thursdays 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. followed by bingo from 1 to 3:30 p.m. More at www.foe3433. com. Spokane Valley Partners Food Bank | Weekly distribution takes place Wednesdays and Thursdays at 10814 E. Broadway by appointment. Appointments are available during the following days/times: Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Thursday (reserved for advanced-age seniors — age 60 and over — and/or physicallyhandicapped people with limited mobility): 11 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Address verification is required. To make an appointment, call 927.1153 ext. 10, Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 1 p.m Spokane Valley Quilt Guild | Meetings are held at 7 p.m. on the first Tuesday of February, April, June, August, October and December at Valley Assembly of God Church, 15618 E. Broadway, Spokane Valley. Open to all interested in sharing ideas and skills of our quilting craft. Participants have can access a comprehensive library, can engage experienced teachers and participate in community service projects. More at www.svqgspokane.com

MUSIC & THE ARTS RECURRING Drop-in Square Dance Lessons | 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. (through May 18). Western Dance Center, 1901 N. Sullivan Road. Square dance lessons for $3 per person; no partner needed. More at 270-9264. Pages of Harmony | 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., Wednesdays. Thornhill Valley Chapel, 1400 S. Pines Road. If you enjoy singing, you will love the four-part, a cappella harmony of this men’s barbershop chorus. More at www.pagesofharmony.org. Spirit of Spokane Chorus | 6:45 p.m., Tuesdays. Opportunity Presbyterian Church, 202 N. Pines Road. Make new friends by joining this women’s chorus, specializing in four-part, a cappella harmony in the barbershop style. More at 2184799.

Spokane Novelists Group | Noon to 4 p.m., second and fourth Saturday of the month. Otis Orchards Community Church, 23304 E. Wellesley Ave., Otis Orchards. A support/critique group for writers. Open to anyone with an interest in writing fiction (no memoirs, nonfiction, poetry, etc., please). Participants should bring 5-10 pages to read aloud and 6-8 copies for others to read along and critique. More at 590-7316. Spokane Valley Camera Club | 7:15 p.m., third and fourth Monday of the month (September through April). Liberty Lake Sewer and Water District building, 22510 E. Mission Ave., Liberty Lake. All levels of ability—students through experienced photographers—are invited to learn. Social events include field trips and workshops. More at 951-1446 or www.sv-cc. org Spokane Valley Writers’ Group | 6:15 p.m. the first and third Thursdays of the month. Lakeside Church, 23129 E. Mission Ave. This supportive critique group welcomes adult writers. More at 570-4440.

HEALTH & RECREATION Sept. 24 | Veterans 5K Run/ Walk, check-in at 9:30 a.m., race starts at 11 a.m., McEuen Park, downtown Coeur d’Alene. This event is an opportunity for the community to support past, present and future veterans. Registration is $10 for kids 6-12, $20 for adults. No cost for veterans. Register by calling 208-416-4726 or at www. stvincentdepaulcda.org. Sept. 24 | Valleyfest Family Bike Ride, Centennial Trail, check in at 11 a.m., event starts at noon. There are four leader-guided routes to choose from: 6.8 miles, 8.8 miles, 13.5 miles and 15.6 miles. Online registration closes Monday, Sept. 18 at 9 a.m. Registration is $15. Proceeds from the ride will help support bike safety in Spokane Valley. Sponsored by Bike Hub. You can register at the event or online at https://valleyfest.org/familybike-ride/. For more information, contact Valleyfest at 922-3299. Sept. 29 | HUB-apalooza Family Fun Festival, 4 to 7 p.m., HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave., Liberty Lake. This free open house will celebrate the HUB’s 10th anniversary and include a jump house, basketball, volleyball, Pickleball, futsal/soccer, appearances by local sports mascots and more. For more information, call 927-0602 or go

See CALENDAR, Page 14

ley then, o k a n e Va l p S s s i M y I love As communit e h t d e v r do so I se uld like to o w d n a h e on so muc resentativ p e r r u o y Council. again as alley City V e n a k o p S

I will listen to you, learn your issues, and lead with integrity.

WWW.VOTELINDATHOMPSON.COM Paid for by Linda for City Council! 10913 E 46th Ave, Spokane Valley, WA 99206

Join us at Captain Bill’s

Come Find us at the Spokane County Interstate Fair

September 15-24 All proceeds benefit children in the Spokane Valley Area


The Current

14 SEPTEMBER 2017

CALENDAR

Continued from page 13

two www.hubsportcenter.org. Each Wednesday | Mindful Music and Movement class, 11:30 a.m. -12:30 p.m. Specifically designed for those living with chronic health issues such as Parkinson's, dementia, COPD, MS, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue or cancer. Supporting body, mind and soul. Facilitated by board-certified Music Therapist, Carla Carnegie at Willow Song Music Therapy Center. 21101 E. Wellesley #102. Otis Orchards WA 99027. More information at www.willowsongmusictherapy.com or call 592 7875.

RECURRING HUB Sports Center 19619 E. Cataldo Ave., Liberty Lake. Various activities and events occur throughout the week including: • Pickleball drop-in: 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Mon. through Thurs.; 10 a.m. to noon Tues. and Thurs. and 6 to 8 p.m. Wed. and Sun. $3/seniors ($5/non-seniors) • Classes including Kenpo Karate and Zumba Aerobics. See website for cost and times. Yoga in Rockford | 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Rockford Park, 20 W. Emma St., Rockford. In case of inclement weather, classes will be held at Dave’s Autobody, 8 W. Emma St.

CIVIC & BUSINESS Sept. 9 | March for the Fallen, opening ceremonies at 8:30 a.m., 7-mile trailhead, Riverside State Park, Spokane. Featuring 5K, 10K and 15K memorial runs/marches to honor Washington’s fallen military personnel. Register at www. MarchForTheFallen.com. Sept. 9 | Central Valley High School Band and Colorguard

Car Wash, CVHS south parking lot, 821 S. Sullivan Road, Spokane Valley, $5 per car. Sept. 11 | Central Valley High School DECA Homecoming Fashion Show benefiting Crosswalk Teen Shelter, 7:30 p.m., CVHS Theatre, 821 S. Sullivan Road, Spokane Valley. Sept. 13 │PACE World Character Day. Schools, families, businesses and other organizations across the Spokane Valley are invited to participate in a worldwide celebration of the importance of good character on Sept. 13. PACE (Partners Advancing Character Education) is facilitating activities and resources to increase awareness and build commitment to recognize and promote good character throughout the year. For more information, visit www. pacecommunity.org. Sept. 13 | Senior Resource and Referral Fair, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Great Room of CenterPlace Event Center 2426 N Discovery Place, Spokane Valley. Hosted by the Spokane Valley Senior Center, this free annual event features information on services and resources in areas such as transportation, housing, legal assistance, health, Medicare, in-home care and more. Complimentary coffee and cookies will be served. For more information contact Senior Center Specialist Karen Clark-Parson at 720-5403 or kparson@spokanevalley.org. Sept. 16 | Socks for the Homeless, 2 to 5 p.m., Spokane Valley Library Conference Room, 12004 Main Street, Spokane Valley. On Feb. 23, 2016 local resident Brandon Dunkle was crossing a street when he was hit by a driver under the influence. Brandon passed on March 1, 2016. In honor of what would have been Brandon’s 17th birthday, socks for the homeless are being collected on Sept. 16. The event will include

music, cake and raffles. Every five pair of new or gently used socks earns one raffle ticket. Socks can be dropped off prior to the event at Twice as Nice Thrift Store, 11811 E. First Ave., Spokane Valley. For more information, contact Amanda Dugger at 869-5512 or amcdugger@hotmail.com. Sept. 23 | Free Law Clinic for Veterans, workshop and complimentary lunch, noon to 1 p.m., legal clinic, 1 to 3 p.m., Gonzaga School of Law, 721 N. Cincinnati Street, Spokane. Income guidelines apply. Call 413-2415 for more information. Sept. 26-27 | Manufacturing Matters Expo 2017 hosted by the Greater Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce, reception 5:30 p.m., Mirabeau Park Hotel and Convention Center, 1100 N. Sullivan Road, Spokane Valley. Displays and workshops, Sept. 26, 1 to 4 p.m.; Sept. 27, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Spokane County Fair and Expo Center, 404 N. Havana Street, Spokane Valley. For more information, visit www.spokanevalleychamber.org/ manufacturingmatters/ Sept. 28 | YWCA Women of Achievement Luncheon, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Davenport Grand, 333 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. All proceeds directly benefit the YWCA’s programs for domestic violence victims and their children, including emergency shelter, counseling, legal services, employment readiness, child care and pre-K programs for low-income children. For more information visit www.ywcaspokane.org. The YWCA 24-hour domestic violence helpline can be reached at 326-2255. Sept. 28 | HUB All Star Breakfast, 7 to 9 a.m., Mirabeau Park Hotel and Convention Center, 1100 N. Sullivan Road, Spokane Valley. Kevin Stocker, former MLB player and current Pac-12 Network announcer, will be the featured speaker. Proceeds from

the breakfast go toward programs like HUB 360, an afterschool program for at-risk middle school students, HUB camp scholarships for disadvantaged youth and/or the HUB Capital Campaign to secure this facility for the benefit of future generations. For more information, call the HUB at 927-0602 or go to www.hubsportscenter.org. Oct. 7 | 76th Annual Harvest Dinner hosted by Veradale United Church of Christ, 5 to 6:30 p.m. This dinner will feature turkey, ham and all the fixings. Donations are invited. Raffle baskets will be part of the festivities. All are welcome. The church is located at 611 N. Progress Ave., two blocks west of Sullivan, one block south of Broadway. For more information, call 926-7173.

RECURRING Spokane Valley City Council | Regular meetings are held on the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 6 p.m. in Council Chambers at Spokane Valley City Hall, 11707 E. Sprague Ave., Ste. 101. Council study sessions are held the first, third and sometimes fifth Tuesdays at 6 p.m., also in Council Chambers. Flag Museum | Sponsored by the Sons of the American Revolution and the Fairmount Memorial Association, details the rich history of the American flag, Mondays-Fridays, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Saturdays, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Pines Cemetery, 1402 S. Pines Road, Spokane Valley. For more information: 926-2753 or www. fairmountmemorial.com/southpines-cemetery Spokane Valley Kiwanis | 6:45 a.m. Tuesdays. Valley Hospital Education Center, 12606 E. Mission Ave. More at www. spokanevalleykiwanis.net. Spokane Valley Rotary | Noon to 1 p.m., Tuesdays. Darcy’s, 10502 E. Sprague Ave. More at www. svrotary.org.


The Current

SEPTEMBER 2017 • 15

2017


The Current

16 SEPTEMBER 2017

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

Page CenterPlace Patio Stage Saturday ....................16 Family Stage Saturday ......................................14 Family Stage Sunday ........................................15 Meadow Festival Stage Saturday ......................12 Meadow Festival Stage Sunday .......................13

EVENT ADDRESSES

CenterPlace Regional Event Center 2426 N. Discovery Place Spokane, Valley, WA 99216

Mirabeau Point Park 13500 Mirabeau Pkwy Spokane Valley, WA 99216

Plantes Ferry Sports Complex 12308 E Upriver Drive Spokane Valley, WA 99206

Table of Contents

EVENTS

Page 5K/10K Run........................................................20 AKC Responsible Dog Ownership Day ...............................................23 Balloons Over Valleyfest .....................................6 Car Show............................................................11 Duathlon.............................................................20 Family Bike Ride.................................................20 Fishing at the Falls..............................................17 Hearts of Gold Parade.........................................9 Lions Club Bed Races.........................................8 Outdoor Movie....................................................17 Pancake Breakfast.............................................11 Robotics, Drones, and STEM.............................17 Step UP for Down Syndrome Walk....................10 TotFest...............................................................21

FEATURES

Page Agritourism ..........................................................21 Artist Corner.........................................................13 Astronomy ...........................................................19 Amenities & Maps..................................................5 Booth Vendors Page..............................................6 Comedy Cup .......................................................16 Compost Demonstration......................................18 Hotels...................................................................11 Hearts of Gold Parade Float .................................8 Interactive Activities in the Park...................18 & 19 KXLY Stuff the Bus.................................................7 National Hispanic Month......................................22 Seattle Seahawks Game.....................................18 Spokane Aerial.....................................................19 Sponsors................................................................3 STA Shuttle Map.....................................................7 Schedule of Events, Staff, and Contributor.............4 Uber.......................................................................7 Valley Ale Fest .....................................................16 Valleyfest Children’s Foundation ........................10

Page 2

Our gOal is the same as yOurs,

your Healthy Future.

at multiCare Valley hospital, you’ll find quality healthcare, when you need it. Our dedicated and experienced medical staff includes more than 450 physicians and offers 20 specialties ranging from emergency medicine and surgery to oncology and obstetrics. the advanced medical care and technology you and your family need is right here, at home.

multicare.org

Valleyfest 2017


The Current

SEPTEMBER 2017 • 17

Thank you to the 2017 Valleyfest Sponsors Title Sponsor

Major Family Sponsor MODERN ELECTRIC WATER COMPANY

Main Sponsors

Partner Sponsors

promoting self-reliance & enhancing quality of life

Supporting Sponsors

BECU Fleet Feet Spokane International Airport

Contributing Sponsors Banner Bank Cabela’s Dishman Dodge Fred Meyer Horizon Credit Union Yoke’s

Event Day Sponsors

Avista Chiropractic Works Wellness Center KIND Snacks

Float Sponsors

Premier Manufacturing, Inc Dave Smith Nissan

** Special Appreciation for SCOPE, Spokane Valley Parks and Recreation, Inland Empire Paper Company, Spokesman-Review and Exploring Families.

Visit a Valleyfest Sponsor and thank them for supporting the Spokane Valley community. To become a 2018 Sponsor, call the Valleyfest office at 509-922-3299. https://valleyfest.org/

Page 3


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18 SEPTEMBER 2017

Valleyfest Staff and Contributors

2017 Schedule of Events

Valleyfest Office

Peggy Doering Executive Director Brad Hohn Event Day Coordinator Pat Leu Administrative Assistant Sales Manager Ari Agnew Dalton Burnett Ashley Jenniges Interns

Event and Marketing Consultant

Stephanie Hughes Folding Table Software Labs

Marketing Agency Ed Clark The Clark Company

Graphic Artist

Heather Berndt Lemonade Graphics

Photography

John Demke Spokane Focus

Printing

Griffin Publishing, Inc. Spokesman Review Wenatchee World

Publication Distribution The Inlander The Current

Recycled Paper Donated by

Inland Empire Paper Company

Volunteers

Hundreds of people volunteer through the year. With volunteer dedication, Valleyfest is possible and successful.

Sponsors

Thank the Valleyfest sponsors by patronizing their businesses. Turn to page 3 for a complete list of Valleyfest sponsors. Special thanks to Carol Carter from CenterPlace Regional Event Center and Mike Stone from the Spokane Valley Parks

Page 4

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 22 Sprague Avenue Between University and Perrine 6:15 p.m. 7:30 p.m.

Lions Club Bed Races North Gillis Road & Moffit Road Hearts of Gold Parade East Sprague Avenue from N Gillis Road to Perrine

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23 CenterPlace Regional Event Center

6:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m. 6:45 a.m. 9:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. 9:30 a.m. 10:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 10:00 a.m.- 3:30 p.m. 11:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m.

12:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. 3:00 p.m.- 8:00 p.m. 3:30 p.m. 4:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. 7:45 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Pancake Breakfast Hot Air Balloon Launch - weather permitting Car Show Step UP for Down Syndrome Walk Mobius Planetarium Fishing at the Falls Beer, Wine and Food Garden Including Valley Ale Fest Music and Entertainment Patio Stage Robotics, Drones, & STEM Showcase Car Show Awards PG Rated Comedy Cup Mobius Planetarium Hot Air Balloon Night Glow - weather permitting

Mirabeau Point Park 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. 10:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. 7:00 p.m.- 10:00 p.m. 7:30 p.m.

Booths Open Live Music and Entertainment Family and Meadow Stages Star Gazing with Spokane Astronomical Society Outdoor Movie - The Incredibles

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 24 CenterPlace Regional Event Center 6:45 a.m. 10:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m.

Hot Air Balloon Launch - weather permitting TotFest

Mirabeau Point Park 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. 11:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m.

LIVE MUSIC CenterPlace Patio Stage - SATURDAY

12:00 p.m. Spare Parts 5:30 p.m. The Redneck Bees 7:30 p.m. The Hot Club of Spokane featuring Abbey Crawford

Mirabeau Meadows Stage - SATURDAY 1:00 p.m. Desja 2:30 p.m. Milonga 5:00 p.m. Bristol

Mirabeau Meadows Stage - SUNDAY

11:30 a.m. Joshua Belliardo 1:00 p.m. Christy Lee 3:00 p.m. The MasterClass Big Band

Family Stage - SATURDAY

12:00 p.m. Musha Marimba

Family Stage - SUNDAY

1:00 p.m. Seterra Bell 3:00 p.m. Mariachi Las Aguilas

Stop by the below booths and thank the people making the community a safe place to live. • The Spokane Valley Firefighters • American Medical Response and • Police Department

AKC Responsible Dog Ownership Day Live Music and Entertainment Family and Meadow Stages Family Bike Ride Check-in 11:00 a.m. Centennial Trail North Trailhead

Plantes Ferry Sport Complex West Picnic Shelter 8:00 a.m.

5K/10K Run Duathlon

Valleyfest 2017


The Current

Event Amenities

SEPTEMBER 2017 • 19

Festival Map

• Convenient parking available at the Spokane Valley Mall, 14700 E. Indiana Ave, Spokane Valley. • Ride the STA Valleyfest Shuttle Bus on Saturday, September 23rd, between 8:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. for FREE. Follow the STA Valleyfest shuttle bus signs on Indiana Ave. into the Spokane Valley Mall entrance near Red Robin to the marked shuttle stop. Parking is limited at CenterPlace Regional Event Center. • MV Transportation provides wheelchair accessible shuttle service between Mirabeau Point Park & CenterPlace Regional Event Center on September 23rd, 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Look for the white shuttle van.

Responsible Dog Owners Day on Sunday

Mirabeau Meadows Stage

• VFW Train: Saturday & Sunday • Find Uber details on page 7. • Parking available at Pinecroft Business Center & at CenterPlace Regional Event Center (space limited). • Handicapped parking at Mirabeau Point Park North Centennial Trail Head and CenterPlace Regional Event Center • Restrooms with handicap accessibility available at Mirabeau Point Park & CenterPlace Regional Event Center

Family Stage

Fishing at the Falls

Car Show Patio Stage

• First Aid provided by American Medical Response • American Medical Response (AMR) is joining our police and fire departments to ensure we have a smooth and safe Valleyfest. AMR Spokane provides emergency and nonemergency medical transport service for Spokane County. AMR Spokane employs approximately 170 paramedics and EMTs and handles on average 45,000 calls annually. If you ever need AMR services, call (509) 323.8825 or their dispatch number (509) 323.8888.

Step Up for Down Syndrome Walk

• ATM Machine at Mirabeau Point Park • Wi-Fi available • Mother/Baby Comfort Tent • Information Booth - CenterPlace Regional Event Center & Mirabeau Point Park • Find lost children at the SCOPE booth.

Trail - 10 Minute walk from CenterPlace Regional Event Center to Mirabeau Point Park

Copyright 2017. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written consent of Valleyfest. All information provided in this publication is subject to change without notice. Valleyfest is not responsible for any errors or omissions.

To become a 2018 Sponsor, call the Valleyfest office at 509-922-3299.

https://valleyfest.org/

Page 5


20 SEPTEMBER 2017

2017 Valleyfest Booths Arts & Crafts

A Dragon Wing Creations Bath Bevy Candy Monster Books Caring Coconut Crafty Ladies Deb’s Quilting Tyme Flutterbye Creations Harry’s Ohs Heidi Farr, Artist Love Hath-A-Way Peoplepainters Randy’s Rocks And Rembrandts Rock Cabin Farm Simple Memories Tada Artworks Tin Fish Studios Totally Spun Un Papillon Valley Candles Wild Thang Jewelry

Food Vendors

Frank’s Franks Lylo’s Oriental Café Jump Up Burger Baja Bowls Pizza Rita Yummy Tyme Big Bear Chocolates Azars Ben & Jerry’s Egg Roll Express

Social Service

Baja Babes King of Tacos Best Buzz Soups On Mr. Pop’s Popcorn Old Fashioned Kettle Corn Leon’s Bavarian Nuts Cotton Candy

Baha’i Faith Camp Journey at Ross Point City of Spokane Valley City of Spokane Valley / Spokane County Water Resources Community Colleges of Spokane Cru Spokane East Valley Community Coalition East Valley ECEAP Fans of Family Search Fostering Washington Frontier Behavioral Health Gideons International Girl Scouts of Eastern Washington and Northern Idaho Greater Spokane Emergency Mgmt. Guardians of the Children Habitat for Humanity-Spokane Hospice of Spokane Hub Sports Center Job Corps K12 Insight School of WA, WA Virtual Academies NAMI Spokane Northwest Christian Schools Operation Christmas Child Riverside State Park Service Alternatives SNAP Spokane Center for Independent Living Spokane County Library District Spokane County Young Marines Spokane Regional Clean Air Agency Stand for Children The Fig Tree US Crusader WSU Master Gardeners WSU College of Pharmacy-Spokane

Marketplace

AdvoCare Agnes and Dora Buskins Color Street Dot Dot Smile doTERRA Essential Oils International Emily Farish Acupuncture Independent Damsel Pro, Damsel in Defense ISAGENIX - Susan Stewart-Baldwin, Nutrition Coach Jamberry Nails Le-Vel Thrive LipSense Lula roe Mama Torrez Salsa Co Mary Kay Cosmetics Matilda Jane Clothing Nucerity International Perfectly Posh Rocky Road Jewelry Rodan + Fields Shop for Spice LLC So Been There (Optavia) Spokane Center for Independent Living Spokane County Young Marines Style Dots Timeless Kisses Wildtree Young Living

Commercial Booths

Apple Valley Dental and Orthodontics Banner Bank Bath Fitter Boeing Employees Credit Union Culligan Dishman Dodge Donna’s School of Dance and Music Farmers Insurance - Fabio Agency Global Credit Union Hi 5 Orthodontics Horizon Credit Union Inland Empire Paper Company Kidsmile Dental MultiCare/Valley Hospital Numerica Credit Union PrimeSource Credit Union Renewal By Andersen River City Chiropractic Sears Holdings Marketing Center Sears Home Improvement Products, Inc. Sleep Dentistry of Spokane Spokane Gymnastics Spokane Transit Authority Spokane Valley Chiropractic Center, PLLC State Farm - Emily Cutler Insurance Agency Inc. Sunshine Disposal & Recycling Sylvan Learning Center of Spokane The Current/The Splash The Inlander Total Care Umpqua Bank US Air Force Valley Health Vera Water and Power Warhorse Karate Washington Trust Bank Waste Management

The Current

Balloons Over Valleyfest September 22, 23, & 24 Parade Float, Sunrise Launches and Night Glow Sponsored by: Washington Trust Bank

Balloon Parade Float Friday, September 22

7:30 p.m. Hearts of Gold Parade 15 million BTUs of Power

Valleyfest thanks sponsor, Washington Trust Bank, and the hot air balloon crew members for all the strong effort. This extraordinary event would not be possible without community partners. The balloons will fly as long as the winds are calm and the skies are clear. If the wind speed is over 5 miles per hour, the balloons will NOT try to launch. ● See the balloon basket in the Hearts of Gold Parade ● Watch the Night Glow on Saturday night at 7:45 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. ● Rise and shine for the sunrise launches at 6:45 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Scheduled Launch Where?

CenterPlace Regional Event Center, Northwest Lawn

When?

Saturday, September 23 6:45 a.m. Sunrise launch 7:45 p.m. Night Glow

Sunday, September 24 6:45 a.m. Sunrise launch

** All flights and Night Glow are weather permitting. Balloons cannot fly when the weather is windy and/or raining.

Giving community members the chance to see their city from a new perspective.

Washington Trust Bank is proud to be the sponsor of Balloons Over Valleyfest. Learn more about Watrustology at watrustology.com.

** There will be even more booths. The above organizations are only a partial list.

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Valleyfest 2017


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Uber Saturday, September 23, 2017 CenterPlace Regional Event Center Uber and Valleyfest will be partnering to provide transportation throughout the festival. Download the free Uber app and enter the promo code VALLEYFEST17 for a FREE ride up to a $15 value. The pickup and drop off location at the festival venue will be in front of CenterPlace Regional Event Center. The app link is http://get.uber.com/invite/ VALLEYFEST17. This link automatically applies the discount code to new account that is created through the link.

STA FREE Shuttle

Saturday September 23rd 8:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.

https://valleyfest.org/

Stuff the Bus KXLY Coats 4 Kids

SEPTEMBER 2017 • 21

Sponsored by: KXLY, STA, Valleyfest & Spokane Valley Mall

The Spokane Valley community has a history of generously supporting the KXLY Costs 4 Kids drive during Valleyfest. This year you can drop off new and gently used coats in bins located at CenerPlace Regional Event Center, Mirabeau Point Park, the STA shuttle stop, and the KXLY Coats 4 Kids bus in the park. The goal is to fill an entire STA bus with winter coats. KXLY will make sure all the coats are distributed to children throughout the Spokane Valley and neighboring communities. Park your car at the Spokane Valley Mall and take the free STA shuttle bus to Valleyfest activities at CenterPlace Regional Event Center and Mirabeau Point Park. Buses will be running continuously from 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Saturday.

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22 SEPTEMBER 2017

Lions Club Bed Races Friday, September 22, 6:15 p.m. Start and Finish Line on Sprague between Gillis Rd. & Moffit Rd.

Sprague Ave closes at 6:00 p.m. and the human powered transportation street party begins with the Lions Club Bed Races in its fourth consecutive year. This crowd pleasing fundraiser rings with laughter as decorated beds-on-wheels and costumed teams of five scramble to the finish line. Staging will begin at N. Gillis Rd. in the parking lot at 6:00 p.m. Rules and heats announced 10 minutes prior to the start of the race. Awards will be given in the categories of Overall Winner, Best Bed Design, and Best Team Spirit. Proceeds from this event will benefit the local community. Teams from businesses, churches, clubs, and families are encouraged to enter this event. Visit valleyfest.org for registration forms. Or call Wendy at (509) 220-1557 or email her at: vanormanby5@aol.com.

The Current

Hearts of Gold Float and Valley Princesses

Amy Bethmann and Melinda Mott, both students at University High School, are the 2017 Valleyfest princesses. This summer, they traveled to community parades including Tekoa, Fairfield, Deer Park, Davenport, and Millwood. These communities, in turn, were invited to participate in the Valleyfest Hearts of Gold Parade. See the Miss Spokane Valley Royalty and Valleyfest Hearts of Gold float on September 22, 2017 on E Sprague Ave. Visit valleyfest.org for details on the Miss Spokane Valley pageant.

AND MUCH, M UCH MORE!

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Valleyfest 2017


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SEPTEMBER 2017 • 23

Hearts of Gold Parade Friday, September 22, 7:30 p.m. Between North Gillis Road & Perrine Road on E Sprague The Spokane Valley parade brings families together and showcases the community and the people with “hearts of gold.” PACE - Partners Advancing Character Education - are the Grand Marshal of the 2017 Hearts of Gold Parade. PACE Ambassadors include board members and the 2017 PACE Award student recipients. These students are from the greater Spokane Valley, Freeman, and Tekoa area who demonstrate outstanding character. Sprague Avenue closes to cars between University Road and Pines Road at 6:00 p.m. on Friday, September 22. Come down to Sprague Avenue early before the road closures. Find good parking, catch the preparade entertainment (the 3rd annual Lions Club Bed Races), and eat dinner along the parade route. There are 30 eateries on the parade route and include Arby’s, Baskin Robbins, Breakfast House, Darcy’s, Dave’s Bar & Grill, Denny’s, Domino’s, Dutch Bros, Ferraro’s,

https://valleyfest.org/

Flaming Joes, Grocery Outlet, Hopped Up, Hu Hot, Ichabod’s East, Iron Horse, McDonalds, Monkey Bar, O’Doherty’s Pub & BBQ, Peking Palace, Pho Le Brothers, Pho Saigon Road House, Ron’ Drive In, Rosauer’s, Sam’s Stop & Shop, Senior Froggy, Taco Bell, Taste of Mexico,Three Sisters, Thrifty Scotsman, Top of India, Two Columns, Zip Trip, Zips Starbucks, Taco Time, Burger King, Brass Faucet Bar & Grill, Conley’s Place

Hearts of Gold

Parade Participants

Grand Marshals PACE Fairchild 141st Air Refueling Wing Honor Guard 509 CARS Balloons over Valleyfest Banner Bank BECU Brookdale Park Place City of Spokane Valley City of Spokane Valley Mayor and Council Members Cub Scout Pack 439 Daughters of the American Revolution Dave Smith Nissan Des Boucher Dick Dodd Dishman Dodge East Valley High School - InTec Eastern Washington ATV Association ECV Irish Kate 1858 Outpost of Doc Maynard 54-40 El Katif Moonshriners El Katif Shrine 1899 Club EL Katif Shrine Legion of Honor El Katif Shriners C.A.T. Unit Evergreen Middle School Band Fred Meyer/Fred Bear Girl Scouts Service Unit 431 Gotcha Covered and More LLC Guardians of the Children Horizon Credit Union Inland Empire Mustang Club Inland Northwest Carting Dogs Jake’s Doghouse Personal Delivery Service Lions Club Bed Races Modern Electric MultiCare/Valley Hospital Northwest Fence Company Northwest Window and Door Opportunity Elementary School PrimeSource Credit Union Ronald McDonald Selkirk COM Servpro of the Spokane Valley South Pines Elementary and

the South Pines Elementary SPACE program Spokane Aquifer Joint Board and Aqua Duck Defender of the Aquifer Spokane County Library District Spokane County Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich Spokane Dog Training Club Spokane Elite Dance Studio Spokane Gymnastics Spokane International Airport Spokane Kennel Club Spokane Lilac Festival Spokane Transit Authority Spokane Valley Baha’is and friends Spokane Valley Cub Scout Pack 464 Spokane Valley Fire Department Honor Guard Spokane Valley Fire Department/Antique Truck Spokane Valley Fire Department/Ladder 10 Spokane Vet Center SpokAnimal St. John Vianney School Sullivan Park Assisted Living Sun City Church Sunshine Disposal and Recycling The Current The Inlander Umpqua Bank University SCOPE Valley Christian School Valleyfest Hearts of Gold Parade Float/Princesses Washington Extreme Cheer and Dance Washington Trust Bank Waste Management West Valley Kiwanis Ziggy’s Building Materials and Ziggy ** The list above is only a partial list of parade participants.

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24 SEPTEMBER 2017 10TH ANNUA L

The Current

The Step UP For Down Syndrome Walk Saturday, September 23, 9:30 a.m. Mirabeau Park Discovery Playground Brought to you by: DS Connections Northwest The Step Up for Down Syndrome walk sponsored by Down Syndrome Connection Northwest beginning at 9:45 a.m. Saturday at Discovery Playground. Proceeds from the walk will support awareness, education, research and advocacy programs locally and on a national level.

You’re Invited! November 9, 5:30 PM

at MIRABEAU PARK HOTEL

To reserve your seat, call 509.927.1153 or email devdir@svpart.org A FUNDRAISER TO BENEFIT

Thank you

Valleyfest Children’s Foundation The Valleyfest Children’s Foundation provides small grants to enrich the lives of students interested in pursuing an activity in arts, science, sports, or math. The aim is to give elementary, middle, and high school students the chance to participate in activities not typically funded by other organizations. These grants are intended to give students

the ability to participate in learning opportunities that they may otherwise not be able to afford. Proceeds from the Pancake Breakfast, Artist Corner “Pro-Am”, Car Show, and Umpqua Bank fund the Valleyfest Children’s Foundation. For more information regarding the application process, visit valleyfest.org

to the 200+ volunteers that make Valleyfest possible!

Come Celebrate the HUB’s 9th Birthday at our Family Fun Festival! All events are FREE for the public!

Saturday, October 1st

Tim Cihal

Isaac Freebairn

Pines Cemetery 1402 S. Pines Road (509) 926.2753

Serving the Spokane Community For Over 125 Years. Call the office if you can volunteer during Valleyfest 922-3299

19619 E. Cataldo | Liberty Lake, WA www.hubsportscenter.org (509) 927-0602

Page 10

South Pines Cemetery Woodlawn Cemetery 926.2753 926.2753 Fairmount Memorial Park Riverside Memorial Park 838.1405 326.3800 Greenwood Memorial Terrace 838.1405 Spokane-Cheney Memorial Gardens 448.2320

www.FairmountMemorial.com

Valleyfest 2017


The Current

Stay in Spokane Valley

Baymont Inn & Suites 2016 N Argonne Rd, Spokane Valley, WA 99212 (509) 922-9002 wyndhamhotels.com ___________________________

Mirabeau Park Hotel and Convention Center 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. Spokane Valley, WA 99037 (509) 924-9000 mirabeauparkhotel.com ___________________________

Comfort Inn & Suites 12415 E. Mission Ave. Spokane Valley, WA 99216 (509) 926-7432 * choicehotels.com ___________________________

Motel 6 1919 N. Hutchinson Rd. Spokane Valley, WA 99212 (509) 926-5399 motel6.com ___________________________

Crossland

12803 E Sprague Ave Spokane, WA 99216 (509) 928-5948 ___________________________

Hampton Inn & Suites 16418 E. Indiana Ave. Spokane Valley, WA, 99216 (509) 928-6900 hamptoninn3.hilton.com ___________________________

Holiday Inn Express 9220 E. Mission Ave. Spokane Valley, WA 99206 (509) 927-7100 * ihg.com ___________________________

La Quinta Inn & Suites 3808 N. Sullivan Rd. Spokane Valley, WA 99216 (509) 893-0955 laquintaspokane.com ___________________________

Marriott Residence Inn 15915 E. Indiana Ave. Spokane Valley, WA 99216 (509) 892-9300 marriott.com ___________________________

https://valleyfest.org/

My Place Hotel 16106 E. Indiana Ave. Spokane Valley, WA 99216 (509) 228-6105 myplacehotels.com ___________________________

Oxford Suites 15015 E. Indiana Ave. Spokane Valley, WA 99216 (509) 847-1000 oxfordsuitesspokanevalley.com ___________________________

Quality Inn & Suites 8923 E. Mission Ave. Spokane Valley, WA 99212 (509) 928-5218 choicehotels.com ___________________________

Ramada 905 N. Sullivan Rd. Spokane Valley, WA 99037 (509) 924-3838 * ramada.com ___________________________

Super 8 2020 N. Argonne Rd. Spokane Valley, WA 99212 (509) 928-4888 super8.com ___________________________

Car Show

SEPTEMBER 2017 • 25

Saturday, September 23 CenterPlace Regional Event Center; North Lawn Registration: 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Fee: $10 Judging: 12:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. Awards: 3:30 p.m. Hosted and Judged by: The LOWCOS Car Club

Place Classes: Pre-1939 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 /present Automobile buffs of all strips will find something to envy at this year’s car show. Sponsored by the Spokane LOWCOS Car Club, the event features motorcycles, rat rods, classics, and customs cars. Join the fun on the north lawn event center. For additional information about Spokane LOWCOS Car Club, its six chapters in the Inland Northwest, and this event, call show chair at (509) 868-3180. The club will begin the awards portion of the show at 3:30 p.m. Proceeds for the event will benefit the Valleyfest Children’s Foundation which provides scholarships for area student activities.

Best in Class Motorcycle Rat Rod Truck Import Convertible Volkswagen Van Paint Interior Specialty Classes: Lowco’s Choice Valleyfest Choice Best of Show

Pancake Breakfast

Saturday, September 23, 6:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m. CenterPlace Regional Event Center Great Room, 2426 North Discovery Place Sponsored by: Fred Meyer A fundraiser breakfast serving pancakes, eggs, sausage, bacon, juice, and coffee. Served by the University High School Cheerleading Squad to benefit the Valleyfest Children’s Foundation. Suggested price is $7 for 7 years and older, $6 for children ages 3-6, and free for children under 3.

Bring the coupon above for $1 off breakfast!

Page 11


The Current

26 SEPTEMBER 2017

Meadow Festival Stage - Saturday

Live Entertainment

September 23, 2017

Desja 1:00 p.m.

Inland Northwest Dance Association 10:30 a.m.

Performing for the 28th year, members of the Inland Northwest Dance Association (INDA) provide the leadership and opportunities to make dance an appreciated art form in the Inland Northwest. INDA strives to unite dance artists with the community at large through education, festivals, master classes, social gatherings, and public performance.

Proudly Presents

MILONGA and

BRISTOL

Singer, songwriter, and performer from Montana, Desja recorded two albums which include covers and original music. In 2015, MusiEco awarded her Montana American Indian Musician of the Year. She will be singing a wide variety of music including jazz, blues, country, rock, classic pop, soul, church songs and Native American songs, as well as her original music which mixes blues, soft rock, and Native American elements.

Rock the Stage Numerica Credit Union, sponsor of this year’s Rock the Stage, is dedicated to enhancing lives, fulfilling dreams and building communities. We know the path to living well includes happiness and celebration, which is why we are proud to support Valleyfest’s headliner bands for Saturday evening. “What better way to help celebrate life in motion than with two great bands! Milonga, the Inland Northwest’s premier Latin band and Bristol, a young rock band from Spokane, is sure to get you moving,” says Kelli Hawkins, Director of Communications. Numerica is the financial institution of choice for over 130,000 members. We are committed to protecting and advancing each of our member’s financial health through better rates, lower fees, nostress services and outstanding support. Find out more about our local credit union visit numericacu.com.

Milonga 2:30 p.m. Milonga provides a taste of the many musical styles and dance forms found across Latin America, the Caribbean, Spain and the U.S. Founded in 2001, Milonga represents countless regional flavors of Latino music & culture. In a world of Salsa, Milonga is the whole enchilada! Valleyfest is proud to support National Hispanic Heritage Month, which runs from September 15 to October 15, and gives our community a chance to learn more about Hispanic and Latino American cultures. This performance is made possible by a grant from the Washington State Arts Commission.

at Valleyfest 800.433.1837 numericacu.com Federally insured by NCUA

Page 12

Bristol 5:00 p.m. Bristol is a new rock band from Spokane. Band members are Curran Long, Riley Long, Sean Tyson and Kris Mayhew.

Valleyfest 2017


The Current

SEPTEMBER 2017 • 27

Meadow Festival Stage - Sunday Joshua Belliardo 11:30 a.m.

Christy Lee 1:00 p.m.

The MasterClass Big Band 3:00 p.m.

Joshua is a home grown Spokane folk singer/songwriter from Spokane, who takes pride in his melodic music. He is able to come up with melodies whenever he hears chord progressions. He says his lyrics are “an expression of his story and an outlet for his emotions.” Joshua loves sharing his experiences with his family and fans.

Christy, a country singer, comes to us from Southern California. She has created a following in the Inland Northwest, as well as Nashville. She has shared the stage with Rascal Flatts, Luke Bryan, Kid Rock, Steven Tyler, Chris Young, and Thomas Rhett. She opened for country artists Randy Hauser, Meghan Linsey, Bret Eldridge, and Clare Dunn. She won BEST OF CITY (Bronze) 2015 by Spokane/Coeur d’ Alene Living Magazine for Best Local Singer and the Inlander’s BEST OF (3rd Place) Best Singer 2015.

MasterClass Big Band brings together top highschool musicians and talented veteran performers. The band performs contemporary hits, R&B and pieces from the Great American Songbook. They describe themselves as “always uplifting, always exciting, always professional.” The MasterClass Big Band performs songs from artists like Sinatra, Natalie Cole, Michael Buble, Count Basie, Chicago and others.

INCLUSIVE Artist Corner Browse, shop, and create with a variety of local, Spokane professional artists. Come by the Artist Corner on Saturday, September 23 to witness Valleyfest’s second “Pro-Am,” where professional artists collaborate with student amateurs to create a one-of-a-kind piece of art under the picnic shelter. The final product will be auctioned off after 3:00 p.m. The Artist Corner is proudly sponsored by the Spokane Valley Arts Council. The “Pro-Am” is sponsored by Art Chowder Magazine. Proceeds from the “Pro-Am” will go toward the Valleyfest Children’s Foundation and making Valleyfest 2018 possible!

Lots of INLANDERS make us their go-to newspaper. So many, in fact, that we’ve become the best-read urban weekly in the nation — for 10 years running. Our secret? We’ve got something for everyone

— a magic mix of content that attracts nearly 190,000 concertgoing, brewpub-loving, ski-bumming, yogaposing, businessowning readers. Pick yours up free, every Thursday!

I N L A N D E R .C O M / I N VO LV E D

https://valleyfest.org/

Page 13

Live Entertainment

September 24, 2017


The Current

28 SEPTEMBER 2017

Family Stage - Saturday

Live Entertainment

September 23, 2017

Donna’s School of Dance 10:00 a.m.

Dynamic Gymnastics 11:00 a.m.

Donna’s School of Dance & Music offers classes in tap, ballet, jazz, hip hop, lyrical, and ballroom dance as well as piano, guitar and voice lessons. Classes are available for all ages.

Rowdy Referees 2:00 p.m. & 5:00 p.m. Rowdy Referees will be presenting wild & crazy stunts with contest prizes galore for the kids. It’s messy, it’s a little loud, and everybody has a great time. Two comical referees perform fun magic tricks, great jokes (ALL G-RATED) and audience participation is required.

Dynamic Gymnastics offers recreational and competitive team classes in a high quality safe environment. Visit dynamicathleticcenter.org to learn more.

Western Dance Association 1:00 p.m.

Musha Marimba 12:00 p.m. Musha Marimba is an accomplished high school performing group from Bryant Center, one of twelve high schools in the Spokane Public School system. Students play polyrhythmic marimba music, mostly from Zimbabwe and southern Africa.

Jung Kim Martial Arts 3:00 p.m.

The Western Dance Association is a very active group of square and round dancers affiliated with the Spokane area council. They offer social events, lessons, and dances almost every night of the week. Visit squaredancespokane.org to learn more.

Elite Dance 4:00 p.m.

Jung Kim’s Martial Arts teaches Taekwondo and has served Spokane with three locations since 1996. Under the instruction of The Spokane Elite All Stars are a competitive dance Grandmaster Kim, the team has performed throughout the Inland group that performs all around the Northwest. The Northwest for over two decades. Visit jungkimtaekwondo.com to students compete in ballet, jazz, lyrical, hip hop and learn more. tap. Visit spokaneelitedance.com to learn more.

Modern Electric Water Company proudly supports Valleyfest’s mission to provide a safe, family oriented festival for the Spokane Valley residents and neighboring communities to enjoy. .

Page 14

https://valleyfest.org/


The Current

SEPTEMBER 2017 • 29

Family Stage - Sunday Jazzercize 11:00 a.m. At Spokane Valley Jazzercise Fitness Center, fun and fitness collide and become one. Classes include Dance Mixx, Fusion, Interval, Strike (kickboxing), Strength 60, 45 or 30, and Core and Flip Fusion! Visit http://jcls.jazzercise.com/ facility/spokane-valleystudio

https://valleyfest.org/

Rowdy Referees 12:00 p.m. & 2:00 p.m.

Seterra Bell 1:00 p.m.

Mariachi Las Aguilas 3:00 p.m.

Seterra is a singersongwriter and multi-musician from Spokane Valley. She performed at various local events and Embers by the Lake in Hauser, Idaho. Seterra is enrolled at Berklee College of Music in Boston and also teaches guitar and ukulele.

Mariachi Las Águilas is a music program at Eastern Washington University. This band is committed to performing Mariachi music for on and off campus events and bringing the Mariachi Culture to everyone. Visit https://www.facebook.com/ ewumariachilasaguilas/

Featuring wild & crazy stunts with contest prizes galore for the kids. It’s messy, it’s a little loud, and everybody has a great time. Two comical referees with fun magic tricks, great jokes (All G-Rated), and audience participation required.

Page 15

Live Entertainment

September 24, 2017


The Current

30 SEPTEMBER 2017

CenterPlace Patio Stage - Saturday September 23, 2017

3:30 p.m. Car Show Awards

Live Entertainment

Spare Parts 12:00 p.m.

Awards will be presented to 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners of the classes: Pre-1939 to Present, Best of Class, the LOWCOS’ Car Club Choice, and Best of Show.

Spare Parts plays a variety of music from classical acoustic rock to Motown. This versatile acoustic group is heavy on individual vocal and instrumental talent and brings it all together in a collective sound that will please and entertain.

Comedy Cup 4:00 p.m.

The 7th annual PG-rated Comedy Cup Open takes place on the west patio of CenterPlace Regional Event Center and will feature clean, family humor.

O le Group

catering

Book your event with us for a unique and memorable experience. Now accepting reservations for 2017 holiday parties! 509-720-5412

The Redneck Bees 5:30 p.m.

A favorite classic rock & roll band from Spokane Valley, WA.

Valley Ale Fest Saturday 11:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m.

Valleyfest celebrates our 3rd annual Ale Fest at the CenterPlace beer garden on Saturday from 11:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.. Meet the brewmasters, enjoy beer on tap, and listen to great music; all brought to you by English Setter Brewing Company and Hopped Up Brewing Company.

Hot Club of Spokane featuring Abbey Crawford 7:30 p.m. Hot Club of Spokane will be featuring Abby Crawford this year. She has sung with the Spokane Symphony and has won Best won Best Singer/Performer in the Spokane Coeur d’ Alene Living Magazine’s Best of Reader’s Poll for 2013 and 2014. The club is dedicated to the preservation of jazz, swing, and blues.

Our communities are rich with hidden gems like shops, restaurants and events like Valleyfest. So share the love! When you bring a friend or make a recommendation, our community thrives.

SPOKANE VALLEY 11205 E Sprague Ave Spokane Valley, WA 99206

www.lecatering.co Member FDIC Equal Housing Lender

Page 16

SBA Preferred Lender

Valleyfest 2017


The Current

Fishing at the Falls

Saturday, September 23, 10:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. Mirabeau Springs Children under the age of 14, Sponsored by: Cabela’s regardless of experience, are invited to try their luck fishing at the Mirabeau Springs waterfall. Cabela’s experts teach youth proper fishing and casting techniques in a fun and friendly environment. Kids learn patience and perseverance while appreciating and respecting nature. All equipment and bait will be provided. Fish caught are given to the Union Gospel Mission. The line for Fishing at the Falls will close promptly at 3:30 p.m.

Outdoor Movie The Incredibles

SEPTEMBER 2017 • 31

Saturday, September 23, 7:30 p.m. Family Stage, Mirabeau Point Park Dress as a superhero for the outdoor movie and enter to win the SUPERHERO COSTUME CONTEST! Bring a blanket, snatch a bag of popcorn, and head to the lawn in front of the Family Stage for The Incredibles! The film follows a family of superheroes who hide their powers and live a quiet suburban life until the family is forced into action to save the world.

Robotics, Drones, and STEM Showcase Demonstrations and Activities Saturday, September 23, 3:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. CenterPlace Regional Event Center Sponsored by: Horizon Credit Union Exploring Families, and Events on Fire

AFRAID OF THE DENTIST? Robots, drones, learning, oh my! The event will entice kids and adults to engage in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) plus robotic and drone activities. Sponsored by Horizon Credit Union, Exploring Families and Events on Fire. Demonstrators include: ● xCraft will be bringing X PlusOne HD drones, including the Build Your Own model and the PhoneDrone Ethos. ● MINDS-i Robotics of Liberty Lake robotics experts will show how to build the most unique robot conceive using patented quick lock construction elements. ● SpokaneFPV (First Person View), the premier drone racing group in Spokane, will highlight the top pilots in the Inland Northwest Area. ● Eastern Washington University will send the best and brightest engineering and design students to showcase the latest projects. ● Edventures/Thrust-UAV of Boise will demonstrate new Discover Drone STEM program. PCS Edventures is a leader in education technology with classroom, after school, home learning, and digital learning products for K-12 students.

https://valleyfest.org/

Wisdom Teeth, Fillings, and Much More Done While You Sleep

YOU’RE AT THE CENTER OF SAVORING THE MOMENT Visit the areas most comprehensive dining destination TWIG’S BISTRO RED ROBIN BUFFALO WILD WINGS HOP JACK’S AND MANY MORE...

DSHS/APPLE HEALTH FOR KIDS UNDER 21 & SPECIAL NEEDS OF ALL AGES 3143 East 29th Avenue sleepdentistryspokane.com

536-5900

LOCATED AT I90 AT SULLIVAN AND EVERGREEN MON - SAT: 10AM - 9PM AND SUN: 11AM - 6PM

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32 SEPTEMBER 2017

Visit Mirabeau Point Park

Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and Sunday 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Composting Demonstrations Saturday, September 23, 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Interactive Activities

Sponsored by: WSU Spokane County Master Gardeners Get your hands dirty, have fun, and explore the magical world of compost. Learn how to turn food and yard waste into beautiful soil for the garden. Stop by anytime between 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. at Mirabeau Point Park parking lot next to Waste Management Truck.

Children’s Activities

CO U N T Y

Climbing Wall

Human Foosball

L I B R A R Y

D I S T R I C T

Serving our community for

ALL LIBRARIES Sep 1–Nov 30, 2017

& counting

75th Anniversary Celebration Featuring Hot Club of Spokane SPOKANE VALLEY LIBRARY Nov 30, 7–8:30pm

Spokane Writes Anthology Release Party NORTH SPOKANE LIBRARY Nov 4, 6:30–8pm

www.scld.org

Page 18

WM SPOKANE VALLEY and Valleyfest!

Connecting you with knowledge & opportunity Looking Back at 75 Years: A Visual History

Wild Walls Climbing Wall will be at Valleyfest on Saturday September 23 and Sunday September 24 from 10 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Find us in the Mirabeau Point Park parking lot!

Play giant foosball on a 20’ X 37’ field. Put a team together and join the fun. Great for both kids and adults. 14 players put their hands on the pole and kick their way to a win. Eagle Scout Darren Hohn donated the human foosball to Valleyfest.

Make and take art, inflatables, magicians, photo booth, animated characters, face painting and more to keep children entertained the entire day.

S P O K A N E

Come check out the trucks in Big Rig Alley!

WM is proud to support Valleyfest as part of our community partnership in Spokane Valley and Liberty Lake. ThinkGreenSpokaneValley wmnorthwest.com

Celebrate with us!

RecylNW@wm.com | 509-924-9400

Sidewalk Games

Connecting community, art, and fun, Spokane Sidewalk Games will be providing GIANT board games to play all day. Test your skills and challenge a friend to a variety of games.

Seahawks in the Shelter Watch the Seattle Seahawk take on the Tennessee Titans on Sunday, September 24th. at the Mirabeau Point Park Picnic Shelter. The game promptly starts at 1:05 p.m. Go Hawks!

Valleyfest 2017


The Current

SEPTEMBER 2017 • 33

Visit Mirabeau Point Park

Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and Sunday 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Astronomy - Saturday Only

Mireabeau Point Park 10 a.m, to 6 p.m. - View sunspots and solar flares through telescopes of all sizes at the Spokane Astronomical Society booth. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. - The Spokane Astronomical Society offer guided tour through the night skies. Objects of interest the constellations, stars, planets, and globular clusters from the universe.

The Big Taste Grill This year Johnsonville will fire up the 65 foot Big Taste Grill at Valleyfest. This 53,000 pound grill cooks 750 brats at one time and has 440,000 BTUs of grilling power. The grill has served over 110 million hungry festival event attendees and helped over 1000+ charities. The Big Taste Grill has provided disaster relief by grilling and donating sausages to hungry aid workers and those affected by Hurricane Ike, Hurricane Sandy, Hurricane Katrina and tornadoes in Joplin, Missouri and Moore, Oklahoma. To learn more visit johnsonville.com

CenterPlace Regional Event Center Mobius Planetarium communities 10 a.m. “Honoring - 4:30 local p.m. and and encouraging citizen involvement” 509.242.7752 Box 363 | Liberty Lake, WA 99019 | www.libertylakesplash.com 6 p.m. - 7:30| POp.m.

Spokane Aerial Performers Spokane Aerial Performers are the first aerial performance company in the Inland Northwest. Students ranging from age 5 to 75 specialize in hand balancing, aerial hoop, aero and fire performance. Find Spokane Aerial Performers by the Family Stage.

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Liberty Lake’s Premier Burger Destination

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Merry Christmas!

What you need to know about your Splash and Current ads! Kids Eat Free on Sundays!

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FAT LOSS!

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Now Introducing six new The Current now has a signature 25,000burgers copy circulation with over 15,000 being direct mailed to households across the Spokane to our Legendary Burger Lineup! INSTRUCTIONAL CLASSES OFFERED MORNING, AFTERNOON, EVENING AND WEEKENDS Valley area in addition to the 10,000 copies being available for pickup at over 250 business locations. There are 9,000 copies FOR ALL GOALS & ABILITIES THROUGH ADULT in the of The Splash are distributed the end of each month, 5,500 of those through direct mail to TODDLER every home and business Competitive Teams • Parkour, Breakdance Hip Hop Classes • Parent’s Nightgathering Out greater Liberty Lake community. The remaining copies are hand-delivered to approximately 120and businesses, and • Bitty Bee Academy & Flippin’ Fun Move Night • Open Gym for All Ages • Gymnastics places in Liberty Lake, Otis Orchards and Greenacres. The Splash can also be accessed online and has over Birthday Parties 40,000 • Ninja Zone views. 1431 N Liberty Lake Rd, Ste B Liberty Lake 99019 www.healthyLivingLL.com

There is a reason why True Legends is

2nd Chance Ranch Petting Zoo

The mission of 2nd Chance Ranch is to save, rescue, and take in as many animals and give them a 2nd chance at life. The ranch shares how wonderful animals are with getting to touch them. The mobile petting zoo offers children a fabulous, hands-on animal experience.

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FOR ALL GOALS & ABILITIES TODDLER THROUGH ADULT Competitive Teams • Parkour, Breakdance and Hip Hop Classes • Parent’s Night Out • Bitty Bee Academy & Flippin’ Fun Move Night • Open Gym for All Ages • Gymnastics Birthday Parties • Ninja Zone

ENROLL TODAY! Our coaches are passionate about gymnastics and focus on teaching quality gymnastics in a fun and safe environment. Classes run year-round with three 13-week sessions (Fall, Winter and Spring) and one 10-week summer session.

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Page 19

• 509-922-3100 • 1201 N Evergreen Road, Spokane Valley • www.evergreenfountains.com

Interactive Activities

10:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. Sponsored by: Spokane Astronomical Society


34 SEPTEMBER 2017

The Current

Multisports Day

Plantes Ferry Sports Complex

Sponsored by: Yoke’s, The YMCA of the InlandNorthwest, and Fleet Feet

Duathlon

5k/10k Run

Enjoy the scenery of Spokane Valley on the second annual timed Duathlon, taking place Sunday, September 24 at 8:00 a.m. The course consists of a 5-kilometer run along the Centennial Trail, followed by an 11-mile bike ride through the neighborhoods of Spokane Valley, and ends with the same 5-kilometer loop on the Centennial Trail along the Spokane River. All transitions take place at Plantes Ferry Sports Complex West Picnic Shelter area. The participants can compete individually or grab a friend and participate as a team! After the race, complimentary food including Yoke’s chocolate milk will be available for the post race refueling! For a detailed map and complete event information, visit valleyfest.org.

New this year, the Valleyfest 5K/10K runs are a Bloomsday Second Seed qualifiers. The Valleyfest annual races start and finish at the Plantes Ferry – West Parking Lot Picnic Shelter on Sunday, September 24. Athletes run west past the Plantes Ferry obelisk to Island Trailheal, then continue over the Spokane River on the Denny Ashlock Bridge and run a loop on the Centennial Trail. After the race, Yoke’s provides delicious chocolate milk for a post-run treat! The run costs $20 if registered by Monday, September 18, 2017, and includes a T-shirt. Online registration closes September 21, at 9:00 a.m. For registration and more information, visit valleyfest.org

Sunday, September 24, 8:00 a.m. Plantes Ferry Sports Complex West Picnic Shelter

Sunday, September 24, 8:00 a.m. Plantes Ferry Sports Complex West Picnic Shelter

WE ARE PUTTING COMMUNITY FIRST In the true credit union spirit of “people helping people,” BECU proudly sponsors Valleyfest!

FAMILY FRIENDLY ENVIRONMENT

NO CONTRACTS 1 MEMBERSHIP 4 LOCATIONS

JOIN THE YMCA TODAY! ymcaspokane.org 509 777 YMCA (9622)

Page 20

Races timed by Across the Finish Line Timing

CHECK IN FOR MULTISPORTS EVENTS: Packet Pickup for Duathlon and 5K/10K Run CenterPlace Regional Event Center 2426 N. Discovery Place Spokane Valley, WA 99216 Friday September 22, 2017 4:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Saturday September 23, 2017 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Family Bike Ride

North Centennial Trailhead Sunday, September 24, 11:00 a.m.

Family Bike Ride

Sunday, September 24, 12:00 p.m. North Centennial Trail/Mirabeau Point Park Sponsored by: Bike Hub

There are four leader-guided routes on the annual Family Bike Ride which include 6.8 miles, 8.8 miles, 13.5 miles, and 15.6 miles. Find routes and information at: valleyfest.org. Check in begins at 11:00 a.m. at the North Centennial Trailhead on Sunday, September 24 and at noon, the ride embarks along the beautiful Centennial Trail and Spokane River. Yoke’s provides chocolate milk after the ride!

Valleyfest orders t-shirts on Monday, September 18, 2017 Register ONLINE by this date!

Valleyfest 2017


The Current

TotFest

Sunday, September 24, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. CenterPlace Regional Event Center Sponsored by: Coordinated Care Valleyfest is proud to present TotFest, which focuses on the early years in children’s lives, child care, school, and community programs for ages 0-6. This event will offer information and resources for parents and teachers, as well as others who care for, nurture, and teach young children. TotFest will feature outdoor activities, a performance stage with local children’s groups, booths, and informational classes to develop healthy children. Some events include: petting zoo, Green Bus (karaoke), YMCA Fit for Kids, Donna School of Dance performance, Wish Upon the Star princesses and prince, bounce houses, Songbird music, CPR class, safe sleep class and more. Register online for the CPR and safe sleep classes at valleyfest.org.

Agritourism

SEPTEMBER 2017 • 35

Celebrating Local Farms

September 24, 2017, 11:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Mirabeau Point Park Valleyfest is offering the opportunity to meet, learn, and network with the producers of agriculture products grown in the Spokane Valley and the greater Spokane County. Settlers were first drawn to the Spokane Valley because of its rich soil and good water, a tradition that continues to this day. Interest in locally grown food, animals and farm to table “agritourism” is fast growing across the country and Valleyfest invites families visit with these local farmers. WSU Extension will be there with information on classes, small urban, farming and to answer questions. Valleyfest is also looking for agritoursim vendor. Call the office at 922-3299 to learn more.

More play, Less worry.

CoordinatedCareHealth.com Member Service & 24-Hour Nurse Line 877.644.4613 https://valleyfest.org/

TDD/TTY: 711

Page 21


36 SEPTEMBER 2017

National Hispanic Heritage Month Celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month at Valleyfest 2017. From September 15 to October 15, enjoy the contributions and the importance of Hispanic and Latino Americans in the United States. 55 million Hispanic/Latino Americans have a strong commitment to hard work, faith, and family, and through these core values, maintain a positive influence in the United States. Hispanic Americans have enriched the nation with the deep traditions that demonstrate the customs of their community. Valleyfest is excited to bring a crowd favorite, Milonga, to the Meadow Festival Stage at 2:30 p.m. on Saturday, September 23. Mariachi Las Aguilas will perform on the Family Stage at 3:00 p.m. on Sunday, September 24. To continue the festivities for Hispanic Heritage Month, the Latino Hope Foundation is sponsoring: • Fiesta Spokane Hispanic Heritage Festival: Saturday, September 30, 2017, from 11 a.m.-8 p.m. on Wall Street across from Riverfront Park, Downtown Spokane. This free, family-friendly event features entertainment, fun crafts, a health and education fair, and food vendors. The entertainment includes the EWU Ballet Folklorico de Atzlan, Mariachi Huenachi, Los Vigiles, and Son Dulce. Visit latinohopefoundation.org for more information.

The Current

¡Valleyfest le invita a celebrar el Mes de la Herencia Hispana! Desde el 15 de septiembre hasta el 15 de octubre, celebrar las contribuciones y la importancia de los hispanos y latinoamericanos en los Estados Unidos. 55 millones de hispanoamericanos tienen un fuerte compromiso al trabajo, la fe, y la familia, y a través de estos valores fundamentales, han mantenido una influencia positiva en los Estados Unidos. Los hispanoamericanos han enriquecido la nación con las profundas tradiciones que demuestran las costumbres de su comunidad. A todos nosotros de Valleyfest, nos da gusto traer a un favorito del público de la gente, Milonga, al Meadow Festival Stage a las 2:30 p.m. el sábado, el 23 de septiembre. Mariachi Las Águilas también actuará en el Family Stage a las 3:00 p.m. el domingo, el 24 de septiembre. ¡Nos vemos allí! Para continuar: las festividades para el Mes de la Herencia Hispana, la Fundación Esperanza Latino está patrocinando. • Fiesta Spokane Hispanic Heritage Festival: El sábado, el 30 de septiembre de 2017, desde 11 a.m. hasta 8 p.m. en Wall Street, frente al Riverfront Park, en el centro de Spokane. Este evento gratuito ofrece entretenimiento, artesanías divertidas, una feria de salud y educación y una variedad de vendedores y comida. La línea de entretenimiento incluye el EWU Ballet Folklórico de Atzlan, Mariachi Huenachi, Los Vigiles, y Son Dulce. Visite latinohopefoundation.org para obtener más información.

wa Fl rist enhou e Experienced designers specializing infresh flower bouquets, basket gardens, hanging baskets and bedding plants. Family owned since 1952, let Appleway Florist and Greenhouses be your florist in the Spokane area. Open Monday - Saturday 11006 E. Sprague Ave. • Spokane Valley, WA 99206 phone: 509-924-5050 • toll free: 888-345-1145 www.applewayflorist.com

509.926.2423 1315 N. Pines Rd. HennesseyValley.com

Page 22

Providing Spokane Valley's only on-site crematory, giving you peace of mind.

Valleyfest 2017


The Current

AKC Responsible Dog Ownership Day

Sunday, September 24, 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Mirabeau Point Park Meadows, 13500 Mirabeau Parkway Celebrating 10 years, Spokane Kennel Club hosts “Responsible Dog Ownership Day” at the main meadow at the Mirabeau Point Park on Sunday. The event educates dog owners about canine activities, dog training, breed information, responsible ownership, and a importance of the dog companion. Canine guests must be vaccinated, ALWAYS on a leash, and are never allowed to approach other dogs. Clean up after dogs while visiting Valleyfest. Activities include: • Spokane Disc Dog Competition - Registration at 8:30 a.m. • Dog and Owner Look Alike Contest sponsored by Pawpular Companion • Paradise Pet Costume Contest sponsored by Paradise Pet Resort • Doxie Derby Races Sponsored by Little Long Dog Dachshund Rescue • AKC Canine Good Citizen Test by CDA Dog Fanciers This 10-step costs $5.00. This test is certification proving that the dog is a well – mannered citizen. • NEW to the event AKC Trick Dog demonstrations • City of Spokane Police Deptment demonstrations. • Rally, Agility and Obedience demonstrations by Spokane Dog Training Club, Lilac City Dog Training and Sunara Dog Training. • Lure Coursing by Gazehound Fanciers of Spokane and a new dog sport Trieball Ball. • Local rescues & local shelters including Spokane Humane Society, SCRAPS, SpokAnimal for on site adoption information and volunteer information • Meet many of the 170 different AKC breeds • Child Safety - Lilac City Dog Training Club offering a Safety Course for all ages of children. Certificates and prizes with completion of the course. • Pet oriented businesses and non profits To find out more about Responsible Dog Ownership Day visit valleyfest.org. The American Kennel Club is committed to helping dog owners raise happy, healthy dogs that can be kept for the pet’s entire lifetime.

Booths at Responsible Dog Ownership Day

Bark’R Boutique Greater Spokane Shetland Sheepdog Club Inland Empire Collie Club Invisible Fence Brand INW Jake’s Doghouse Personal Delivery Service North West Great Dane Rescue Peaceful Paws Massage Sammy’s Clubhouse Spokane Ferret Rescue SCRAPS Hope Foundation Spokane Dog Training Club Spokane Humane Society Spokane Kennel Club

SEPTEMBER 2017 • 37

Board of Directors The Valleyfest Board of Directors thank Sponsors and Volunteers for supporting Valleyfest 2017.

Rick Wilhite, President Wilhite Enterprises, Gail Bongiovanni, Vice President Gail’s School of Dance Debbie Green, Secretary Washington Trust Bank Peggy Doering Valleyfest Executive Director Steven O. Anderson Stamper Rubens, P.S. Steve Florance Inland Northwest Insurance Rory Henneberg Umpqua Bank Stephanie Hughes Folding Table Software Lab Judy Lippman American Cancer Society Melanie Rose Spokane Valley Fire Department Amanda Torres-Brooks Spokane Valley YMCA Shirene Young Inland Empire Paper Company

Valleyfest Auction Friday, April 13, 2018 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. CenterPlace Regional Event Center Visit valleyfest.org

Spokane Valley Cycle Celebration

Sunday, July 29, 2018 Mirabeau Point Park Visit cyclecelebration.com

We’re all about the water! the Spokane County VISITWater Resource Center Located at 1004 N Freya St, Spokane, WA

Stop by our booth at Valleyfest on Sept. 23!

    

LEARN ABOUT

K-12 Pre-schools College classes

Spokane Valley-Rathdrum Prairie Aquifer Spokane River-Aquifer Interchange Wastewater Treatment Simulation models Water Reclamation Guided activities Stormwater

Scouts Civic groups Non-profits

Families

Professionals

Retirees

ENGAGE

Activities for groups of 10 or more.

TOUR the state-of-the-art

Spokane County Water Reclamation Facility! Learn how the County’s water reclamation facility protects drinking water.

Schedule a Visit: wrc@spokanecounty.org  509.477.7577 More information: www.spokanecounty.org/wrc

https://valleyfest.org/

Page 23


The Current

38 SEPTEMBER 2017

M eeting Perfection

Corporate Meetings to Weddings “You can’t beat the jewel of the Valley”

♦ Great Room for 350 to 450 people ♦ Fireside Lounge with outside deck ♦ Meeting & event rooms with picturesque views ♦ In-house catering ♦ 380 free parking spaces ♦ Affordable

Home of Featured Valleyfest Events at CenterPlace September 23 and 24, 2017 ♦ Hot Air Balloon Launches ♦ Pancake Breakfast ♦ Classic Car Show ♦ Food Available ♦ Beer & Wine Garden

♦ CenterPlace Outdoor Stage

Entertainment from 12-9:30pm including music & comedy

♦ Totfest ♦ Hot Air Balloon - Night Glow

2017

Complete schedule with times inside.

www.spokanevalley.org ~ 509-720-5200~ Mirabeau Point Park


The Current

SEPTEMBER 2017 • 39

Rockford welcome new well, looks forward to fair

By Benjamin Shedlock Current Correspondent Providing clean water. Creating safe and attractive public spaces. Conducting environmental mitigation and review. These challenges keep the Spokane metro area’s largest cities busy, but they have also topped the agenda for the town of Rockford this summer and the work will continue into the fall. Rockford began the summer months by getting its new Well #6 officially online. After receiving good water sample results last spring and approval from the Washington Department of Health, the well went online in early June. Rockford residents experienced water usage restrictions in the summer of 2016 as a result of the dry conditions, which were exacerbated when one of the town’s wells went offline. The new well has improved water capacity. “We’ve not had any issues this year at all,” said Mayor Carrie Roecks, referring to the water capacity. She noted that the town’s ability to provide water is notable given the current dry conditions. The dry conditions that necessitated the new well stand in contrast with the region’s wet spring. Record breaking

rainfall stressed waterways already swollen with higher-than-usual snowmelt, including Rock Creek. In March, the governor declared a state of emergency for at least 20 Washington counties that were affected. The town had to provide unanticipated maintenance and make several repairs related to the state-declared emergency and applied for relief funds through the Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA). “If we haven’t already this week, the town will be receiving money from FEMA to help us with the emergency repairs,” Roecks said on Aug. 14. “It should pretty much cover what we spent.” Rock Creek will also be cleaned this fall. In June the town began working with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife to apply for a permit to dredge the creek, which the town has submitted. State shoreline management rules require applications for dredging to be reviewed by several agencies, including the Department of Ecology and Fish and Wildlife as well as the Army Corps of Engineers, according to Town Council Member Micki Harnois. The reviews include examination of compliance with environmental rules. “The environmental reviews should be done by the first of September,” Harnois said. The dredging will clean a stretch of Rock Creek in the vicinity of the Emma Street Bridge. Harnois and Roecks do

not expect the work – scheduled to be completed in September – to disrupt traffic flow. The work is “totally under the bridge,” Harnois said. Town residents will have to look higher up to see September’s other improvements to the town. Four ornamental lights will be installed on First Street along the Rockford Town Park, providing light that will enhance the town’s nighttime walkability and security. Rockford will pay for the project through a grant from the Transportation Improvement Board (TIB). The town signed a contract with Midland Electric, Inc. in July to install the lights after completing a competitive bidding process. The town expects to have enough funding left over from the grant after paying for the lights to level the tree stumps left behind by the Avista Utree trimming project late last spring. Harnois says that the town purchased “decorative but functional” lighting that will have hooks to drape the town’s seasonal banners. “It’s going to look really cool when it’s done,” said Roecks. The town expects the project to be complete in time for the 74th Southeast Spokane County Fair, scheduled for Sept. 22–24 in Rockford Town Park. The fair is an annual celebration of the small rural towns that dot the southeast portion

of the county, including Fairfield, Latah, Rockford, Spangle, Waverly, Mica and Valleyford. In referring to this year’s fair theme, “Small Towns, Big Dreams,” Fair Board Vice President Heidi Johnson said the slogan reminds people that “pieces of our dreams are coming true,” such as the construction of the new food booths, which the fair board plans to unveil this year. “New ideas are coming to the fair” as well, said Fair Board Director Sheila McCormick. The biggest new event will be a soapbox derby. Eligibility is open to “anyone 7 years old and goes up to whoever can fit into a soapbox car,” said Johnson. Johnson credited the idea to local families who lobbied for the event and said it was an example of how the fair is responding to the community. The route will be on Stringham Road from Sprague to First Street. Registration for the soapbox derby is open online through Sept. 15. Another new event is a judged talent show on Friday night that will carry cash prizes for the winners. More details will be posted on the fair website as the event gets closer. Many perennial favorite events will return, including the carnival, parade, livestock, exhibits, pancake breakfast, bingo, the Harvest Hustle 5K, horse show, and 3-on3 basketball. For more information, go to www.sespokanecountyfair.com.

Family discount available

Fall schedule

Fall dance is $40 a month for a once a week class of either ballet / tap combo classes or other combos as described starting the first week in January.

FARMERS MARKET L i b e r t y

L a k e

Tuesday

Every Saturday 9am-1pm

Wednesday

ART AT THE MARKET

9:30 - 10:30am 2-3 year olds Ballet/Tap Combo 10:30-11:30am 3-5 year olds Ballet/Tap Combo 4:15-5:15pm 4-6year olds Ballet/Tap Combo 5:15- 6:15pm 3-5 year olds Ballet/Tap Combo 6:15- 7:15pm Hip Hop / Jazz 7:15-8:15 7+ year olds Ballet/Lyrical

Thursday

4:15 - 5:15pm 4-6 year olds Ballet/Tap Combo 5:15 - 6:15 pm 6-8 year olds Ballet/Tap Combo 6:15 - 7:15 pm Hip Hop/Jazz

Friday

9:30 - 10:30 2-3 year olds Ballet/Tap Combo 10:30 - 11:30 4-6 year olds Ballet/Tap Combo 11:30 - 12:30 3-5 year olds Ballet/Tap Combo 12:30 - 1:30 5-7 year olds Ballet/Tap Combo

Email, Call or Text me to join in the Fall Fun! Miss Michelle

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40 SEPTEMBER 2017

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The Ferris Wheel was designed by American engineer George Ferris for the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair. He was known for specializing in large scale engineering projects like bridges. Many people thought this was a crazy idea that couldn’t be built. The first Ferris Wheel was 264 feet tall, weighed 4,100 tons and was 825 feet around. The total cost was about $250,000. It carried 36 cars, known as gondolas and was powered by two 1,000 horsepower steam engines. At the time, the axle that it rotated on was the largest piece of steel that had ever been forged weighing 56 tons. When installed it was built to withstand 150 mph tornado winds. Carrying 60 passengers in each of the gondolas enabled 2,160 people to enjoy the ten minute ride at once. It cost 25 cents to enter the fair and 50 cents to ride the Ferris Wheel. It was the most popular attraction making about $10,000 per day. By the end of the Expo the ride had made almost $727,000 and was so popular it was moved to Chicago’s North Side where it remained in operation for another ten years. It was moved to the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis and eventually dynamited on May 11, 1906.

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The Current

SEPTEMBER 2017 • 41

PACE Trait Respect

Recognizing, considering and properly honoring the worth of one’s self and others. Local observation set for PACE World Character Day

By Mary Anne Ruddis Current Correspondent Character matters and on Sept. 13, the world will be having a conversation about it. The fourth annual World Character Day involves a global conversation about the importance of developing and improving character. World Character Day begins with asking the questions, “What kind of person am I?” and “Who do I want to be in the world?” The filmmakers at LetitRipple.org imagined the question “What would it look like to have people around the globe devote one day to talking about character?” Hence Character Day was born in 2014. The first event had 1,500 schools and organizations participating. It has grown to over 70,000 groups signed up to participate in 2017. Local groups create an event of any size at any time of day on Sept. 13 anywhere in the world. Short videos about character as well as discussion materials and a global question and answer session to unify all the conversations are provided free of charge at www.characterday.org. In Spokane Valley, Partners Advancing Character Education (PACE) will be participating in the event with the “Shine On – Bringing Character to Light” campaign. According to Melanie Rose, current president of the PACE board, the program began in 2009 by Central Valley School Superintendent Ben Small after he attended a seminar that discussed the idea. Small brought together local businesses, the Greater Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce, the faith community, public agencies and local school districts as a grassroots initiative to advance the importance of good character that was not isolated in any one area but that engaged the entire community in the conversation. Partners work from a common list of monthly character traits that are

integrated into schools, conversations and regular business activities. The West Plains chapter of PACE was started in 2014. As the former Central Valley director of communications, Rose has been involved with PACE since the beginning. Currently, she is community affairs officer for the Spokane Valley Fire Department. In 2015, the fire department signed on to become a PACE partner. “It was a natural fit,” said Rose. The idea for PACE was to reinforce a specific character trait each month among students, their families and the community, as part of an ongoing conversation about character. The program was rolled out in the fall of 2010 in area schools. Participating community partners agree to recognize and promote good character in their businesses in whatever way they want. “The sky is the limit,” said Rose. Some retail stores could reward students’ good behavior. Others will hang posters in break rooms. Some will incorporate the current month’s trait into staff meetings. Some may choose to recognize employees who exhibit good character. PACE will provide posters and materials free of charge to help promote the message. Additional ideas can be found on the PACE website at www. pacecommunity.org. Initially, Central Valley, West Valley, East Valley and Freeman school districts as well as community partners promoted specific character traits from September (Respect) through June (Integrity). With parent input, a year-round calendar was developed that added July (Generosity) and August (Gratitude). The remainder of the months/topics include January (Fairness), February (Honesty), March (Diligence), April (Trustworthiness), May (Courage), October (Responsibility), November (Citizenship) and December (Caring). Prior to PACE, schools were having conversations around character but were not consistent or structured. The West Valley School District had done a lot of work to develop character traits and PACE was able to use that work

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to build a common foundation. PAVE provides schools with banners and promotional materials and information to send home with students. They also provide partners with posters and promotional materials. Libraries hang posters and provide a selection of books that coincide with the current month’s character trait. In 2012, the first PACE awards were initiated to recognize one student from each participating school. Students selected are recognized for “consistently demonstrating exceptional character. “It is a difficult decision to select just one,” said Rose. In 2017, 50 students from Spokane Valley, Freeman and Tekoa were celebrated at an awards dinner. Students are recognized for their outstanding character in a formal setting with their school principal, teacher and parents. The West Plains chapter recognized 18 students at their 2017 awards. School counselor Lisa Marsh taught the PACE character traits in the classroom at Central Valley Kindergarten Center. She will be working at the new Liberty Creek School this fall. “I love it – it addresses the whole child,” Marsh says of PACE. “It really encompasses community when the students see the same character traits in the community, on the walls, on reader boards. They remember it.” Marsh says she is looking forward to “Shine On” on World Character Day this month. PACE decided to enroll in World

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Character Day after board members learned about it at a national character education conference. The group has been working for months to develop materials and promote a global conversation about character. The “Shine On – Bring Character to Light” poster was designed by Whitworth University students. Local participants can sign up on the PACE website (www.pacecommunity.org) to receive free promotional and marketing materials. The character trait for September is Respect but on World Character Day, the conversation can focus on any character trait or a discussion about character in general, underlining the event’s grassroots origins with flexibility for each participant. Many ideas can be found on the PACE or World Character Day websites. World Character Day will be the kick off for the entire year. Look for PACE to be represented in the grand marshal role at the “Hearts of Gold” Valleyfest Parade on Sept. 22. PACE award recipients from the Valley and West Plains will be invited to be ambassadors in the parade. “We work with schools, businesses, families, and churches,” Rose said. “The day is a happening. We’d love to have you engaged in the conversation, model it and recognize it.” Find more information and sign up on the website. Also, watch the PACE website for information on the 2018 poster and video contest.


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42 SEPTEMBER 2017

Valley Chamber

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Manufacturing Matters The Manufacturing Matters EXPO is a two-day trade show featuring the capabilities of Inland Northwest manufacturers through exhibits, educational workshops and cross-industry networking. The EXPO is designed to attract buyers, purchasing agents and engineers throughout the Northwest to attend and discover the capabilities and expertise of manufacturing in our region. The Manufacturing Matter Dinner is a celebration of the region’s rich history of making quality goods that fuel economic prosperity for families and our region. This year’s keynote speaker is Tom Simpson, Entrepreneur, Investor & Advisor. Tom will detail the story of founding, growing and merging etailz, the premier online marketplace expert who partners with manufacturers and distributors to optimize their brands on Amazon, eBay, Walmart, and Jet. He will also highlight his investment activities in the Spokane area and provide views on the economic development opportunities and challenges facing the region.

Manufacturing Matters EXPO Reception & Dinner with Keynote Address– September 26 Mirabeau Park Hotel EXPO: Exhibits & Workshops– September 26 & 27 SC Fair & Expo Center New Members: JULY Allstate Insurance – Andy Cline Anastasi, Moore, & Martin, PLLC AutoCraft Designer Decal European Wax Center (EWC) Gonzaga University Paul Davis of Spokane SCOPE Spokane Regional Clean Air Agency Verizon Weston Technology Solutions Wishing Star Foundation

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Visit: spokanevalleychamber.org/ manufacturingmatters

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Student of the Month A positive attitude and dedicated work ethic have stood Addison Bowen of Spokane Valley in good stead as a student, athlete and volunteer. Her family donates time to community causes through the Rockford chapter of The Grange, supporting local nonprofits like the Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery and efforts like Coats 4 Kids. Bowen also contributes to the junior chapter of The Grange and has donated her hair to cancer patients. She also created friendship bracelets to sell as a fundraiser for a coach from Valley-based Spokane Gymnastics – where she trains as part of the trampoline and tumbling team – who lost his home in a fire. Her coaches and parents describe Bowen as self-motivated, responsible and helpful to others.

Citizen of the Month

Thanks you for all you do in our community

SEPTEMBER 2017 • 43 Central Valley High School junior Cierra Neumann will participate in her seventh Spokane County Interstate Fair this month as an accomplished equestrian. Training out of the Hendrickson Quarter Horse Ranch in Greenacres, Neumann participates in both Western gaming events and barrel racing. She has won numerous ribbons and prizes in events that include Showmanship, Equitation and Trail. Cierra is a member of the Washington State Horseman and the Inland Empire Barrel Racing Association. Neumann has participated in volleyball, basketball and track since her freshman year at CV. This fall, she is part of the cross country squad. She maintains a 3.95 grade point average and is a member of the National Honor Society and DECA.

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Peggy Doering has served as director of Valleyfest since 1996, catapulting the event into a regional happening each September. Doering began as a volunteer with Valleyfest in 1990. She was named Citizen of the Year by the Greater Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce in 2009 and is a past honoree as Washington State Parks Volunteer of the Year. Doering is a longtime volunteer with Mid-City Concerns, the downtown Spokane Meals on Wheels program where she once served as volunteer coordinator. She is secretary of the Washington Board for Festivals and Event Organization and serves on the YMCA advisory board. Doering is also president of the Gonzaga University Guild. The Boise native is a graduate of Gonzaga. She and her husband Gregory have been married 42 years and have three children and three grandchildren.

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44 SEPTEMBER 2017 Brought to you by

Evergreen

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Evergreen Fountains expanding along with Spokane Valley By Staci Lehman

Current Correspondent Spokane Valley’s Evergreen Fountains Senior Living Community is growing, along with the community it serves. “It’s absolutely an honor to see an expansion to a Spokane Valley business,” said Spokane Valley Mayor Rod Higgins at the Aug. 17 groundbreaking for the Fountains’ addition. “It’s a sign that we’re not just growing but growing very rapidly.” Higgins, along with Deputy Mayor Arne Woodard, representatives from the Greater Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce and many others attended the ceremony where the Arger family – brothers Prokey and Greg and Greg’s son Gene – kicked off construction work that will expand the family business over the next year. Prokey, a lifetime Spokane Valley resident, is the onsite day-today state licensed administrator for operations. Greg, also having spent his entire life in Spokane Valley, is responsible for overseeing the new project expansion and development. Gene serves as the Marketing/Leasing director for the Fountains. All three are proud to be bringing new jobs to the area, both in construction and at the facility, caring for the community’s residents. “The Argers build a highquality product for a vulnerable population,” said Woodard. “They provide a tremendous service to our community.” Evergreen Fountains opened in 2008 and is currently comprised of 106 units inside a gated development. The 61,700-squarefoot addition will house 39 new units and be connected to the original building through an indoor skywalk. TW Clark Construction is the general contractor and Sam Nystrom Architect designed the

Evergreen Fountains Senior Living Community in Spokane Valley has broken ground on a 61,700-square-foot addition that will house 39 new units and be connected to the original building through an indoor skywalk. The expansion also includes a juice bar, game room and sports facilities. Contributed image

building. “The new building will be stateof-the-art with large modern floor plans for independent and assisted living with an expected grand opening date of June 2018,” said Gene Arger. “We will have one, two and three bedroom plans with modern living spaces up to 2,000 square feet.” The expansion also includes a juice bar, game room and sports facilities. Outside, new cottages will be constructed for those able to live more independently. “They are triplexes, so four triplexes totaling 12 units,” said Gene Arger. “Two and three bedrooms.” When construction is complete, the 8-acre campus located just south of Interstate 90 on Evergreen Road will also include a landscaped park, walking trails, garages and raised gardens. That is in addition to amenities already on-site, like an indoor warm water pool, wellness center, arthritis-certified programs, on-site bistro, wine tasting and entertainment room and gourmet dining options. “This is a blessing to the entire community,” said Father Andrew Welzig of Spokane Valley’s Christ the Savior Orthodox Christian Church, who blessed the

construction site and led attendees at the groundbreaking in prayer. “I know first- hand what it is like to live here. It’s a great place.”

Community is located at 1201 N. Evergreen Road in Spokane Valley. To learn more, call 922-3100 or visit www.evergreenfountains.com.

Father Welzig lived at Evergreen Fountains when he first moved to the area to lead his church. The Arger family offered him an apartment when he couldn’t find a place to live. According to the Argers, Evergreen Fountains is one of only a few locally owned senior living communities in the area. Their motto is “Where wellness is a way of life.” “This is going to be the premier senior living community in the Spokane Valley and we have a focus on wellness and an active lifestyle for our residents,” said Gene Arger. Higgins agrees the Fountains is a hospitable place – one he may know a lot better in the future. “My wife and daughter are traveling today and called me this morning to ask what I was doing,” the mayor told the crowd at the ceremony. After telling his family he was at the grand opening, Higgins added, “I said ‘I’m scoping out our next residence.’” Want to find out more? Evergreen Fountains Senior Living

Prokey, Greg and Gene Arger at the Aug. 17 groundbreaking ceremony for the expansion to the Evergreen Fountains Senior Living Community on Evergreen Road in Spokane Valley. The Arger family owns and operates the Fountains. Photo by Staci Lehman


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ACROSS 3. DOMESTIC BOVINE 4. BURROWING MAMMAL 1 6. FREE TRIES 9. MEANS OF RAISING 4 MONEY 11. FAIR FOOD ON A STICK 14. WHERE THE RIDES ARE 15. WOOLY MAMMAL 22. LOCATION FAIR IS HELD AT 24. A WAY TO SAVE YOUR HARVEST 26. DECISION MAKER 29. MOTORSPORT EVENT 19 30. FARM ANIMALS 32. USES RAPID CONDENSATION TO 24 CREATE POWER 33. DOMESTIC SWINE 34. DEEP FRIED TREAT 35. JUDGED EVENT 37. FROZEN TREAT 38. GARDEN’S BOUNTY 39. ENTERTAINING PEOPLE DOWN 1. SPITTING MAMMAL 2. CLUSTER OF GAMES

SEPTEMBER 2017 • 45

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19. LARGE ORANGE FRUIT 20. WESTERN MAN 21. ELECTRIC CAR RIDE 23. CINNAMON-SUGAR DELIGHT 25. PUBLIC DISPLAY 27. BUILDING THAT SHOWCASES TALENT 28. HERBIVOROUS QUADRUPED 31. ANIMAL HOUSING 36. FODDER

ACROSS 3 DOMESTIC BOVINE 4 BURROWING MAMMAL 6 FREE TRIES 9 MEANS OF RAISING MONEY 11 FAIR FOOD ON A STICK 14 WHERE THE RIDES ARE 15 WOOLY MAMMAL 22 LOCATION FAIR IS HELD 24 A WAY TO SAVE YOUR HARVEST 26 DECISION MAKEER

Where Wellness Is A Way Of Life

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46 SEPTEMBER 2017

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WSU recruit leads imposing EV offense

By Mike Vlahovich Current Sports Editor The question facing East Valley’s football team in the continuing saga of the Great Northern League’s most dynamic athlete, Rodrick Fisher, was whether he’d be granted another season of eligibility. It was likely, EV coach Adam Fisher said, that granting him a hardship year would be a formality, although with bureaucracy you never know. “We presume he’s there.” The answer about a week before the start of the season was a resounding “yes.” The Washington State University commit’s value is two-fold for EV.

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Every time the state champion sprinter touches the ball, Rodrick can potentially take it to the house. He also plays defensive back. And since teams must double cover him, it subsequently creates opportunity for other EV skilled players. “He will be a major part of our offense,” said Coach Fisher who is also Rodrick’s adoptive father. “When someone has exceptional talent getting the ball in his hands is essential but with that we stress to the other skilled players it is a fantastic opportunity because you know you are getting one-on-one coverage,” Fisher said. “With that, you understand you make the most of your situation and can really shine.” Quarterback Christian Johnson also returns. “He’s been there, done that,” Adam said. “He’s calmer in the pocket and that’s a huge part having that at quarterback.”

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If dynamic Ale’dre Bracey, can repeat his All-GNL running back performance and Isaiah Ervin takes up up where he left off, the Knights have the makings of a potent offense. Key linemen are Zac Holt, Chris Kent, Landon Hofstee, Aaron Harris and Dom Carrillo. The Knights aren’t deep with a varsity turnout numbering the 40s so virtually all those players, including fullback-linebacker Felix Morales, must play both ways. Last season Adam felt the Knights could have finished anywhere from being undefeated to 2-7. They were 4-5 and missed out on the playoffs, the losses by roughly a touchdown each. EV is dangerous through air and on land with Johnson throwing the long ball to EV’s jet propelled receiver and speedy ground troops running by defenders. Although lack of numbers is a concern, it could be a season to remember.

West Valley vies for return to state bracket

By Mike Vlahovich Current Sports Editor Playing three post-season games in 11 days, West Valley’s football team reached the state 2A quarterfinals and finished last season with a 10-2 record. After his third state tourney appearance WV, Coach Craig Whitney wouldn’t mind a repeat. “We would like to think so,” Whitney said. “We still have to play the game, but we feel really pleased with the guys coming back.” Two of them, Connor Whitney, the coach’s son being pursued by Idaho, and Collin Sather, loom large in the Eagles’ plans. They are missing a big piece of the puzzle with the graduation of quarterback Hunter Wright who passed for 2,848 yards and rushed for 958 more, accounting for 36 touchdowns. Filling the blank is essential for the Eagles return to the post-season. “We have two kids – Matt Allen is a sophomore and Blake Transue is a senior and they both bring a little bit of something,” Whitney said. “We’ll kind of use them both.” Allen throws the ball well; Blake

East Valley senior Rodrick Fisher will be a major part of the Knights’ offense this year. The fleet wide receiver and state champion sprinter has committed to play college football at Washington State University. Photo by Mike Vlahovich is seasoned, bigger, has improved passing and is a good runner, their coach said. “The competition’s on and both of them will play to determine how much,” Whitney explained. This year’s team centers around returning All-Greater Northern League athletes Whitney, Sather and a sizeable line featuring All-GNL 308-pound Josh Quirk, 315-pound Josh Moss, plus Scotty Bray, who, the coach says, is the team’s strongest player. “We feel really pleased with the ‘uglies’ coming back,” the pet name Whitney said for the linemen. “It takes a little pressure off the quarterback and we feel we can run the ball a bit.” Chase Howat was the league’s top place kicker who booted five field goals and was 42-for-46 on point after attempts. Sather had 64 catches for 1,154 yards, averaging 18 yards per reception and 13 TDs. He also had two touchdowns rushing. Whitney caught 54 passes for 738 yards and seven scores. Other keys are running back Tanner Jones, last year’s second-leading rusher and Hunter Tiffany at receiver. “Our summer was really good in the weight room,” Craig said of preseason preparation. “And we went to team camp at the University of Idaho, competed hard and got a lot of questions answered as far as our personnel goes.”


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SPORTS

Valley Sports Notebook – Prep sports return with a flourish

The Titans return virtually their entire team, led by All-GSL co-Most Valuable Player Rachel Schlect. Besides Schlect, regular competitors from last year included defensive specialists Kaitlynn Madison, Alaina Chester and setter Rochelle Koepke, hitters Taylor Jones, Krisah Tiffany and Jill Bowden. “I’ve learned a lot,” said Collins of working for two coaches at U-Hi. “I’ll be a combination of the two coaches, and I have some new stuff I want to try.” The credit, he said belongs to the players. The other things, Collins added, are on him. CV’s starting lineup was veteranheavy last year, but has a nucleus of eight returnees for Allen to mold. All-GSL middle blocker Paige Wollen and setter Hannah Wampler are veterans at the center of this year’s lineup, solid places to build around. Other varsity underclassmen were Sami Smith and Hayden McAuliff, Kailyn White, Brianne and Noelle Bowden and Lexi Horton. Coupland inherits a team that had but one senior last year. Rishel Hartshorn was a second-team All-GSL performer and Genesis Wilkenson is arguably the best all-around athlete in the school. West Valley’s Jaylynn Buehler was All-Great Northern League second team. State 1A perennial Freeman placed fourth, Hannah Hanson was an All-Northeast A League selection.

Beware the Bear There’s still room for improvement for Central Valley’s boys cross country which finished second in the state 4A cross country meet. The young team is on a mission. Six of CV’s runners are back, four of them juniors, led by Ryan Kline who finished 14th and had a tremendous spring. Evan Peters, 23rd in state last year, Joey Nicholls and Sheamus Mahoney are the other juniors. Seniors Gabe Romney, who placed 17th and Fielding Demars also return. West Valley fielded its first full girls’ team in a while last year and the result was a team state appearance. Freshmen Emma Garza, Mikayla Davis and Annika Esvelt led the way. Sydney Stone and Sarah Adamson were sophomores. Cody Skay from West Valley, 10th in state last fall, Hunter Reynolds and Will Sharp from EV and Claire Dingus and Rebeccah Lehman representing University, were individual state competitors. Soccer teams nearly intact A proud program with back-to-back state 4A championships, CV girls’ soccer last year missed state for the first time in six years. Coach Andres Monrroy can be pardoned if he wasn’t totally upset. All but four Bears were underclass, including three freshmen, 12 sophomores, four of them first-team All-Greater Spokane League, and four

Final Point Catching up with a sportscasting icon

Robertson made his name with the Cougars. When his wife passed away, sportscasting was his refuge. He’s now in a secondary role with WSU after being replaced as play-by-play guy a few years ago. He works 30-plus Spokane baseball games and weekends in Tacoma. “It’s been my life,” Robertson told me during a phone conversation. “The best way I can describe it, it’s my avocation and vocation. They are the same thing. That’s about as succinct as I can make it.” He takes the words right out of my mouth as my wife, Tambra, will attest. She still puts up with my pounding out stories like these seven years past “retirement.” Many of our memorable “vacations” back in the day were spent while I covered state tournaments. Cougar football was Robertson’s main source of income and still is financially as he juggles three jobs. “I’m a Cougar,” he says. “When I’m on a road trip I think ‘If I didn’t do this I could sleep in.’ Then again, I enjoy it and don’t know what I’d do if I didn’t have those things around me.” Robertson also called Cougar basketball for 23 years until 1994. In 2004, he received the Chris Schenkel Award from the College Football Hall of Fame. He has been inducted into both the Inland Empire and WSU Athletic halls. Back in the day, broadcasting was on

three-year contracts. Robertson first called the Cougars for three years then the in-state rival Washington Huskies for the next three. He got the Cougar contract back and stayed with the Crimson and Grey. “It (got) to the point where either nobody wants me or everybody wants me, so I stayed with the Cougars and I think it was a good choice,” he says. Robertson also broadcasted basketball and the baseball games in Tacoma for a long time but the baseball team made changes and he was out of a full-time job. Spokane followed. “I called Bobby (Brett) and he hired me full-time,” said Robertson, who knew the Indians’ owner through hockey. “At one time I was the sole announcer. Then my wife became terminally ill and I had to drop that.” Boyle came aboard 17 years ago and has learned from the broadcasting legend. “I thought I had it pretty down but Bob has shown me some things and I incorporated them for myself,” Boyle said. “His home run calls are as good as you’ll hear.” “He doesn’t lack for energy that’s for sure,” Boyle continues. “We had a 1 o’clock game and he was itching to be there at 9:30. He’s 33 years older than me and there are times I’d like to lay down for a nap and he’s raring to go.”

By Mike Vlahovich Current Sports Editor It is a year of change for Valley volleyball coaches. District rivals, University and Central Valley, took similar routes by hiring from within to replace last year’s head coaches, Mike Summers and Laurie Quigley who both stepped down. Their replacements, Tony Collins with the Titans and CV’s Jason Allen, were both promoted from junior varsity and ease the transition. East Valley also has a new coach, longtime club and former CV mentor Chad Coupland. And like the other teams, he was an assistant for the Knights. Titans coach Collins has taken incremental steps over some 20 years as he takes over. He began coaching at Horizon Middle School and first became freshman coach at U-Hi, where his daughters played. Allen has helped coach in various positions at CV and is an in-building instructor. “I’m excited,” Collins said of his promotion. “I’m looking forward to the opportunity.” U-Hi tied for fourth in league last year, but upended third-place CV.

By Mike Vlahovich Current Sports Editor I was a sophomore at Washington State back in 1964 and Bob Robertson was broadcasting Cougar football. Some of us sportswriters and broadcasters – emulating the late World War II General Douglas McArthur’s memorable “old soldiers never die, they just fade away” farewell speech – refuse to give it up; they’ll have to haul us away. Not only does the 88-year-old Robertson still cover the Cougs more than half a century later, but also in his spare time he shares the microphone as a part-time voice of the Spokane Indians and Tacoma Rainers baseball teams, driving the 600 or so miles round trips in his automobile in order to get from University Place – southwest of Tacoma – to Pullman and Spokane. “He’s a marvel, he really is,” said broadcast partner and Indians lead radio voice Mike Boyle. “He’s always (saying), ‘When Vin retires, I retire.’” Beloved Dodgers’ sportscaster Vin Scully retired at the end of last year. Robertson shows no signs of slowing down. “Sometimes I’m sitting here between games, trying to balance how I can get to the two,” he says.

SEPTEMBER 2017 • 47

juniors. At that, they shared first place in the GSL before losing a pair of post-season contests, including a one-goal loss to fourth-place state finisher Hanford. The All-GSL girls were goal keeper A.J. Crooks, defender Alyssa Molina, forward Kailyn LaBrosse and midfielder Maggie Ames. Like CV, University was young with only four seniors. Kelsey Crosby, Abby Koker and Abby McConnell were allleague last year. New coach Todd Slatter greets East Valley which reached the quarterfinals of 2A state last year with a team that had five first-team and two secondteam All-GNL players. Slatter has been the assistant for 10 years so little will change, he said. A couple cogs graduated and are playing at community colleges. “We’re returning a lot of our girls,” he said. “Our goalkeeper graduated and that was our biggest hit, but overall I think we’re going to be pretty good.” Kailee Hance-Brown and Autumn Stewart anchor the defense. Chloe Gellhaus, Charity Yount and Taryn Baxter were impact sophomores. West Valley was also young. There were but five seniors on the 19-player squad and the offense came primarily from players who return. Chelsea Koker led the Eagles with 10 goals as a sophomore. She, Kellie Fitzpatrick and Abby McConnell were second-team All-GNL. I asked Bob about some memorable moments with the Cougars and Indians over the years. The former was WSU’s Rose Bowl trip and sea of crimson he witnessed from the press box; the infamous “Snow Bowl,” in fact every game were the others, he said. At Spokane, it was the year the Indians weathered losing seven straight baseball games and still made the split season league playoffs. Vancouver split in Spokane and won at home for a 2-1 lead in the best-of-five series. “Vancouver had a real good team,” Robertson recalls. “We weren’t sure we could win and didn’t show signs of life.” The resigned team checked out of its hotel before game four, but came from behind to tie the series. “We had to talk our way back in (to the hotel),” he remembers. The Indians trailed most of the title game before rallying to win 3-2. Two things stick out to Robertson’s while remembering. “We were still under .500 (for the year) despite winning the title. And the other thing was, a member of the staff had to go into the office of Vancouver to borrow its ring sizer” (to fit the players for their championship rings). The Indians hadn’t the foresight to bring theirs. “We didn’t think we could win it,” laughed Robertson, a winner himself and 88 years young.


The Current

48 SEPTEMBER 2017

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The Current

LIBRARY

Public transportation Looking ahead after meets the modern 75 Years By Patrick Roewe digital library By Erin Dodge

Current Guest Contributor Spokane Transit Authority (STA) and the Spokane County Library District (SCLD) have partnered to bring you “Read & Ride,” a campaign to encourage everyone traveling by bus to sign up for a library card to gain access to hundreds of thousands of eBooks, audiobooks, digital magazines, movies, music and more. It’s convenient to take the library with you wherever you go! Enjoy our digital content while commuting— that’s the convenience of traveling with Spokane Transit. You can get a library card in September during Library Card Sign-up Month. Download and stream eBooks, audiobooks, magazines, music and more to your device. Then relax and enjoy your STA ride. Here are a few of the digital resources that you can use to escape your commute! OverDrive: Discover popular and topical fiction, nonfiction and poetry that you can download as eBooks and audiobooks. Plus the eBooks and audiobooks return themselves on the date due – very convenient! Biblioboard: Find a new favorite author and read their stories digitally in two great collections: Indie Washington and SELF-e Select eBooks. RBDigital: Download and read digital versions of popular magazines, including ESPN Magazine, Inc., Newsweek, National Geographic, Popular Science, O, The Oprah Magazine and many more. hoopla: Download and stream popular music, movies, audiobooks, eBooks, comics and television shows instantly with automatic returns, never any late fees! Pronunciator: Learn over 80 languages through interactive and self-paced courses for beginners, young learners, travelers, health care workers and more. Morningstar: Download up-todate reports, newsletters and other tools for mutual funds, stocks, and exchange traded funds that you can look over during your ride. Explore the complete SCLD digital library at www.scld.org/digitallibrary/ for even more to keep your occupied on your STA ride.

Spokane County Library District Spokane County Library District looks pretty good at 75 years old. From our humble origins in a downtown basement in Spokane, to our current system with 11 libraries and a robust suite of digital resources, the district has a rich history of adapting to technological and cultural changes to best meet the needs and interests of the people we serve. I’m excited to help write the district’s next chapter as the new executive director. As we look to the future, we will continue our community engagement efforts to ensure that our services reflect community needs and we will also focus on improving the library user experience so that your interactions with our resources and programs are both positive and efficient. And, as always, we will focus on these areas

SCLD opposes city amendment

By Mary Anne Ruddis Current Correspondent On July 25, the Spokane Valley City Council voted to approve an amendment to the 2012 interlocal agreement between the city and the Spokane County Library District (SCLD) for construction of a new central library. Prior to the approval, the SCLD Board of Trustees opposed the amendment by a 3 to 2 vote. In 2012, the city purchased 8.4 acres on Sprague Avenue from the Pring Corporation. The property is across from the new City Hall site and was purchased with the intent of selling 2.82 acres to SCLD for construction of a new library and the remaining land to be secured for public use such as a park or community area. The SCLD purchased the property for $839,285.10. The amendment addresses Section 10 of the 2012 agreement and extends the expiration date of the interlocal agreement from Oct. 31, 2017 an additional five years to Oct. 31, 2022 with the ability to further extend the agreement an additional two years if agreed to in writing by both parties. Without voter approval, SCLD will not be in a position to develop its portion of the property. Section 10 contains a requirement that “in the event that the Library District has not, within five years following the closing, secured voter approval of a construction bond for the library building and ancillary improvements in such amount as shall be determined necessary by the Library District, that thereafter the Library District shall reconvey all of the property back to the City at the same price paid by the

while remaining good stewards of taxpayer dollars. The one constant in these last 75 years has been and still is the opportunity to connect people with knowledge. This has always been our core purpose. When we got our start, that knowledge was confined to just books. But now, you can find knowledge in a book, a DVD, a downloadable eBook or music album, a storytime, a class about electricity using Snap Circuits, or an online resource for learning to speak French. That’s an exciting arc of innovation to contemplate, as it underscores how our communities’ needs and interests have evolved over time. On behalf of all of the staff and trustees of the Spokane County Library District, thank you for the opportunity to serve this community over the past 75 years. We look forward to celebrating this milestone with you this fall. As we look to the future, we are excited about the innovations that will help you find new ways to be informed, engaged and inspired. Library District to the City.” The SCLD put forth a construction bond twice and it failed both times to gain a super majority of at least 60 percent voter approval. The second part of the amendment reduces the minimum size of the facility from 30,000 square feet to a minimum of approximately 25,000 square feet. A third provision commits city tax dollars of $1.3 million for frontage and/ or joint site improvements instead of splitting the cost. Of this, $461,000 would come from the general fund and $839,285 would be from funds held from the original sale to SCLD. The library district also would commit $1.3 million to purchase the library site as well as a second site at Sprague Avenue and Conklin Road. These funds would not be part of a bond measure. Earlier this year, the city and SCLD established an ad hoc committee comprised of library district board members, City Council members and senior staff from both entities to identify and implement ways to achieve the goals of the new library. According to Patrick Roewe, incoming SCLD executive director, the library board rejected the amendment because “they had unresolved questions and also wanted more time for public comment to take a fuller look at all the pieces.” “There are no concrete plans right now, next steps are pending,” added Roewe. There still remains a chance that other fundraising opportunities can be explored. The amendment will be on the Oct. 17 council agenda for determination. Another public comment meeting is planned for later this month after the city has moved into the new City Hall building.

SEPTEMBER 2017 • 49

Discover the possibilities that await you. September is Library Card Sign-up Month!

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The Current

50 SEPTEMBER 2017

Avista to become subsidiary of Canadian-based Hydro One By Michelle Valkov Splash Correspondent Spokane’s domestic utility Avista announced on July 19 that it will become a subsidiary of the Hydro One, Canada’s largest electricity transmission and distribution provider. The acquisition, which awaits regulatory approval, creates a utility that will represent $25.4 billion in enterprise value. The proposed merger expands complementary and diversified regulated assets including natural gas local distribution. Hydro One will aquire Avista for $53 per share in a $5.3 billion allcash transaction. The contract is expected to close in the second half of 2018. Both companies have more than 230 years of collective operational experience as well as shared corporate principles and standards. While Avista will continue to operate under the same name from Spokane headquarters, the ownership structure will change.

The ownership shift won’t affect the things that matter most about Avista, local representatives say. All jobs will stay in the local communities as well. Casey Fielder, Avista communications manager, says that the company believes partnering with Hydro One is in the best interests of their customers, communities, employees and shareholders. “We believe this is the right partnership at the right time,” Fielder said. According to a July 19 joint news release from Avista and Hydro One, Mayo Schmidt, president and CEO of Hydro One, said “this marks a proud moment for Canadian champions as we grow our business into a North American leader.” In a joint press release, both companies have confirmed that the merger will not impact customer rates. Avista, founded in 1889 as Washington Water Power, is not expecting significant change after the deal is finalized, reassuring

customers that they will continue to receive high quality, reliable energy services at a reasonable cost. Hydro one, founded in 1999, has said levels of community contributions will nearly double after the acquisition is official. Schmidt also mentioned “this transaction demonstrates the power and value of the transition into an investor-owned utility, by allowing for healthy expansion into new lines of regulated utility business and new jurisdictions, such as the Pacific Northwest which is experiencing customer and economic growth.” Hydro One serves 1.3 million customers and manages and maintains enough distribution lines to wrap around the earth three times. More than two million retail and industrial customers will be served by the combined entity that will hold assets throughout North America including Ontario, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Alaska. Another key benefit to the union is that it will increase the ability to create cost savings and efficiencies. Scott Morris, Avista chairman, president and CEO said “for Avista, the decision to team up with Hydro One at a time of strength and growth

represents a win for our customers, employees, shareholders and communities we serve.” The merger will also provide Hydro One with a significant and stable increase to earnings and cash flow supported by fully regulated utility operations jurisdictions with constructive monitored mechanisms. Avista has also said that with Hydro One as their partner, they will continue to uphold their longstanding commitment to environmental responsibility, innovation, safety and reliability.

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The Current

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Route 26 Lidgerwood and Route 28 Nevada will operate to the end of the line 7 days a week. Route 26 Lidgerwood now runs north past Magnesium to East Jay and North Dakota.

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Route 90 Sprague and Route 25 Division will see improved shelters and stronger on-time performance.

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LOCAL LENS

52 SEPTEMBER 2017

The Current

EDITOR/PUBLISHER

Ben Wick

Danica Wick

ben@libertylakesplash.com CO OWNER

danica@libertylakesplash.com

EDITOR

Craig Howard

craig@libertylakesplash.com OFFICE MANAGER

Congratulations Central Valley Schools!

Cycle Celebration

Millwood Daze

GRAPHICS

The Central Valley School District celebrated seven dedications of new and renovated buildings going into the 2017-18 school year. The projects were made possible by the passage of a $121.9 million construction bond in February 2015. Summer wound down in the greater Valley area with the ninth annual Millwood Daze on Aug. 26. The fifth annual Spokane Valley Cycle Celebration took place July 30. Contributed photos

Local Lens

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CIRCULATION Larry Passmore circulation@libertylakesplash.com CONTRIBUTORS

Craig Howard,

Staci Lehman, Mary Anne Ruddis, Michelle Valkov, Mike Vlahovich, Ben Wick The Valley Current P.O. Box 363 Liberty Lake, WA 99019 Phone: 242-7752; Fax: 927-2190 www.valleycurrent.com The Current is published monthly by or before the first of each month. It is distributed free of charge to every business and home in the greater Spokane Valley area. Copies are located at drop-off locations in Spokane Valley, Liberty Lake and the surrounding area.

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be received by the 15th of the month in order for the subscription to begin with the issue printed the end of that month. Correction policy The Current strives for accuracy in all content. Errors should be reported immediately to 242-7752 or by email to editor@valleycurrent.com. Confirmed factual errors will be corrected on this page in the issue following their discovery. Advertising information Display ad copy and camera-ready ads are due by 5 p.m. on the 15th of the month for the following month’s issue. Call 242-7752 for more information. Advertising integrity Inaccurate

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The Current

Valleyfest’s third day features full agenda From Current New Sources

New this year! Valleyfest 5k/10K is now a second seed Bloomsday qualifier. Runners will begin heading west past the Plante’s Ferry obelisk to Island Trailhead and continue over the Spokane River on the Denny Ashlock Bridge. 5K runners will turn around at the 12 mileposts while 10K runners continue until they turn around a short distance passed the South Mirabeau Trailhead. The duathlon will take place Sept. 24 at Plante’s Ferry Sports Complex. Register online before Sept. 18 at 9 a.m. and receive a Multi-Sport Day T-shirt. Athletes can enter as teams or an individual. Participants will start the duathlon by running a 5K loop over the Spokane River and through the Centennial Trail. Once they return to the Plante’s Ferry, participants will continues eastbound towards Flora Road for a 11-mile bike route. Then will finish the duathlon by re-running the 5K loop. Each participant will receive a chocolate milk provided by Yoke’s Fresh Markets. Families can also enjoy the day by participating in the family bike ride. This ride is hosted by the Bike Hub and is perfect for a day full of family bonding. Families can take four different routes that range from 6.8 miles to 15.6 miles. Each family can pick the perfect route for them. After Multi-Sport Day, TotFest will start at 11 a.m. and continue until 4 p.m. This year, TotFest will hold information classes on safe sleep and infant CPR. Attendees will be able to learn to care for their child while interacting with local vendors. Kids can enjoy the bounces houses and even a petting zoo. All kids are also encouraged to participate in the activities such as dance, song and fit for kids. Events on Sunday will go beyond all your expectations. Don’t miss out on these events!

OPINION

Dear Editor,

I appreciate your detailed coverage of the Spokane Valley City Council, as always. I was particularly interested in Bill Gothmann's excellent coverage of the SCLD library issue. I worked hard to pass the last bond and was extremely frustrated by Ed Pace's public and vocal opposition. The Spokesman article, while it included the information about the $839,000 that SCLD paid Spokane Valley for acreage adjacent to Balfour Park, the average reader did not understand that the $1.3 million the city would allocate toward the new library includes the $839,000 that it owes SCLD.

SEPTEMBER 2017 • 53

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gymnastics and focus on teaching BECU 4 Liberty Lake Family Dentistry quality gymnastics in a fun and safe environment.8 Classes run year-round Liberty Lake Farmer’s Market with three 13-week sessions (Fall, Clark’s Tire and Automotive 3 Linda for10-week City Council Winter and Spring) and one summer session. Candidate Forum

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Service Directory

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Of note: This thank you message was produced by The Current’s advertising team, which works its tail off on behalf of partner businesses, helping them share their messages through advertisements. This is an independent function from The Current’s editorial team, which has its own evaluation process to determine the community news stories and features it pursues. For more information about a win-win partnership that expertly markets your business to thousands of readers (while making this home-grown community newspaper possible), email advertise@valleycurrent.com. With story ideas, contact editor@valleycurrent.com.


The Current

54 SEPTEMBER 2017

SERVICE DIRECTORY Take exit 299 off of I-90, Just West of Cabelas

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Want you business to be part of our Service Directory? Contact Danica at 242-7752 or advertise@libertylakesplash.com We look forward to hearing from you!


The Current

ON THAT NOTE

SEPTEMBER 2017 • 55

Beyond the Visitors’ Guide – Local communities shine in and out of column space By Craig Howard Current Editor In case you missed it, the Washington City/County Management Association Summer Conference was held at the Spokane Convention Center, Aug. 22-25. Government celebrities like Jay Covington, the city of Renton’s CEO and Tracey Dunlap, Kirkland’s deputy city manager were among the featured speakers. Autograph sessions following most talks were lightly attended. The headliner of the event was arguably Mike Roth, Gonzaga University athletic director, who has nothing to do with municipal management but was available to answer questions about booking flights to the Final Four. Well-respected leaders like Katy Allen, city administrator in Liberty Lake and Mark Calhoun, Spokane Valley’s city manager were not among the guest speakers at the seasonal conference although former Spokane Valley City Council Member Steve Taylor, now city manager in Kelso, serves on the board for WCMA (the group’s acronym efficiently blends cities and counties into one “C” in an apparent ode to lean government). Rumors that former Spokane Valley City Manager Mike Jackson would offer a keynote address on “Severance Pay in the Age of Shifting Political Winds” proved to be unfounded. Prothman, a Northwest-based firm and scholarship sponsor of the conference, may be a familiar name to those who followed the early days of Spokane Valley after passage of incorporation in May 2002. Specializing in recruitment, interim staffing and organizational consulting, the company provided mentors who brought years of municipal experience and insight to the inaugural City Council faced with the herculean task of constructing a city from the ground up. Many of the city’s first leaders still talk about the wise and patient guidance of Prothman staff like Lee Walton, who served as Spokane Valley’s first city manager on an interim basis. Along with sessions on topics such as lean management, collaborative workspaces and broadband infrastructure, WCMA conference attendees from cities like Sequim, Kent and Washougal were able to explore downtown

shops and restaurants during their stay. Savvy guests likely reviewed several visitors’ guides available at the popular “Library of Endless Brochures.” The current Washington State Visitors’ Guide, the official publication of the Washington Tourism Alliance, divides the state into 10 sections with the greater Spokane area defined as “Northeast.” At just over four featured pages, our region gets about the same amount of ink as places like North Cascades and Peninsulas/Coast but well short of the nine pages allotted to Metro Seattle. Liberty Lake earns a short blurb in a Northeast sidebar called “Small Towns” in which it is described as “more than just a sleepy suburb.” Perhaps referring to the glory days of the lake when the dance pavilion and accessible waterfront characterized the shores, the guide describes how the “namesake lake is a big draw on sunny days when visitors flock to its sandy beaches.” Hopefully those who are part of any lakeside migration understand that means the beach (singular) at Liberty Lake Regional Park. The state guide essentially glosses over any Spokane Valley landmarks, although the Mirabeau Park Hotel and Convention Center is featured in a half-page ad next to the Northeast introductory page. One Valley restaurant – the Cottage Café on Appleway – is mentioned in another section titled “Culinary Road Trips” as part of the “Spokane to Ellensburg” trek. The reference astutely points to the eatery’s “hearty breakfasts” featuring menu items like the chicken fried steak and “burrito-sized omelets.” Visit Spokane, our region’s tourism catalyst, is more generous to the Valley and Liberty Lake in its 2017-18 Official Regional Visitors’ Guide. At the very top of the publication’s cover, Spokane County and the cities of Spokane, Spokane Valley, Liberty Lake, Airway Heights and Cheney earn top billing. While the guide is largely Spokane-centric in its profiles of restaurants, places to stay, shopping, events and outdoor sites, greater Valley draws like the Dishman Hills Natural Area, Spokane Valley Mall, Liberty Lake’s trio of golf courses and Mica Moon Zip Tours all receive mentions.

The Cottage Café on Appleway in Spokane Valley earned a mention in the 2017 Washington State Visitors’ Guide for its “hearty breakfasts.” The guide features four pages on the greater Spokane area. Photo by Craig Howard Spokane Valley and Liberty Lake each get a substantial paragraph in the publication’s “Neighboring Cities” section with Spokane Valley described as “a thriving collection of suburban neighborhoods, entertainment districts and outdoor attractions.” Liberty Lake, meanwhile, earns accolades as a “dynamic city just 20 minutes outside of Spokane” and “a family favorite for its sparkling lake with sandy beaches, nature trails and water sports.” As with the state guide, a clarification on lakeside access may be in order but Visit Spokane gets it right with referrals to the Liberty Lake Farmers Market, the Friends of Pavillion Park Summer Festival and “the forests and wetlands of Liberty Lake Regional Park.”

both Spokane Valley and Liberty Lake that approach the sort of detail allotted to Spokane in the regional guide. The pamphlets manage to cover so many themes that each would make beneficial resource material to both visitors and residents alike.

Visit Spokane has also produced impressive individual brochures on

Ultimately, the best guide for visitors is the citizenry itself.

No word whether any attendees at the WCMA gathering ventured outside downtown during their four-day stay. If they did, it would have been clear that the Inland Northwest consists of far more than just the city of Spokane. Along the same lines, visitors to areas like Spokane Valley and Liberty Lake will quickly recognize that beyond the restaurants, shops and outdoor amenities, it’s the caring and genuine people here who make our communities exceptional.

The 2017-18 Visit Spokane Official Regional Visitors’ Guide refers to the water sports and sandy beaches of “sparkling” Liberty Lake in its section on “Neighboring Towns.” Photo by Craig Howard


The Current

56 SEPTEMBER 2017

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