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PRSRT STD ECRWSS U.S. Postage Paid Permit #010 ZIP CODE 99019

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Centennial Centennial Trail Revisited: Trail:

What you may not know What you may not know about region’s grand about the the region's grand scenic scenic pathway pathway page 12 page 12

NEW LEADER AT VALLEY PARTNERS PAGE 36

SV FIRST MAYOR SPEAKS OUT PAGE 2

FROM LAMPLIGHTER TO MIRABEAU PAGE 29


2 • AUGUST 2017

NEWS

They are parents to two grown children, Logan and Rachel. You can also add the title of “grandpa” to DeVleming’s list of roles as of last May.

The Park Bench

Q: Take us back to the summer of 2002 when you were one of 49 candidates for seven positions on the first Spokane Valley City Council. Why did you decide to add your name to the ballot and what was your approach to campaigning?

Valley Pioneer – DeVleming set tone as city’s inaugural mayor By Craig Howard Current Editor This time in 2002, Mike DeVleming was knocking on doors throughout Spokane Valley as one of 49 candidates aspiring to be part of a startup City Council. While politics ran in the family – his great grandfather once served as treasurer in Garfield County – DeVleming’s only experience in running for office was in middle school when he campaigned, and won, for class president. His slogan – “I Like Mike” – was derived from another election winner, former President Dwight Eisenhower. While DeVleming had the support of family and friends, he took care of most of the doorbelling. His wife, Pennie, would follow behind through residential streets, water bottle at the ready. “It was a lot of work,” DeVleming said of his first official political campaign. “I remember losing some weight with all the walking. I was so grateful for Pennie for all her help.” DeVleming had not been keen on the idea of Valley incorporation that appeared, and failed, on previous ballots. Yet by the time the question appeared again in May 2002, he felt the area was ready to become its own city. “We just didn’t have adequate representation,” he said. The vote passed by a narrow margin of 51 percent, meaning DeVleming and other council candidates ran into their share of less-than-enthused residents still wary of the impending transition. DeVleming collected nearly 30 percent of the vote in the primary election and won a chair on the inaugural council with 54 percent that fall. By the time Spokane Valley officially incorporated in March 2003, DeVleming was in place as

The Current

Mike DeVleming served as the first mayor of Spokane Valley and was part of the City Council for five years. Photo by Craig Howard the city’s first mayor, appointed to the mostly ceremonial position by his council colleagues. Utilizing slogans like “listen more than you talk” and “a policy of no surprises,” DeVleming quickly developed into the enthusiastic face of the new city. He appeared at civic events, ribbon cuttings and community presentations, some of which he initiated in an attempt to educate citizens on the logistics of incorporation and how they could be involved in the new city. “There were some people who didn’t want to talk to anyone but the mayor,” he said. In 2003, DeVleming and his cohorts around the dais faced no shortage of work. The council passed nearly 80 ordinances, signed 55 contracts and approved around 50 resolutions. The foundation for Washington’s newest jurisdiction had been established. The council’s conservative approach – which included setting aside a healthy reserve and contracting for many municipal services – sustained the city through the Great Recession and beyond. In 2004, the Greater Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce honored DeVleming with the Harry E. Nelson Citizen of the Year award. DeVleming’s decision in 2007 to not run for re-election signaled a changing of the guard at City Hall. By that June, three council hopefuls had applied for the position DeVleming had held for nearly five years. He served through December and wouldn’t appear on another

ballot until 2013 when he nearly defeated incumbent Ron Schmidt for a seat on the Spokane Valley Fire Board of Commissioners. A native of Spokane, DeVleming was one of four kids in a family that called the South Hill home. As a student at Ferris High School, he remembers “not really knowing which direction to go.” After graduation, he worked at a golf course, delivered pizzas and later latched on at a paper mill in Usk where he met Pennie. His wheels around that time were noteworthy – a well-maintained Ford Galaxy 500. DeVleming would go on to earn a degree in civil engineering from Spokane Community College. While at SCC, he spent time as an intern with Vera Water and Power. In 1989, he was hired at Vera by longtime General Manager Joe Custer, a World War II veteran who served as president of the Valley Chamber and contributed to a slew of community causes. DeVleming remembers Custer as a mentor. “Joe was the classiest boss,” DeVleming said. “He had such a presence about him and really cared about all the employees.” DeVleming currently serves Vera’s customer service director. Similar to his former job as mayor, the task calls for an affable, energetic communicator who does his homework and relates well to people. DeVleming fits the bill. Mike and Pennie will celebrate 27 years of marriage in November.

A: In the beginning, it was as simple as just not wanting to see the Valley get off on the wrong foot. This was a very pleasant place to live and work and I didn’t want to see too many radical changes. After I really got going, I saw a heck of an opportunity to start something really special. I felt that I had a little name recognition because of my job but I knew I needed to get out and pound the streets. I wanted more of a faceto-face campaign. This meant knocking on doors. I was thinking that a minimal budget and lots of doorbelling would get me through the primary. My wife Pennie was so supportive of me during this time. She would drop me off at the end of one neighborhood and pick me up at the other end a couple of hours later. Often, she would track me down with a water bottle or a snack. It was a fairly hot summer in 2002 and I walked many miles. I think in the end I lost about 20 pounds from just doorbelling. Q: As we know, the vote for incorporation passed by a very narrow margin. Did you get the sense back then that the community was still pretty divided about being its own city? A: Yes, some folks were still upset that the incorporation vote passed. More than a couple of times while doorbelling, I had a door slammed in my face. On the other hand, many were excited that we would be a new city. At the south end of the Valley, the hot issue was 40th Avenue and whether or not it was going to be extended from Bowdish to Highway 27. When it came down to it, most folks just didn’t want to see the taxes increase. Some might recall the handful of disincorporation rallies that continued after we opened the doors of City Hall. The disincorporation group lobbied hard for the new City Council to put it back on the ballot for another vote. Of course, we didn’t grant that wish but that didn’t stop them.

See DEVLEMING, Page 4


The Current

AUGUST 2017 • 3

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See the August Splash for the Official Event Guide


4 • AUGUST 2017

DEVLEMING

Continued from page 2 They had petitions in hand and tried hard to gather the required signatures to put it on the ballot. We watched the process from the sidelines with a modest amount of concern. I recall that the antiincorporation noise did take a toll on the new city staff. So many of our new employees had pulled up roots from other communities in the hopes of being a part of a new city. They felt their jobs were in limbo if not in jeopardy. Q: After the general election in November 2002, the inaugural City Council was in place. What were some of your first impressions about the collection of colleagues who had been selected to lead the city? A: The candidates started sizing up each other almost immediately. Even at the first “Meet the Candidate” event that the Spokane Valley Mall hosted. We saw a wide range of talent and strengths in each other. Once the races moved past the primary election, we were down to just 14 of us. Having only

NEWS

The Current

two candidates per race gave us a much clearer view of what the first City Council would look like. I saw a reasonably diverse group that would represent the Valley well. I also saw people that I could work with. In the end, I think the right seven candidates won. Q: How would you describe the chemistry on that first council?

A: There was a lot of energy in that first council. We were relieved to put the election behind us. Now it was time to get the real work done. The timeline from the Nov. 5 election was a series of issues to resolve and decisions to be made. Some of the decisions were the behind-the-scenes issues. One was the issue of selecting a mayor. This was a decision that could not be officially voted on by the council until we were sworn into office and sat together formally for that first council meeting on Jan. 7, 2003. Leading up to that meeting, there were many one-on-one meetings between all of us. Interestingly, I didn’t expect to be the first mayor. I thought Dick Denenny would be the best choice. I had seen his leadership capabilities at the helm of the Spokane Valley Chamber

Mike DeVleming has worked for Vera Water and Power for the past 28 years. He currently serves as customer service director. Photo by Craig Howard and felt confident he would do a good job. However, Dick didn’t want to commit that kind of time to the council. His insurance business was keeping him extremely busy. There was so much to decide. We all had agreed to the contract city concept. But we needed to hire the first management group and select an interim City Hall. Ironically, the local television stations finally took notice of the new council and all of us were getting hit with numerous questions. Mostly issues like “Will we stay incorporated?” or “Who will we hire for a city manager?” or “Will we have to raise taxes?” The big question was “Who would we select to be the first mayor?” That decision wasn’t going to be made public until January. Q: What did you enjoy most about serving as the mayor of Spokane Valley in those early years? A: My wife and I were treated so well. It was incredible. We couldn’t have been treated better by the community. I could hardly go anywhere without being approached. The citizens of Spokane Valley are so friendly. More than once someone would literally sit down at our table in a restaurant and start asking questions or make suggestions. My wife was so patient with this. Eventually we got pretty good at dealing with it. Q: When you think back to the influence and impact of that first council, what are you most proud of? A: There are many accomplishments that I am proud of from that first council. Probably

the biggest accomplishment was starting city off on a sound financial foundation. This was accomplished by determination and great teamwork from the council and Dave Mercier, our first city manager. Q: Switching gears to your role at Vera, what do you think has kept you at this company for so many years? A: Vera Water and Power has been a great company to work for. My job has been a combination of inside and outside work, mostly consisting of serving the customers in our district. I am blessed to have found a job that has been so rewarding. It really is like family at Vera. As you would imagine, family has its ups and downs – but mostly ups. Q: Between your years at the city and your job at Vera, what are some things about the Spokane Valley that you have learned over the years? A: I have learned that Spokane Valley is great place to raise a family. The school system is really good and the parents have created a very strong support system. This is a great area to retire in, which I plan to do. That has been proven over and over by the number of folks who come back to set down roots after they visited the area. Q: Do you follow what's happening with the city of Spokane Valley these days? A: I do pay attention to Spokane Valley and local politics. I am pleased that they have kept

See MAYOR, Page 5


The Current

MAYOR

AUGUST 2017 • 5

NEWS

Continued from page 4 Spokane Valley primarily a contract city and that they have stayed financially conservative. On the other hand, I think the City Council has made some unfortunate choices and most of these decisions have revolved around how city managers and staff are treated. It concerns me that the impression from the outside is that the city Spokane Valley is no longer a great place to work. I also worry about the road maintenance and what sort of plan is in place for the long-term care of our roads. Another issue that I think this current council struggles with is communication. Not everyone can make it to a council meeting or a sit-down for coffee and one-on-one at the local fast food restaurant. Mayors and council need to talk and listen to their citizens. Communication is the biggest part of being an elected official at the local level. Time will tell. Q: Do you have any regrets from your time as a city leader? A: That is easy. I have three major regrets. The first is allowing the City Council to receive full healthcare. Aside from the financial impact to the city, it wasn’t the best business plan. The Spokane Valley City Council may be the only part-time employees in our area that receiving a full healthcare benefit. It may not be a popular idea among the current council but it is a line item on the budget that seems to avoid the chopping block year after year. The library issue was also troubling. The senior staff had projected a significant savings if Spokane Valley took the library service in-house. It really penciled out and we could have increased the level of service significantly. Likely, Spokane Valley would have a substantially larger library and possibly other branches throughout the city. This was the one time where we listened to a small group of very vocal citizens who didn’t want a change. And today, Spokane Valley is still using the same undersized library. Finally, the Spokane Valley couplet was a project that the majority of Spokane Valley wanted. The initial council faced substantial resistance from the Spokane County Commissioners when we asked for the railroad right-ofway be handed over. We fought hard on that one but even when commissioner makeup changed, we still couldn’t get two of them to agree to give Spokane Valley the property.

Q: You seemed to take your time as a politician in stride. Would you like to see your children follow in your footsteps? A: I think everyone should put some time into public service, even if it’s something as simple as the PTA. Spokane Valley provides numerous possibilities to get involved. As far as my kids go, I see both as people who will be involved. Both have been active voters and we have had numerous discussions regarding local, state and federal politics. I have spent my fair share of time debating issues with both. Of the two of my children, my son has the strongest political views. He has a passion for the underdog and if the right opportunities present themselves, I would expect him to get involved even more significantly. Q: What advice would you give to a candidate running for City Council on the latest ballot? A: I am really encouraged by the number of candidates that have jumped into the various races. I think it is important for all incumbents to be challenged. This way the issues are debated for all to see. It helps us as citizens understand the priorities of our elected officials as well as what the citizens priorities are. So, my advice to an incumbent is get out there and find out what your citizens want. What is important to them. Do not rely on the few people that send you an email or make a public comment at a council meeting for your communication stream. They don’t speak for the majority. If you are a challenger – same advice. Knock on doors. Listen, listen, listen. Spend less time complaining about your opponent and more time talking about how you will make things different.

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The Current

6 • AUGUST 2017

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The Current

NEWS

Roewe selected as new SCLD executive director

all ages and all stages of life.” The philosophy was championed in the area by Roewe’s soon-tobe predecessor Ledeboer. While Roewe says he plans to carry this momentum forward, Craig says there are changes in SCLD’s future as well.

By Staci Lehman

Current Correspondent The Spokane County Library District (SCLD) will have a new leader starting this fall. Following a national search, the SCLD Board of Trustees announced the selection of Patrick Roewe as the new executive director. Roewe, current deputy director, will take over when Nancy Ledeboer steps down as executive director Sept. 1. Ledeboer announced earlier this year that she would retire. She has led the district since March 2012.

Patrick Roewe

Roewe has worked his way up through the district to this position.

communities like Deer Park and Medical Lake as examples. He says those areas traditionally don’t see a lot of arts events so the library district has worked to fill that void.

“I’ve been with the district for 10-and-a-half years,” he said. “I started as a librarian in January of 2007. My first library job was here.”

“Concerts or music events get a good response in places like that,” he said, while other communities have different needs.

Prior to that, Roewe, originally from Chehalis, Washington, worked in the Visitors Services Department at Seattle’s Pacific Science Center. He earned his master’s degree in Library and Information Science degree from the University of Washington. Roewe also spent some time in Spokane as an undergraduate, earning a bachelor of arts in English from Gonzaga.

“A library can be that place you can go to hear music or learn a craft or learn to program robots,” he said. “We want to be there for

In May, Roewe was announced as one of three finalists to replace Ledeboer. Ultimately, Roewe’s familiarity with the area and SCLD helped him to secure the position over other candidates, according to John Craig, SCLD board chair. “Trustees unanimously felt Patrick demonstrated superior ability to lead an organization like the Spokane County Library District,” Craig said. “His experience with the district and the community speaks for itself. Beyond that, his understanding of the broader legal and political environment in which we operate is very impressive.” Roewe said the district’s emphasis on community collaboration has helped him gain that understanding. “We really made our focus for strategic planning on public engagement,” he said. “Both the district as a whole but each city or district within it. We want to make sure the services we offer work in the area where they are happening.” Roewe

points

to

smaller

AUGUST 2017 • 7

“Patrick is fully invested in the outward-facing policies Nancy has developed but I think the board has confidence in Patrick’s ability to adapt as we face new challenges,” said Craig. “For example, trustees were pleased during his interview to learn that Patrick already was considering ways to improve efficiency by reconfiguring his current position if he became the executive director.” Roewe says reconfigurations are necessary as the whole library model has changed. “We’ve really focused the last few years to go beyond books,” he said. “Our job is to facilitate knowledge and that goes beyond checking out books.” The community has responded to this in a positive way, although Roewe says some were surprised

initially that the library was becoming more of a player in the community. “It’s a little less daunting now,” he said. “People were asking ‘Why is the library asking me about my community?’ We’re being seen as more of a partner now.” Roewe is focusing some of those partnership efforts on Spokane Valley. The district recently opened a satellite library, The Book End, at Spokane Valley Mall, but Roewe feels that’s not enough. “We’ve had two bond issues for the city of Spokane Valley that got really close but didn’t pass,” he said. “We think Spokane Valley could benefit from new libraries and deserves them. We’re exploring options to make them happen.” As for what he would like to happen at existing libraries, Roewe said the definition of library utilization is changing. “You can be an active member and never set foot in a library,” he said. “You can download e-books and music or take a course online but you may never check out a book.”

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8 • AUGUST 2017

Spokane Valley City Council Report – Aug. 2017

NEWS

The Current

By Bill Gothmann

Current Correspondent New law enforcement contract approved City Council unanimously approved a new contract between the city and the Spokane County Sheriff’s Office. The contract is five years with rolling termination after that. The contract specifies vehicle color, the marking on all cars except detective and supervisor cars, color of officer uniforms and patches, identifying full-time Spokane Valley officers, and simplifying the cost methodology. Deputy Mayor Arne Woodard commented, “This captures a whole lot of what we wanted to try to modernize in that contract. I think you have done a wonderful job.” Senior Administrative Analyst Morgan Koudelka noted “They (the county) wanted to make sure that we are getting what we want out of this contract.” Is there a new library in our future? In 2012, the Spokane County Library District (SCLD) purchased 2.82 acres of land from the city adjacent to Balfour Park for $839,285.10 with the provision that, should SCLD fail to pass a bond issue within five years to construct a library, the city would buy the land back at the same price. The ballot issue was twofold – first, it established a capital facilities area (CFA), a subset of the library district, permitting up to two ballot attempts at passing a bond issue. Second, it asked for approval of the bond issue. Although the CFA was approved, two ballot attempts failed to gain the required 60 percent bond issue approval. Over the past few months, an ad hoc committee composed of two council members, senior city

staff, SCLD Board of Trustees and SCLD staff met five times in order to develop a plan for constructing libraries. They recommend extending the agreement for five years to 2022. The original agreement required that SCLD and the city split the cost of common areas. The committee refined this to a $1.3 million obligation. The city would keep the money that SCLD paid for the land, add $461,000 and use these funds for the common area. At the July 11 council meeting, Council Member Sam Wood suggested the SCLD was not contributing enough. Council Member Caleb Collier expressed that this is not a need to the city. Thus, council members Wood, Collier, and Mike Munch were not in favor of continuing with the matter, whereas Mayor Rod Higgins, Deputy Mayor Woodard, and Council Members Pam Haley, and Ed Pace were in favor. Staff noted that the present agreement expires on Oct. 31. At a later meeting, City Attorney

Police Chief Warning to Citizens • The “Jury Duty” scam is quite active in our area, whereby a person asks for money or prepaid cards to prevent your prosecution. Law enforcement will never ask for funds over the phone. • $100 counterfeit bills are appearing in our area. • Firearms and other thefts from vehicles are up. Keep firearms in a safe place, record their serial numbers and keep valuables out of sight.

Cary Driskell noted that both the city and SCLD receive their funds from the citizens. Since anything beyond the city’s $1.3 million would be paid by SCLD, the district’s investment would really be in the $11 million-$12 million range. At the July 25 council meeting, 10 citizens testified in favor of the agreement and council approved it 5-1, with Haley absent and Collier dissenting. More urban farming and animals may be permitted in residential areas City staff has developed a new municipal code that includes both farming and the keeping of farm animals. The code would permit community gardens in all zones of the city and establish rules for sales of produce from such gardens. Marijuana and marijuana products would not be allowed. Gardens would require operating rules, require water and fertilizer to be contained on-site and in permit accessory structures such as greenhouses and sheds. Selling could occur from 7 a.m.-7 p.m., seven days per week. Structures from which products are sold, garbage and signs would be restricted. The ordinance would also cover animal keeping. Three large animals per acre would be permitted on large lots (40,000 square feet or more) in residential zones and in other zones where there is an existing residence on a

large lot. In all residential zones the ordinance permits keeping one “small livestock” per 2500 square feet or one “small animal or fowl” per 1000 square feet. “Small livestock” includes goats and sheep and other animals not exceeding 36 inches in shoulder height or 150 pounds. Council wanted all swine excluded from residential areas. Chickens and bee keeping would be permitted in all residential zones of any size and on large lots in other zones with an existing residence. Chickens are limited to 25 birds. The ordinance requires upkeep of structures and enclosures to protect and contain the animals. Staff will rework the proposal in accordance with council comments and will return later with another presentation. Council Approves Pines/Trent Rail Crossing Study City staff presented two alternatives for a Pines railroad underpass. Option 1 aligns Pines with the existing Trent intersection, requiring considerable excavation to lower Trent so that traffic going south on Pines can clear the underpass. Option 2 moves the Pines underpass east where the Trent road bed is lower. This would result in less Trent excavation but require building a larger, oblique bridge over the tracks and possibly requiring the purchase of more railroad right of way. Council approved awarding a contract for

See COUNCIL, Page 9


The Current

COUNCIL

AUGUST 2017 • 9

NEWS

Continued from page 8 $124,349.85 to HDR Engineering to evaluate all aspects of these two options, permitting staff to make a recommendation to the council in four months. Plans for Pines and Grace intersection on hold Between 2012 and 2016, there were 41 reported collisions at the Pines/Grace intersection, predominately involving vehicles making left turns off Pines. The original design included purchasing right-of-way on the west side of the intersection to improve visibility. However, according to information provided to the council, “the city was not able to come to reasonable negotiations with the property owner at the southwest corner.” As a result, the design was changed to prohibit left turns from Grace turning north onto Pines. At a community meeting held on June 12, citizens strongly objected to the design, noting that this would merely shift the problem to other roads, such as Buckeye. As a result of these events, staff has put the project on hold while they consult with Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) on other alternatives. Pines is a state highway. The design is done by Spokane Valley with oversight by WSDOT. The project is paid for by a federal grant of $671,050 and $200,000 from the city’s stormwater fund. City considering 30 mph speed limit on Eighth Avenue On June 6, Deputy City Manager John Hohman and Senior Traffic Engineer Ray Wright reviewed work done by David Evans and Associates concerning crashes at Eighth and McDonald, noting that eight occurred last year and two so far this year, three since the completion of improvements such as larger stop sign and the clearing of brush. Drivers heading west on Eighth are crashing into drivers heading south on McDonald. Staff was looking at possible alternatives. On June 27, staff returned, noting another accident had occurred the day before. Staff recommended reducing the speed limit to 30 mph on Eighth Avenue between Pines and Sullivan, installing new red flashing beacons above the stop signs on Eighth Avenue and installing crossroad warning sign assemblies with yellow flashing beacons above the signs on McDonald in advance of Eighth Avenue. They will also work on clearing brush to improve sight distances

and work with Modern Water and Electric to determine options for relocating the utility pole at the northwest corner of the intersection. Staff will continue to monitor the traffic to see if other actions are warranted. The beacons will cost $10,400 each. Furthermore, staff will examine whether to reduce all residential arterial speed limits to 30 mph. Council concurred. Left turns off Progress onto Trent to be prohibited In the last four years there were 24 crashes at the Progress and Trent intersection, 18 of which were left turns from Progress onto Trent. Trent is a state highway, so WSDOT recommended placing an island to prevent these left turns and were looking for the city’s concurrence. At a public meeting of the neighborhood that included over 20 attendees, there was unanimous agreement on the change. Zip Trip noted the need to keep their driveway open to large delivery trucks and the WSDOT plan will do this. They hope to install the island by the end of July or the first of August. Council concurred with this plan.

Folds of Honor Patriot Golf Day Tournament Friday, September 15, 1-7 pm

MeadowWood Golf Course 24501 E. Valleyway, Liberty Lake

Shotgun Start, 1:00 pm, Dinner to follow Awards will be presented to top teams and individuals for long drive and close-to-the-pin Various sponsor levels Registration includes green fees, cart and dinner: $500 per team or $125 per individual

Staff given parking restriction powers Council unanimously approved a resolution granting powers to staff to limit parking in construction zones for up to 120 days. A 30-day extension may also be granted. In order to establish such a restriction, staff will be required to perform a traffic analysis, determine the minimum length of time required for the restriction, give written notice to affected property owners and provide proper traffic control devices. City applying for grants for Argonne, Mullan, University and Mission Council approved staff submitting three road projects and one sidewalk project to the State Transportation Improvement Board in response to a call for projects in these two categories. These include providing an asphalt overlay on Mullan from Boadway north to Indiana, providing an asphalt overlay on University from 16th Avenue to Dishman-Mica and concrete reconstruction of the Broadway and Argonne/Mullan intersections. The sidewalk project would provide a sidewalk on the north side of Mission from Bowdish to Union. Browns Park volleyball drawing national attention

See VALLEY, Page 10

BEHIND EVERY WAVING FLAG, THERE ARE THOUSANDS FOLDED

Folds of honor provides educational scholarships for the children and spouses of military men and women killed or disabled in service to America. Since 2007, Patriot Golf Day has been our number one source of financial support. Help us continue to change lives through the game of golf by participating in your courses’ Patriot Golf Day.

Register Your Team:

www.eventbrite.com/e/patriots-day-golf-classic-tickets-35767289927

Corporate Sponsorships Available! Call: Craig Whiting at (509)869-8650 or Duane Tait at (509)280-2797

Tee and green sponsorships are available for $1000, which includes: one foursome and signage


The Current

10 • AUGUST 2017

VALLEY

Continued from page 9 Evergreen Region Volleyball Association (ERVA) Commissioner Meredith Coupland lauded the eight sand volleyball courts at Browns Park, noting “the word has gotten around about these courts in Spokane Valley.” The volleyball facilities exhibit “the pinnacle of the sand courts within the Inland Northwest,” Coupland said, and are even considered better than beach parks on the coast while attracting both regional and national attention. ERVA includes 3,580 junior boys and girls and 1,660 adult members, but the use of the park extends far beyond the association. Because of the remarkable growth of the sport, Coupland is looking forward to the city developing additional courts as shown in the Park and Recreation master plan, thereby attracting national events. State Legislative action affects city transportation, water rights, cell networks According to the city’s state legislature lobbyist, Brihna Murray, there was progress on Valley water providers’ water rights; $1.5

million was allocated to the Barker/ BNSF grade crossing, $556,000 in Appleway Trail amenities will probably be funded and state shared revenues remain protected. Rights for citizens to use their permitted water wells still remain in limbo, reducing the value of their property and shifting the tax burden to urban areas. Municipal staff and the city lobbyist are working to prevent loss of city authority to regulate small cell phone networks and to fund cleaning up abandoned properties. The new family leave bill will require funding by the city. Council discusses lodging tax goals Staff reviewed goals that will be given to the Lodging Tax Advisory Committee for recommending those agencies who will receive the 3.3 percent lodging tax funds collected by the city. The council emphasized they wanted funds to go to those activities that generate hotel occupancy, “heads in beds,” while acknowledging that the state law provides for them to go to tourism marketing, marketing and operation of special events and festivals, and operations and capital expenditures of tourismrelated facilities owned or operated

by a municipality or public facility district. Council wants such agencies to be self-sustaining, while acknowledging that such agencies as Visit Spokane and Spokane Sports Commission will never be self sustaining. This goal also affects such local agencies as Valleyfest and the Spokane Valley Heritage Museum. As a result of lobbying by the hotel industry, state law restricts council. They can only approve or disapprove a grant; they cannot modify it. City working on Intelligent Transportation System Senior Traffic Engineer Ray Wright reported that city traffic signals are maintained under contracts with the county and the state costing about $850,000 per year. The city has been devising its own Intelligent Transportation System (ITS), whereby signal timing can be changed from City Hall to allow for dynamic changes in traffic. However, they are working on problems communicating with the county’s ITS at the Spokane Regional Transportation Management Center. Council Briefs:

• Council expressed no interest in pursuing term limits after a staff report, requested by council Member Wood, stated these limits could be imposed by ordinance. • Council decided to require snow removal on all safe routes to schools. • Police Chief Mark Werner reported that The Property Crimes Task Force emphasis resulted in 633 new felony charges, 58 bookings, 90 summonses or warrants requested and 158 new misdemeanor charges from March through June 30. • Deputy Samuel Turner assisted a child’s father in reviving his 2-year old from drowning. The child is doing well. • Chief Mark Werner praised SCOPE for its over 2,900 hours of volunteering in May and over 2,500 hours in June at the six SCOPE stations within Spokane Valley • Spokane County Sheriff Office Citizens Advisory Board received the Lutheran Community Services Northwest Partners in Justice nomination for Outstanding Service to the Victims of Sexual Assault and Other Crimes in the category of legal systems.


The Current

Millwood Council Report By Mary Anne Ruddis Current Correspondent The Millwood City Council heard a presentation from the Spokane County Library District (SCLD) at its July 11 meeting. The district has a variety of programs and amenities from weekly story times for children to business and career training. There are programs on financial literacy with a popular program for senior planning with another series in the works. There are also free meeting rooms available six days a week. The Millwood History program was a great success and in anticipation of Millwood’s 90th anniversary, there are plans for additional programs. The library also reaches out into the community and brings books and programs to the Millwood Kindergarten Center. The

WVHS Eagle Buddy program provides wings of inclusion By Marie Ann Ruddis Current Correspondent In a world where we tend to hear more about what divides us than what unites us, the Eagle Buddy program at West Valley High School is an example of unifying community in action. Recent West Valley graduate Sydney Jones started the program last year. The Eagle Buddy Program pairs National Honor Society students seeking a rewarding way to earn required volunteer time with special education students in the Life Skills class. The volunteers commit to having lunch with the special education class every Wednesday. “We have lunch, talk, and laugh and have a game or craft,” said Sydney. “It’s the highlight of everyone’s week. You get to know the kids and see them in the hall. It makes it inclusive. Sometimes people can be scared of the other side. The program helps special needs kids socialize and helps the regular education kids as well.”

AUGUST 2017 • 11

library will also have a presence at Millwood Days on Aug. 26. The Argonne Library will be having its yearly book sale on Sept. 30. The South Riverway Property public participation is still in process with the planning commission. The commission is considering alternatives to the use of the property from a park to selling the properties. There have been four meetings and the commission heard ample comment both for and against use for a park or river access. The meeting on July 26 (after presstime) was expected to yield a recommendation from the council. Shawna Beese’s appointment to the vacant City Council position has stalled with the Spokane County Commissioners taking no action. Beese is the only candidate to file for the position in the November election so it is likely that the position will not be filled until after the election. The results of the program reach out beyond the Wednesday scheduled meeting time and friendships have formed outside of the Buddies’ lunchtime. Sydney’s sister, Lauren, is a Life Skills student and the program helps her connect Lauren’s fellow classmates to the larger student population. “Lauren is involved with the track team, so she already has experience with the larger school and I wanted that for the other Life Skills students,” Sydney says. “It’s why I started the program. They are Eagles too.” Jones got the idea from her mom who learned of another local high school with a similar program that pairs regular education students with special education students to create a more inclusive and rewarding experience for everyone involved. The special education students were isolated in their own class and the program helps other students branch out into an area they may not know anything about. Both sides wind up benefiting. Taylor Roderick, a student volunteer and Sydney’s friend, agrees. “I come in every Wednesday and I usually meet with Gibson, who is not here today,” he said on a recent Wednesday. “We pick a Buddy and

The Comprehensive Plan Amendment CPA 17-01 Becker Rezone was continued from the June meeting. At the June council meeting, after hearing the written recommendation from the planning commission to approve the request, the council requested additional time to review the change after hearing public comments. The request is to change the land use designation for the parcel located at 9016 E Frederick from a UR-3 multi-family residential to C-2 low intensity commerical/mixed use. The amendment was passed. The city received only one bid for the entry sign to the city and it came in at $91,034.00 – nearly double the expected cost of $40,000 - $45,000. The council unanimously voted to reject the bid and will revisit the issue later in the year. The Walk Bike Bus partnership with the Spokane Regional Health

play a game. It’s the coolest thing to see the kids in the hall and we recognize each other as all part of the school community. It is really fun. We can walk down the hall and high-five each other.” About 15 student volunteers participate in the program. The group also helps the special education students participate with the spirit assemblies.

District (SRHD) is going well, according to city officials. There was a two-part workshop offered on biking safely in traffic in July. A guided bike ride is scheduled along the Centennial Trail on Aug. 12. A bike shelter, bike racks and informational kiosk will be added on the south side of Dalton Avenue near Argonne road in partnership with SRHD. Visit the Walk Bike Bus Facebook page for more information: www.facebook.com/ walkbikebus In other news, City Attorney, Brian Werst gave a briefing on the Union Pacific Lease Agreement stating that there are several issues that need to be resolved before coming to an agreement. The Grace and Sargent sidewalk project is due to be completed by Aug. 18. There were some road closures but they did not impede residents’ access to their properties. The council voted Shaun Culler as mayor pro tem for six months.

and says the Eagle Buddy impact continues to resonate at West Valley. “It’s a phenomenal program,” he said. “The kids look forward to it every week.” By the looks of the smiling students and the sound of happy chatter, it appears Cerenzia knows what he’s talking about.

“We’ll go to the assembly beforehand,” Sydney said. “The cheerleaders will host them and we help them learn the cheers. It lets them feel like an Eagle.” Sydney’s goal is to make the program sustainable after she graduates. She will be going to Stanford University in the fall to study mechanical engineering with an emphasis in product design. Sydney worked this year on getting the underclass involved. Her brother, Spencer, a junior in the fall, has also started volunteering with the program. He plans to take it over now that Sydney has graduated. “It’s fun being here,” Spencer said. “Some of the kids I’ve known from middle school and grade school.” WVHS Special Education Teacher Adam Cerenzia gives credit to Sydney for starting the program

Recent West Valley graduate Sydney Jones (right) started the Eagle Buddy program last year. Her brother Spencer (left) will be taking over the program in the fall. Contributed photo


COVER STORY

12 • AUGUST 2017

Route Repair – Past and future Centennial Trail upgrades By Julie Humphreys

Current Correspondent Maintaining 40 miles of wellused trailway is a full-time task requiring a dedicated, collaborative effort. Recent improvements to the Centennial Trail include: • The completion of a 2.2mile extension on the western end of the trail to Long Lake. Finished last year, the project extended the trail from its previous end point at Sontag Park near Nine Mile Falls Dam to an area of Long Lake known as Nine Mile Resort. • The Sullivan Bridge Replacement Project, coordinated by the city of Spokane Valley, is complete and includes a realignment of the Centennial Trial under the new bridge. The realignment adds better access from Sullivan Road to the trail. Upcoming projects summer include:

this

• Completion of the maintenance project begun last fall (see main story), including the flood damage in the Valley. • Mission Park Phase 1 in September, which is the pedestrian street crossing between Mission Park and Avista Headquarters. Friends of the Centennial Trail Board of Directors 2017 priorities include: • Support the Centennial Trail Coordinating Council Trail maintenance and asphalt overlay projects. • Encourage Washington State Parks and Spokane County to finalize a gap completion plan for Argonne Road. • Invest in Spokane City Parks plan to renovate the Don Kardong Bridge in 2019. • Encourage the city of Spokane to find a solution for the trail

The Current

Happy Trail to You – Community support preserves Centennial Trail as local gem By Julie Humphreys

Current Correspondent

gap from Boone to Pettit Drive that provides Class 1 roadway separation. • Advocate for all recreational trails in the region. • Update Centennial Trail printed maps and kiosk posters once the Riverfront Park span is confirmed. • Invest in way finding signs, markers and mile posts when it is expedient to do so. • Encourage and promote Trail safety for all users. Each segment of the trail, no matter what city or county it lies in, has its own unique flavor. Almost the entire trail in the Spokane Valley is undeveloped because it sits in state park land. Mike Basinger is the Economic Development manager for the city of Spokane Valley who serves on the Friends of Centennial Trail board. “It’s like you are in nature,” Basinger says. “It’s a really cool asset for the city.”

There’s just something about a river and access to it and a trail meandering alongside it. The Spokane River is as compelling today to people seeking recreation and beauty and a source of power as it was to the Spokane Tribe of Indians more than 100 years ago for nourishment and spiritual purposes. Flowing 111 miles from Lake Coeur d’Alene to Lake Roosevelt, the Spokane River is part of the fabric of who we are. That’s why it was important to a group of local citizens some 30 years ago to build a trail along the river. Dedication, fund raising, forward thinking and a lot of heart resulted in what became the Centennial Trail. The original plan was to build a 10.5-mile trail in the Spokane Valley with a namesake reflecting Washington state’s 100th birthday in 1989. The dream was an eventual 60 miles of multi-purpose recreational trail running along the river from Lake Coeur d’Alene to the confluence of the Spokane

and Little Spokane rivers. Today, that 60 miles is a reality with 40 miles in Washington beginning at the Washington/Idaho state line and ending at Lake Spokane in Nine Mile Falls. Another reality is the hundreds of thousands of trail users and enthusiasts from numerous local communities with a vested interest in supporting and maintaining “their” Centennial Trial. The original citizens’ group behind the trail eventually morphed into the Friends of the Centennial Trail (FOTC), a non-profit that assists in the development, operation, maintenance and enhancement of the trail. FOTC consists of a volunteer board of directors and one employee, Executive Director Loreen McFaul. “We love to recreate in the Northwest,” McFaul says. “I think there is an expectation that the trail should be available, clean and safe. But it takes a lot of money to keep it that way.” McFaul says that stewardship takes a lot of coordination and

See TRAIL, Page 13

The segment of the Centennial Trail that runs through downtown Spokane is urbanized and currently a detour zone with the Riverfront Park Redevelopment Project underway. Watch for orange markings around the construction that redirect trail users. To note: The Centennial Trial is patrolled by rangers who are fully commissioned law enforcement officers. They maintain public restrooms, deal with the homeless population along the trail, manage downed trees and other dangers and more. Rangers remind us to follow two basic trail safety rules – all dogs must be on a leash and bikers/cyclists must adhere to the 15-mile-an-hour speed limit on the trail. Enjoy your Centennial Trail! For more information on upcoming trail projects go to http://spokanecentennialtrail. org/

The Centennial Trail was originally intended to be a 10-5-mile path in Spokane Valley built to celebrate Washington state's 100th birthday in 1989. The trail formed into a 60-mile route that includes 20 miles in Idaho and 40 miles in Washington. Most of the construction was completed by 1992. Photo by Craig Howard


The Current

TRAIL

COVER STORY

AUGUST 2017 • 13

Continued from page 12 cooperation between multiple agencies – happening now like never before under a newly formalized Centennial Trail Coordinating Council. The council has always been loosely in place but now McFaul says the interagency agreement is setting a standard “for state parks on how to work together.” The four governing agencies all with a financial obligation to the council include the city of Spokane Parks and Recreation Department, the city of Spokane Valley Parks and Recreation Department, Spokane County Parks, Recreation and Golf and the Riverside State Park management under Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission which administers and manages the Centennial Trail. Joining the council this summer is the city of Liberty Lake. “The more jurisdictions that can be a part of the council, the stronger the trail will be” according to McFaul. “Liberty Lake’s support is key as there is a lot of development and traffic there and the more people who use the trail, the more important it is to maintain it.” Jennifer Camp, Liberty Lake Parks and Recreation director says the city is excited to looking forward to being part of keeping the trail clean, safe and well-maintained. “The city will have more of a voice and potentially more access to the water” she says. Liberty Lake has been courted to participate in the trail management for years and Camp says the decision to step in now has a lot to do with a building boom. The area north of the freeway and south of the river has been empty for some time but is currently seeing substantial business and residential growth. While the city is surrounded by a river to the north and a lake to the south, the trail is actually outside of the city’s boundary lines so there is no water tie to the city of Liberty Lake. What Liberty Lake does have is lots of trails. “One of our specialties is trails,” Camp said. “We have miles in our city and we feel like we can share trail knowledge and maintenance. Eventually we would like river access. We’ve formed good relationships with the other jurisdictions and are ready to step in.” Stepping into the council means a $20,000 annual commitment. All

Benches along the Centennial Trail overlook the Spokane River and provide a respite for walkers, joggers and cyclists. A few miles to the east of this bench, improvements have been made to trail access from Sullivan Road as part of the Sullivan Bridge Replacement Project coordinated by the city of Spokane Valley. Photo by Craig Howard jurisdictions pay that amount and the money goes into a pool for trail improvement and updates. Funds pay for work on sections of the trail in highest need regardless of how many miles of the trail are actually in a city or county’s boundaries. Liberty Lake has only three to five miles of trail – the boundary is still being determined – while the city of Spokane Valley has six-and-ahalf miles. Mike Stone, Spokane Valley Parks and Recreation director, says eventually things even out. “We are trying to get the biggest bang for our buck,” he says. “When we started looking at cost estimates for repairs it far exceeded what we thought.” Since the majority of the trail was completed in 1992, there are sections that haven’t seen major improvements in more than a quarter of a century. That’s a lot of rain, snow, freezing and extreme heat on the asphalt over time. Even with four, and now five, agencies putting $20,000 in the pot, it doesn’t cover the cost of a coordinated and comprehensive trail update. Enter the state of Washington who owns the majority of land that the

trail sits on. Last fall, the state got $250,000 in deferred maintenance money to use on the Centennial Trail. Diana Dupuis, state parks manager, says because the council had a strong maintenance plan in place, they were able to get started on trial updates right away. Much of the work was done last fall but a harsh winter with a lot of snow followed by a wet spring and substantial flooding postponed some work. The winter caused significant damage to portions of the trail that now need to be fixed. Mile 6.5 to 7.5 west of Barker Road in the Spokane Valley was particularly impacted and closed this spring. Dupuis says the state is obligated to fix the trail regardless of whether or not the damage qualifies for federal disaster dollars. However, the repair project has been deemed FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) eligible and Dupuis is optimistic the state will be reimbursed. Meanwhile, with flooding damage repairs mostly complete, the maintenance project started last fall is underway and should be done this autumn. Crews are still assessing if the flooding did additional damage to areas of the

trail that were just fixed at the end of last year. Much of the regular maintenance work involves fixing cracks in the asphalt and damage from protruding tree roots to make the trail safer for walker, runners, skaters and people on bikes. Another council priority is to make the trail easier for people to get to which means better signage, maps and cell phone technology to guide trail users. “We’re only as good as the community support we get,” says McFaul, referring to both financial and volunteer reinforcement. The Friends of the Centennial Trail has about 300 annual members who make contributions as well as 39 sponsors who adopt various miles of the trail. The group puts on an annual bike swap and expo that has brought in $160,000 in its six years. It takes a lot to keep 40 miles of trail safe, clean and accessible. The council thinks it’s worth it and apparently so do the people who make up the 2.4 million visits to the trail each year. "The way the trail links the community is pretty unique,” says Dupuis. “There’s something special about recreation users in Spokane, they work for it and that’s inspiring.”


COMMUNITY

14 • AUGUST 2017

“ IT’S

THE LAW ”

In WASHINGTON Click or Call Two Business Days Before You Plan To Dig

www.CallBeforeYouDig.org

1-800-424-5555 or dial 811 Inland Empire Utility Coordinating Council www.ieucc811.org

Calendar of Events COMMUNITY EVENTS Aug. 1 | National Night Out, times and locations vary. The 34th annual nationwide rally against crime and drugs will include participation by law enforcement, fire fighters, county and city officials at locations throughout Spokane County. Sites will feature free games, food, music and familyfriendly activities. To find out more about hosting a National Night Out event in your area, please contact the Neighborhood Watch coordinator at 477-3055 for more information and to register Aug. 4-5 | Barefoot in the Park, Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter, Liberty Lake. The third annual summer event facilitated by the city of Liberty Lake will feature barefoot soccer in the park hosted by the HUB Sports Center, a food truck rally, live music, bubble soccer, a bouncy house, vintage car show and activities for animals hosted by Pawpular Companions. For more information about the two-day agenda, call Liberty Lake City Hall at 755-6700 Aug. 12 | Friends of Pavillion Park Movie Night, “Rogue One,” dusk, Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Road, Liberty Lake

For Income-Eligible Children 3 or 4 Years Old by August 31

Call us to enroll today! FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO ENROLL YOUR CHILD: Central Valley School District .............. 228-5810 East Valley School District .............. 924-1830

Aug. 19 | Friends of Pavillion Park presents Montana Shakespeare in the Park, 5 p.m. at Pavillion Park Aug. 26 | Ninth annual Millwood Daze, 8 a.m.-8 p.m., Dalton Avenue in Millwood. Featuring a family 5K race, country breakfast, red wagon parade, Dachsund raqce, vendors, music, entertainment and more. Proceeds benefit MidCity Concerns Meals on Wheels. For more information, visit www. mowspokane.org Aug. 26 | Friends of Pavillion Park Movie Night, “Beauty and the Beast,” dusk, Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter, Liberty Lake Sept. 2 | Lud Kramer Memorial Concert featuring the Spokane Symphony, dusk, Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter, Liberty Lake

Learn more! www.del.wa.gov/care/find-hs-eceap/

The Current

Wednesdays through Sept. 13 | Millwood Farmers Market, 3 to 7 p.m. Located in front of Millwood Presbyterian Church, 8910 E., Dalton off Argonne. Featuring food and farm vendors, artisan crafts, music and more. Market

accepts token System, WIC, senior vouchers, EBT and Fresh Bucks programs. For more information, visit millwoodfarmermar.wix.com/ market

Military Sobriety Support Group | 10 to 11: 30 a.m., Spokane Vet Center, 13109 E. Mirabeau Parkway, Spokane Valley. Call Steve at 8934746 for more information.

Saturdays through Oct. 14 | Liberty Lake Farmers Market, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Town Square Park, 1421 N. Meadowwood Lane. Market features local food and farm vendors, artisan crafts and baked goods, music and more. Upcoming special events include the Pie Festival, Aug. 26, and Art at the Market, beginning Friday, Sept. 8 at noon and running through 1 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 9. For more information, visit www. libertylakefarmersmarket.com.

Grange Meeting and Dessert | 6:30 p.m., first Wednesday of the month, Tri-Community Grange, 25025 Heather St., Newman Lake. The public is welcome for this community-based service organization. For more information call 226-2202 or see us on Facebook.

RECURRING ACT 2 senior classes | Affordable classes offered by Community Colleges of Spokane to those who are retired or planning to retire. A wide range of courses from geology and history to exercise and art are offered at CenterPlace, 2426 N. Discovery Place, as well as other locations throughout the area. “Focused Fitness on Dishman Mica,” a yoga class, is now part of the schedule. More at www.sccel. spokane.edu/ACT2. Baha’i Fireside Conversation | 5 to 6 p.m., third Friday of the month. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main Ave. Discussion of Baha’i teachings, history, and perspectives on resolving the challenges facing humanity. All are welcome. More at 599-2411 or www.bahai.us. Inland Empire Blues Society monthly meeting | Oct. 13 at 7:30 p.m., Bolo's 116 S. Best Road. Café Card Club | 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Tuesdays. On Sacred Grounds, 12212 E. Palouse Hwy., Valleyford. Play pinochle, cribbage, or hearts. More at www.onsacredgrounds. com. Catholic Singles Mingle | Meeting times and locations vary. This group, with no dues, is for single adults of all ages. More at www. meetup.com/Catholic-SinglesMingle. DivorceCare Recovery Support Group | Tuesdays 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Eastpoint Church, 15303 E. Sprague Ave. Learn how to heal from the deep hurt of divorce and discover hope for your future. DivorceCare for Kids (ages 5-12) meets at the same time and location. Cost is $25 for workbook. More at 892-5255 or eastpointchurch.com.

Men’s Weekly Bible Study | 7 a.m. Tuesdays. Millwood Presbyterian Church, 3223 N. Marguerite Road, Millwood. The men’s weekly Bible Study meets in the Reception Hall with different members sharing in the leading of the study. All men are invited to join. More at www. milwoodpc.org. Pancreatic Cancer Action Network | 6:30 p.m., the first Monday of each month. Liberty Lake Municipal Library, 23123 E. Mission Ave., Liberty Lake. More at www.pancan.org or 534-2564. Rockford Crochet Class | 10 a.m. to noon, Saturdays. The Harvest Moon, 20 S. First St., Rockford. Free classes. We have crocheters, knitters, embroidery, quilting and needlepoint. Come and share with us what you are doing. Call 2913722. Rockford Historical Society | 11:30 a.m. second Friday of the month (Feb. to Nov.). Harvest Moon restaurant, 20 S. First St., Rockford. More at 291-3193. Spokane County Library District | Locations include Argonne, Fairfield, Otis Orchards, and Spokane Valley. Special events and weekly activities for all ages including book clubs, children’s story times, classes, Lego club, teen anime club and writing clubs. More at www.scld.org Spokane Valley Eagles | 16801 E. Sprague Ave. Breakfast served Sundays 9 to 11:30 a.m. Lunch served Thursdays 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. followed by bingo from 1 to 3:30 p.m. More at www.foe3433. com. Spokane Valley Partners Food Bank | Weekly distribution takes place Wednesdays and Thursdays at 10814 E. Broadway by appointment. Appointments are available during the following days/times: Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. to


The Current

COMMUNITY

3:15 p.m. Thursday (reserved for advanced-age seniors — age 60 and over — and/or physicallyhandicapped people with limited mobility): 11 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Address verification is required. To make an appointment, call 927.1153 ext. 10, Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 1 p.m

Spokane Valley Quilt Guild | Meetings are held at 7 p.m. on the first Tuesday of February, April, June, August, October and December at Valley Assembly of God Church, 15618 E. Broadway, Spokane Valley. Open to all interested in sharing ideas and skills of our quilting craft. Participants have can access a comprehensive library, can engage experienced teachers and participate in community service projects. More at www.svqgspokane.com

MUSIC & THE ARTS Aug. 3-6 | “The Secret Garden” presented by the Spokane Valley Summer Theater, Central Valley Performing Arts Center, 821 S. Sullivan Road, Spokane Valley. SVST presents the Tony awardwinning family musical by Lucy Simon and Marsha Norman. Tickets are available online at www. svsummertheatre.com. Tickets are $38 for adults; $36 for seniors/ military and $20 for students or $10 30 minutes prior to the show

RECURRING Drop-in Square Dance Lessons | 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. (through May 18). Western Dance Center, 1901 N. Sullivan Road. Square dance lessons for $3 per person; no partner needed. More at 270-9264. Pages of Harmony | 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., Wednesdays. Thornhill Valley Chapel, 1400 S. Pines Road. If you enjoy singing, you will love the four-part, a cappella harmony of this men’s barbershop chorus. More at www.pagesofharmony.org. Spirit of Spokane Chorus | 6:45 p.m., Tuesdays. Opportunity Presbyterian Church, 202 N. Pines Road. Make new friends by joining this women’s chorus, specializing in four-part, a cappella harmony in the barbershop style. More at 2184799. Spokane Novelists Group | Noon to 4 p.m., second and fourth Saturday of the month. Otis Orchards Community Church, 23304 E. Wellesley Ave., Otis Orchards. A support/critique group for writers. Open to anyone with

an interest in writing fiction (no memoirs, nonfiction, poetry, etc., please). Participants should bring 5-10 pages to read aloud and 6-8 copies for others to read along and critique. More at 590-7316. Spokane Valley Camera Club | 7:15 p.m., third and fourth Monday of the month (September through April). Liberty Lake Sewer and Water District building, 22510 E. Mission Ave., Liberty Lake. All levels of ability—students through experienced photographers—are invited to learn. Social events include field trips and workshops. More at 951-1446 or www.sv-cc. org Spokane Valley Writers’ Group | 6:15 p.m. the first and third Thursdays of the month. Lakeside Church, 23129 E. Mission Ave. This supportive critique group welcomes adult writers. More at 570-4440.

HEALTH & RECREATION Aug. 12-13 | Volleyball Skills Camp with Olympic gold medalist Pat Powers, Saturday, Aug. 12, 9 a.m. -4 p.m. and Sunday, Aug. 13, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave., Liberty Lake. Designed for novice through advanced levels, youth and adults. The registration fee includes 12 hours of instruction and T-shirt. Register at http://www. vbclinics.com/register.asp?lid=124 or call the HUB at 927-0602 for more information Aug 14 | Mobile Vet Center, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Fairchild Air Force Base, AAFES parking lot, 101 W. Spaatz Road. The Mobile Vet Center will be on hand to connect veterans with resources including medical, disability compensation, counseling, readjustment counseling as well as to answer questions about benefits and other topics. No appointment necessary. For questions, call Stu Sturtevant at 444-8387. The Spokane Vet Center is located at 13109 Mirabeau Parkway in Spokane Valley. For more information, call 444-8387. For assistance after hours, weekends, and holidays call toll-free 1-877-WAR-VETS (1-877927-8387). Aug. 21-23 | Nigel WilliamsGoss Youth Point Guard Camp, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. each day at the HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave., Liberty Lake. The former Gonzaga point guard

See CALENDAR, Page 16

AUGUST 2017 • 15


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16 • AUGUST 2017

CALENDAR

• Classes including Kenpo Karate and Zumba Aerobics. See website for cost and times.

who led the Bulldogs to the 2017 National Championship Game will be providing instruction for a minimum of four hours each day. The camp is for kids 7-14 of all skill levels. Cost is $200 per participant before Aug. 1 and $225 each until Aug. 15. Call the HUB at 927-0602 for more information.

Yoga in Rockford | 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Rockford Park, 20 W. Emma St., Rockford. In case of inclement weather, classes will be held at Dave’s Autobody, 8 W. Emma St.

Continued from page 15

Business Resource Open House Registration Open Thursday September 21st, 2017 3:00pm - 6:00pm

Celebrate our new brand and meet local business resources and lenders See details at : www.snapwa.org

Aug. 24 | Do It Yourself Make and Take featuring Doterra essential oils, 6:30-7:45 p.m. Choice of up to three recipes. "Peaceful Child" to help your child achieve better emotional regulation, and two others. All materials provided. Door prizes. $9 per person. Hosted by Willow Song Music Therapy Center, 21101 E. Wellesley #102. Otis Orchards. For more information, call Carla at 592 7875 or email carla.carnegie@ gmail.com Each Wednesday | Mindful Music and Movement class, 11:30 a.m. -12:30 p.m. Specifically designed for those living with chronic health issues such as Parkinson's, dementia, COPD, MS, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue or cancer. Supporting body, mind and soul. Facilitated by board-certified Music Therapist, Carla Carnegie at Willow Song Music Therapy Center. 21101 E. Wellesley #102. Otis Orchards WA 99027. More information at www.willowsongmusictherapy.com or call 592 7875

RECURRING HUB Sports Center 19619 E. Cataldo Ave. Various activities and events occur throughout the week including: • Pickleball drop-in: 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Mon. through Thurs.; 10 a.m. to noon Tues. and Thurs. and 6 to 8 p.m. Wed. and Sun. $3/seniors ($5/non-seniors)

Funded in part through a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration.” In conjunction with funding from the City of Spokane CDBG and JP Morgan Chase

CIVIC & BUSINESS Aug. 13 | Willow Song Treasures, from noon to 4 p.m., old, new repurposed and vintage items displayed by various vendors, stringed instruments by Adagio Strings, baby blankets, antique bottle collection, wedgewood, baskets, fresh eggs and more. Hosted by Willow Song Music Therapy Center, 21101 E. Wellesley #102.Otis Orchards. For more information call: Carla at 592 7875 or Jane at 230 2490

RECURRING Flag Museum | Sponsored by the Sons of the American Revolution and the Fairmount Memorial Association, details the rich history of the American flag, Mondays-Fridays, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Saturdays, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Pines Cemetery, 1402 S. Pines Road, Spokane Valley. For more information: 926-2753 or www. fairmountmemorial.com/southpines-cemetery Spokane Valley Kiwanis | 6:45 a.m. Tuesdays. Valley Hospital Education Center, 12606 E. Mission Ave. More at www. spokanevalleykiwanis.net. Spokane Valley Rotary | Noon to 1 p.m., Tuesdays. Darcy’s, 10502 E. Sprague Ave. More at www. svrotary.org.


LIBRARY

The Current

Harvest produce at SCLD sites this summer

AUGUST 2017 • 17

Out of This World

By Gwendolyn Haley

Spokane County Library District My eyes are bigger than my freezer and pantry. Every year, I plant a little garden, only to be overwhelmed when everything starts to ripen at once. My family starts to groan and say, “No more… beans, tomatoes, squash” and so on. Each spring, I underestimate just how much produce will come from six tomato plants—and don’t get me started on the zucchini plant that generates a lifetime supply of squash. Every summer, my mother keeps trying to give me more and more plums, but you can only eat so many crisps and cobblers. This year, I plan to take full advantage of the Produce Swaps at our seed library locations. The idea of a produce swap is simple. Bring your extra, fresh produce and take home something different. So if you too feel overwhelmed with an abundance of fruit and veggies, I invite you to bring your extras to the swaps and pick up something different, that way you can have little more variety on the dinner

Celestial celebrations and the solar eclipse By Erin Dodge

Current Guest Contributor This month, the Spokane County Library District (SCLD) has celestial celebrations planned for all to enjoy. For the first time in almost 40 years, a total eclipse of the sun will be visible in parts of the continental U.S. Here in Spokane, we’ll see a partial eclipse, in which the moon covers a portion of the sun. Experience this astronomical phenomenon on Solar Eclipse Day, Aug. 21, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Spokane Valley and Argonne Libraries. To celebrate, you can join in for even more out of this world events.

Come to the library for a totally amazing solar eclipse & celestial celebrations

table. Once you visit a produce swap, you may find a new favorite variety to plant next year. Any leftovers from each produce swap at the seed libraries will be donated by library staff to a local food bank— that way everybody benefits. And yes, the library will take your excess zucchini. Just put it on the table next to mine. Here’s the schedule for Produce Swaps, starting in August, continuing through September: Otis Orchards Library, Saturdays, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

At Spokane Valley, Argonne, and Otis Orchards libraries, Aug. 1–21, kids of all ages and adults can tackle hands-on solar eclipse activities to learn about the sun, what causes a solar eclipse and how to safely view the eclipse. Discover the night sky at the Stargazing Workshop with Spokane Astronomical Society at Spokane Valley Library on Thursday, Aug. 3, from 7–8 p.m. Pre-schoolers, toddlers, babies and their caregivers are invited to special Sun and Moon Storytimes at Spokane Valley Library, Monday and Thursday, Aug. 7 and 10, at 10:30 a.m. for toddlers, ages 18 months to 3 years; Tuesday and Wednesday, Aug. 8 and 9, at 10:30 a.m. for preschoolers, ages 3 to 5 years; and Friday, Aug. 11, at 10:30 a.m. for infants up to 18 months. If those days don’t fit your schedule, you can catch a Sun and Moon Storytime all week long at all scheduled storytimes at all libraries, Aug. 7–11. Take a drive up the South Hill to the Moran Prairie Library to

Fairfield Library, Tuesdays, 10 a.m.–2 p.m.

SOLAR ECLIPSE ACTIVITIES Aug 1–21

Cheney Library, Tuesdays, 1–5 p.m. Medical Lake Wednesdays, 1–5 p.m.

Library,

Deer Park Library, Sundays, 1–5 p.m. Looking for recipe inspiration or a new way to prepare your bounty? The cookbook section at the library (section 641) is one of the largest in our libraries. Plus we add new titles all the time, both in print and in our digital library, OverDrive. Bon appetite!

see Mobius Science Center’s 360-degree virtual tour of our solar system in their mobile planetarium on Wednesday, Aug. 16, with afternoon and evening shows at 2, 3:30, 5 and 6:30 and also at North Spokane Library on Thursday, Aug. 17, with afternoon and evening shows at 1, 2:15, 3:30, 5, 6:15 and 7:30. Space is limited for these shows, so tickets will only be available 30 minutes prior to each show time. Eye Safety during a Solar Eclipse Experience the eclipse safely by protecting your eyes at all times. Some options for solar-eclipse viewing include solar viewers, pinhole viewers and binoculars, telescopes, cameras or finder scopes with a solar filter. Do not use sunglasses – they don’t offer your eyes sufficient protection. No matter what recommended technique you use, be sure to take breaks – look away from the sun regularly – and give your eyes a rest. Do not stare continuously at the sun. Your vision depends on it!

STARGAZING HOW-TOS Aug 3 & 10

SUN & MOON STORYTIMES Aug 7–11

MOBIUS SCIENCE PLANETARIUM SHOWS Aug 16 & 17

SOLAR ECLIPSE DAY Aug 21

Visit www.scld.org for locations & times.

www.scld.org


The Current

18 • AUGUST 2017

Greetings, Inland Northwest. We’re excited to be here. Rockwood Clinic, Valley Hospital and Deaconess Hospital are now a part of the MultiCare family. MultiCare is a not-for-profit health care system dedicated to the health and well-being of the communities we serve. Thank you for welcoming us into your hospitals, clinics and homes.

multicare.org


Brought to you by

INSTRUCTIONAL CLAS

OFFERED MORNING, AFTERNOON, EVENING AND W

FOR ALL GOALS & ABILI TODDLER THROUGH AD

Competitive Teams • Parkour, Brea and Hip Hop Classes • Parent’s N • Bitty Bee Academy & Flippin’ Fu Night • Open Gym for All Ages • Gym Birthday Parties • Nin

ENROLL TODAY! Our coaches are passionate about gymnastics and focus on teaching quality gymnastics in a fun and safe environment. Classes run year-round with three 13-week sessions (Fall, Winter and Spring) and one 10-week summer session.

Coloring Day was created by Dover Publications in 1970 when they decided to print the first coloring book targeted for adults called Antique Automobiles. Would this ever have been created without crayons?? On March 31, 1885, in New York City, Edwin Binney and C. Harold Smith founded the company that would become known around the world for their line of wax crayons known by the brand name “Crayola”. The name was chosen by Alice Binney, who was a former schoolteacher. They went into production in 1903. By 1905, they had expanded the line to 18 different sized boxes with five different sizes of crayons, two of which are still available today. They originally sold for 5 cents to $1.50. In 1926, Binney & Smith purchased the Munsell crayon line. This purchase added 22 new colors to their line enabling them to introduce a 52 color assortment in 1939. This size was retired in 1944, making way for the 48 color box which is still available today. Further expansion happened in 1958 when they introduced the 64 color box

which came with a built-in sharpener. Crayola crayons were inducted into the National Toy Hall of Fame in 1998 as one of the founding members. If you went to the Smithsonian Museum, you would see that they have over 300 boxes in their collection. Today, Crayola is sold in over 80 countries and has a 99% recognition worldwide which makes them very famous indeed. The 100 billionth crayon was molded by Mr. Rogers in 1996. In 1998, a postage stamp was introduced to commemorate the cultural impact Crayola has made. The world's largest crayon was made in 2003 from 123,000 used or broken crayons donated by people around the world. It is 15 feet long with a 16 inch diameter. Did you know that the other original inductees to the National Toy Hall of Fame were Barbie, Etch a Sketch, Erector set, Frisbee, Hula Hoop, Lego, Lincoln Logs, Marbles, Monopoly, Play-Doh, Radio Flyer wagon, Roller Skates, Teddy Bear, Tinkertoy, View-Master and Duncan Yo-Yo.

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The Current

20 • AUGUST 2017

Summer is almost over, savor it! Show us your coloring! Send it to contest@libertylakesplash.com


The Current

AUGUST 2017 • 21

Ice Cream in a Bag

What You'll Need: • 1 1/2 cups half and half • 1 tablespoon sugar • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla • 1/2 cup rock salt • 3 cups ice • 1 gallon-size zip-top bag • 1 pint-size zip-top bag • Dish towel What You Do: 1. Start by filling the gallon-size zip-top bag with half the ice. Sprinkle half the rock salt over the ice. 2. Now carefully measure and pour the half and half into the small pint-size bag along with the vanilla and sugar. Make sure the top is tightly sealed! Place the pint size bag inside the gallonsize bag. 3. Pack the rest of the ice around the cream-filled baggie and then sprinkle with the rest of the rock salt. Zip the top, wrap in the dish towel, and get ready to shake. 4. Check the bag after one to two minutes of good shaking. Creamy ice cream should be awaiting inside! 5. Remove the ice cream from the bag of salted ice and enjoy!

PACE Trait Gratitude

Feeling and expressing thankful appreciation for benefits recieved. Try showing your graditude for someone by doing one of these: • give them a hug or handshake • make them a card • write them a note • do something helpful like fold laundry or take out the trash • make them a meal or snack • plan a fun activity • give them a compliment

WEEKLY SUMMER CAMPS

Join us at one or all of our weekly summer camps with a different focus each week. In addition to our gymnastics and trampoline camp weeks we’ll have Adventure camps, Ninja Zone camps, Cheer camps and Parkour/ Breakdance camps for children ages 3 and up!

Camp pricing starts at $129 (half days) or $229 (full days) for the week, daily rates also available. Registration is now open and can be done in person or by phone.

315-5433 2515 N. Locust Road Spokane Valley 99206

www.spokanegymnastics.com

Animal Facts

Cut them out and collect them all! TOUCAN - South American Rain Forests - 25” tall, 14 to 20 ounces, 7.5” beak - Approximate 20 year lifespan - Flocks of about six - 37 species - Nest in tree holes - Beak is honeycomb. Mostly just for show and not defensive, but useful for eating. - It’s tongue is like a feather. It has bristles on either side to help it taste and move food down its throat.


The Current

22 • AUGUST 2017

Anne Evelyn, who would later write as Eve Bunting, was born in the small village of Maghera, Ireland. As a child she longed for a library. She went to school in Belfast where she attended Methodist College, graduating in 1945 and then Queen’s University where she met her husband Edward. After marriage they moved to Scotland to start their family. In 1958, the family immigrated to the United States where they settled in Pasadena, CA. Feeling a strong desire to write about her heritage, she took writing classes at the local college. Her first published book, The Two Giants came out in 1971. Since then she has written over 250 titles when she isn’t teaching writing classes at the University of California, Los Angeles and numerous writing conferences. She is an extremely diverse author with books tackling important issues such as war, death, and immigration. Her books have won many awards.

Author Spotlight

Eve Bunting

9th Annual

2017 Millwood Daze August 26th, 2017

Country Breakfast by Masonic Lodge (Millwood Community Center) AnyTime Fitness Family Challenge: 9:00am start Entertainment Stage WVHS band kicking off at 8:45 am and all day entertainment Street Fair with activities and food trucks, Street Dance w/ free dance class from 5PM – 6PM and dancing from 6:00pm – 8:00PM Free movie: SING! (behind Rocket Bakery)

Near East Dalton street between Argonne and Dale in Millwood, WA Questions? Contact Anytime Fitness at (509)315-5023

Put these on your summer reading list!

Dandelions, 2001, ages 5-8

If you love Little House on the Prairie then it’s likely this book will appeal to you. The art has a lack of focus to allow you to use your imagination. Maybe you’ll look at the dandelions in your yard a little differently

after reading this.

Night of the Gargoyles, 1994, ages 5 and up

This stunning black and white picture book has captivating artwork done by David Wiesner. It also answers any questions you might think of about sculptures on buildings and what they might think or do when no one is paying attention.

P is for Pirate: A Pirate Alphabet, 2014, ages 6 and up

Not your typical alphabet book. Each page has historical facts about famous pirates and the life they led. Plus this book will help prepare you for “Talk Like a Pirate Day” in September. The art is very humorous and bright to give giggles.


The Current

Student of the Month At 6-foot-6 and 280 pounds, Campbell Barrington is a titan on the campus of University High School. A starter in football as a sophomore, Barrington will enter his senior year this fall as one of the top offensive linemen in the Greater Spokane League, specializing in run blocking. Last June, he gave a verbal commitment to join the football program at Brigham Young University. Schools such as Arizona and Eastern Washington also offered scholarships. Barrington is a letter-winner in basketball at U-Hi as well. In the classroom, Barrington maintains a 3.73 grade point average and is a member of Washington Drug Free Youth. He has also contributed to nonprofit efforts like Blessings Under the Bridge. Before starting his college football career, Barrington plans to serve a two-year mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Citizen of the Month

Thanks you for all you do in our community

AUGUST 2017 • 23 When it comes time to print out the honor roll at University High School each semester, Claire Dingus has her name etched in. The senior-to-be maintains a 3.97 grade point average and is a member of the National Honor Society. She is also part of the school’s Washington Drug Free Youth chapter and a member of Key Club, helping to coordinate activities and community service projects. As an athlete, Dingus has the rare opportunity to become a 12-time letter winner by the time she graduates in 2018. She has lettered in varsity cross country, basketball and track each of the last three years. She has been named a cross country co-captain for the upcoming season and has received first-team All Greater Spokane League honors three years in a row. In basketball, she was named to the All-GSL honorable mention team last season.

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October 31st

Come visit your Spokane Valley Neighborhood Financial Center located at 615 N Sullivan Road

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Athlete of the Month Before and after she worked for the American Heart Association, it was clear that Jennifer Schlenske had a heart for worthy causes. A graduate of Central Valley High School and Eastern Washington University, Schlenske began as development director in January 2013 for Spokane Valley Partners (SVP), a community center serving the greater Valley area. She was named SVP executive director last October. Schlenske has volunteered with the Cystic Fybrosis Foundation and, in 2001, raised nearly $4,000 for research of the condition by running a half-marathon. Schlenske, who will be moving to the Puget Sound area with her family, made a difference at SVP with her wisdom, enthusiasm and leadership ability, according to Pat Dockrey, the agency’s board chair. “Jennifer came on at a difficult time,” Dockrey said. “She really helped on the fundraising and grant writing side. She had a big impact here.”

Have lunch with us at Captain Bill’s

at the Spokane County Fair and Expo Center this summer! This is the Spokane Valley Kiwanis’ major fundraisier which supports our scholarships program and all of our annual communtiy projects. Show your support by visiting us at events such as Early Ford V-8 Swap Meet (July 7th - 9th), Spokane Highland Games (Aug 5th), Goodguys Rod and Custom Show (Aug 18th - 20th), and the Spokane County Insterstae Fair (Sept 15 th- 24th).


The Current

24 • AUGUST 2017 Brought to you by

Evergreen

About and for Valley seniors

RSVP blankets community with unique layer of support By Staci Lehman

Current Correspondent “What else am I gonna do with my time? You can only make so much chicken salad,” laughs Marilyn Reed, an energetic 75-year-old in describing the volunteer work she does for RSVP, a program sponsored by the YMCA of Spokane. RSVP (the Retired and Senior Volunteers Program) is a national effort that coordinates senior citizens with opportunities to donate time in their community to help those in need. RSVP of Spokane County has been around since 1971 and works to find positions for volunteers at many area programs and cover a wide variety of needs. “We focus on Meals on Wheels, the food banks, we have a tutoring program, there’s Project Warm Up where volunteers make hats and scarves and lap robes,” said RSVP Director Adam Borgman. Reed is one of the volunteers who crochets. From her Spokane Valley home, she spends over 20 hours a week most weeks, working on warm items to be used this

winter. She crochets scarves, hand warmers, baby clothes, hats and more. “Some weeks I do 10 (crocheted items) a week,” she said. The items are distributed through over 30 area charities and nonprofits to people who are homeless, have disabilities, are sick or going through treatments like chemotherapy, or qualify as low income. “There’s a lot of people who can’t afford heat,” said Reed. “We give them something to keep them warm.” Amazingly, Reed also has time to work as a protective payee coordinator for Spokane Valley Partners, the greater Valley’s nonprofit community center that also helps people in need. While she loves her job, she also loves that it allows her to help more people through RSVP. “They pay me for it!,” she says. “So I can buy more yarn.” RSVP volunteers like Reed contribute anywhere from a few to over 40 hours a week to the cause. They work in schools, day care centers, health care organizations, senior community centers and at agencies that work with lowincome populations and with law enforcement and community policing organizations like SCOPE (Sheriff’s Community Oriented Policing Effort).

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There are few requirements to participate in RSVP; the main one being that volunteers have to be at least 55 years old. Many are substantially older however. “Our oldest volunteer right now is 102,” said Borgman. “She works for Project Warm Up knitting and crocheting.” While a major benefit of being an RSVP volunteer is the feeling of well-being for making a difference, volunteers also get some perks like supplemental insurance while on duty, on-the-job training from the organizations they are placed with, mileage reimbursement for those who drive as part of their volunteer duties and new friendships. RSVP considers a volunteer’s abilities and areas of interest and finds volunteer jobs that can best utilize those abilities. Even those who are homebound or mobilitylimited can help. And in turn, the program gives back to the volunteers. “The community benefits through having seniors engaged,” said Borgman. “Unless you’re homebound, most of our volunteer positions have some social component to them. Even if they are homebound, they can knit warm items and someone comes to the house to bring supplies and visit and have a cup of tea with them.” Other members of the community benefit as well. Mary Carpenter is

A stack of recently crocheted items made by volunteer Marilyn Reed for the RSVP program.

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the manager of Volunteer Services at the Kindred Hospice office in Liberty Lake. She also works with volunteers who knit, crochet or sew items for her patients and is often in need of materials. “Whenever I need yarn or quilting materials, I call (RSVP Administrative Coordinator) Teri (Wallace).” She said. RSVP makes Carpenter’s job easy by not only gathering donations of yarn, fabric, fleece and other materials, but also delivering them to her for her volunteers to use. Carpenter has seen first-hand the good a homemade item can do for someone in need. “I started looking for donated materials because my grandmother was a patient of Hospice and someone made her a blanket,” she said. “Not only did it provide her warmth but it became a keepsake for me. It’s been seven years and I still have it on the back of my rocking chair.” It is also a way to make a real impact on people who may not have families. “It’s just a way to make them feel loved,” said Carpenter. Reed agrees, but she says she does it for herself as well. “I jokingly say that if I quit moving they’re gonna shovel dirt over me,” she laughs.

See RSVP, Page 33

Photo by Staci Lehman


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Marilyn Reed is a volunteer with RSVP (the Retired and Senior Volunteers Program) sponsored by the YMCA of Spokane. Local seniors, 55 and over, donate time to a variety of community causes through the program. Photo by Staci Lehman

RSVP

Continued from page 32

Want to help? RSVP always needs volunteers, some programs more than others. “Meals on Wheels in particular,” said Borgman. “They are always looking for regular drivers.” If you are over the age of 55 and interested in volunteering, call the RSVP program at 344-7787 or email rsvp@ymcaspokane.org for more information. Material and yarn are also always needed. Use the phone number or email address above to donate.

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26 • AUGUST 2017

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Freeman baseball shines on field, in classroom By Benjamin Shedlock Current Correspondent On an unseasonably hot spring day on the Palouse, the reader board outside Freeman High School’s baseball diamond read “82 degrees.” It was muggy and the Scotties were sluggish in putting away Colville in the district playoff. As waves of heat roiled the horizon, it was unclear just how much momentum the Scotties had to go deep into the playoffs. Throughout the season, the varsity baseball team had lived up to the Freeman athletic program’s history of success. They just missed out on the state championship in 2015 and 2016, placing fourth and third, respectively. The 2017 squad routinely shut out opponents by double digits. After two early losses, their closest call was against Chewelah in early May, when they allowed five runs and generated eight of their own. But now, a team that they twice put away convincingly by margins of nine and 15 was proving as sticky as the humidity.

For the second straight year, the Freeman High School baseball team earned the 1A academic state title from the Washington Interscholastic Activities Association with a combined grade point average of 3.75. On the field, the Scotties took third place at the state 1A championships in Yakima last month, the third straight top four finish for the program since 2015. Contributed photo With a 4-0 lead in the bottom half of the last inning, Freeman had already won. But the players and parents knew it was an off day. Feeling the pressure of their own success, the players kept at it. Encouragement poured from the Scottie dugout until one runner got on base, then another. Steady cheering from the team continued until their slump snapped with the echo of aluminum on leather

and a ball landing deep in left field. The double sent a runner in. After several walks and a pitching change, five more runs followed. “We have a great camaraderie and family feel that makes it easy,” said senior JT Neely, the Scotties’ shortstop. He could just as easily have been referring to the team’s success on the field as off of it. As the Scotties took one more step

toward another state final four appearance, their efforts in the classroom had already earned them the 1A academic state title from the Washington Interscholastic Activities Association (WIAA). The academic state crown is the top prize in WIAA’s Scholastic Awards program. It is given to the top academically achieving team in

See SCOTTIES, Page 27

10th Anniversary

-APALOOZA

Save The Date: Friday September 29th, 2017 4:00pm-7:00pm Ribbon cutting celebrating the 10 year anniversary at 4:30pm with Valley Chamber and Greater Spokane Incorporated. Enjoy hot dogs and drinks, photo booth, bouncy house and all the courts open to try different sports!

http://www.hubsportscenter.org/hub-family-fun-2017/


The Current

SCOTTIES

Continued from page 26

each sport in each classification. The long-running initiative was created “to recognize and reward those teams or groups that maintain a high collective academic standard,” according to the WIAA website. The Scotties have compiled a combined 3.75 GPA this year, a grade that’s just as good as their overall record. The Scholastic Awards program is open to sports and other competitive activities, including dance, forensics and fine arts. Freeman baseball was the only greater Spokane Valley-area team to win an academic state title this spring, their second in two years. “It shows that we have our stuff together and we’re not a bunch of slackers,” said senior Simon Rooney, who does double duty as a

WilliamsGoss to teach basketball, life lessons at HUB camp By Mike Vlahovich

Current Sports Editor What’s the hubbub about? The inaugural Nigel Williams-Goss Youth Point Guard Camp is coming to the HUB Sports Center in Liberty Lake. The popular guard who led Gonzaga University to the title game of the 2017 NCAA basketball tournament will conduct the camp Aug. 21-23 for boys and girls ages 7-14. Williams-Goss was drafted by the Utah Jazz in the second round (55th overall) of the NBA draft in June after foregoing his senior season at GU. He was named the 2016-17 West Coast Conference Player of the Year and earned second-team All American honors, leading Gonzaga to a 37-2 record and the program’s first Final Four appearance. “Basically, ever since I left Spokane I was trying to find a date when I could go back up there,” said Williams-Goss. “With the draft and stuff I couldn’t get up there.

SPORTS

first baseman and pitcher. Rooney also manages an extracurricular balancing act throughout the year. In addition to schoolwork and baseball, he plays football and the snare drum in the Scottie band. Sometimes, all those activities can conflict. Last May, a 13-inning game caused Rooney to miss the band’s Lilac Parade performance. Still, Rooney never seems to have trouble fitting in academics. “I don’t have trouble balancing,” he said. “In school, I focus on homework.”

Just like baseball, the Scotties approach academics as a team. Teammates share several classes, and “help each other with homework and projects so there are no surprises when grades come out,” said Neely. Students have to maintain a minimum academic standard to play and the club knows I wanted to go back for Hoopfest because I knew there were a lot of Gonzaga alums up there, but I couldn’t get there until August.” The Oregon native said that conducting a camp in Spokane was something that had been in the back of his mind so decided it was a perfect time to hang out with college buddies and teach basketball. The camp will be tailored for young campers, with emphasis on the things he did as a player growing up, and more. “There will be a lot of skill work and a lot of competition,” he said. “But I’m definitely more than a basketball player so I wanted to do some life skill lessons. I’ll be talking to the kids about being wellrounded, not just on the basketball court.” Cost for the three-day Elite Youth Camps clinic is $225 ($200 prior to Aug. 1) and runs from 9 a.m.3 p.m. Each camper will receive a T-shirt and autographed photo of the Bulldogs star. Not one to simply lend his name to a project, GossWilliams will be instructing at the camp for a minimum of four hours each day. On the court Williams-Goss scored 640 points for the Zags this past basketball season, eighth best in school history. He averaged 17 points, five assists and six rebounds per game his senior year. His 179 points were ninth in GU history and

that they might struggle if they lose just one player. The team stuck together for another stellar playoff run this season, advancing to its third straight state semi-final appearance with a 13-9 win over Connell on May 19. The Scotties fell to Cedar Park Christian, 6-1, in the next contest at Yakima County Stadium but showed resilience in the consolation game on May 27, defeating Cashmere, 5-3, to earn the third-place 1A trophy. Over the last four years, the Scotties won 82 games and lost only 18.

AUGUST 2017 • 27

noted that there are few grade issues in any sport at the school. The entire Freeman community has helped to build this culture. Since fall 2015, Freeman volleyball, football, girls’ basketball and band have also won academic state titles. “Teachers come out to games,” said Neely. “They make sure we’re ready on game day and in class.” Grade checks catch problems early and teachers communicate with each other and the athletic staff. Neely’s father, who teaches middle school English, emphasizes his grades.

Academic success is a “culture among student athletes,” said Brian Parisotto, Freeman assistant principal and athletic director. He

“We tell them you’re a student first and an athlete second,” said baseball coach Chad Ripke, who has led the team for 12 years and also teaches physical education and strength training. “We have a bunch of driven athletes and students.”

his 64 steals were fifth best, trailing only two other players including NBA Hall-of-Famer John Stockton who has the top three singleseason marks in that category.

Jazz roster. He’s going in with the mindset to make it as their backup point guard. If not he’ll likely be on the Jazz development team that also plays in Salt Lake City.

Williams-Goss played two seasons at the University of Washington where he made the All-Pac-12 freshman team averaging 13.3 points and 4.4 assists, best among the rookies. His sophomore season he scored in double figures in 23 of 30 games, including a seasonbest 30 points in one of them. But graduation and defections decimated the Huskies. That hastened the decision to transfer.

“Either way I’m hoping to be there a good chunk of the time,” he said. “As long as my employers are happy with what I’m doing, I’ve got to keep doing it.”

In the classroom, the Scotties remain the undisputed state champs.

To learn more about the Nigel Williams-Goss Youth Point Guard Camp, call the HUB Sports Center at 927-0602.

“Every coach has their own philosophy,” Nigel-Goss explained. “It was a different style at Washington.” He added that he enjoyed every second of his two years in Spokane “and so much of it had to do about the community. It was way more than just the team.” Being drafted by and making the team in Utah is his next challenge. He says Salt Lake is like playing in Spokane, the focus on one team by a supportive community.

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“It’s been kind of a whirlwind because we did play so late into the pre-draft process,” Williams-Goss said, referring to the Zags’ historic March run. He added he’ll have to adjust to the speed of the game with its 24-second clock if he’s to make the

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The Current

28 • AUGUST 2017

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The Current

Mirabeau Park Hotel features unique traits of past and present

HISTORY

AUGUST 2017 • 29

By Derek Brown

Current Correspondent You could say recent renovations at the Mirabeau Park Hotel and Convention Center on Sullivan Road resulted in a two-fold benefit – first, to modernize facilities at one of the region’s most respected hotel sites while also preserving a piece of Spokane Valley’s past. Originally called the Lamplighter Lodge, the hotel first opened in 1969. It offered live music nightly (outside of Sunday), gourmet dining, a full lounge, coffee shop, banquet hall with meeting and conference rooms, and even an airport limousine service approved by AAA. “The hotel was very well built,” said Lee Cameron, current operating partner of the hotel. Cameron has family roots in the Spokane area that go back much farther than the history of the place where he now works. "My mother was born and raised here,” he said. “Senator James Keith was her brother. He was a

Unique features like this well-maintained courtyard set the Mirabeau Park Hotel and Convention Center apart. Contributed photo long- time senator for the state of Washington and represented Spokane. So I have family roots that go all the way back to 1903 in Spokane." A few short years after opening, the Lamplighter Lodge was purchased by the Thunderbird Corporation. Known for their Thunderbird-Red Lion Inns, the Thunderbird Corporation was sold in 1984 to Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. for $600 million. In 1996 the chain was acquired by Doubletree. Finally in 2001, Red Lion Hotels

was sold to West Coast Hospitality by Hilton. "The Lamplighter went from Thunderbird to the Red Lion and Red Lion actually added onto the property," Cameron said. "They expanded the building, added two more wings of guest rooms and a convention center." Cameron, along with the Sombrowskis, three others who divided up the ownership, purchased the hotel in 2003, and eventually the hotel was given the name, “Mirabeau Park Hotel and

The Mirabeau Park Hotel and Convention Center has been a fixture on Sullivan Road in Spokane Valley going back nearly 50 years to when it opened as the Lamplighter Lodge. Photo by Craig Howard Convention Center.” "It gets kind of confusing, but at the time, the name of the property was the Red LionDoubletree," Cameron said. "The Red Lion company was purchased by Hilton. But some of the oldtimers would still remember it as the Lamplighter." And though the hotel has changed numerous hands over the years, it now retains its independence. “We've elected to keep the hotel independent rather than franchised out,” Cameron said. “And the reason behind that is that we didn't want an affiliation to dictate our standards. We wanted to have the financial ability to meet those standards.” One of the standards is keeping the original structure intact. The exterior has retained some of the features of the original Lamplighter as Cameron wanted to recognize the architecture of the facility. Only modest changes to exterior of the building were made in order to preserve the unique architectural style. "We decided to renovate it kind of from the inside out," Cameron said. "We've more or less gutted every area of the hotel — public areas, convention center and guest rooms and completely rebuilt and redecorated." Since 2003, when the renovations first began, over $15 million has been invested into the hotel. All new electrical, plumbing, infrastructure and furniture has

See MIRABEAU, Page 29


The Current

30 • AUGUST 2017

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Manufacturing Matters EXPO Reception & Dinner with Keynote Address– September 26 Mirabeau Park Hotel EXPO: Exhibits & Workshops– September 26 & 27 SC Fair & Expo Center New Members: JUNE Adaptive Technology Group Cascades Job Corps College & Career Academy ChangePoint Northwest Center for Housing Country Swing LLC, dba Country Swingers CutBoard Studio Dignified Assurance Planning Family Home Care Independent Wealth Connections Intessa Group Liberty Lake Wine Cellars Neptune Society Schrack Financial Group Sportsman’s Warehouse Vertical Options, LLC VIP Event Planning and Design

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SVFD Report – August 2017

Spokane Valley Fire Department (SVFD) crews responded to a total of 1,504 emergency calls from June 24 through July 24. Incidents include: • Motor Vehicle Accident – June 29 –SVFD crews responded to a motor vehicle accident on I-90 eastbound near milepost 296 just before 6 p.m. Upon arrival, crews found one patient that had wrecked his motorcycle. He was unconscious at the arrival of bystanders and regained consciousness before crews arrived. The patient had multiple abrasions to his hands, legs, feet and face. He was transported with apparent non-lifethreatening injuries. • Confined Space/ Technical Rescue – July 4 – The SVFD Special Operations team used a technical rescue rope system to move an injured swimmer safely up a steep bank of the Spokane River to an awaiting ambulance for transport to a local hospital. Crews responded just after 2 p.m. to the 3800 block of North Park Road. • Emergency Medical Services – July 7 – Shortly before 8:15 a.m., SVFD crews responded to the 22800 block of East Country Vista Drive to investigate a reported unconscious person slumped over the steering wheel of a car parked at Big Trout Lodge. The car was in a disabled parking spot. Crews found two people asleep in the vehicle. Both were breathing. The incident was turned over to the Liberty Lake Police Department. • Rubbish Fire – July 8 – Just before 9:30 p.m., SVFD crews responded to a reported outside rubbish fire in the 800 block of South Liberty Drive. The large, untended rubbish fire was on the beach in front of the residence. Fire crews found the renter inside the home and asked him to extinguish the fire. He had a water hose on his deck that would not reach the fire location so fire crews went down to the beach and spread out the garbage for extinguishment.

• Service Call – Lock Out – July 10 –SVFD crews responded to a report of a 2-year-old boy locked inside a car in the 14900 block of East Sprague shortly after 6 p.m. Upon arrival, firefighters were able

to quickly access the child, who was unharmed. • Rescue Task Force – July 11 – Members of SVFD’s Rescue Task Force were called to standby while the Sheriff’s SWAT Team executed a high risk warrant near the 14000 block of East Trent Avenue, just after 5:30 a.m. Rescue Task Force members remained inside their armored vehicle, but were not needed to administer emergency medical aid. • Brush Fire – July 13 – Just before 2 a.m., SVFD crews responded to a brush fire outside a home in the 24600 block of East Liberty Creek Road. Upon arrival, crews found a 60 foot by 60 foot wooded area that was fully involved in fire, with flames not yet in the crowns of the pine trees. Fire crews used water and foam to quickly knock down the fire to keep it from spreading to the nearby home and boat. The homeowners, who were awakened by the smell of smoke, expressed interest in learning more about green space around their home and were referred to the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) for more information. • Electrical Fire – July 17 – Shortly after 11:30 a.m., SVFD crews responded to a reported residential fire in the 9800 block of East Eighth Avenue. Firefighters arrived to find smoke coming from an upstairs window of the home. A father and his daughter were alerted to the fire by smoke alarms installed several months earlier by SVFD personnel. They escaped safely with the family’s cat. The day before, the daughter reported a strange smell in her bedroom. The family searched for the source without luck and decided that she should not occupy the room until checked out by an electrician the next day. The cause of the fire was electrical - an aging wall outlet that was arcing had caught fire. Damage was estimated to be at least $20,000. • Residential Fire – July 19 – SVFD crews responded to a reported structure fire in the 5700 block of East 15th Avenue at 1:40 p.m. Upon arrival, crews observed smoke coming from the rear of the small, two-story home and began an aggressive fire attack. The fire appeared to have spread from a wooden deck behind the home

See SVFD, Page 31


The Current

AUGUST 2017 • 31

SVFD

Continued from page 30 into the kitchen area and up into the attic. Three people and a dog escaped safely. The most probable cause of the fire was a discarded cigarette igniting combustibles on the deck. Damage estimates totaled $40,500 for the structure and contents. • Cooking Fire – July 23 – Shortly after 9:45 p.m., SVFD crews responded to a reported apartment fire in the 12200 block of East Fourth Avenue. They arrived to find a burning pot of oil sitting on the ground outside the apartment unit, which firefighters quickly extinguished. The resident of the apartment had put a pot of oil on the stove to boil and fell asleep. Quick thinking neighbors safely evacuated the woman and tried to put out the fire with extinguishers. They ultimately carried the burning oil outside. There was minor fire damage to the kitchen. The resident was treated for smoke inhalation at the scene. Burn Ban – Outdoor recreational fires and open burning are RESTRICTED due to high fire danger in the cities of Liberty Lake, Millwood, Spokane Valley and unincorporated Spokane County. This means any outdoor fire without a chimney – including campfires and backyard fire pits (with or without screens) – are prohibited. Open burning of fields, yard waste and garbage is always prohibited. Read more at www. spokanevalleyfire.com. By the numbers: •

Fires* = 132

• Emergency medical service =1,182

• 89

Motor vehicle accidents =

Hazardous materials = 13

Building alarms = 52

Service calls = 23

Vehicle Extrication = 4

Water Rescue = 7

• Confined Rescue = 1 •

Space/Technical

Rescue Task Force = 1

*Brush, Commercial, Residential, Rubbish, Vehicle Fires and Unauthorized Burning About SVFD - Spokane Valley Fire Department serves the cities of Liberty Lake, Millwood, Spokane Valley and unincorporated areas of Spokane County including the communities of Otis Orchards, Pasadena Park and the area surrounding Liberty Lake, with a combined population of 125,000 across approximately 75 square miles. SVFD firefighters and paramedics responded to more than 16,250 emergency calls in 2016. Established in 1940, SVFD is an Accredited Agency by the Commission on Fire Accreditation International (CFAI), one of only a handful in the state of Washington. SVFD operates 10 stations providing fire suppression, emergency medical services, vehicle extrication, hazardous materials response, special operations rescue, fire investigation, fire prevention, commercial property inspection, CPR and fire safety training. The department also offers free home fire safety inspections and installation of free smoke detectors. For more information call 928-1700 or visit www.spokanevalleyfire.com.. For more information call 928-1700 or visit www.spokanevalleyfire.com.

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The Current

32 • AUGUST 2017

CVSD wraps up construction, looks ahead to vote

By Staci Lehman Current Correspondent While school is the farthest thing from most people’s minds in the summer, others are concentrating on some significant changes that will be in place when students head back to the classroom this fall. The Central Valley School District (CVSD) is moving full-speed ahead to finish construction on some new schools – and upgrades to others – in order to open the doors in September. “We currently have nine schools under construction,” said CVSD Superintendent Ben Small during a presentation at a Liberty Lake City Council meeting in June. “Of those schools, five will be completed and dedicated in August of 2017, another in September and then another in December and two more in the fall of 2018.” The remodel and expansion to Chester Elementary was completed soon after Small’s presentation and the renovations to Greenacres and Sunrise Elementary schools and

Evergreen Middle School will wrap up this month. The new Liberty Creek Elementary K-2 in Liberty Lake will also be completed in August. It shares a site with the existing Liberty Lake Elementary, which will be converted to accommodate grades 3-6 when Liberty Creek opens. The CVSD collaborated with the city of Liberty Lake on this project. The remodel of Opportunity Elementary is scheduled to be done in December. Ponderosa Elementary, North Pines Middle School and Riverbend Elementary at Mission and Long will all be wrapped up in 2018. Another future school, that isn’t under construction yet, is a third high school for the district, to be constructed in the area of 16th and Henry Road near the Saltese Uplands Conservation Area. The school district purchased the property back in 1980, anticipating growth that would eventually require another high school. When built, the new high school will ease crowding at Central Valley and University high schools. While the area of 16th and Henry is fairly rural today, the district is already looking for ways to avoid negative traffic impacts on the neighborhood around the school

site, based on community feedback. “Traffic is of concern to people and it is of concern to us as well,” said Small. “So much so that we have been planning ahead how we might mitigate traffic. If you look at the intersection at Sprague and Henry, that intersection is an intersection of concern for us. We have recently purchased 22.2 acres in the city of Liberty Lake and another 20 acres in this area right here that is in the county.” Small said the land was purchased to address the Sprague/Henry intersection and “to be able to have land ahead of that time so that we could improve traffic as we know it is going to be an issue.” The 20 acres Small referred to will allow the school district to coordinate efforts with Spokane County to extend Henry Road and put a roundabout in the area. The roundabout is aimed at slowing traffic as drivers approach neighborhoods. The Henry Road extension would divert through traffic off Sprague, which borders residential areas and take them to the Country Vista arterial. “That would extend Henry north to Country Vista,” Small said. “We are in the process of acquiring right- ofway but what this would do for us

is allow traffic that is coming from the west to have access that is not on Sprague. Sprague would have a stop sign.” The district is also brainstorming with engineers on other ways to manage traffic near the future high school. “What we’re working on with the county is a couplet idea where oneway traffic is this way and one-way traffic uses the existing roadway coming to the north,” said Small. Before all that becomes a reality though, something major must happen – voters must approve it. “So as we move forward, in February of 2018 we will have a bond before our community,” said Small. The $129.9 million bond will include three major projects – the new high school, a new middle school in the city of Liberty Lake (the district’s sixth) and renovation of Horizon Middle School, which was built in 1982 and is in need of upgrading. With the 1998 construction bond being paid off, Small wants voters to know that this new bond won’t cost them any more than what they are paying now. “It will keep the tax rate steady at $1.86 per thousand (of property value),” he said.

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The Current

AUGUST 2017 • 33

Trail of the Month – Exploring Dishman Hills’ nourishing network By J.R. Conrow

Current Correspondent The Inland Northwest region is beloved for a number of distinct reasons, starting with the generosity of its citizens and accessibility to the outdoors. One of the most popular outdoor activities the area affords is the ability to hike. With the summer season well underway, the Current will be focusing on the variety of options available if you are looking for a new adventure along the winding pathways that offer a respite from the bustling network of cars and concrete. In the inaugural installment of the "Trail of the Month" series, we have the Dishman Hills Conservancy (DHC) to thank. Here, more than 2,500 acres are managed for public access to hike as the DHC and Spokane County Parks and Department of Natural Resources work together to maintain and protect the property. Jeff Lambert, DHC executive director, says the roots of this effort go back to the 1960s. Money for preserving the land was raised through local schools, service clubs, garden clubs and other groups. During this same time, a $30,000 donation from a local resident Ida Hughes Johnston, a Land and Water Conservation fund grant and help from the Nature Conservancy created the area today that is known as the Dishman Hills Natural Area (DHNA). "Tom Rogers was a University High School biology teacher and amateur naturalist who led nature walks around Spokane during the 1960s," said Lambert. "He identified the rocky ravines and forests of the Dishman Hills as a unique area for learning about nature.” Lambert said the DHNA features four major trailheads that are accessible for hiking, mountain biking and nature exploration. They include: Camp Caro located off of Appleway Avenue.; Iller Creek in the Ponderosa area of Spokane Valley; Stevens Creek Road off the

The Dishman Hills Conservancy (DHC) works with Spokane County Parks and the Department of Natural Resources to maintain over 2,500 acres of public land known as the Dishman Hills Natural area. In July, DHC led weekly hikes through areas like those pictured above. Photos by Jeff Lambert

Palouse Highway and the newest section, the Glenrose Trailhead, accessible from the South Hill. Each trailhead has something distinctive that makes it unique. Lambert said the trails have been built and maintained by the Washington Trails Association and Spokane Mountaineers in cooperation with the Spokane County Parks Department and the Washington Department of Natural Resources. Lambert added that all areas of each trail are open to hikers for fitness and education. The Iller Creek and Glenrose trails allow horses and mountain bikers as a variation to the other trails. Throughout July, DHC offered a hike every Thursday night for any and all individuals regardless of hiking skill and ability and designed to connect people to nature. Lambert says these hikes are suitable for hikers ages 8 and older and are less than 2 miles. On July 6, a hike through Deep Ravine took hikers to and past the

Dishman Cliff. Other hikes in July featured spectacular panoramic views of the Valley and landmarks like Goldback Springs Cliff and Enchanted Ravine as well as an opportunity to see wetland ecology and special geological features. On July 27, hikers traveled to see the Rocks of Sharon where views of giant rock outcroppings and the Palouse Hills were the highlight. Each hike ran approximately two hours. "There are many unique natural areas including the ponds in the natural area, the geologic features including the stunning Rocks of Sharon and a wide variety of plant species from forests to meadows to wetlands," Lambert said. While the DHC wants to maintain and keep the lands accessible to all hikers and outdoor enthusiasts, Lambert said a goal is in place for the long term. "The Dishman Hills Conservancy is actively working on stewardship of those natural resources including

having a comprehensive forest stewardship plan for the lands they manage," he said. Regarding stewardship of the land, Lambert said fire mitigation, forest health and restoration of native species are some of the important goals. As far as restoration of the native species, Lambert points to efforts underway like weed control, which includes hand-pulling of weeds by volunteers and spot spraying on stubborn weeds. Other restoration approaches include planting trees, shrubs and grass seed. This summer and beyond, Dishman Hills offers a variety of unique opportunities for hikers and outdoor enthusiasts – all within a short drive of residential and commercial areas. As part of its stewardship to the land and the people who established the area, DHC will continue to work diligently to maintain this natural treasure for current and future generations. For more information, visit www. DishmanHills.org.


The Current

34 • AUGUST 2017

Millwood Tree Board rooted in appreciation for greenery By Mary Anne Ruddis Current Correspondent Kahlil Gibran once wrote, “Trees are poems that the earth writes upon the sky.” Not only do trees provide a beauty and majesty to our world as this image underscores, they provide many practical benefits as well. According to the Arbor Day Foundation, trees “clean air and water, slow climate change, ease poverty and hunger, prevent species loss and feed the human soul. All we need to do is plant and care for them.” In Millwood, there is an organization that heartily echoes those sentiments. The city of Millwood established the Beautification and Tree Board in 2007 to protect and enhance Millwood’s collection of trees along city streets and parks. As one of the oldest incorporated jurisdictions in Spokane County -- the area became the greater Spokane Valley’s first official city in 1928 – Millwood benefits from a vast amount of diverse mature trees that serve many benefits. By 1911, the community had already established a paper mill and lumber yard with businesses like a barber shop, general store, hotel and restaurant cropping up as well. Rows of trees became trademarks along Millwood’s burgeoning streets. According to “A Community Tree Program,” a document that guides the board’s mission, trees have been recognized to “modify the urban climate by slowing wind movement, by reducing irritating noise levels, controlling glare and reflection from buildings, cooling city streets in summer and purifying air as they filter out pollutants and add oxygen to the immediate environment.” The board also emphasizes the impact of trees on a household budget. Again, referring to the document – “Properly placed trees can reduce residential heating and cooling costs by an estimated 20 to 50 percent.” Millwood residents may be eligible for rebates from Avista Utilities for planting shade trees that meet certain specifications. Information on the program can be found on the Millwood city website

The city of Millwood is known for its distinctive tree-lined streets and overall greenery. The Millwood Beautification and Tree Board was established by the city in 2007 to protect and enhance the community’s diverse collection of trees. Photo by Craig Howard at www.millwoodwa.us. For nine years, the city has been awarded the “Tree City USA” designation by the Arbor Day Foundation in cooperation with the USDA Forest Service and the National Association of State Foresters. The Arbor Day Foundation designation is a nationwide movement that was started in 1976 to provide more than 3,400 local communities, regardless of size, a standard framework to manage and expand their public trees. To achieve this designation, four standards must be met. The first is the establishment of a tree board or department so that someone is legally responsible for the care of all trees on city-owned property. The second standard is the adoption of a community tree ordinance that forms a foundation for the tree care program. The third standard is the requirement to spend at least $2 per capita on urban forestry. This requirement demonstrates that cities are committed to providing the necessary financial support crucial to grow and tend to the health of the trees in its care. The fourth standard is recognition of the work and dedication invested by celebrating Arbor Day. Millwood celebrated National Arbor Day on April 28 by planting a Norway Maple tree to replace one

that had been damaged in a storm. Maintaining the street canopy is important and makes Millwood special, says Vikkie Naccarato, one of the three-member Beautification and Tree Board members. Other members are Debbe Lehinger and Charlie Peterson. “Millwood is known for its trees,” Naccarato says. When it comes to the residue of trees, especially in the autumn, Naccarato points out that Millwood does its part to address falling leaves.

receive a bevy of accolades or attention for its diligent work, the board continues to do its part to raise awareness and appreciation for trees in Millwood. You may never sit under and enjoy the shade and beauty of a tree that you plant today, but future generations will thank you – just as we thank past generations for their foresight in providing the beauty and benefits of the mature majestic trees we rest under today.

“Millwood has a popular leaf pickup program to help residents with the clean-up,” she added. “We also encourage using certified arborists (for private trees).” The city’s tree ordinance requires a permit before work on or removal of street trees and a certified arborist must do any work. In 2007, the city conducted a tree inventory and identified approximately 53 species of trees with many tree species unidentified. From Ash to Birch to Crabapple to Japanese Cherry to Pine to Spruce, the city is rich in greenery. This diversity is necessary and intentional. If there were to be blight or some disease that strikes a specific species of trees, the variety serves as inherent protection. While

it

doesn’t

necessarily

The Tree Board has identified 53 species of trees in Millwood. The diverse inventory is well distributed among many historically significant homes that date back to the early 1900s when the community was formed in the shadows of a paper mill. Photo by Craig Howard


The Current

PACE Trait of the Month – Gratitude By Steve Stager

I like smiles and I even like smiling – but the truth is, I often don’t feel like smiling. Stress often squashes the smile. I can’t count the number of times I’ve heard a superstar athlete say, “I’m just so blessed, I’m so thankful for everything.” And to be honest, I respond with some skepticism, “I’d be thankful to too if I were in your shoes.” Championships, million dollar contracts, multiple luxury homes, future secured. Being grateful would be easy; smiling would be easy! But in real life, it seems hard, even elusive. Recently I read comments from Stephen Curry, face of the Golden State Warriors. But he wasn’t commenting on their two championships in three years, or how he landed one of the most massive contracts in NBA history. He talked about his time as the smallest kid on his team; he discussed being unranked as a recruit in high school and downplayed as a college player. And get this, he said he was grateful for those times. What? How could he be grateful for the hard things, the challenges, the disappointments. That doesn’t seem to make sense. So what is gratitude and where does it come from? I had the privilege of climbing Mt. Rainier in 2001 – crampons, ice axes, tired legs and bursting lungs. I remember standing around 12,000 feet elevation and looking up at a huge serac jutting out of the glacier just above us. A serac is a block of ice crystals pushed up by the movement of the glacier. They are beautiful as the sun glints off them, but they can also be dangerous because they can collapse in unstable conditions. This one was huge, the size of a downtown building or a school, towering above us. And I remember feeling immensely grateful. Not just grateful because it didn’t collapse; not just grateful to be there and see it. Although it was stunning, I was grateful because it reminded me how small I was, how insignificant in the grand scheme of things and yet how many privileges I enjoyed, and that my life was unique. Gratitude is a response in life that is sourced in a humble awareness of what’s around you. There will always be those who have more

AUGUST 2017 • 35

– more s t u f f , m o r e privilege, m o r e talent. And there will be t h o s e with less. And of course some of our life, Steve Stager both the g o o d and challenging, has been done by others. But some of our life has been created by our choices. A response of gratitude pushes back on both victimization (my life is horrible) and entitlement (I deserve more).

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But if gratitude is a response, then it’s also a choice. Corrie Ten Boom was a Dutch woman imprisoned during World War II. She tells a story of how her barracks were infested by fleas. The fleas were horrible. They bit, they itched, they kept her from sleeping. She hated the fleas. But her sister kept prodding her to be thankful for the fleas. It seemed a preposterous idea to Corrie. Later, she learned that the soldiers stayed away from their barracks due to the flea infestation, allowing the woman inside more freedoms than if there had been no fleas. So gratitude is derived not only from awareness of what’s around me, it’s also a choice to see the good in my life. That requires a practiced shift in perspective. Instead of “I can’t” I learn to say, “What resources do I have?” Instead of thinking “This is horrible,” I train my mind to think “How is this challenge a blessing in disguise?” Stephen Curry is known to have his own brand of basketball. One of the words most often used by commentators to describe his style is “joy.” You see, that’s the end game. Gratitude is sourced in a humble awareness that chooses to see the good and it ends in true joy! A grateful person is a joyful person! And joyful people smile a lot! Steve Stager grew up in Spokane Valley. After living in Portland and working as a youth pastor with American military families in Germany, he moved back to Spokane in 2015 with his wife and four kids. He pastors Foothills Community Church in the foothills of Mt. Spokane. Steve enjoys serving the community, sports of all kinds, especially outdoor adventure sports, and adventuring as a family.

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The Current

36 • AUGUST 2017

Coblentz hired as new director of Valley Partners

By Craig Howard Current Editor The Valley’s hub for help has a new leader. Cal Coblentz, most recently the executive director for Spokane’s Sinto Senior Activity Center, has been hired in the same role at Spokane Valley Partners (SVP). Coblentz began on July 17, replacing Jennifer Schlenske who is moving with her family to the Seattle area. SVP Board Member Nancy Nelson, who was part of the search and interview team to replace Schlenske, said Coblentz will bring determination to his new position. “The one thing I took away from my conversations with Cal was that he’s ready for a challenge,” she said. “I think that motivation will help meet that community need.

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We have to continually improve in ways to serve people and I think Cal is the perfect leader to do that because he wants that challenge.” Coblentz served in the Air Force from 1983 to 2006, specializing as a survival instructor. After the military, he worked for the state of Alaska, teaching search and rescue skills. He also served as a pastor in Alaska from 2006 to 2011. He and his wife have four grown children who all live in the greater Spokane area. Originally from the Midwest, Coblentz lived in Indiana and Ohio with his family before his father was hired to work in Southern California between Cal’s freshman and sophomore years in high school. Coblentz was stationed at Fairchild Air Force Base for 14 years. While he says he and his wife enjoyed Alaska, he is glad to be back in the Inland Northwest working in the nonprofit field. “We decided we wanted to do something more like this, charitable work,” he said. “So, we found our way back to Spokane.” Coblentz will take over a nonprofit with roots that go back to 1951. SVP offers programs that assist low-income residents of the greater Valley with everything from food to clothing to cooking classes that promote healthy nutrition. Each year, the SVP Food Bank serves over 10,000 families while a clothing bank helps more than 6,000 people. Other programs, like emergency assistance (over 8,000 families served each year) protective payee services and Food 4 Thought (providing weekend food to students on the free-andreduced lunch program) create a layer of support that increases stability for residents in need. With a low administrative and fundraising overhead, SVP ensures that 92 cents of every donated dollar goes directly to programs and services. Coblentz was hired at Sinto in January 2013. There, he led a revenue transition following cutbacks in government funding. He was able to increase annual independent revenue at the center by 21 percent and obtained $120,000 in new funding for a capital improvement project. “We were looking for the strength of business development along with the director’s role,” Nelson said. “That helped to narrow down the candidates. From what we’ve seen, we think Cal is going to be fantastic.” As Schlenske did before, Coblentz will also be responsible for the agency’s fundraising/development efforts. Nelson said the marketing of SVP among area businesses and

other potential supporters will be a key. “We need to continue to raise awareness and funds so needs can be met,” Nelson said. “I think recipients know about Valley Partners but I don’t think the overall Valley community is fully aware of what we do and how much impact we have. I think with Cal, we just want to continue to get the word out.” In late June, Schlenske told the SVP board that she would be stepping aside in order to move to the Seattle area where her husband had just started a new job. She began with the agency in January 2013 as development director and transitioned to executive director last October after longtime director Ken Briggs retired. “I’m going to miss the love people here have for the work and this place and the people they serve,” Schlenske said. “You don’t have any naysayers when you want to go the extra mile here to help someone because everyone here is so dedicated to the work.” While nearly 40 applicants expressed interest in SVP’s lead role, the board conducted just two interviews. “I think if we had someone come in with 30 years as an executive director of a nonprofit, I’m not sure that’s what we were looking for,” said SVP Board Chair Pat Dockrey. “We’re small, it’s a close-knit group of people here, more like a family. I think Cal’s going to fit in really well. He’s a low-key guy who is a good listener. We needed someone who is flexible and can work in a lot of different situations.” Dockrey said Schlenske – who the board will likely keep on as a long-distance consultant for a time as Coblentz adapts – helped the agency forge ahead during lean times. “It was a difficult position to be in,” he said. “She was able to keep us on course until we turned things around. She did a great job. I’m sorry to see her go.” As far as the agency having three executive directors in less than a year, Nelson said there is a foundation in place that keeps SVP strong and resilient. “The staff here knows what they’re doing,” she said. “From that perspective, the day-to-day operations will be totally fine. That will give time for Cal to learn and absorb and make those community connections. I’m sure there will be challenges but I’m not worried about that because of the staff and the connectivity we have on the board. I think with that combination

plus the help from Jennifer we’ll be fine.”

Three questions for Spokane Valley Partners Executive Director Cal Coblentz

Q: Why were you interested in applying for the job of SVP executive director? A: The Spokane Valley Partners' mission is what I’ve been searching for as a nonprofit executive for many years. I was thrilled with the opportunity to join a team that is truly solving some of the most fundamental problems within our community. We provide food, clothing and emergencies services to tens of thousands of Valley families and weekend food to hundreds of homeless students. Having “partners” in the name also helped me quickly identify that the goal is to activate community-wide participation in these solutions. Q: What skill sets and experience will you bring to this role? A: Much of my leadership style was developed during my Air Force career, which was an environment that had an important mission, dedicated people and a spirit of excellence. SVP has a very important role within our community. The staff and volunteers are among the most professional and dedicated I’ve experienced and we all want to present the best possible image to our community and to those we serve. I’ve been part of many teams in various settings and want to bring all of those experiences into this organization. I’m truly excited to get out and meet with all of the great leaders, companies and organizations that make our community great and those who can partner with us to meet these needs. Q: What are you enthused about when it comes to leading SVP? A: I believe in building upon past successes. We’ve had the right leadership in place at each phase of our development. In this new season, SVP is poised to take the next great step in service to our community and needs a leader who honors the past but looks to the future. I’m energized by exploring ways to multiply our services and establish new sustainable revenue sources, while honoring and elevating those we serve on a daily basis and continuing to be the best possible stewards of every donated dollar.


The Current

AUGUST 2017 • 37

EDITOR/PUBLISHER

Ben Wick

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EDITOR

Craig Howard

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Paula Gano

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Hayley Schmelzer

hayley@libertylakesplash.com

CIRCULATION Larry Passmore circulation@libertylakesplash.com CONTRIBUTORS

Derek Brown, Bill Gothmann, Craig Howard, Staci Lehman, Mary Anne Ruddis, Benjamin Shedlock, Mike Vlahovich The Valley Current P.O. Box 363 Liberty Lake, WA 99019 Phone: 242-7752; Fax: 927-2190 www.valleycurrent.com of each month. It is distributed free of charge to every business and home in the greater Spokane Valley area. Copies are located at drop-off locations in Spokane Valley, Liberty Lake and the surrounding area.

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Continued from page 29 been installed. Cameron says the refurbishing efforts include putting money back into the local economy.

The Current is committed to serving the Greater Spokane Valley area through excellent community journalism. We can’t do it at all without you, our readers, and we can’t do it for long without support from our advertisers. Please thank our business partners and look to them when offering your patronage.

“We have a corporate philosophy that we attempt to buy products and spend money on materials first in the city of Spokane Valley and second in Spokane County, or the greater Spokane area,” Cameron said. “So lots of money is spent right here." Renovations include new "extended stay" rooms or condolike rooms for guests on extended stays. The rooms include complete kitchens with dishwashers, pots, pans and other household items. New "full access" rooms have also been created, with everything within reach for guests who may have disabilities or other needs. THE A new pool and hot tub will now be available now year-round. And a full guest, self-service laundry center has been created as part of the renovations.

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"We still have some parking lot and landscaping renovations to be completed before we indicate that we've completely gone through every inch of the facilities," Cameron said. There are 235 rooms, all over 400 square feet, starting at $105. The hotel has in excess of 125,000 guests per year, so it's important that the hotel modernizes its infrastructure to accommodate the high number of peopleNew utilizing the in Spokane, homes facility. "I think we're the only fullservice convention hotel in greater Spokane Valley," Cameron said. "We're constantly striving to book conventions that will be held in the Valley. These conventions that are held in the Valley will utilize services in the Valley, so it benefits more than just this hotel and restaurant. We are very committed to the community." The venue features an up-scale restaurant, Mirabeau at The Max, convention/meeting space and full amenities. Further, the hotel hosts a wide variety of events that directly benefit the community, everything from fundraising occasions to conventions. "We believe in giving back,” Cameron said. “We’ve done quite a bit of fundraising for people with an extreme need. We do that for families. So there’s quite a bit we can try to contribute and give back. That’s a highlight of who we are as owners and a company.”

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The Current

38 • AUGUST 2017

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The Current

A Bear in China – CV grad makes difference in life of orphan

ON THAT NOTE

are also outreach efforts to support families who do choose to keep their children. Cathy came to Shepherd’s Village at 5 years old. She has seizures, anorexia and a poor immune system. She also has undiagnosed conditions. In 2016, she started anti-seizure medications and began to show progress. Caudill returned to China in 2016 for a second trip. “I got to see her again,” she said.

By Mary Anne Ruddis Current Correspondent

Bethany Caudill had no idea of the life-changing adventure that would occupy her world after her first trip to China in 2015.

“She wasn’t just a slip of paper,” Caudill said. When Caudill left China for a second time, she was told that Cathy needed additional testing to understand the best way to target her therapies. She had been misdiagnosed at one point and to increase her chances of being adopted, she needed a solid diagnosis and plan. That would cost money.

The trip, with a group of 15, was coordinated through Liberty Lake Church. Caudill was 15 years old at the time. She knew that she wanted to see and learn about other parts of the world. When she heard about the trip to China, she decided that she wanted to go and see the world for herself. “China is a contradictory society,” said Caudill, who graduated from Central Valley High School in June. “There were buildings in disrepair at the first location yet much care was taken about where things were placed. The hotel was nice but smoking indoors took some getting used to.” Visiting China, “definitely changed my perspective,” said Caudill, “Everyone should have an opportunity to (travel).” Caudill held fundraisers to earn the money to go. She returned with a different outlook than her classmates and was much more aware of not only her own blessings but also

Bethany Caudill has been to China three times to visit Cathy, who suffers from seizures, anorexia and a poor immune system. Caudill has worked to raised funds to help with Cathy’s diagnosis and treatment. Contributed photo

AUGUST 2017 • 39

“Having a bridge to address the problems, adoption becomes more available,” Caudill said. “A diagnosis changes everything,” Caudill said.

Bethany Caudill, a 2017 graduate of Central Valley High School, visited China in 2015 with a group coordinated by Liberty Lake Church. While in China, she met an orphan named “Cathy” who she has supported ever since. Contributed photo the waste that takes place in the United States. Caudill traveled with her group to volunteer at Shepherd’s Field Children’s Village, an orphanage for children with disabilities that focuses on the medical and therapy needs of special needs orphans. Shepherd’s Field is an outreach of the Philip Hayden Foundation in California. According to the Shepherd’s Field website, there is “a medical clinic, therapy center, school, the Inn of Eight Happinesses for visitors and guests, the office, and a vocational center. Children at Shepherd’s Field receive the medical care and therapy, with more than half receiving therapy in fine motor skills, gross motor skills or speech.” On her first trip, Bethany was visiting the orphanage when she noticed a young girl named “Cathy” who was sitting off by herself. She “was obviously stressed,” sitting “all balled up” and “wringing her hands,” Caudill recalls. The little girl was non-verbal and staring into space. “She was looking at something that we couldn’t see,” Caudill says.

After talking with the therapy director who explained that the children craved love and affection, Caudill approached Cathy. At first, the little girl would not look at her. Caudill noticed that she was grinding her teeth and continued wringing her hands. “I started talking to her and held my hands out,” Bethany said. Eventually, Cathy reached out and clutched her hands. That first meeting was only 20 minutes but Caudill left knowing she had to help this girl from China. After Caudill returned to the Inland Northwest, she checked back for updates on Cathy’s condition and progress. Caudill followed Cathy’s progress and learned as much as she could about her. She learned that Cathy came from an orphanage in Baotou, China and that there was no history of her parents. According to a 2015 BBC report, Baotou is also home to toxic waste from “rare earth” minerals used in manufacturing computer and smart phone components among other things. Children with disabilities in China are many times not wanted by their families and are considered outcasts. Caudill learned that there

Caudill’s first thought was to raise funds to have Cathy come to the U.S. for treatment but that was not an option due to Cathy’s frail condition. The medical team did not feel she was strong enough for that kind of a trip. Caudill decided to raise the funds needed to provide care for Cathy at the orphanage as well as getting her the specialized testing so necessary to providing her with a chance to reach her fullest potential. Caudill to China progress time with

was able to go back in April to see Cathy's personally and spend her.

“A week before I went back, the funds were raised for her diagnostic treatment,” Bethany said. “Currently, the funds raised for her are being put to use with medical facilities in China who can test Cathy for a proper diagnosis. This process is being done currently, and I pray that she will have a diagnosis within the next month.” If readers wish to help, they can visit the orphanage website at chinaorphans.org. Caudill maintains a blog at http:// mycathygirl.blogspot.com that includes updates and the latest on Caudill’s journey. A valiant effort from a CV grad is changing the life of a young girl across the world. It all happened because she saw and she acted. May we all do the same.


The Current

40 • AUGUST 2017

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August 2017 Current  

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