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June 21 - 27, 2013 Free Issue 846

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Vacation

SUMMER IS HERE


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June 21 - 27, 2013 Vallarta Tribune 846

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Welcome

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Welcome to Puerto Vallarta and Riviera Nayarit Here is some advice to make your trip a little easier and more enjoyable. TIME ZONE: The entire state of Jalisco is on Central Time, as is the southern part of the State of Nayarit starting from San Blas in the north.

Cover Photo

La Cruz, Nayarit Madeline Milne PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS Fernando Gonzalez Corona DIRECTOR Lic. Arturo Martinez Rojas EDITOR Lic. Madeline Milne mmilne@vallartatribune.com SALES Sylvie Scopazzo ventastribuna7@yahoo.com EDITORIAL BOARD Marcia Blondin Raymond C. Beaty Lois Ellison John & Christie Forget Landon Hollander Nancy Van Landingham Robina Oliver DESIGNER Cynthia Estela Andrade G. cisandra@vallartatribune.com Vallarta Tribune is an activity and entertainment guide and merely publishes information as it is provided by the advertiser or event host. We do not assume responsibility in errors or omissions other than to correct them as soon as they are made known to us regarding event schedules, locations and/or prices. In addition, we do not assume any responsibility for erroneous inclusion or exclusion of information except to take reasonable care to ensure accuracy, that permission has been obtained to use it, and to remove it as soon as is practical upon receiving your notification of error. We recommend you always confirm prior to attending or visiting an event or establishment. Weekly publication edited, printed and distributed by Ediciones y Publicaciones Siete Junio, SA de CV Grupo Editorial Tribuna Calle 21 de Marzo # 1174 Col. Lomas del Coapinole Del. El Pitillal, Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco México CP 48290 Tel. (322) 226-0829, 226-0800 editor@vallartatribune.com

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BUSES: A system of urban buses with different routes can bring you from one end of the bay to the other and all the spots in between. Current fare is $6.50 pesos per ticket and passengers must purchase a new ticket every time they board another bus. There are no “transfers”. TAXIS: There are set rates within defined zones of town. Do not enter a taxi without agreeing on the price with the driver first. Price is per trip not person. MONEY EXCHANGE: Although you may have to wait in line for a few minutes, banks will give you a higher rate of exchange than the exchange booths (caja de cambio). You will need your passport. Better yet, use your bank card to withdraw funds from any ATM machine. Note that ATM’s in the banks are the safest to use and generally charge lower fees. DRINKING WATER: For the 17th year in a row, Puerto Vallarta’s water has been awarded a certification of purity for human consumption. The quality of the water tested at the purification plant varies greatly from what comes out of the tap at the other end. So do be careful. If you want to be doubly sure, you can pick up bottled water just about anywhere. EXPORTING PETS: Fall in love with the street dog outside your hotel or a puppy on the Malecon doesn’t mean they can’t come home with you. The process is fairly inexpensive and only takes a day or two. You need a certificate of health from a local vet among other things. The time of year that pets can travel in the cargo section of the plane may be your biggest challenge. For the most up-todate information contact the Puerto Vallarta SPCA at spcapv@gmail.com.

LEGAL SYSTEM: Not knowing the law is not an valid excuse in Mexico or anywhere. If you find yourself caught in a legal situation be aware that guilt is presumed until your innocence can be proven.

This is a very difficult lesson to learn if you are visiting from the United States or Canada in particular. Immediately contact your consulate for assistance.

Calling in Mexico

Calling phones in Mexico can be tricky as it is different than in the US or Canada. There are different codes you need to use depending if you are calling landlines or cellular phones and if they are local or long distance. Long-distance calls from within Mexico For national long-distance calls (within Mexico) the code is 01 plus the area code and phone number. For international long-distance calls, first dial 00, then the country code (for the U.S. and Canada the country code is 1, so you would dial 00 + 1 + area code + 7 digit number). Calling Cell Phones (from a land line) If you are calling from a landline within the area code of the Mexican cell phone number dial 044, then the 10 digit number including area code. Outside of the area code (but still within Mexico) dial 045 and then the 10 digit phone number. Cell phone to cell phone only requires the 10 digit number.

Emergencies: 060 Municipal and Transit Police: 322.290.0507 Fire Department: 322.223.9476 Red Cross - Ambulance: 322.222.1533 Consulates American Consulate Nuevo Vallarta: 322.222.0069 24 hrs Guadalajara: 333.268.2145

Phone Cards Phone cards (“tarjetas telefonicas”) for use in pay phones can be bought at newstands and in pharmacies in denominations of 30, 50 and 100 pesos. Pay phones do not accept coins. When buying a phone card for pay phone use, specify that you would like a “tarjeta LADA,” because pre-paid cell phone cards are also sold in the same establishments. Calling Toll-Free Numbers Some toll free numbers work from Mexico to the US and Canada, but many do not. You need to dial a different prefix. To call the following toll free prefixes, dial as follows: 800 numbers Dial 001-880-then the number 866 numbers Dial 001-883-then the number 877 numbers Dial 001-882-then the number 888 numbers Dial 001-881-then the number

Red Cross: 065 Immigration: 322.224.7719 Consumer Protection: 01.800.468.8722 Tourism Offices Jalisco: 322.221.2676 Nayarit: 322.297.1006 Canadian Consulate 322.293.2894 24 hrs: 1.800.706.2900

COMMON SENSE: Just as you wouldn’t walk around your hometown drunk and beligerent, it is not acceptable to do that here. While Mexicans are a forgiving bunch, basic politeness is appreciated. For the guys, peeing in public is a major faux pas and if you are caught, can get you tossed in jail or an expensive fine. Pay attention to your surroundings. Pay your bills. Be courteous. And have fun! DRINKING AND DRIVING: First off – just don’t. The consequences are not worth it. Taxis are cheap and plentiful. Fines are as much as 10,000 pesos. You can be taken to jail and your vehicle impounded. There are many checkstops on the weekends and you will be asked to blow if they suspect you have been drinking.

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{ So I ask you, Tell Me, literally tell me, are you reading the paper? Are you heading out crack of dawn Friday mornings to grab the paper and a cup of coffee at Pages in the Sun? Or suiting up the dogs and heading to Starbucks to enjoy the paper with your grande caramel macchiato?

Editors Notes

CHANGE CHANGE CHANGE

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o, this is lucky issue number 13. In the past three months we have updated the design of the newspaper, changed the content to be more local focus and news based, we have increased the number of pages, sorted out most (not all) of the distribution issues and we have brought in some really great writers that are committed to making the Tribune the best paper in the Bay.

More Flights to Vallarta

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ecently announced by long time Puerto Vallarta advocate, Apple Vacations, new flights will soon be operating from many cities in the United States to Puerto Vallarta’s International Airport (PVR). New flight departure cities include: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; New York, NY; Saint Louis, Missouri; Rockford, Illinois; and Lansing, Michigan. In addition to the new cities more flights from cities that already offer service to PVR will represent an increase of 73% in the seats available on nonstop flights to Puerto Vallarta / Riviera Nayarit. An increase in the existing flights from the cities of:Chicago, Colorado; Dallas, Denver, Illinois, Kansas City, Missouri; Milwaukee, Wisconsin; and Minneapolis.

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Perhaps you are sliding onto the bar stool at Yo-Yo Moe’s mid-afternoon for a cold one and a chance to catch up on the local news? Regardless how you found this fine paper, we would love to hear your feedback. From typos to kudos your comments are important to the growth and ultimate success of this publication. Speaking of things that change (and things that don’t) we have the cloning ATM machines rearing their ugly key pads again. (Yes this happens the world over – even in picturesque Eugene, Oregon and sleepy St. John’s.) Please exercise caution and keep an eye on your accounts if you are using ATM machines.

Editorial

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Next week we will run some tips on how to protect your cards from cloning. In the meantime, we recommend you transfer only what you can stand to lose into a separate account and make all your withdrawals from there. Lots of great events coming up and if you get a chance check out the Let’s Schmoooze in La Cruz event tonight (Friday June 21st) at the Ya-Ya Café from 11am-2pm and the Umbrella Downwinder on Saturday the 22nd also in the hopping town of La Cruz. June 29th has us celebrating and fundraising for the Firefighters and Lifeguards at the Cena con Causa at the Krystal Hotel and resort for only $300 pesos. We have Barbara Peters Birthday Bash on June 22nd at her gallery Galeria Vallarta in Centro. Drop by for some treats and a chance to see Roger Lex work. All the event details can be found on page 21 in this week’s paper. Hope to hear from you soon and perhaps we can grab a drink at one of the many things happening around town this weekend. Send me an email at Madeline@VallartaTribune.com

The St. Regis Unveils Punta Mita Beach Festival 2013

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he St. Regis Punta Mita Resort, in conjunction with Punta Mita Expeditions and the Riviera Nayarit Convention & Visitors Bureau, recently announced the inaugural Punta Mita Beach Festival 2013. This celebratory event will be taking place July 4 – 7, 2013, and will take full advantage of the golden shoresPunta Mita. Whether it’s surfing, stand up paddle, stand-up paddle yoga, sandcastle building for the kids, a fashion show showcasing the latest in surf attire, or sipping on a margarita as you savor the delicacies of the ocean, this funfilled weekend promises to be one to remember. “One of the most alluring aspects of The St. Regis Punta Mita Resort is our beautiful beachfront location, which will

be showcased in every regard as a part of the Punta Mita Beach Festival,” said Carl Emberson, general manager. “We are very excited to unveil this all-encompassing event to guests, involving world-class partners for experiences that range from surfing to fashion to culinary. With something for everyone, the Punta Mita Beach Festival will be another destination event in Punta Mita, a bespoke occasion unlike any other.” The inaugural Punta Mita Beach Festival 2013 at The St Regis Punta Mita Resort includes three nights’ accommodations, your choice of any of the scheduled activities and events, as well as breakfast, lunch and dinner, including non-alcoholic and alcoholic beverages.

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“El Foco” Linking identities on C7 Radio

ach week El Foco discusses local issues on the radio. Here is a recap of this week’s show. Tune in every Monday to learn more. At El Foco this past Monday we had the pleasure of receiving María Eugenia Huesca (Maru for short), President and Founder of Bienestares, A.C.. Bienestares, whose name means Wellbeings, is a nonprofit organization which seeks to heal and develop communities through the human development of the family as a base. Bienestares A.C. works with 22 families in each community (Bucerías and Punta de Mita so far), starting with the parents and working to include their children and youth to promote integral development. For more information contact Maru at maruhuesca@gmail.com. Don’t miss the chance to practice your Spanish with “El Foco” every Monday at 4:00 pm on 91.9 FM C7 Radio, or tune in at 4:50 pm for our English summary

Guadalajara Gets All Jazzed Up

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he streets and bars of Guadalajara, Jalisco, are tuning up for the International Jazz Festival on August 2-11. Organized by Tónica, a civil association formed by young musicians, with the backing of the US consulate in Guadalajara, the festival will feature artists of the stature of Peter Bernstein, Ben Allison, José James, Brian Lynch and Michael Davis. An International Jazz Seminar will be held as part of the festivities, with conferences and an educational program that includes an audio production and engineering seminar and several intensive workshops with some of the world’s most talented jazz players. Music industry professionals will have the opportunity to attend round tables hosted by prestigious exponents of the genre, while a film program is just one of the fringe activities on offer in this quixotic encounter between the city and the sensual world of jazz. www.tonicagdlac.com

ABOGADO O PARTIDO SIN ABOGADO Mendocino County HHSA/Social service Family & Children´s Division PO Box 839 , Ukinh CA 95482 Teléfono 707-463-7990 Fax 707-463-7748 Superior Court Of California County of Mendocino 100 Nort State St. Ukiah CA 95482 NOMBRE DEL CASO: Isabella Leigh Rangel LA CITACION DE COMPARECER PUBLICADA POR EL DEPARTAMENTO DE BIENESTAR Y SUS INSTITUCIONES DEL CODIGO ARTICULA 294 (F) (7) (A) NUMERO DE CASO: SCUK-JVSQ-12-16505-01 1. Para Arturo Vargas Rangel y cualquier otra persona que esta reclamando ser el padre de Isabella Leigh Rangel, nacida el 8 de diciembre del 2004 en Santa Rosa, California, EEUU. 2. Habrá un junio de Departamento de Bienestar y sus Instituciones el 6 de agosto del 2013 a las 9:00 a.m. en el Departamento F localizado en la corte superior mencionada arriba. 3. En el juicio, las recomendaciones de la trabajadora social serán consideradas por la corte. 4. La trabajadora social va a recomendar que la niña este libre de la custodia legal de usted, para permitir que sea adoptada. si la corte sigue las recomendaciones, todos sus derechos paternales serán terminado. 5. Usted tiene derecho a estar presente en este juicio y presentar evidencia, y tiene el derecho de ser representado por un abogado. Si no tiene un abogado y no tiene manera de pagarlo, será nombrado por la corte para usted. 6. Si la corte termina sus derechos paternales, la orden podría ser final. 7. La corte procederá con este juicio este usted presente o no. Fecha: 5 de junio del 2013 CARYN A. DOWNING. Empleada Provisional por PEGGY MELLO. Diputado La Citación de Comparecer Publicada por el Departamento de Bienestar y sus Instituciones Del Código Articulo 366.26 será publicada en las Siguientes fechas: 10, 17 y 24 de junio y el 1 de Julio del 2013.

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June 21 - 27, 2013 Vallarta Tribune 846

IFC Invites you to Celebrate Christmas in July! by Janie Albright Blank

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ho needs snow?! The International Friendship Club (IFC) is hosting a festive evening at the River Café on Saturday, July 20th including a Holiday dinner with all the trimmings! Get in the spirit joining with your family and friends in Vallarta to celebrate – best part is no need to wear a Christmas sweater and no presents to buy! However if you bring a new children’s toy or toiletry item you will be entered in a special raffle. There will also be live entertainment and a mini fashion show with “seasonal fashions” from Carol’s Boutique. A welcome cocktail is included and the cocktail hour begins

at 6:30 followed by dinner at 7:30. The elegant meal begins with Assorted Lettuce, Spiced Cheese, Plantain Banana, Grilled Chistorra and Apple Vinaigrette followed by Hand-carved slices of Tender oven-roasted Turkey paired with Roasted garlic mashed Potatoes and grilled Vegetables, served with a side of house-made Apple Sage Stuffing and Cranberry Mango Chutney. Dessert will be Pumpkin spice Crème Brûlée, a house-made pumpkin spice custard baked and topped with caramelized sugar. The cost is $350 pesos and includes tax and tip. A Vegetarian menu is also available. As always, proceeds go to fund the Cleft Palate Program and other charities supported by the IFC.

Mexico City to Consider Legalization

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s a sign of the ever changing times it would appear that the Legalization of Marijuana has drifted on a cloud of smoke, south to Mexico City. With a handful of US states and Canadian provinces, toying with the idea of decriminalization or full out legalization, this movement doesn’t come as a shock. Mexico City has regularly reflected the more liberal and cosmopolitan views of the world at large. As reported in the Huffington Post, Party of the Democratic Revolution is preparing legislation that would make it legal to smoke weed in Mexico City, news site Sin Embargo reports. The legislation, which will be introduced in September, would allow people to grow marijuana at home, smoke it in designated places and carry up to 25 grams for personal use. Lawmakers say the bill aims to permit marijuana use for medicinal reasons, but also opens the door to legalizing its recreational use. “Most marijuana consumers aren’t addicts,” Mexico City Deputy Vidal Llerenas Morales told Sin Embargo. “They aren’t criminals. They are functional people.” News of the coming legislation comes just days after exPresident Vicente Fox made a series of public statements

arguing in favor of legalizing the drug as a way to remove some of the profits away from drug cartels. Fox said earlier this month that he’d grow weed himself if it were legal. But the country’s current President, Enrique Peña Nieto of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI, in Spanish), is less convinced decriminalization is the way to go. “I’m not in favor because it’s not just about legalizing marijuana,” Peña Nieto told CNN shortly after taking office in December. “ It seems to me that this would open up the possibility that some sectors of the population could wind up consuming much more harmful things.” More than 70,000 people have died from violence tied to the illegal drug trade since Peña Nieto’s predecessor Felipe Calderón launched a frontal assault on Mexico’s drug cartels in 2006. Decriminalization has seen much success in other countries around the world including Portugal, Bangladesh, Belgium, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, and a few others Where possession of small amounts of marijuana is either legal or tolerated. Still other countries, like the U.S and Canada, have legalized medical marijuana in some areas.

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There’s a New Restaurant in Town LAYlA’s RestAurAnte

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ast Saturday, June 16th Layla’s Restaurante officially opened its doors to Vallarta’s fine dining lovers and we had the oportunnity to try this new concept of international and mexican fine cousine at very affordable prices. Restauaranteur Rodrigo Villar and his wife Isabel Cenil took the plunge and moved from New York to Puerto Vallarta with the idea of creating a new restaurant where they could offer creative dishes with excellent service in a comfortable and elegant ambience. With more than 25 years of experience in the gastronomic business Rodrigo is quite sure Layla’s will be among the ten best restaurants in Vallarta. Such thoughts of low season mean little to him as he declared “We will succed no matter what! We will pamper local customers with what they deserve all year round”. Chef Mario Murrillo with a

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long history of cooking experience in Manhattan presented his delicious creations. As starters we had Fried Oysters in chipotle cream and mexican sauce presented in the shell over black beans and slices of lemon as decoration. Then we tried a fresh Spinach salad with walnuts and balsamic vinaigrette and mushrooms sauteed in garlic. For the main course we chose the lemon trout fillet stuffed with shrimps, asparagus and mushrooms, lemon cream with a green rice timbale, that yielded fantastic

flavors. We washed it down with a pitcher of Red Sangría. Layla’s restaurant is well located at the Centro zone in front of Parque Hidalgo on Venezuela street, this privileged location gives us great views of the mountains and the bay, especially at the terrace-bar located on the second floor. 137 Venezuela Street, Colonia 5 de Diciembre. Phone 322 222 2436 Open Tuesday to Saturday 9am - 12 midnight Sundays from 9am to 9pm

’Don Popo’ Erupts from his Slumber

exico’s active Popocatepetl volcano has been showing signs of activity, spewing gas and ash for the past few weeks, June 17th saw one of the largest explosions yet. The volcano has registered a massive explosion spewing ash and incandescent rock almost 4 kilometers high. What makes this particularily noteworthy is that the video footage of the explosion is captured in perfect clarity. A few weeks earlier, a UFO was caught on video allegedly flying into the Volcano crater. No word on the whereabouts of the UFO now. Around 4.5 million people live within a 50-kilometer radius of the active volcano, 650,000 of whom are considered to be at high risk. According to authorities in the state of Puebla, where the second-tallest volcano in Mexico is located, the incandescent fragments released in the blast fell as far as 2 kilometers from the crater. Director of Puebla’s Civil Protection department Jesus Morales said that burning

rocks sparked small fires around the volcano. Mexico’s National Center for Prevention of Disasters (Cenapred) said the volcano had returned to its previous activity level, and that the volcanic alert level would remain at ‘yellow phase two.’ In addition, volcanic ash that was blown up to 4 kilometers into the air could be shifted by wind currents and then fall on Puebla, or even as far away as Mexico City, Cenapred warned. Popocatepetl had previously been in phase two after breaking the record for the most volcanic emissions in one day – the 5,452 –meter-tall giant gave off 300

emissions in just one day in May. In December 2000, the volcano registered one of its largest eruptions in recent history, prompting the mass evacuation of the surrounding countryside. With favourable weather conditions there is excellent video footage of the blast. No sign of the UFO though.

VIDEO LINKS See the blast here: http://youtu.be/3ATDHCtaMBs See the UFO here: http://youtu.be/Wk5qbQv7u1w

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Locals

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t was not long ago that I was sitting at my house in the city of Denver, in the state of Colorado, in the country of – you guessed it - the United States. After transporting my body 1700 miles (2700 KM) to the country of Mexico, to the city of Bucerias, to a home which is a hotel room: my same brain and body remain intact. Only the context in which I find myself has changed. No longer do I expect to hear English every time I am on public transportation. No longer do I expect to see those familiar American products always occupying shelf space at the store. No longer do I assume I will fit right in, not being looked at as an outsider, a gringo. For some reason, however, I find it necessary to say that I love it. I love the speed of life. I love the differences you find, the senses you interpret, the experiences you have. I love it all. One thing I don’t love at times is my inability to communicate. There is one action I believe to be universal and understood by all living creatures: eye contact. For this, you don’t need words or expressions or tone of voice. In fact, you don’t even need to be conscious of it. All you need to do is simply look. If what people say is true about eyes being windows to the soul, I believe it’s safe to say that

eye contact is, essentially, the act of souls connecting. One thing I love about travel is exactly this. You don’t need to know a language to have a genuine connection with another human being. Last week on assignment with Investours, the organization I’m interning with, I attended a local community event to record video footage of a basketmaking class. The teacher was an inspirational leader: a single mother of 5, a cancer survivor, and an extraordinarily hard worker. She spoke to me through a translator about her life, her hopes for the women in her class, even about the symbolic value of art. I could only comprehend about 20% of the words she spoke, but I understood 100% of what her legacy would be. I could feel the power of her words and presence. I got goose bumps as she leaned in closer, eyes piercing into mine, to emphasize why these “mujeres” were so important to her (yes I do know that one- it means “women”). So sometimes we don’t need to hear sounds in the form of language in order to associate them with ideas. Sometimes in order to understand a seemingly incomprehensible person, all we need is a little bit of interest, a little bit of time, and to keep our eyes open.

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Abstract artist Roger Lex Showing in Vallarta

A Myles Wallingford, Investours Intern

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June 21 - 27, 2013

rtist Roger Lex has claimed Puerto Vallarta as his second home for over 20 years now. He is an acclaimed artist having painted a mural in the Las Vegas Convention Center and a larger one in the Houston Astrodome. Roger was also commissioned to paint the reproduction of the King Tut mask which was produced as a limited edition lithograph and marketed through National Geographic, The Wall Street Journal and the Smithsonian. Extremely collectible, his works are part of the collections of Tex Ritter and Ernest Tubb, Gran Ole Opry stars among others, and his art is part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Naval History in Annapolis,Md.

Currently, Roger is now creative director and owner of Tri Ad Creative Group. Previously he was the owner of two fine art galleries and curator for a third. Roger believes his passion drives his art, the core of which originates inside the eye of his mind where he sees what others miss, whether of nature or man, realistic or abstract. This vision is what he is driven to capture in his art. He says “abstract paintings represent ‘energy’ captured forever on canvas.” The paintings of Roger Lex will be featured at Galeria Vallarta at the Cocktail opening on Saturday, June 22, 6-9 p.m. Guerrero 187, #110, Puerto Vallarta Centro.

VALLART PRIDE 2013 RAFFLE WINNERS The Vallarta Pride Organizing Committee is pleased to announce the raffle winners from last Friday’s 1st Awards Event andFundraiser at Paco’s Ranch in the Romantic Zone of Puerto Vallarta. Prize winners are: Zuri Resendiz Winner of a water generator, a value of $1,499 USD. It was donated by Stonewall Bar. Tim Longpré Winner of a 1 week vacation at any RCI property, a value of $2,100 USD. It was donated by Almar Resort Luxury All Suites & Spa. Dale Copper Winner of a 1 week vacation, a value of $2,100 USD. It was donated by Almar Resort Luxury All Suites & Spa. Daniel Camacho Winner of a 4 in 1 vacation week, a value of $5,000 USD. It was donated by Almar Resort Luxury All Suites & Spa. Sam Ellsworth Winner of a 2 night stay at Hotel Blue Chairs Resort, a value of $300 USD. The Vallarta Pride Committee has contacted each of the lucky winners to deliver their exciting prizes with their warmest congratulations.

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June 21 - 27, 2013 Vallarta Tribune 846

Locals

{ PV Sea Dive

By Erin Staley oldtownfm.com

By Sue Keevil pvseadive.com

Addicted to Diving

A Bag of Goodies at the Old Town Farmers’ Market

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ill up your shopping bags with all sorts of “make it, bake it, grow it” goodies at the Old Town Farmers Market– Tianguis Cultural. From decadent sweets to handcrafted PreHispanic musical instruments, we’ve got it all for a fun-filled Saturday morning of shopping. While you’re weaving through the stands of goods and services, be sure to check out the masterful weaving skills of Emiliano Hernández Cruz, owner of Artesania de Oaxaca. “I started crafting baskets as an eleven-year-old in Oaxaca,” says Cruz who weaves whimsical baskets, bags and flowers. “We hand select natural palms and cut them according to the traditional methods used by my family for generations.” Once the palms are dried by the warmth of the sun, they are woven into colorful and handy products perfect for everyday

errands or special occasions. Using the same artisan techniques Cruz also hand makes a line of bags and baskets woven from durable plastic strips. “Our customers appreciate the craftsmanship found in each of our woven bags and baskets,” says Cruz. “We are proud that our Artesania de Oaxaca products promote the artistry and creativity of Mexican handicrafts around the world.” Your Artesania de Oaxaca basket is the perfect eco-friendly shopping staple for all of your Market purchases, including the delectable meat and deli products from Carnes del Mundo. Owned by Kyle and Irma Quast, Carnes del Mundo is a family-run business located in Bucerias, just 25km north of Puerto Vallarta. “We started by making the foods we missed from home,” says Kyle Quast. “It was a time when the people of Vallarta

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couldn’t just dart into Sam’s Club, Walmart or Costco for tasty meat products. I researched the local market and eventually made samples for the diners at my Marina based restaurant.” The meat and deli products were a such a hit, that the Quasts soon opened Carnes del Mundo. Today, they continue to smoke many of their selections while crafting their own sausages. With over 220 varieties, Carnes del Mundo offers the freshest, hard-to-find meats for a one-ofa-kind dining experience. Fill up your bags with these Carnes del Mundo favorites: Bacon – Guanaciale, pancetta, hickory smoked, hickory smoked pepper, Canadian pea meal and smoked Canadian BBQ – Brisket, chicken, pork ribs Deli Meats – Pastrami, roast beef, corned beef, hickory smoked ham, smoked turkey breast, deli sliced tongue Gourmet – Pate and ostrich pate Jerky – Black or red pepper, teriyaki, turkey, ostrich, regular Sausage – Brats, bangers, Italian, Polish, kielbasa, breakfast, Texas hot link, Spanish chorizo Don’t forget to pick up a variety of Carnes del Mundo’s sauces: BBQ, ranch, honey mustard, satay, teriyaki, horseradish and chipotle marinade. To place direct orders and schedule a free delivery, visit the Quasts at the Market or at their Heroe de Nacozari #31 location in Bucerias. You can also visit Carnes del Mundo online. Fill up your bag of goodies this Saturday at the Old Town Farmer’s Market – Tianguis Cultural. Located along Basilio Badillo between Olas Altas and Pino Suarez, the summer Market is open 9:30 am to 2 pm until the last Saturday in July, rain or shine. For more information, visit www.oldtownfm.com or “like” us on Facebook.

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lot of the time I take people diving for the first time, I feel really sorry for them. “Why?” I hear you ask “is that?” Well, I once had a normal life and a regular job, and then I learnt to scuba dive. Now I live far away from “home” and could not work in the “real” world if I wanted to. I don´t think I could be this happy without diving as much as I do. Diving is a very addictive sport. Once you learn to dive, all your vacations are going to be taken somewhere you can dive, and there is always somewhere new to put on your bucket list. Let me try and explain why. The underwater world is quiet. The moment you drop below the surface of the water the worries and concerns of modern life fade away. You are in a foreign world, where strange creatures live and where the rules of physics that govern our everyday existence no longer apply. Gravity disappears. For the duration of the dive you are an explorer who can navigate an environment few humans are privileged to experience. In a way, divers are like astronauts - they escape their terrestrial existence! Unlike space travel, the training to safely explore the underwater environment takes only days. The relative safety and ease of scuba diving makes it a great way for many people to step back from their busy lives. Underwater, you cannot be reached on your cell phone, the latest

Facebook updates are of no concern and Twitter is silenced. Life goes on pause and you are simply alone with the water. While unusual aquatic life and the bizarre environment consume your attention, to dive safely, you must focus on your immediate surroundings and actions. A diver must manage his dive gear and monitor his depth, time, and air supply. Someone told me once that all divers are trying to escape from something. Maybe that is true. Whatever drives us to voyage into the underwater world, whether it is a need for break or a simple penchant for exploration and adventure, diving provides a welcome relief from our everyday lives. We emerge from the water refreshed, and ready to tackle our obligations on land from a new perspective. It is for me, just like doing meditation, but I can´t sit still long enough for that! I had a guest jump on our boat yesterday with all of the worries of the world etched on his face. He owned a busy business back in Canada and chatted about growth plans and the effect the economy was having on his business all the way to the dive site. After diving, I did not hear a single reference to his company, only talk of the fish he saw and the diving techniques that he wants to improve. His face had relaxed and he was a different, happier man. He needed to dive and I don´t think anything else could do this to or for him.

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Locals

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Diary of an Intern

This is Paradise...

By Marcia Blondin marcia.blondin@ymail.com

By Alexander Sternberg Investours Intern

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hile all of us at the Co-op Market - held every Saturday at the Paradise Community Center - are waiting for Vallarta´s first major rainfall, I want to introduce two of our hardworking vendors…ladies first. Meet Lisa – originally from Finland and Vallartense for more than three decades. Not only lovely to look at, she is smart and multi-talented. Already the author of two well received books available on Amazon; she is constantly showing up at Market with new things. Her hand painted Italian Renaissance reproductions on tile have been wildly successful and are adorning villas and condos all over Vallarta. Recently Lisa was shopping for something to wear in our blistering summers that would be attractive, light, airy and not hot! Not finding exactly what she wanted – out came her sewing machine and Palazzo Wear was born. Initially many vendors asked where her billowy flared pants came from and one order led to another and that, as they say, was that. See Lisa´s new brightly colored, reasonably priced collection every Saturday. She custommakes pants, sleeveless dresses and tops to your exact measurements to keep you elegantly cool year round. About 15 years ago Armando spent three months in the south of France on vacation. A chance visit to a rural farmer´s market piqued his interest in soap making and would ultimately lead to his life´s work. Many conversations with the elderly French soap maker inspired Armando to experiment with her family recipe when he returned to Mexico. He began growing his own herbs, trying various blends and scents and successfully created his own completely organic line of soaps. In2010, Armando branched out, knowledgeable enough from years of studying botanicals and skin types to begin creating exfoliants, body oils, creams, colognes and more. Today he has a full line of personal care products that you can first sample at our Market and purchase knowing they contain nothing artificial. His oil based products made from coconuts and almonds - never mineral oil! - are suitable for massage and aromatherapy. One long hot soak immersed in Armando´s apple bath salts will have you back at Market clamoring for more! In addition to their beautiful hummingbird feeders Phillip and Brenda are now making marionettes out of the same super clay; all you need to add are a few strings. Everything you purchase from this creative couple comes in a hand painted (by them, of course!) paper bag. Look what´s coming to the Paradise Community Center: “Fashions for Charity” by Deja New! The brainchild of Vallarta business woman Kathleen Palmer will open this November featuring hundreds of donated items. Kathleen´s intention is to raise awareness in our community to the urgent needs of the 14 charities to which her store regularly donates clothing and – most importantly – cash. Lots more info to come and in the meanwhile visit Deja New Consignment, Jacarandas 280. Until next week – find your umbrellas! The only English paper in the Airport

hen walking through the ocean side of Bucerias, it’s hard to remember that Mexico can be a dangerous and very frustrating country. It’s very easy to become trapped in the Bucerias bubble especially as I do much of my work on the computer in a cafe or at my hotel. It’s very easy to recline into the cushy, touristpriced lifestyle, with the Decameron soundtrack thumping in the background. However, in my three weeks of life in Bucerias the most gratifying experiences I’ve had have come from the other side of the highway. This past Friday, I had the chance, along with two other interns, to meet a local fisherman named Javier who uses his catch to make ceviche, which he claims, will increase your strength and vitality. After devouring a kilo of his ceviche over the weekend, I think he might have a point. My fellow interns and I sat down with Javier to talk about his fishing technique, the development of his small business and his hopes for the future.

It’s easy to forget that this is a community with a very clear socioeconomic divide. There are some pretty incredible success stories of local businesses throughout this community and it only takes a few steps off the beaten path to find them. Javier’s ceviche recipe wasn’t passed down for generations in his family, it was something that he developed a passion for and has

built into a growing business that provides stability for his family. The artisans and small business owners in Bucerias might have traditions passed down through generations but they do represent a community striving to improve their lives as well as providing important services and interesting, and in Javier’s case delicious, products.

Javier is a gregarious character, constantly smiling and joking, and was natural in front of the camera as we filmed him for the interview. It was interesting for me to take a step back and watch my fellow interns in their element as one zoned in to the lighting, sound and filming of the interview and the other drew Javier’s personality out with interview questions. I’m happy to be working with a very competent and talented team. Furthermore, I am excited by the opportunity to venture into the other side of the highway, which might go unnoticed to the average tourist. Reach more tourists with the Vallarta Tribune


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Local

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Paradise and Parenting

By Leza Warkentin rhythm2rain@gmail.com

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know it’s June because I am no longer in the mood to create magic in my kids’ lunch bags. I’m certainly grateful for peanut butter and jelly (it’s organic, ok) at this time of year. Gone are the days of special, cut-out sandwiches and mom’s home-baked chocolate chip cookies, folks. In other words, I’m slumping toward the finish line and I’m getting a leg cramp. We’ve decided to spend our summer vacation in Vallarta this year. There are a multitude of reasons for this, one being that Vallarta is so full of interesting places to visit. I can’t wait to be a tourist in my own town. Another reason is that we are all ready for a break, after a busy school year for the children and me, and a nonstop high season for my musician husband. It will be wonderful to have few responsibilities and a loose schedule. The paragraph above is what I wrote to my friends and family in Canada. I left out a portion of the truth, which is included here, because they thankfully do not receive the Tribune there. The real deal is that we went to Canada last summer, and the

big, nasty Canadian dollars cornered our little Mexican bank account on the schoolyard and held its arm behind its back until it cried empty. My Canadian family and circle of friends have no problem believing that we’d love to spend a summer re-discovering beautiful Vallarta without the crowds, hiking in the jungles, lolling around on the beaches and sipping fruity drinks.

Starting the Summer Vacation

But here we all know that in summer, any walking we do feels like a slog through a swamp. Oh sure, I love the beach in summer, as long as we go before 8:30am and as long no one speaks to me or asks me to play any type of sweat-producing sport such as dodge ball. And by the way, I was telling the truth when I said I needed a break. However, two kids perspiring, fighting, and running out of batteries on their Wii remotes usually tends to cut into the break time. So then I check pinterest for project ideas and all I feel is a deep frustration that I can’t buy Borax in Puerto Vallarta so that we can make our own silly putty. What we try to do is be crea-

tive with our summer activity planning. For example, a favorite of my husband’s is called Let’s Go to the Store and Not Buy Anything! The goal of this activity is to stay in free air conditioned comfort for as long as possible while not actually spending any money. It’s fun to browse for milk products and frozen french fries until the store manager gently asks if s/he can see some

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ID. This activity is getting old for the younger family members, who have now figured out that the endless list making in the toy section doesn’t seem to pay off. Well, we have picked up some tricks over the years of summer vacation desperation. We don’t actually have a pool, but we have made friends with people who do.

And, if we do enough activities during the week like the storebrowsing one, we can have some serious fun on the weekends. I’ll continue to update you on our family’s shenanigans as the summer progresses (or degenerates… it kind of depends on your perspective). I’m pretty sure I can find some recipes for silly putty that won’t require Borax.

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Food

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Mezcal

By Sandra Roblágui

Fire on the tip of everyone’s tongue The wild but sophisticated bittersweet notes that characterize a quality mezcal, produced using traditional methods, is what has earned certain brands a place on the shelf alongside the most select spirits in the world.

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ome 100 certified brands of mezcal are currently sold in delicatessens and bars in over 30 countries. Casa Mezcal in New York and La Botica de la Condesa in Madrid are among the chicest establishments dedicated to this Mexican elixir. The success of mezcal can largely be attributed to the way it is made. Small-scale traditional processes are still favored because most producers believe mass production and market ing would jeopardize the flavor of a fiery beverage whose magic is the fruit of patience. Each batch of mezcal has its own distinct flavor and aroma, depending on which one of 23 utilizable species of maguey plant –the only raw ingredient used in the making of mezcal– it is made from, the type of soil the plant grew in, the kind of still used and the master mezcal maker’s touch According to the blog for Mezcalito a punto de veneno, a brand of mezcal from Oaxaca that is highly praised by connoisseurs, “the flavor and aroma of mezcal will vary depending on whether the maguey was harvested in the wild or cultivated; whether its flower stalk was cut or not; whether it grew on a hillside, a gully, high up in the valley or low down; and how much sun it received during its life span. Other factors include the water and type of soil it grew in, the species and whether or not one single species of maguey or several were used.” To cut a long story short, every time you take a sip of mezcal, you are sampling a boutique beverage. Only regions that have been producing mezcal for centuries –the states of Oaxaca, Guerrero, Zacatecas, San Luis Potosí and Durango and 11 municipalities in Tamaulipas and one in Guanajuato– were authorized to make mezcal under the 1994 denomination of origin de-

cree issued by the Mexican government. Mezcal as we know it today was first made in Mexico shortly after the Spanish Conquest, when Old World knowledge was applied to New World ingredients. The process has remained virtually unchanged since the agave of Mesoamerica was first distilled by the conquistadors using technology they had borrowed from Arab countries, according to Origins of Mezcal, an essay by Guillermo Marín, former director of the Center for Research and the Dissemination of Mexican Culture at the Oaxaca Institute of Higher Education IESO. It takes around eight years for an agave or maguey plant to become mezcal. The mature plants must pass through an oven, fermentation tubs and a still before they reach the bottle and are finally displayed on the shelves of exclusive bars in Mexico and abroad.Even in its most traditional form, mezcal is experiencing a boom that started less than 10 years ago. In the words of a partner of La Botica, one of the first mezcal bars in Mexico City, “when someone would come into the bar and we’d tell them we only sold mezcal and beer, they’d leave. I had to sit down with each of those first customers and explain to them the origin and characteristics of what they were about to taste. I spent eight months in a drunken stupor, but it worked: those first customers came back with others and passed on the knowledge.” In 2005, La Botica was selling two beers for every shot of mezcal. Today it’s the other way around: customers are ordering two shots or “caballitos” for every beer. La Botica has seven branches, including one in the upscale district of Polanco in Mexico City, all of which offer some 50 types of white, golden and aged mezcal. Mezcal has won over drinkers in cosmopolitan cities, not just in Mexico, but around the world. La Botica de la Condesa isn’t an isolated case. To grasp the extent of the mezcal revolution, all you have to do is enter the magic word “mezcal” and your city of choice on any Internet search engine. And judging from the number of enthusiasts out there, it’s here to stay! Originally published in Negocios ProMéxico

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It takes around eight years for an agave or maguey plant to become mezcal. the mature plants must pass through an oven, fermentation tubs and a still before they reach the bottle and are finally displayed on the shelves of exclusive bars in Mexico and abroad.

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June 21 - 27, 2013 Vallarta Tribune 846

By Gary R. Beck

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ost travelers explore the region’s offerings for dining experiences in various cuisines. Puerto Vallarta has slowly risen to the top in culinary opportunities throughout Mexico. Many surveys rank the Bahía de Banderas area second only to the capital city, passing Guadalajara. Here we are blessed with an array of cultures and cuisines ranging from traditional Mexican to gourmet Mexican, Spanish to Italian, Japanese to Indian, South American to German, Austrian and Swiss. That is only the beginning. Prices range from budget like taco stands, street vendors and small cafés to reasonable and moderate, found much lower in price than comparable cities throughout the world. Expensive restaurants in the Puerto Vallarta area offer much more

Food

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Dining in Puerto Vallarta than food; rather an entire evening experience: many places glowing with ambiance, decorated with beautiful local art accentuated by talented performers offering fine music, resulting in a most pleasurable event at prices lower than one has been accustomed. It is not uncommon to enter a small eatery and discover the chef/owner is from Italy and he makes his own pasta and pizza dough. Very fresh local ingredients are used in every creation, from fruits and vegetables to meats and seafood, adding a vibrant explosion of flavors and smells. All ingredients are made safe though washing in purified water. Support is extended to the Jaliscan farmers who work long hard hours under the blazing sun, producing crops as their families have done for many de-

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cades. For diners who have an interest in learning more about the cuisine of Mexico, consider branching out from the usual tacos and enchiladas when visiting the myriad of places offering good home-cooked traditional food. Have you sampled gringas, sopes, volcanes, molcajete dishes, enmoladas, chilaquiles and molé? Not all chiles are hot and hotter. Poblano [as in chile relleno] and smoky chipotle [especially in a cream sauce] are ranked on the mild side, yet enhance the preparations with unique flavor. Menudo and pozole are two popular creations enjoyed by the locals and daring gringos. In addition to hundreds of locally grown vegetables, observe the fruits available for snacks, garnishes, salads, smoothies and desserts: mango, papaya,

pineapple, pear, guava, strawberry, cantaloupe, watermelon, lime, apple, banana, coconut, passionfruit, starfruit, tamarind, orange, tangerine, coconut and guayaba. Carmen Miranda’s hat is plenty packed. Perusing Italian menus one finds pastas including: fusilli, fettuccine, linguine, lasagna, rigatoni, tagliatelle, pappardelle, spaghetti, cannelloni, seashell, butterfly, gnocchi, tortellini, vermicelli, many of which are made in the restaurant’s kitchen. Various breads as baguettes, ciabatta and focaccia may be freshly baked. Banderas Bay is one of the world’s largest bays, measuring 26 miles from east to west and 20 miles from north to south. The bay starts to the North in Punta Mita which is also the end of the Sierra de Vallejo mountains and, to the south,

ends in Cabo Corrientes, part of the foothills of the Sierra del Cuale mountain range. Logically, Puerto Vallarta teems with fresh fish and seafood. Often found are: tilapia, huachinango [red snapper], dorado [mahi mahi], sea bass, eel, marlin, oyster, clam, mussel, trout, salmon, octopus, crab, lobster, langostino [crayfish], halibut, squid, scallop, tuna and shrimp. Whether eaten raw, grilled, broiled, baked, smoked or sauced with anything from a creamy cilantro to ajillo garlic chile, the freshest fish available is a treat to the taste buds. There is no need to subsist on “United States-style” hamburgers and pizza. When visiting Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, relax and explore the vast surprising treats right here at your fingertips.

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Shopping & Restaurant Guide

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多PLEASURE OR BUSINESS?

RESERVACIONES 293.09.00 / ZONA HOTELERA NORTE, PUERTO VALLARTA / WWW.LALECHERESTAURANT.COM

Francisco I Madero # 202, corner Pino Suarez, Emiliano Zapata Olas Altas Reservations 222 6593 www.latiavallarta.com e-mail latiavallarta@hotmail.com


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June 21 - 27, 2013 Vallarta Tribune 846

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Beat the Heat Looking to escape the heat of Summer in

Look no farther! Vallarta Tribune will bring you refres tips and deals all summer. Isn't that so cool?


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June 21 - 27, 2013 Vallarta Tribune 846

VALLARTA BOTANICAL GARDENS

Puerto Vallarta Restaurant Guide

BECK’S BEST

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shing articles,

390 Restaurant Reviews in over 130 pages. The largest restaurant guide in Puerto Vallarta by long-time resident and dining connoisseuer Gary R. Beck. To download Puerto Vallarta Restaurant Guide Beck’s Best, Kindle e-book: www.amazon.com/dp/B004NEVX7I Apple iPad: http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/becks- best- puerto-vallarta/id429588300 B & N Nook: www.barnesandnoble.com/w/books/1106980846 2013 Bound print: www.cafepress.com / vallartaguide

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Travel

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Celebrate saints day in the Cradle of Mexican Culture

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traditional and magical festival will take place next June 29th in Mexcaltitan, a northern Nayarit fishing village, that every year celebrates the island’s patron saints: San Pedro and San Pablo. Teams representing the saints will engage in a battle, and the winner will most likely be St. Peter, who is known as the cornerstone of the Catholic Church. They may be a little too heavy at times, but they’re in no way cheating. This town is said be the mythical starting point for the pilgrimage of the Nahuatl tribes in search of Tenochtitlan, what is now essentially Mexico City and is depicted on the Mexican flag. Since the arrival of the Spanish, this small island lost in wetlands has honored both apostles. And if the Huitchilopoztli God did indeed commanded its people to undertake a pilgrimage in search of an eagle – or more realistically a more precise interpretation made by the Boutorini Codex – a heron devouring a snake, now San Pedro and San Pablo are the guides every year. The festival is colorful and unique. Shrimp-fishing sustains this region and the Saints sail out

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early in the morning, followed by a procession of parishioners, to bless the waters so that the traps set receive an abundance of plump fresh shrimp. The life-giving mangroves create the shrimp’s habitat and provide the material to build an elaborate levee system that have been used for fishing since before anyone can remember. The blessings are followed by a battle, and the whole town is split into two teams, each representing one of the saints. The teams compete in a race throughout the island, followed by a rousing cele-

bration. Each team will chose their best sailors for the race, who will sail on enormous canoes carrying the image of their respective saint. They’ll circle around Mexcaltitan, propelling the canoe with sticks that are submerged to the bottom of the channels, just like they do in the trajineras in Xochimilco, and not with paddles like it’s done in the rest of the country. Every year, San Pedro’s team will invariably win. “No, we’re not cheating. It’s just that San Pedro is even more miraculous and it’s better to commend fishing to him, as we don’t want to annoy him. The

strongest contenders are always placed in San Pedro’s team, and this is why he always wins… but we’re not cheating, the competition takes place like any other”, said Hector Apodaca, a guard at the Museo del Origen, which was built on this island to celebrate its designation as the ‘Cradle of Mexican culture’. The joy, cheering and festive environment that surrounds the race is only the beginning of a fiesta as traditional as any, which includes dancing and eating, as well as fireworks during the night, but more importantly,

framed by a natural environment of incomparable beauty.

LICK YOUR FINGERS Eating at Mexcaltitan is a whole new experience. This is the place that gave birth to the original recipe of the ‘cockroach shrimp’, and in no other place can they be found as crunchy, the ideal snack to go along with a beer. Fish in the zarandeado style, shrimp tamales, shrimp pate and aguachile from Nayarit complete the feast.

HOW TO GET HERE

Mexcaltitan is located 21 miles northeast of Santiago Ixcuintla, approximately 1 hour from San Blas and 2 hours from Tepic. From Santiago Ixcuintla you must take the road towards Sentispac, and continue on towards the La Batanga pier, where you’ll have to take a boat to the island. It’s recommended to sleep in San Blas when visiting Mexcaltitan, so the travel to and from the island can be made with ease. In San Blas, one can find a room in comfortable hotels like Garza Canela, Hacienda Flamingos and Casa Mañana, among other charming hotels. Visit vallartatribune.com


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Education

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Choosing a school in Vallarta Part 2

By Leza Warkentin

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his is our second installment in a series on choosing the right school for your child in Vallarta. Last week I talked about the differences between the private and public system, and began a list, in order of priority (in my view) of what you as a parent should be checking carefully when visiting schools in PV. The first item was school accreditation. The next one I will be touching on here is teacher quality. Obviously this one is tied to school accreditation, but it needs its own section. I cannot over-emphasize the importance of teacher quality. There has been so much research done on the impact good teaching has on students, one of the most recent being a study done by econo-

mists from Harvard and Colombia universities where they researched the impact of one year of good teaching. Nicolas Kristoff of the New York Times put it this way in January 2012: “Having a good fourth-grade teacher makes a student 1.25 percent more likely to go to college, the research suggests, and 1.25 percent less likely to get pregnant as a teenager. Each of the students will go on as an adult to earn, on average, $25,000 more over a lifetime — or about $700,000 in gains for an average size class — all attributable to that ace teacher back in the fourth grade. That’s right: A great teacher is worth hundreds of thousands of dollars to each year’s students, just in the extra income they will earn.” Be sure to ask if the schools’ teachers are teaching in their native language, since you will likely want your child’s English

The only English paper in the Airport

teacher to be a native speaker. Check also for the percentage of teachers with their bachelors and masters degrees in their specialized areas. Every school should be able to provide you with a copy of their school philosophy, mission and goals. Read this carefully and be sure that it coincides with your own. If you cannot support what this school aims to achieve with its students, your child’s chance for success will be impeded. Ask about teaching methods, what sort of student support is available if this becomes necessary, and what sorts of methods are used to control student behavior. If extra-curricular activities or student leadership opportunities are important to you, don’t forget to ask the school what emphasis they place on these things. There are some schools with particular

religious programs, so be sure to find out more about these if that is important to you. You will also want to know what types of ethical and community programs are being implemented in the school. Some schools are very active in the community, which again are important elements of leadership and values training. You should definitely check on the academic results of the schools you visit. While the philosophy of the school is very important, you need to know if the school is doing what it says it will do in its philosophy and mission statement. One way to find this out is by checking on SAT scores for high school, and some type of standardized testing in the lower school. You can see how the school does in relation to other schools, and you can also see if this is the kind of school that

would be beneficial for your own particular child. The last area I will mention is the schools’ physical facilities. This one may be important to you depending on your child’s interest and abilities, but a beautiful playground and huge soccer field will not necessarily reflect the quality of the school’s education. Certainly a school should pay attention to the whole child, which includes physical, social, and emotional development, but the academic facilities of a school should then be up to the same standards. Next week we will finish our series with some advice about the school visit– what you should be looking for and what questions you need to ask on the tour. We will also provide a list of some private schools in the area with contact information.

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{RivieraNayarit{

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Fun on the Riviera Nayarit

Hollywood arrived and virtually overnight Lo de Marcos and the Mexican Riviera became a popular hideaway for the rich and famous.

By Cat Morgan www.rivieranayaritfun.com

Visit Lo de Marcos, Nayarit

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he western coast of Mexico has been referred to as the Mexican Riviera, but is now widely known as the Riviera Nayarit, with Lo de Marcos located between San Pancho and Rincon de Guayabitos off of the 200 highway. Vacation towns like Puerto Vallarta and Sayulita have made the area known the world over and little pueblos like Lo de Marcos have been able to draw in visitors who are looking for a more authentic experience when vacationing in Mexico. Until the late Sixties and early Seventies, Lo de Marcos was essentially swampland dotted with the occasional palm grove harvesting coconuts and processing the oils.

Early settlers fished the abundant waters and hunted alligators in the bogs to sustain themselves. There is a lovely estuary at the North end of the playa that is still houses alligators, although not many are sighted. The coastal areas of Nayarit were very sparsely populated with little or no modern amenities like electricity or reliable roads until, as so often is the case, Gradually, infrastructure was added and tourism supplanted agriculture as the driving economic force of the area and for forty years now the locals have been hard at work earning the vacation dollars of thousands of visitors each year.

AFFORDABLE AUTHENTICITY Lo de Marcos has an official population of fewer than 2,500 people during the summer and off season, and around 7000 visitors during the peak winter season. Lo de Marcos is not the splashy and polished scene found further south in Puerto Vallarta. What it is, is a genuinely Mexican town on the coast – meaning a very casual atmosphere with authentic Mexican foods and customs that can be hard to find in the big tourist spots. It is rural Mexico with enough amenities to make a stay comfortable yet unadulterated enough to allow visitors to feel

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they are relatively disconnected from society. Prices are lower than the more southern pueblos for rentals and food. You can still go out for Huevos Rancheros on the playa for $25-30 pesos.

RV’ING IN NAYARIT One of the most popular ways that folks visit during the season is by an RV, and these folks return each year to their favorite RV parks.

Lo de Marcos has some great surfing off of the point at the South end of the playa, and it is also important to note that the South end of the playa is also the best place for swimming, as the rest of the beach can have a strong undertow, making it difficult to get in and out of the water. It’s a also a good idea to learn a bit of Spanish or come armed with your phrase guide,

as most of the native locals do not speak or understand very much English. See you on the beach! You can find out more about Lo de Marcos at allLodeMarcos. com and RivieraNayaritFun.com Cat Morgan is owner of the RivieraNayaritFun.com Regional Network, and can be reached at Cat@RivieraNayaritFun.com

Lo de Marcos has an abundance of beachfront RV parks that line the ocean, with several other RV parks close to the beach.

THE BEACH The beach is clean and well maintained by the locals. The Lo de Marcos Amigos fund-raise and pay hired hands to have trash picked up on a weekly basis and to keep the town square clean. There are a few non-profit organizations that help the community of Lo de Marcos, one being La Casa de Los Ninos, a children’s community center that keeps kids active in a healthy way, and celebrating life.

NOW Hiring Newspaper Advertising Sales Position Male or Female Full time Bilingual Excellent presentation Send curriuclum to ventastribuna7@yahoo.com

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{RivieraNayarit{ Sayulita Life

By Riley Hunter Originally Published By Sayulita Life

Gringo Hill Heads to Highway

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he Bottleneck, Dead Man’s Curve, The Alamo; these are the names of some rather treacherous obstacles that line the one road into and out-of Gringo Hill. After many slammed breaks and near collisions, the community of Gringo Hill teamed up and said, “no more!” Donn Sanders, Santo Cominos, and Gabriel Gallegos decided to team up and make this long discussed project a reality. The community had long been tired of the narrow, winding road that bottlenecks just before the beer depository at the entrance to Gingo Hill; and there had long been talks of building a road to the Punta Mita Highway to avoid big SUVs trying to squeeze in between the massive wall of the Alamo and the opposing wall face.

However, nothing seemed to make much headway. A good guess as to why would be, everyone was out surfing. But, wo-

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rries continued to arise about the safe evacuation in event of an emergency, and no one wanted to ding-up their golf carts or collide surfboards either! Their first step was to get the permission from the government, which as we know, could have been a daunting task. They found an attorney who had the right way with words and before they knew it, they had a team of 8 government officials and a translator from the municipality on top of Gringo Hill, ready to sign off on the new road plan! After the “road was clear” so to speak, and they had the goahead, offers for the contract began to pour in. Donn and crew heard figures ranging from 95k to 25k, and didn’t want to either pay too much or build a road that cars would slip on at the first hint of moisture from the summer rains. They quickly ruled out the lowest offers that proposed to use cobblestone, which becomes slippery when wet, and finally chose a proposal that included 8-inch concrete with rebar, retaining walls, a scored surface for traction, and even pipes to connect a future sewer system. Once this was done, they soon realized that they had accrued some out-of-pocket expenses and needed to bolster their community e-mail list to gather donations and support from the residents of Gringo Hill. Donn and his wife began emailing, door-knocking, and putting in some good grassroots work to get this project funded.

Registration of Canadians Abroad We encourage you to sign up for the Registration of Canadians Abroad service if you are travelling or living in Mexico. Registration enables us to reach you in case of an emergency abroad or inform you about a family emergency in Canada. Sign up online at travel.gc.ca/register or register by mail, fax or in person. For more information, contact the Consular Agency of Canada in Puerto Vallarta:

Soon, their email list went from 30 to 50, and landowners were walking up and flying in to see the project and donate their personal funds! They managed to raise 21k (4k short) just before the start of the project with the help of residents and benevolent business owners like the those of Don Pedro’s. But Donn and the team had come too far to put the project on hold. They chose to go ahead, and either pay extra costs with personal funds, or attempt to raise the remaining money as they go. With the road half-finished, and an expected end date of midJune, Donn and the crew are still emailing and fundraising away! Donn says, “It honestly has been a lot of fun. It was a surprising amount

of hard work to fundraise and get the project kick-started, but it has been really wonderful to see the Gringo Hill community come together, and people are really excited about the new road. I have walked up several times with home and land owners to show them the progress, and they think it’s great! Everyone is super excited. The new road will even allow two cars to pass at once from opposing directions! Surprisingly, that is something new for Gringo Hill! We will definitely have a celebratory party next high season! I know we can raise the last few dollars to get this finished.” Once again, in true Sayulita fashion, our caring and concerned citizens have come together and have made good things happen for the community!

We are so glad that people like Donn and the rest of the team are constantly striving to make Sayulita a better place. This is why Sayulita is such a visitors paradise and a utopia for us residents alike. When closing the interview with Donn, he had one last comment, “Now don’t go and make me look like a hero, it was really everyone else’s work that got things done. Gabriel, Santo, and the community did a wonderful job. But, my blues music band does play at Don Chow’s during the high season, so just tell everyone to come see us play on Mondays!” Originally Published on SayulitaLIfe.com. Reprinted with Permission.

Inscription des Canadiens à lʼétranger Nous vous encourageons à utiliser le service dʼInscription des Canadiens à l’étranger si vous voyagez ou habitez au Mexique. Nous pourrons ainsi communiquer avec vous dans le cas dʼune urgence à lʼétranger ou dʼune urgence familiale au Canada. Inscrivez-vous en ligne à lʼadresse voyage.gc.ca/inscription ou par courriel, par télécopieur ou en personne. Pour de plus amples renseignements, veuillez communiquer avec l’Agence consulaire du Canada à Puerto Vallarta :

Plaza Peninsula, Local Sub F Boulevard Francisco Medina Ascencio 2485 Zona Hotelera Norte, 48300 Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco, México

' 52 (322) 293-0098 / 293-0099 | 7 52 (322) 293-2894 | * pvrta@international.gc.ca

Vallarta Tribune

Your best source for English news in the Bay of Banderas


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June 21 - 27, 2013 Vallarta Tribune 846

Travel

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Natural Sanctuary for your Soul

Hotelito Desconocido Sanctuary Reserve and Spa By Madeline Milne

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otelito Desconocido provides an experience like no other, combining the spice of “roughing it’ with full bodied seasoning of luxury. It’s not a place for technology

addicts or those who enjoy the incessant bass of the all-inclusive, or those who are afraid of bird songs or the gentle shuffle of turtles in the sand. It is a place so unique that it could well be the greatest destination on earth. Hotelito Desconocido, (precious little known

hotel) as it is charmingly called, is set on sixty kilometers of pristine UNESCO protected bird and turtle sanctuary, located about two hours south of Puerto Vallarta in the exclusive Costalgre region. It offers twenty seven private palafittes with intricately

woven thatched roofs, all themed around the Mexican lottoria cards (similar to Bingo but with more personality) and set back on the estuary. Each is built on stilts to lessen the impact on the land and without electric lights to disturb the night sky. As evening rises

an attendant lights a pathway of candles from your cabana to the hotel lobby and El Diablo (the Devil lotteria card) restaurant. Once your eyes adjust you’ll wonder why you don’t live like this everyday. The spa offers exclusive thalassotherapy treatments based

GETTING THERE

Playón de Mismaloya 48460 La Cruz de Loreto Tomatlán, Jalisco Drive South along Highway 200 Towards Manzanillo Approx 100 kms After the town of El Tequesquite You will see signs for Hotelito. You are almost there. A right turn and another 15 kms will find you in paradise

WHAT TO BRING Take advantage of the solitude and catch up on your summer reading. Pack a few games to play over candle light. Don’t forget your walking shoes and a sun hat to enjoy the 60 kms of protected white sand beaches.

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{ Real Estate {

June 21 - 27, 2013

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Vallarta Tribune 846

Mexico, Canada Sign Real Estate Marketing Agreement John K. Glaab - The Settlement Company

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he Mexican Association of Real Estate Professionals (AMPI) and Mexi-Go! a Canadian marketing strategy company, have signed a partnership agreement. The signing took place at the recent, successful AMPI/NAR sponsored event “Viva-Mexico, an investment, resort and second home forum,” in San Jose del Cabo. Key items in the agreement include the use of the two entities’ logotypes in bulletins and other material, issuance, and AMPI participation in the upcoming Mexi-Go! Expos. (Held in September 2013, one will be in Vancouver and another in Calgary.) Mexi-Go! will also promote the AMPI referral program to its Canadian database. AMPI will host two seminars at the Mexi-Go! Expos in September. One will be aimed at educating Canadian Realtors on AMPI’s referral plan. A second seminar will focus on the value for Canadian investors in working with a member of AMPI. Commenting on the agreement, Linda Neil, Director of AMPI’s International Commission said, “The growth in the number of Canadians buying retirement and second homes in Mexico has increased substantially in recent years. Since only a few Mexican states have real estate licensing laws it is important that buyers deal with a member of AMPI.”

on the theory that exposure to sea air and immersion in warm seawater, mud, clay, and protein-rich algae helps restore the body’s natural chemical balance and once balanced you can soak in the special saline pools. The apothecary wall in the spa is filled with potions and creams and houses gorgeous antiques over one hundred years old. Many of the furnishings are from the owners’ private collection and others still are crafted onsite by the local towns people. Most of the food is grown in the resort’s organic farm and there are plans to be fully sustainable in the near future. Half the fun of the beachclub is getting there. Hail a passing row boat or charter one of your own. The beachclub is on the Pacific ocean and offers uninterrupted pristine white sandy beach for miles in each direction.

to the hot tub and back to your hammock without spilling your fresh squeezed lime margarita. The days are peaceful, filled with beachcombing, a soak in the pool, a row or bike ride around the grounds and deliciously organic freshly prepared meals. The evening are set to the sparkle of the stars and candlelit paths lead you to back to nature. Hotelito captures the essence of the land, respects the natural, and embraces the colour and craft of Mexico, while managing to infuse luxury and quality into everything it does. It’s inspiring hotelito.com

If the ocean is not for you, and it may not be as the waves and currents can be strong here, there is an Olympic-sized oceanfront infinity pool that offers submersed hammocks and an embedded hot tub. Your biggest challenge may well be how to move from the pool hammock Promote Your Next Event

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June 21 - 27, 2013 Vallarta Tribune 846

{

Sports

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You already know the answer By Joel Hansen

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don’t know who will win Game Seven tonight between Miami and San Antonio, but you do. By the time you read this we will have a new NBA champion. I am writing this column Thursday evening just minutes before tip-off in Miami, and according to my editor I do not have the power to “stop the presses” to wait for the results and if I don’t get my article in before deadline she will find something “that is interesting to people” to fill my space. You see me and the editor go way back, she has had to endure my sports obsession for a long long time she has been dragged to sporting events all over the world. From watching backroom Muay Thai matches in Chiangmai to bringing a book to some of the greatest baseball cathedrals in America, she has been there and done that and I think she might be over it. And my sports obsession. She recently told me that “I live in Mexico, If I never see another Canucks game again I will be just fine” Considering how they have disappointed us

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for forty years I guess I can’t really blame her, but as I wait for game seven to tip off I can’t help but feel a little excited, nothing compares to a game seven and to make it even that much more special I am watching the game here in Mexico, cold beer in hand, the ocean a stones throw away. Nothing could be better. So I submit this article without knowing the fate of King James, will he be a hero or a goat? He is the most divisive person in sports and one of the most fascinating. Tip-off is approaching and I am 5 minutes past my deadline, my phone is ringing and I bet it is my tireless editor, I better hit send, but not before predicting a second championship for James and the Heat, as much as that pains me. Stay tuned next week as I take Madeline to our sons season opening football game, I wonder what book she will bring? Ed.- To be fair, baseball is really boring. If I have 3 or 4 or 11 ‘free’ hours I think I’m better served catching up on my trashy novel and catching a siesta or two. Plus it’s a usually a good place to catch a tan.

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{ Cena con Causa to Benefit Vallarta Firefighters

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n June 29th attend the ‘Cena con Causa’ coordinated by DIF Puerto Vallarta in support of the firefighters and lifeguards who work tirelessly to protect our citizens and visitors. Funds raised will support training and equipment. Join the 90 person strong team and celebrate the efforts of these important community members. The benefit Buffet Dinner will include live music, and an auction with great items up for bid. Starting at 6:30 pm at the Krystal Hotel and Resort, tickets are $300 pesos. Tickets are available at the Fire Department located at Avenida Las Américas 565 in Colonia Lázaro Cárdenas as well as from volunteers on the Southside, in the Marina, Bucerías and Nuevo Vallarta. For more information, contact Gary Green at 322-150-7214 or email gary(at)andalesonthebay.com.

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Calendar Events

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hat better place than the water to celebrate the summer solstice? In La Cruz de Huanacaxtle, summer will be celebrated on Saturday, June 22 with an Umbrella Downwinder and Paddle Rally with a wind-filled drag race through Marina de La Cruz from Ikuai to Oso’s Oyster Bar. To participate in the Umbrella Downwinder, meet at the Marina Restaurant Ikuai Sailor Pub at 2:00 pm to sign up for the Drag Race, which begins at 3:00 pm. Ikuai Sailor Pub will provide a special “Summer Sailstice” lunch from 12:00 pm - 3:00 pm at Happy Hour prices. If you wish to enter the SUP Paddleboard Rally, participants should be at Oso’s Oyster Bar at 5 pm to register for the race, which begins at 6 pm. If you need a board, Pacific Paddle will provide one a demo board for free use during the event. Prizes sponsored by the local businesses of La Cruz will be awarded in each category. After the races, kick back and enjoy a relaxing dinner, a full moon bonfire, and Live Music by “Deep River” at Oso’s Oyster Bar. With amazing sunsets, balmy ocean breezes and live music, this is the way La Cruz celebrates the arrival of summer!

The movie “CICLO” is the story of two brothers, Arturo and Gustavo Martínez who left their hometown Pachuca, Hidalgo on bicycles May 1st 1956 with only 100 dollars in their pockets and the desire to cross the continent. Eighty-two days later they arrive in Toronto, not knowing this feat would change the entire route of their lives and their family tree. The two brothers are the father and uncle of the movie Director Andrea Martinez Crowther. Fifthy-four years later, Arturo and Gustavo- now in their 70s- retrace the same path, in an exploration of memory, the cycle of life and the unavoidable

LIVE MUSIC VENUES Please be sure to contact the venue to confirm all events. La Bodeguita Del Medio Paseo Diaz Ordaz 858, Malecon” 322.223.1583 Tues-Sun 9:30 2:00 am El Jardin del Pulpo Coral 66, La Cruz de Huanacaxtle” 329.295.5071 10:30 am 12.30 pm La Palapa Pulpito#103, Playa los Muertos” 322.222.5225 Mon-Sun 8:00am 1:00pm Benito’s Paninoteca Bar Nima Bay, Local 12, Marina Vallarta” 322.209.0287 El Patio de mi Casa Guerrero 311 esq. Matamoros 322.222.0743 Encore Lazaro Cardenas51, Bucerias 329.298.0140 Wed-Mon 9:00 am 10:00 pm The River Café Isla del Rio Cuale Local4 Centro 322.223.0788 Vitea Libertad Edificio Malecon 2, Centro” 322.222.8703 El Rio BBQ Bar Felipe Angeles 245 Col Paso Ancho 322.184.1200 Tue-Sun 11:00 am 7:00pm

passage of time. The movie is in Spanish and English but with subtitles only in Spanish. You can find more information on the web page www.ciclofilm.com. At the end of the movie there will be a celebration for Canada Day at the Biblioteca Los Mangos from 7:00 to 10 PM. Lyne Benoit, Consular Agent of Canada and her guests will celebrate with you.There will be the singing of Canadian and Mexican anthems, music, raffles, games, BBQ and beverages at a reasonable price. All the money collected from the sales will go to the Biblioteca Los Mangos. Come and celebrate Canada Day in Puerto Vallarta at the Biblioteca Los Mangos!! Sugges-

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ted dress code is casual red and white. The Biblioteca los Mangos is the only Public library in Puerto Vallarta and survives on donations from the public. They offer more than 80,000 services every year to the population of Puerto Vallarta and areas. MOVIE: CICLO July 1st, 2013 at 5:30 Tickets at the door at 4:30 Cost is 20 pesos per person Tickets are available at: Canadian Consulate M- F 9- 5 Located at Plaza Peninsula Biblioteca Los Mangos Avenida Francisco Villa 1001 Puerto Vallarta

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Celebrate Summer on the water

Celebration of Canada’s 146th Anniversary in Puerto Vallarta

ith the purpose to celebrate Canada’s 146th anniversary and to collect donations for the Biblioteca los Mangos, the Consular Agency of Canada and the Biblioteca Los Mangos are organizing two events for Canada Day this July 1st. The two events will be the exclusive presentation in Puerto Vallarta of the movie “CICLO” from Andrea Martinez Crowther and a BBQ celebration at the end of the presentation for all Canadians and their Mexican friends.

June 21 - 27, 2013

Las Adelitas Av. Fluvial Vallarta 234 322.293.7778 Beboteros Diaz Ordaz 565 Malecon 322.113.0099 Café Roma Encino 287 Centro Mon-Sun 10:pm -3:00 am Murphy’s Irish Pub Morelos 484 Altos 1, Centro 322.113.0373 Philo’s Delfin15, La Cruz de Huanacaxle”329.295.5068 Thu-Sat 8:30 pm Barcelona Tapas Matamoros esq 31 de Octubre Centro 322.223.0831 El Dorado Pulpito # 102, Playa los Muertos”322.222.4124 Que? Pasa Aquiles Serdan 625, Col Emiliano Zapata 322.223.4006 Trio Guerrero 264 Centro 322.222.2196 Mon-Sat 7:30 pm

PVSPCA ADORABLE DOG IN THE SPOTLIGHT...OREO

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reo is as sweet as a cookie, hence his name. He is very cuddly and good with other animals. Oreo is about two years old. And, at only 4.5 kilos, he is the perfect travel companion since he can even accompany you in the plane’s cabin. Please contact us at spcapv@gmail.com. Our sanctuary is preparing for the difficult summer months when Vallarta’s economy that depends on tourism is at a low and many animals become ho-

meless. Help us continue our efforts. To use your credit card to make tax deductible donations through PayPal, go to our website www.spcapv. com/donate

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{ Philanthropy{

June 21 - 27, 2013 Vallarta Tribune 846

Non-Profit and Charitable Organizations For visitors to Puerto Vallarta who wish to do a good deed for the less privileged in our paradise, this is a list of some of the many organizations that could benefit from such kind gestures. If you would like your organization recognized here, please email details to editor @vallartatribune.com

Centro Comunitario SETAC-GLBT - provides essential services to the GLBT community, including physical & mental health treatment and referrals, education & recreation, free AA meetings, English classes, HIV testing and counseling. Paco Arjona 224-1974 or paco@setac.com.mx

American Legion Post 14: contributes to the community through fund raising and providing resources and manpower to improve Day Cares, Senior Homes, Schools for the Disabled and Deaf, Public Schools in rural areas and other private institutions needing building maintenance www.americanlegion14.org

Clinica de Rehabilitación Santa Barbara - Rehabilitation of the handicapped. Contact: Laura Lopez Portillo Rodriguez at 224-2754.

Asilo San Juan Diego home for the elderly - Contact: Lupita Sanchez Covarrubias Tel. 222-1257 or malupita88@hotmail.com or visit the website www.mexonline.com\asilosanjuandiego.htm Asociación Down - The Foundation for assistance to persons with Down’s Syndrome – Contact: Ana Catalina Eisenring at 224-9577. Banderas Bay Women’s Shelter Safe shelter for women & children victims of domestic violence. Enables women to become financially independent through jobs, education and non-interest micro loans, professional counseling for them & their children. www.compassionforthefamily.org Becas Vallarta, A.C. – provides scholarships to approximately 300 high school and university students. Donations are tax-deductible in Mexico and the USA. Polly Vicars at (322) 223-1371 or Buri Gray at (322) 221-5285. www.puerto-vallarta.com/amf Bucerias Bilingual Community Center Support local families in Bucerias. 16 de Septiembre at calle Matamoros www. buceriasbilingualcommunitycenter.org Casa Hogar - a shelter dedicated to improving the lives of orphaned, abandoned, disadvantaged or vulnerable children.- Contact: Luz Aurora Arredondo at 221-1908, Rita Millan (322) 141-6974. casamaximocornejo@gmail.com

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CompassionNet Impact - forms strategic partnerships & initiates programs that provide opportunities for people living in chronic poverty to transform their own lives. Bookmobile, homes, jobs creation, loans, English & computer classes, emergency food, medicine & clothing, etc. Taxdeductible in Canada & the U.S. Cell: (322) 133-7263. ric@4compassion.org Cruz Roja (Red Cross) - handles hospital and emergency service in Vallarta. It is the only facility that is authorized to offer assistance to injured people on the street, transport them to their facility or other ones indicated by the injured person. Contact: 222-1533, 222-4973 Desarrollo Integral de la Familia (DIF) A municipal service, part of the federal System of Family Services that assists not only in times of emergency, but also with ongoing education, health, and training programs for the whole family. Contact City Hall 222-0058 Discapacitados de Vallarta, A.C. (DIVAC) association of handicapped individuals dedicated to helping one another. Contact: Ivan Applegate at 221-5153. GrupoEcològico de Puerto Vallarta – Contact: R.C. Walker at 222-0897, rc_ walkermx@yahoo.com.mx

Navy League - Meets and greets visiting Naval vessels from all nations, assists in the transportation of donated medical supplies from the U.S., organizes work groups to paint and repair schools and other public/charitable facilities, and operates the local Toys for Tots program. Contacts: Bill Clark at 222 3616 or Jerry Lafferty at 221 6156. www.vallartanavyleague.org. New Life Mexico - a British Charity working in Mexico. Challenging Child Poverty with Health and Education Programmes. Contact: Philippa.VernonPowell@facebook.com Pasitos de Luz (Mamas Unidas por la Rehabilitación de sus Hijos) - substitute home for low income children with any type of handicap, offers rehabilitation services and special support to their families. 299-4146. www.pasitosdeluz.org Pro Biblioteca de Vallarta - raises fundsfor Los Mangos Public Library. Taxdeductible receipts for Mexico and USA. Contacts: Ricardo Murrieta at 224-9966 or Jimmie Ellis at 222-1478. Proyecto Pitillal, “Busca un Amigo” - association created by underprivileged mothers of paralyzed children who need society’s help. Contact: 299-4495. Puerto Vallarta Garden Club: Beautify and protecting the environment. Open to all: Mtgs held at Paradise Community Center, third Thursday every month at 11am from October to May. www.vallartagardenclub.com PuRR Project - a no-kill cat shelter with approx. 250 resident felines living in a natural environment, un-caged, kittens in the Kitten Nursery, on-site clinic with daily veterinarian services. www.purrproject.com

Refugio Infantil Santa Esperanza Shelter for children. Donations are taxdeductible in Canada and the U.S. Contact: Madre Mari at 222-7857 or Sudy Coy at 222-5765. www.ccshf.ca Roma’s Kids - educate the children of the Volcanes and surrounding area, to provide them with the skills necessary to become employable by the major industry here in Puerto Vallarta – tourism: math, English and computer programs a priority. 100% goes to the kids. www.kids.romamexico.com Toys for Tots Vallarta - is a non-profit organization that is celebrating 15 years in Puerto Vallarta. Distributes toys and constructs playgrounds for less-advantaged kids in the Puerto Vallarta area during the Christmas holiday period. Contact: Jerry Lafferty 322 221 6156 or Lourdes Bizarro lourdes.bizarro@marriotthotels.com. SPCA PV – provides private vet costs for rescued animals, volunteers to create & maintain a data base of adoptions, to walk dogs at the foster home, Casita de Guadalupe, foster homes for dogs & cats, trap & release program for feral cats, etc. www.spcapv.com Un MañanaBrillante (A Brighter Tomorrow) - partnership of Americans and Canadians to support the ColegioMexicoAmericano. Contact: Margi Baughman mach1@prodigy.net.mx or David Bender dbender@prodigy.net.mx Vallarta Botanical Gardens - To build Mexico’s greatest botanical, rwesearch & education of plant life, city beautification programs, bird watching, etc. Donations to the Vallarta Botanical Gardens are tax deductible in the USA. Contact: 223-6182 or info@vallartabotanicalgardensac.org.

The International Friendship Club (IFC) - a registered charitable organization in Mexico listed as Club Internacional de la Amistad de Puerto Vallarta A.C. The IFC supports the Cleft Palate Surgery Program & families in need. Funds are raised through Membership & Home Tours. - Contact:322-222-5466. www.ifcvallarta. com. ifcvallarta@gmail.com.

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{Brain Teasers{ SUDOKU easy

June 21 - 27, 2013

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Vallarta Tribune 846

Challenge your brain! Sudoku is easy to play and the rules are simple. Fill in the blanks so that each row, each column, and each of the nine 3x3 grids contain only one of each of the numbers 1 through 9.

medium

HUB-WORDS How many words can you make from the letters in the wheel? Each word must contain the hub letter N. Can you find a 9-letter word and at least 20 other words of five letters or more avoiding proper nouns? LABYRINTH Some other words of four letters or more containing the hub letter N: anil, anti, ayin, barn, bran, hint, lain, lint, nail, nary, rain, rani, rant, tarn, than, thin, tiny, yarn, bairn (Scot), blain, brain, brant, briny, inlay, rainy, riant, train, binary, brainy, in-tray, litany, ratlin, rhinal, thinly. How many words can you make from the letters in the wheel? Each word must contain the hub letter R. Can you find a 9-letter word and at least 20 other words of five letters or more avoiding proper nouns?

hard

Freezing

Can you find the hidden words? They may be horizontal, Vertical, diagonal, forwards or backwards. Antarctic, arctic, arctic circle, arctic fox, blizzard, Freezing, frosty, frozen, gelid, glacier, husky, ice, Iceberg, icebreaker, ice field, ice floe, ice shelf, Icicle, igloo, north pole, penguin, permafrost, Polar bear, sled, sleet, snow, snowshoe, Snowstorm, south pole, whiteout.

GLADIATOR Some other words of five letters or more containing the hub letter R: agora, altar, aorta, argal, argot, aroid, artal, atria, goral, grail, griot, groat, laird (Scot), largo, radio, raita, ratio, riata, taira, tiara, trail, triad, trial, adroit, aortal, argali, atrial, lariat, latria, radial, tailor.


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June 21 - 27, 2013 Vallarta Tribune 846

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Issue 846, June 21 - 27, 2013