Vallarta Tribune Digital 004

Page 1

Oct 5 - 11, 2020 Year 01 Online Issue 004

FR EE

GU ID E

ALL-INCLUSIVE NEWS AND ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE FOR PUERTO VALLARTA AND RIVIERA NAYARIT

WWW.VALLARTATRIBUNE.COM | FB/VTATRIBUNE | TWITTER @VALLARTATRIBUNE | INSTAGRAM @VALLARTATRIBUNE


02

Welcome

Welcome to Puerto Vallarta and Riviera Nayarit

A

t the Vallarta Tribune we want you to have the best experience possible while you explore Puerto Vallarta, the Bay of Banderas and Riviera Nayarit. Here are some helpful tips for traveling. TIME ZONE: The entire state of Jalisco and the southern part Nayarit are on Central time – if you’re heading further north than Lo de Marcos, Nayarit, remember the time change so you don’t miss your flight. BUSES: A system of urban buses can bring you from El Tuito in the south to San Pancho in the north and all the spots in between. Fares vary according to distances travelled, but the base fare is 10 pesos. If you’re going further than San Pancho, head to the main bus terminal to catch a ‘Pacifico’ bus. TAXIS: There are set fares within defined zones of town. Do not enter a taxi without agreeing on the price with the driver. Make a note of the taxi number in case you leave something behind. Drivers typically do not carry change. UBER: New in 2017 to Puerto Vallarta, Uber is still experiencing some growing pains particularly in the state of Nayarit. Uber is cheaper than a taxi usually. GETTING AROUND: In many places such as Centro Vallarta and Nuevo Vallarta there are paths for bikes and pedestrians. Please be respectful of these designations. MONEY EXCHANGE: The most hassle-free way to exchange money is to use your debit card in the ATM to withdraw pesos. Exchange houses offer higher rates and banks are remiss to change dollars to pesos if you don’t hold an account with them. Best to use ATM’s that are affiliated with a reputable bank located in well lit secure areas. TIPPING: In general you should tip 10-20% in restaurants and bars. Taxi or Uber drivers – 10-20 pesos. The person who bags your groceries or helps load your car – 10-20 pesos. Don’t forget to tip

CALLING IN MEXICO

your maid, bell boy, masseuse, the band, the entertainment on your tour. And by all means, tip more if you want, wages are extremely low in Mexico. DRINKING WATER: While Puerto Vallarta’s water has been awarded a certification of purity for the past two decades, the quality of the water tested at the source varies greatly from what comes out of the tap at the other end. Don’t wreck your holiday – buy bottle water. EXPORTING PETS: Falling in love with the street dog outside your hotel is easy to do and it’s also easy to bring them home with you. The process is inexpensive and only takes a day or two. You only need a certificate of health from a local vet and check with your airline for additional requirements. COMMON SENSE: Just as you wouldn’t walk around your hometown drunk and belligerent, it is not acceptable to do that here. While Mexico is a tolerant culture, politeness is paramount. Don’t pee in the streets. Don’t flash your money or expensive gadgets. Pay attention to your surroundings. Know where you are going. Pay your bills (and don’t forget to tip). And have fun! DRINKING AND DRIVING: First off – just don’t. The consequences are not worth it. Taxis or Ubers are cheap and plentiful. Fines are very expensive. You can go to jail and your vehicle impounded. There are many checkstops on the weekends, and you will be asked to take a breathalizer test if they suspect you have been drinking. LEGAL SYSTEM: Not knowing the law is not a valid excuse in Mexico, or anywhere. If you find yourself caught in a legal situation, be aware that often guilt is presumed until your innocence can be proven. This is a very difficult lesson to learn if you are visiting from the United States or Canada. Immediately contact your consulate for assistance.

Sept. 21 - 27, 2020 Year 01 Online Issue 002

FR EE

GU ID E

ALL-INCLUSIVE NEWS AND ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE FOR PUERTO VALLARTA AND RIVIERA NAYARIT

WWW.VALLARTATRIBUNE.COM | FB/VTATRIBUNE | TWITTER @VALLARTATRIBUNE | INSTAGRAM @VALLARTATRIBUNE

Teléfono: (322) 226 3870 Proa #111, Marina Vallarta, C.P. 48335. Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco, México.

Oct 5 - 11, 2020

LOCAL CALLS WITHIN MEXICO All calls within Mexico can now be dialed using the 10-digit telephone number (usually a two- or three-digit area code plus an eight- or seven-digit number) from a landline or cell phone, eliminating the need for prefixes, such as 01, 044 or 045. In Mexico, most cities use a three-digit area code, notable exceptions being CDMX, Guadalajara and Monterrey. LONG DISTANCE CALLS WITHIN MEXICO Same procedure as above applies. LONG DISTANCE CALLS TO MEXICO FROM ABROAD If you are making a long-distance call to Mexico from abroad, simply add the country code (52) to the 10-digit number as described above.

CALLING TOLL-FREE NUMBERS (The following procedure predates the August 2019 update. We are waiting for specific information regarding toll-free calls within Mexico and to numbers elsewhere.) Some toll-free numbers work from Mexico to the US and Canada, but many do not. Those that do work are often not toll-free. You need to dial a different prefix. To call the following toll free prefixes, dial as follows: 800 numbers Dial 001-880-then the number 866 numbers Dial 001-883-then the number 877 numbers Dial 001-882-then the number 888 numbers Dial 001-881-then the number

INTERNATIONAL LONG-DISTANCE CALLS FROM MEXICO US & Canada: Dial 001 + Area Code + Number Elsewhere: Dial 00 + Country Code + Area Code + Number

FIRE DEPARTMENT: 322.223.9476 AMBULANCE: 322.222.1533 IMMIGRATION: 322.224.7719 CONSUMER PROTECTION: 01.800.468.8722

Emergencies: 911 Red Cross: 065

TOURISM OFFICES Jalisco: 322.221.2676 Nayarit: 322.297.1006 CONSULATES American Consulate 24 hrs 01-332-268-2100 Canadian Consulate 322.293.0098 322.293.0099 24 hrs: 1.800.706.2900

Photo by Social Media Tag

The Vallarta Tribune is an activity and entertainment guide and publishes information as it is provided by the advertiser or event host. We do not assume responsibility in errors or omissions other than to correct them as they are made known to us regarding event schedules, locations and/or prices. In addition, we do not assume any responsibility for erroneous inclusion or exclusion of information except to

take reasonable care to ensure accuracy, that permission has been obtained to use it, and to remove it as soon as is practical upon receiving your notification of error. We recommend you always confirm prior to attending or visiting an event or establishment. Weekly publication. * www.vallartatribune.com * www.facebook.com/VtaTribune/


Local Voices

Oct 5 - 11, 2020

03

Health and Wellness Cat Morgan

NewEnergyConsciousness.com RivieraNayaritFun.com

Cat Morgan is owner of RivieraNayaritFun.com and also NewEnergyConsciousness.com If you have any questions, comments or Riviera Nayarit news please contact her at Cat@CatMorgan. me

Healthy living does not take time... It Gives Time.

O

ne of the most important issues coming into focus for so many right now is our physical health. People have been forced by the onset of the COVID-19 virus to really take a deeper look at their body’s health and medical conditions.

In times like these, chronic comorbidities such as diabetes, obesity, cancer, Alzheimer’s, heart disease, and auto-immune disorders are rampant and leave us vulnerable to flu, viruses, and other diseases. It has become so bad that the next generation is expected to live shorter lives than their parents. This season I am choosing to write my Health and Wellness articles with a focus on how to reclaim health and vitality, and creating a strong immune system (healthy cells and DNA repair) through a health-focused whole food balanced diet, thoughts (perspective), emotions, energy (prana) and body movement, as well as information on why some things may not be so great for our gut health. The first focus will be on what we eat. This does not mean you need to become vegan or vegetarian but discover better balance. Changing our food consumption can be challenging at times because we are used to eating what we have grown to enjoy and also what has been passed down from our families and culture. However, these programmed and habitual food items are not always healthy for our brain health, emotions, and physical aspect. With planning, focus, and intention, and changing one’s perspectives, over time the old programming is reprogrammed. When you eat a more whole food diet, you feel better with more physical endurance, a boosted immune system that allows your own body to fight off viruses and infection, and also feel balanced mentally and emotionally. Mental illness and lack of nutrition are deeply linked. What’s On Your Plate? What we eat has become the #1 killer in the

western world. From Diabetes, heart disease, cancer to depression, lack of energy, and brain fog to the onset of Alzheimer’s, food contributes to nearly all chronic diseases. In addition to this, our world has also become so complex and fast-paced that (in the United States alone) 70% to 80% report feeling overwhelmed. We do not need to read a report to see this in our own neighborhoods, social media and news, and in our society. It is certainly not new information that Chronic Stress has been proven to be a precursor to illness and disease. Stress can also lead to symptomatic inflammation which is also one of the underlying drivers linked with food. In addition, over 2.8 million antibiotic-resistant infections occur in the U.S. each year leaving the body’s own immune system to fend for itself. With the current COVID-19 situation at hand, stress and fear have intensified our “usual” survival stress levels, which also lower our immune systems and leaving many folks feeling extremely overwhelmed and isolated. Disease, Diet, and our Immune Systems 40% of all cancer cases are linked to obesity, and with obesity on the rise so is cancer. (in Comparison to 2010, the CDC expects 24% more cancer cases in men, and 21% more in women.) 70% of our immune system lives in our gut, yet most people eat a diet that destroys their health. From inflammation, weight loss, diabetes, immunity, Vitamin D, Omega-3s, to hormones and performance, one can discover ways to promote cellular regeneration and DNA repair, promote brain health and create strong immune systems for optimum health. It has been proven that we can lengthen our telomeres to fight off disease at any age. (Telomeres look like the plastic at the end of a shoestring, and are located on the ends of our chromosomes. Once they are worn down and depleted, our bodies can no longer fight against disease. ) Taking Responsibility for your Health It is unfortunate that mainstream media, the

WHO, and the CDC focus has not been on preventative medicine, boosting our immune systems, and how to take better care of ourselves. Discovering knowledge and acting on that knowledge on how to protect yourself against toxins that are all around us is called wisdom. The time has come to take responsibility for our own health and wellness to the best of our abilities. You can’t do anything in life if you don’t have the energy to do it! If you are struggling with illness and disease, take a moment to notice what your diet consists of. Write down what you eat and drink on a daily basis for at least one week, including all those snacks! While medical issues such as obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, and other medical conditions did not happen overnight, you may just be surprised once the body detoxes how quickly you can heal and regain health and vitality. By learning how to overcome fear and discovering the strategies that work for you to perform at your highest level, and insights into maintaining healthy habits you can take simple yet massive action right away with whole food nutrition. We can all learn how our bodies can absorb more nutrients, sleep better, destress in minutes, and use breathing and other simple strategies and techniques for coping emotio-

nally to our advantage and go from tired and burned out to charged up. One day at a time; one choice in each moment. With more health-based daily choices we can reclaim our health, be strong and vibrant, and face the world with a calm confident mind-set. If you can, please see your dietitian on how to create health with detoxing and diet changes. While I have focused much of my life on health and wellbeing on all levels, I cannot prescribe or diagnose, and can only offer suggestions of what I have experienced or would consider and other information from leading doctors, nutritionists, and therapists in this field. It is important if you are on pharmaceutical medications to consult your doctor for advice on how to change those medication levels as you become healthy and feel better. NEVER stop taking your medication “cold turkey!” I am looking forward to sharing information that will be easy to bring into your lives by making small adjustments in the wheel. Over time those adjustments add up to a big change creating optimum health and wellness. For questions or assistance with whole food based nutrition and energetic balancing please contact me at Cat@NewEnergyConsciousness.com or Cat@CatMorgan.me. Thank you, and blessings to all on your path of Health and Wellness.


News 04 Oct 5 - 11, 2020 Tips for living online – lessons from six months of the COVID-19 pandemic Pamela Scott Bracey, PhD Associate Professor of Instructional Systems and Workforce Development, Mississippi State University

V

alentine’s Day was sweet, spring break was fun, then… boom! COVID-19. Stay-at-home orders, workplace shutdowns, school closures and social distancing requirements changed lives almost overnight. Forty-two percent of the U.S. workforce now works from home full-time. In the six months since the “new normal” began, Americans have gained a fair amount of experience with working, studying and socializing online. With schools resuming and cooler weather curtailing outdoor activities, videoconferencing will be as front and center as it was in the spring. As someone who researches and teaches instructional technology, I can offer recommendations for how to make the best of the situation and make the most of virtual interactions with colleagues, teachers, students, family and friends. Create a designated videoconferencing space If working from home, select a location with a simple background that does not show angles of your personal space that you would like to keep private. Some videoconference platforms even include free virtual background options to choose from, or allow you to upload your own mock office image files. If you aren’t able to add home classrooms, desks or workstations, be sure to create a designated learning space at a table for children and their school materials to create structure and a routine. Post schedules near the workspace, and limit distractions. If lighting in your designated workspace is dark, invest in a ring light or other lamp to guarantee that you can be clearly seen. Environment affects mood. Since many people now spend the majority of their time within the confines of their homes, it’s worthwhile to declutter, reorganize and clean on a regular basis to make home a space of peace and comfort in the midst of chaotic circumstances.

provide clear communication. Create accounts within videoconference platforms before going into meetings to access more available features and set your personal preferences. If you’re tired of the “Hollywood Squares” effect of Zoom and the other major videoconferencing platforms, take a look at some of the newer alternatives, like Spatial, and keep an eye on projects in the works that aim to make videoconferencing feel more like real life. Keep a schedule and take breaks Set alarms five or 10 minutes before scheduled start times to remember when to log into videoconferences. Also keep your schedule written in a planner in case your phone dies or gets misplaced. People with children participating in virtual learning may feel like they’ve become personal assistants trying to juggle multiple schedules. Showing students how to maintain their own schedules will not only lessen your load but will also teach them valuable planning and accountability skills that will carry them far beyond grade school.

Get to know your videoconferencing software To lessen the probability of having your meetings compromised by hackers, usepasswords and log onto videoconferences only via secure, password-protected internet networks.

Consider actually resting during scheduled breaks in videoconferences. Go for walks outside for fresh air, eat healthy snacks and drink water. Refrain from forcing children to work on homework during short breaks, and allow their eyes to rest, too. Excessive screen time can be bad for your eyes.

Use headphones with noise-canceling microphones for optimal sound. This can help

Sitting in front of a computer for long periods of time can cause pain in other parts of the

body, so be sure to get up and move around during breaks. Being sedentary is generally bad for your health. Keeping computers at eye level or using moveable webcams can help alleviate neck pain, and also avoid showing what’s in your nose. Maintaining an upright posture can help prevent back and wrist injuries; and using an external mouse for laptop navigation can help reduce strain on fingers and joints. Identify available resources Explore resources and benefits offered through your place of employment. Perhaps there is a designated budget for home office equipment like printers, desks, chairs, webcams and headsets. Many companies also offer free mental health therapy sessions, childcare provisions and extended family medical leave through the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. If you have suffered personal losses due to COVID-19, taking time to grieve is essential; coping alone can weigh heavily on your mental health. Having the support of friends and colleagues can help you navigate these uncharted waters more successfully, but only if they are made aware of your circumstances. Life online isn’t easy – be patient with yourself and others The effects of living virtually online continue to affect everyone in various ways. Some are struggling with guilt from having to send children back to school while COVID-19 is still spreading rapidly – but work schedules or financial situations leave no other choice. Other families are struggling with the

demands of keeping children home to learn virtually because their school districts aren’t offering an in-person option due to safety concerns. People in supervisory roles should try to remember that life is different for everyone right now. It’s unreasonable to expect the same level of productivity without considering employees’ home-life situations. While virtual learning is extremely inconvenient for parents who have multiple children, demanding careers or financial restraints, it’s important to recognize that most educators are doing the best they can – especially those who are also parents. Most are working to learn how to use new software applications, navigate learning management systems and adopt unfamiliar online strategies and classroom management techniques, often with no technical assistance. Whatever your reality is right now, just trust your gut and do the best that you can. Take time to appreciate small pleasantries of life, incorporate daily physical activity, take walks to enjoy nature, reconnect with family through game or movie nights and try new cooking recipes. Be especially mindful of your attitude around children, since adults set the tone and highly influence the outlooks of impressionable young minds. Living online is not the end of the world, but attitude is everything. Continue to do your best, and know that this too shall pass, hopefully sooner than later. Source: The Conversation Creative Commons license.

under

a


Oct 5 - 11, 2020

05

News

Large class sizes during the coronavirus pandemic are a triple whammy Chris Bauch, University of Waterloo; Brendon Phillips, University of Waterloo; Dillon Thomas Browne, University of Waterloo, and Madhur Anand, University of Guelph

student might have been transmitting the virus for several days, or someone else in the class may have been asymptomatic and transmitting for many days. This third point is crucial — it is increasingly clear that SARS-CoV-2 can be spread by aerosol particles.

F

ormulating school and childcare centre reopening plans in North America this fall has been a daunting task, as both the pandemic and our scientific knowledge of COVID-19 continue to unfold quickly. For students attending in person, there are many questions to consider: How important is the cleaning and disinfecting of surfaces? Which age of students should use masks, and when? What is the best approach to cohorting? How large should class sizes be?

Other consequences The worst scenario, by a wide margin, was the 30:1 ratio in the primary school setting. Switching to a 15:1 ratio with alternating weekly cohorts (15:1A) reduced the number of cases and student-days lost to closure by a factor of around four. And even though higher student/educator ratios allow more students to get in-person instruction, they also cause more disruptions due to more frequent need to close classrooms when a case is identified.

Knowledge of how COVID-19 spreads has improved since the pandemic started, but as reopening plans were being developed, we recognized a need to investigate outbreak scenarios in schools and childcare centres. With our combined background in mathematical modelling, epidemiology, environmental sciences and childhood education, we tackled the question of class sizes. We developed a mathematical model of outbreaks in homes and classrooms. The model made a very surprising prediction: as class sizes go up, the negative impacts of COVID-19 go up exponentially faster. We can help you make informed decisions with our independent journalism. A granular approach We opted for an “individual-based” model where distinct individuals (adults and children) are allowed to interact according to specified rules. This highly granular approach allows us to see the effects of social groupings and individual characteristics on personal outcomes like missed school days. Using age and household size information obtained from Canadian census data, we constructed small populations with childhood education centres and associated households consisting of one or more adults and one or more children. Our model is essentially a simulated virtual world of schools and homes. Children were allocated to classrooms randomly or by grouping siblings together. We considered childcare centre scenarios with student/educator ratios of 7:3, 8:2 and 15:2. We also considered primary school scenarios with student/educator ratios of 8:1, 15:1 and 30:1. Students could attend class every day or alternate between in-person instruction one week and online learning the next week.

In addition, there are likely to be significant psychological, social and mental health consequences for parents and children when schools and childcare centres close. And since outbreaks can happen at any time, working parents may need to be pulled from their work with little or no advance notice. Mathematical models can help figure out class sizes and configurations to minimize disruptions and school closures. (Shutterstock)

Influencing factors Then we ran our computer simulation of COVID-19 outbreaks in this setting. We assumed that when a symptomatic case of COVID-19 appears in a classroom that it would then be closed for 14 days. But modelling the impact of class sizes on outbreaks is tricky. Schools have been closed during much of the first wave and so — perhaps unsurprisingly — school-aged children did not account for a significant portion of cases during this period. In addition, children are more likely to be asymptomatic and therefore not reported as having COVID-19. A host of other factors could influence both the risk and size of outbreaks. So how can we predict what outbreaks in schools might look like, given that schools have not been open in Ontario since March 2020? Since we don’t know all of the right input values to use, we took an approach of “uncertainty analysis,” a cornerstone of scientific inquiry — admitting that you do not know everything. This approach meant that we would change the model inputs and study how those affect the predictions. For example, we distinguished between a “high transmission” assumption, where the virus can spread quickly, and a “low

transmission” assumption, where the virus spread is being slowed by the use of masks, disinfection and physical distancing. Triple whammy Across all of the permutations used in our uncertainty analysis, we were surprised to find that when class size doubled, the number of cases and student-days lost to closure more than doubled. Student-days are calculated by multiplying the number of closure days by the number of students affected, and with each class size doubling, they went up by factors of two to five. When we increased the transmission rate, it changed the total number of cases, but the relative number of cases or student-days lost to closure between the various class size scenarios did not change much: larger classes were always relatively worse than smaller classes, and by about the same factor of two to five. We describe this as a “triple whammy.” First, when class sizes are larger, the chances are higher that one of the children will test positive. Second, when that child does test positive and the class is closed, closure of a larger class affects more children. Third, by the time the case is identified, the

Moving forward Schools and childcare centres have already reopened. Some districts have been allowed to go with a preferred model that permits smaller class sizes, and this is a step in the right direction. There are also many examples of how school districts can reduce class size at minimal cost. For instance, kindergarten classes with two teachers could split into two groups, one of which uses the library, gym or spends more time outdoors in activities. If widespread school closure occurs again this fall, we suggest that re-reopening plans pay close attention to the aspect of class size. While the risk of outbreaks will never be zero even with small classes, it would be prudent for class sizes to be lower, so these disruptions affect the fewest number of children and families possible. In the meantime, for parents and caregivers, the best thing to do is have honest and open conversations around how closures will look like in their family, including arrangements for work and child care. The math tells us that school or classroom closures will be a reality for many school districts this fall. Source: The Conversation under a Creative Commons license.


News 06 Oct 5 - 11, 2020 Tourists return to Tulum; hotels report higher occupancy 32% of rooms are currently occupied, says hotels association

He said that Quintana Roo’s designation as a yellow-light state according to the federal government’s stoplight system to assess the risk of coronavirus infection is welcome news as it allows hotels and restaurants to increase their capacity. Ortiz highlighted that archaeological sites and beaches in Tulum

are also now open at reduced capacity. However, he noted that bars in the Caribbean coast municipality have not yet been allowed to reopen. As a result, Tulum has recently felt like the Tulum of old – “a lot more rest and less partying,” Ortiz said. While he agreed that bars should not yet reopen, the hotel association chief said that authorities should increase the limit on the number of people allowed to attend events such as weddings, which is currently set at 50. Weddings in Tulum are big business but the current limit on guests is a deterrent, Ortiz said, adding that there are venues with the capacity to host larger numbers of people while ensuring that social distancing recommendations are observed. While predicting that tourism will continue to increase, Ortiz said that Tulum’s market remains limited because flights from Europe to Cancún are still well below pre-pandemic levels. Canadians are also not currently traveling in the number’s tourism operators would like, he said. Travelers who do make it to Tulum, as well as residents, are being encouraged to use a face mask as part of the Quintana Roo Tourism Promotion Council’s “Wear to Care” campaign. “Despite [being allocated] a yellow light, it’s important that we keep working to send a safe image of our destination. We mustn’t relax the health measures,” Ortiz said. Source: La Jornada (sp)

median time of education, percentage of people in the same home after five years, and per capita income. All the crime data was taken from public sources. The results of the research supported the initial hypothesis: a comparatively small number of people practicing TM can reduce crime rates in a given area. Over the years, other peer-reviewed studies have noted repeated indications that the collective consciousness of a society or a nation is a real phenomenon TM and its advanced practices have demonstrated a positive, measurable effect on reducing stress in the collective consciousness of America. A series of four studies, published in 2016 and 2017, charted changes in US crime and fatality rates between 2007 and 2010 that were attributable to TM and its advanced group practices. During the experimental period of these US studies, rates of violent crimes, including homicides, aggravated assault, robbery, and rape all decreased compared to the baseline period. A follow-up study, which has been submitted for publication, provides evidence that after the group diminished in size in 2011, violent social trends again worsened. This outcome indicates that the improvements only took place and had a lasting effect when the group was of

a sufficient size and engaged in group practice daily. An Antidote to Violence weaves together psychology, sociology, philosophy, statistics, politics, physics, and consciousness to provide evidence that we can reduce violence in society by using this brain-based technology. By decreasing violence and increasing quality of life, positive changes in collective consciousness have significant consequences for a community and its environment. The good news is that when TM programs are properly implemented — in schools, the police force, or the military— the current norm of horrific violence could become a thing of the past. About the Authors: Patricia Saunders, Ph.D. is the coauthor of An Antidote to Violence and a Ph.D. graduate in the Department of Consciousness and Human Potential of Maharishi International University, USA. Arlene Schar has served as Dr. Leffler's Executive Assistant at the Center for Advanced Military Science (CAMS) StrongMilitary.org since 2015. Dr. David Leffler, Ph.D. served as an Associate of the Proteus Management Group at the Center for Strategic Leadership, US Army War College. Currently, he serves as the Executive Director at CAMS.

H

otel occupancy in Tulum, Quintana Roo, is currently at its highest level since the economic reopening, the resort town’s hotel association president said Sunday. David Ortiz Mena said that 32% of rooms are currently occupied, noting that most visitors are staying in hotels and resorts located on or near the beach. He said that some hotels remain closed and that those that have opened are operating at reduced capacity. The Bahía Principe hotel, located about 25 kilometers north of the town of Tulum near Akumal, has only opened 750 rooms out of almost 4,000, Ortiz said. Most hotels in the Tulum coastal zone – the town proper is located about five kilometers inland – have reopened and some have occupancy of close to 60%, he said. “Only 4% of hotels in that area are still

closed,” Ortiz said. The hotel association chief said that he expects occupancy levels to increase further this month despite September normally being part of the low season. He also said that many tourists are choosing to stay longer than the average 3 1/2-day stay.

Ideal Violence Prevention By Dr. Patricia Saunders, Arlene Schar and Dr. David Leffler

I

n The World Report on Violence and Health (WRVH) the World Health Organization (WHO) defines violence as “the intentional use of physical force or power, threatened or actual, against oneself, another person, or against a group or community, that either results in or has a high likelihood of resulting in injury, death, psychological harm, maldevelopment or deprivation.” Violence is a pervasive problem worldwide. Many governmental and nonprofit organizations have attempted to curb this trend by reducing easy access to lethal weaponry, more long-term investment in social outreach programs, and harsher sentencing to help prevent violence and senseless tragedies. One innovative social program for reducing the stress and tensions resulting in violence is the widespread implementation of Transcendental Meditation® (TM®) programs. Extensive research shows that the implementation of large groups practicing the Transcendental Meditation technique and its advanced practices in unison twice

a day creates a field effect. This field effect has a localized impact on social problems by reducing the stresses and tensions which are causative of those problems in the immediate area. Plans for introducing this approach can be set in motion now, with the intention of actual implementation of TM programs once COVID-19 is brought under control. It is generally accepted that TM practice increases energy and inner peace on the individual level; recent research indicates it also produces similar effects for society. A new book, An Antidote to Violence: Evaluating the Evidence (https://anantidotetoviolence.org), examines 20 peer-reviewed studies which indicate that governments can achieve a lessening of violence, not on the basis of political rhetoric or a stronger police presence, but by a rise of harmony, coherence, and order in the collective consciousness of the majority of people who make up a society. Early TM studies found that when 1% of the population of US Midwestern cities learned the TM technique, crime rates decreased. A follow-up study published in 1981 took new factors into account: population density,


The Heart of the Sea: Mariel Hawley will swim across Banderas Bay This Mexican mermaid and Triple Crown of open water swimming winner will cross the 42 kilometers between Punta de Mita and Cabo Corrientes in an extraordinary feat to benefit Corazón de Niña Children’s Home.

all the proceeds will go to the Children’s Home. A mission of love Mariel shares how she has managed to combine her passion for swimming with the love she has for helping the less fortunate and the great life lessons she has gleaned from the best and worst experiences she has faced. Mariel Hawley’s accomplishments include crossing the Catalina Channel, the English Channel, and the Manhattan Island Swim Marathon, making her the first woman in Mexico to win the Triple Crown in Open Water Swimming.

M

ariel Hawley, the amazing Mexican mermaid and winner of the Triple Crown of open water swimming is set to take on another challenge in her already storied career: swimming across Banderas Bay from Punta de Mita (in the Riviera Nayarit) to Cabo Corrientes—at 42 kilometers, this is the largest bay in all of Mexico.

She is also the National Masters Swimming Champion from 2002 to date, plus winner of the Ironman 2010. Crossing the Seven Seas

The details of this feat were announced at a press conference held at the W Punta de Mita hotel, the official sponsor together with Marriott Resort Puerto Vallarta, the Riviera Nayarit Convention and Visitors Bureau (CVB), and the Puerto Vallarta Tourism Promotion Trust. Although the crossing will take place during the last week of October (between the 22nd and the 26th), Mariel decided to travel to this region earlier in order to scout out the Bay of Banderas and start her training. The challenge before her is not easy, not only due to the distance (42 km) but also to the maritime currents, not to mention

07

News

Oct 5 - 11, 2020

that at this time of the year jellyfish abound as a consequence of the increase in water temperature. However, she will be very well taken care of, accompanied by a boat and support staff from Vallarta Adventures; every half hour she will stop to hydrate. The trip is expected to be completed in 14 or 16 hours.

Altruistic strokes The initiative has been called Corazón de Mar (Heart of the Sea), which goes hand in hand with the cause she will be leading. Mariel has always focused her career on altruistic work, which ranges from obtaining resources for surgeries and treatments for children with a cleft lip and/or palate, to

oncological treatments for children suffering from some type of cancer. On this occasion, the beneficiary will be the Corazón de Niña Children’s Home of Puerto Vallarta, for which the athlete—who is also a speaker—will offer her lecture “Overcoming limits with each stroke,” at a cost of $200 pesos per person;

“Today it’s my turn to do my bit and put in a lot of strokes to support others who are facing a much more intimate, personal, and complicated battle called cancer.” “The idea is to make a crossing that marks out a new route, that blazes a new path for other people to follow, I think that’s part of what I do,” she said.

As if that wasn’t enough, she is the 15th person in the world to complete the open-water Seven Seas challenge: the North Channel (separating Ireland and Scotland); the Cook Strait, (between New Zealand’s North Island and the South Island); the Tsugaru Strait (where the Sea of Japan and

the Pacific Ocean meet); the English Channel (separating England from the European continent); the Strait of Gibraltar (where the the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean meet with Europe and Africa); and the Catalina Channel (between Santa Catalina Island and the coast of California). The last three were already completed by this daring sportswoman and Mexican swimmer Nora Toledano. The awards received by the swimmer throughout her sporting career include The Andres Henestrosa Golden Scroll of Merit in the “Female Athletes” category; the Mont Blanc Award in 2013 in the category of “Female Trailblazer;” the National Women’s Award 2012 in the category “Sportswoman with a cause that delivers;” a 2012 Honorable Mention award granted by the National Women’s Institute to Women in Sports in conjunction with CONADE; and the 2011 Woman Builds Award granted by the Observatory for Women in Latin America, A.C. For more information about this event, please visit Mariel Hawley on Facebook. Follow the hashtag #MarielNayaritVallarta


Cuisine 08 Oct 5 - 11, 2020 Try cooking with fresh coconut: it’s plentiful, inexpensive, healthy and delicious Two dishes in which you can incorporate a delicious local ingredient By Janet Blaser

H

aving lived in Mexico for more than a decade, I’ve learned – sometimes by choice, sometimes out of necessity — to adapt many of my favorite recipes to incorporate local ingredients. All in all, I have lots of fun in the kitchen, often discovering pleasantly surprising and delicious dishes and combinations hitherto unimagined, either because of cost or availability. A good example is coconuts. Where I live – Mazatlán — fresh coconuts are easy to find all year round. Vendors sell them from street carts or on the beach for about 40 pesos apiece, whacking off a small opening at the top with a machete and inserting a straw for drinking the fresh, sweet, preferably ice-cold coconut water. When you’re done with that, they’ll whack the coconut again, scrape out the meat with a special tool that looks kind of like an ice cream scoop, and give it back to you with toothpicks or a fork for eating. Locals like to doctor up the coconut meat with lime juice, chile powder and all kinds of hot sauces; I like it just plain. One day I realized (in what I like to call a “duh” moment) that I could get the whole shebang “para llevar” – to go – and take it home to use instead of canned sweetened “coconut milk.” They’ll put the chunks of coconut meat and the water in a plastic bag, tied at the top. Then I just whir the fresh meat and water in a blender and voila! add it to a curry or smoothie. Sometimes I’ll shred the coconut meat and dry it in my dehydrator for using in granola, fruit salads, cookies, etc. Coconuts, believe it or not, have seasons too. There are certain times of the year when they’re young and new, and the flesh will be softer, almost custard-like, and sweeter; later, as they’re on the tree longer, the meat gets that familiar crispy-hard texture we’re used to. Personally, I prefer them when they’re tiernos – soft – but feel myself fortunate that I can have them all year round, in whatever state. Here are a couple of my favorite go-to

recipes. Even if you’re not living in paradise like I am, you can still make yourself a little taste of the tropics! Oatmeal with coconut, mango & pineapple This is one of my favorite easy breakfasts. Why use plain old raisins when you can have this delightful tropical treat instead?! 2 cups water 2/3 cup whole oats ½ tsp. cinnamon 2-3 Tbsp. dried or fresh mangos, chopped small 2-3 Tbsp. dried pineapple, chopped small 1-2 Tbsp. dried coconut, unsweetened if possible Place water, cinnamon, coconut and dried fruit in small saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Whisk in oatmeal; bring to boil again. Turn off heat, cover and let stand 3 minutes. Sweeten to taste and serve with milk or yogurt. Serves 1. Dennis’s green curry This recipe is a bit complex, but the flavors make it well worth your while. 2-3 sweet potatoes or 1 small butternut squash 2 coarsely chopped shallots or 1 yellow onion 1 Tbsp. chopped garlic 1 Tbsp. fresh ginger root, peeled & minced 2 jalapenos or serrano green chiles, to taste ½ cup plus 3 Tbsp. water ¾ cup cilantro leaves, chopped Meat & water from 1-2 fresh coconuts, blended, or 1 can coconut milk (unsweetened) 1 Tbsp. each sugar and salt About 1 cup chicken, fish, shrimp or tofu, cut in bite-size pieces 1/4 cup fresh basil leaves

Combine shallots or onion, garlic, ginger, chiles, 3 Tbsp. water, ½ cup cilantro. Blend in blender or chop & mix well. You want a paste. Use a mortar and pestle if need be. Set aside. Put about ½ cup fresh blended coconut “milk” into a medium saucepan and bring to a gentle boil over medium heat. (If using canned coconut milk, shake well first.) Cook, stirring a little, for about 3 minutes. Add the paste and cook for 1-2 minutes, mashing, scraping and stirring it all together. Add the rest of the coconut milk, the

remaining ½ cup water, the sugar, salt and chicken, fish, shrimp or tofu. Raise heat to high and bring the curry to a rolling boil. Stir well, reduce heat to maintain a gentle boil and continue cooking till meat is ready, about 15 minutes. (Tofu may need less cooking time.) Meanwhile cut all but a few basil leaves crosswise into thin strips. When curry is cooked stir in the basil strips and remaining ¼ cup cilantro. Garnish with 1-2 whole basil leaves. Serve with basmati or other white rice. Yield: 2-3 servings. Source: Mexico News Daily


Oct 5 - 11, 2020

09

Environmental

Biodiversity: where the world is making progress – and where it’s not Tom Oliver Professor of Applied Ecology, University of Reading

T

he future of biodiversity hangs in the balance. World leaders are gathering to review international targets and make new pledges for action to stem wildlife declines. Depending on whether you are a glass half-full or half-empty person, you’re likely to have different views on their progress so far. More than 175 countries agreed to 20 targets under the banner of the Convention for Biological Diversity, which was signed in 1992. The most recent plan, published in 2010, was to halt the extinction of species and populations by 2020 to prevent the destruction of global ecosystems and to staunch the loss of genetic diversity – the variety within the DNA of species’ populations, which helps them adapt to a changing environment. But the targets were missed. An optimist might say that’s because they were laudably ambitious, and we’re making good progress nonetheless. The protection of land particularly rich in biodiversity has increased from 29% to 44% in just a decade, which is a huge policy achievement. On the other hand, we failed to halt global biodiversity loss during a previous round of global targets ending in 2010 and, a decade later, we are still far behind where we need to be. A recent UN report compiled detailed assessments of the world’s progress towards each of the 20 targets. It highlights some small victories, and where the greatest gulfs exist between present action and necessary ambition. The good news The international community has made progress on several goals. We have improved our global capacity to assess biodiversity trends, and funding for conservation roughly doubled over the previous decade to USD$78-91 billion annually. There is now an international protocol governing the fair sharing of genetic resources discovered in nature, so they cannot be plundered by companies from rich countries. This gives countries added incentives to protect their biodiversity, which might lead to new medicines or technologies for use in food production. Two of the biggest drivers of biodiversity loss are habitat destruction and invasive species. Through scientific research and monitoring programmes, scientists are now better at identifying the pathways by which invasive species colonise vulnerable habitats. Protected areas have expanded across the globe too. Achim Steiner, leader of the UN Development Programme, stated that the world is on track to achieve protection of 17% of land and 10% of marine areas identified

under the programme by the end of 2020. All this has had a tangible effect. Up to four times as many birds and mammals likely would have become extinct in the past three decades without such actions. The bad news So far, so good. But all these successes are partial and ambiguous. Yes, we have increased funding for biodiversity, but this is still swamped by more than £500 billion in environmentally harmful subsidies, such as aid for the fossil fuel industry. Although we have identified more of the ways in which invasive species spread, there has been limited progress in actually controlling them. Though a significant area of the world is now designated as “protected”, management within these areas is still often inadequate.

What’s more, for many of the other targets, things have actually got worse. The loss and fragmentation of the world’s forests continues, depriving biodiversity of habitat and exacerbating climate change. Deforestation rates are only one-third lower in 2020 compared to 2010, and may be accelerating again in some areas. Essential ecosystem services – such as the provision of clean water, soil for farming and pollinating insects – continue to deteriorate, affecting women, indigenous communities, and the poor and vulnerable more than others. We are still unable to even track changes in the genetic diversity of wild species, meaning we cannot assess these hidden changes in biodiversity which are important for the long-term resilience of a species.

The fundamental problem is that we have failed to address the underlying drivers of biodiversity loss. Targets for reducing pollution, habitat loss and climate change all show negative progress. We have achieved several easy wins, but the tougher challenges remain. Overcoming these will mean stopping the activities that are at the root of biodiversity loss. We need better regulation of harmful chemicals which pollute the environment. Of the over 100,000 chemicals used in Europe today, only a small fraction are thoroughly evaluated or regulated by authorities, despite many causing harm to health and the environment. We need strong trade policies that prevent the destruction of primary rainforest for products such as palm oil and soy. Perhaps most of all, we need radical action on climate change, which is expected to overtake other drivers to be the number one cause of biodiversity loss in coming years. These systemic changes require action from states and industries. But we can also take action as citizens and consumers. We need fundamental changes in the way we live – how we invest our money, the food we eat and how we travel. Each of us, making internet orders at the click of a button, has hidden power to influence the state of the planet. What we choose to buy, or not to buy, can help decide whether wild species flourish across the globe. If world leaders fail to regulate unsustainable markets, then we need to be even more savvy about potentially harmful connections to the natural world that lie behind our purchases. Perhaps then we can start to be both optimistic and realistic about the state of our planet’s biodiversity. This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license.


9

8

PITILLAL

FLUVIAL

1

3 2

7

4 5

27

3

RIO AMECA

HOTEL ZONE

NU

EV

OV AL LA R

WG

TA

4

ES PA AR &S S M INA RT TRE B REG RESO CLU ESTIN CE W LA O TA THE AN PA ALAD LLAR S A Y MA A EL TO V IOTT R Y R PLA PUE MAR LIA NA D ME N RA G MA

S ATE

26

VIE

GRAND MAYAN PARADISE VILLAGE MEZCALES OCCIDENTAL NUEVO VALLARTA 5 HARD ROCK HOTEL GRAND VELAS RIVIERA NAYARIT DREAMS VILLAMAGNA HOTEL MARIVAL 6 RIU JALISCO 4 ACQUA FLAMINGOS RUI PALACE PACIFICO FLAMINGOS VILLA DEL PALMAR FLAMINGOS 4 VILLA LA ESTANCIA 25 4 ROYAL DECAMERON 24 BUCERIAS 23 PUNTA ESMERALDA B NAYAR 29 VILLA AMORE DEL MAR 1 5

7

SA

CA

6

BAY

2

1

TOM DE CA BO

VIDANTA

7

RTA

ALLA INA V

MAR

8

STATE OF NAYARIT

2

1

5

R LOS T LY VALLA D FRIEN CAPE AR SUNS DEL PALM NA VILLA AMERICA A FIEST HOLI AL RA A PLAY N KRYSTNAVENTU RESORT HILTO NDA BUE E GOLDEN HACIE PARADIS CLUB N E CROW PARADIS N CROW

az Ord Díaz tavo port Gus l Air Lic. nationa r Inte

6

VERSALLES

28

TO SAYULITA

PUERTO VALLAR 22

PLAYA LA MANZANILLA W PUNTA MITA Agustin Flores Contreras Municipal Stadium

GRAND PALLADIUM VALLARTA HOTEL LA QUINTA DEL SOL

123 2

MESON DE MITA PUNTA MITA FOUR SEASONS

1

FRANCISC

O VILLA

ST. REGIS PUNTA MITA

UAY PARAG

SHERATON BUGAMBILLIAS

5 DE5 DE DECIMBRE DICIEMBRE

3

ISLAS MARIETAS

BY SEA TOWNS & COLONIAS BEACHES

RESORTS MALECON SHOPPING/ARTWALK

1. MARINA RIVIERA NAYARIT 2. NUEVO RIVIERA NAYARIT 3. MARINA VALLARTA MARINA 4. CRUISE SHIP TERMINAL 5. LOS MUERTOS PIER/ WATER TAXIS

LAND & AIR

SHOPPING

GOLF

1. CENTRAL BUS STATION 2. VERSALLES BUS STATION 3. OLD TOWN BUS STATION 4. BUCERIAS BUS STATION 5. INT’L AIRPORT - PVR

1. GALERIAS VALLARTA 2. WALMART/SAMS CLUB 3. COSTCO 4. LA ISLA 5. PLAZA CARACOL 6. MEGA/ LA COMER BUCERIAS 7. WALMART NUEVO VALLARTA

1. PACI 2. BAHI 3. LITIB 4. FLAM 5. EL TI 6. & 7 V 8. MAR 9. VISTA

2


9

STATE OF JALISCO

BUENOS AIRES BUENAS ARIES

10

PUERTO VALLARTA 5 DeDECIMBRE Diciembre 5 DE

12 13

AMAPAS

14

15

CASA CUPOLA RESORTS BY PINNACLE

EL NOGALITO

CONCHAS CHINAS

PLA YA L O SAN S ARC VIL LA PLA EM MA OS MER YA L PER RIN CED OS ADO O E MU R TRO S PETI ERTO A ALM PICA T HOT S V EL A A N PLA YA C LLART R RES HOTEL HYA TT Z ONC LI A SH ORT IVA HA NDO OR GRA CO PUERT CASA S CHIN MAR ES ND STA O V KAR AS F S A P GAR LAY IESTA UR RE LLARTMA ZA A PU AME SOR A BLA NTA RIC T HOT NCA R NEGR AN EL M ESO A OUS RT AII

NES MARO GRAND A CA PLAY VENTURA E A S BUEN PREMIER AMBILLIA VILLA ATON BUG SHER S ET SECR AMBER NOW L SOL O DE CANT LAZA S ET P SUNS ICANO A PEL PLAZ ULES RTA T

CENTRO

HOT EL R OSIT A

11

GRINGO GULTCH CASA KIMBERLY HACIENDA SAN ANGEL

MISMALOYA

30

TO EL TUITO

BARCELO

LOS ARCOS

COLOMITOS LA TROVA CASITAS MARAIKA HOTELITO MIO

RTA 20

LAS ANIMAS 17

XINALANI RETREAT

QUIMIXTO

MAJAHUITAS MAJAHUITAS RESORT

3

21

BOCA DE TOMATLAN

HOTEL LAGUNITA

16 11

12

PALAPA MARACUYA 19 15 18

13

CENTRO

FING

POINTS OF INTEREST

IFICO GOLF COURSE IA GOLF COURSE BU GOLF COURSE MINGOS GOLF COURSE IGRE GOLF COURSE VIDANTA RINA VALLARTA TA VALLARTA

1. TURTLE RESCUE CAMP 2. WHALE OF A TALE HOLE 3. PLAYA ESCONDIDO 4. KISSING BRIDGE 5. EL CORA CROCODILE SANCTUARY 6. PUERTO VALLARTA SIGN 7. ESTERO EL SALADO 8. PITILLAL PLAZA

‘OLD TOWN’

9. 5 DE DEC. CEMETARY 10. MIRADOR CERRO DE LA CRUZ 11. MALECON 12. VIRGIN DE LA GUADALUPE CHURCH 13. LOS ARCOS AMPITHEATRE 14. ISLA CUALE 15. LAZARO CARDENAS PARK 15. OLAS ALTAS FARMERS MARKET

16. HIDALGO PARK 17. THREE HENS MARKET 18. MARSOL MARKET 19. MUNICIPAL MARKET 20. EMILIANO ZAPATA MARKET 21. CUALE CULTRAL CENTER 22. 5 DE DEC MARKET 23. HUANACAXLE MERCADO

5

24. FOREVER SPRING MARKET 25. BUCERIAS ARTWALK 26. RIVIERA FARMERS MARKET 27. MARINA ARTISAN MARKET 28. MOVIE + PICNIC 29. RED CROSS 30. LOS ARCOS NATIONAL PARK


12 The Boardwalk Malecon

R

ight in the heart of Puerto Vallarta a place that can’t be left apart is located. Puerto Vallarta’s Boardwalk Malecon is a seaside walk of ard. 875 yd. where tradition converges with modernity creating a magical atmosphere full of culture, art, entertainment and history. The Boardwalk Malecon starts with the historical Hotel Rosita, the oldest in Puerto Vallarta. Originally opened in 1948, its location and typical architecture makes it a must to know in town and a relic of Puerto Vallarta. Its rooms hosted Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton in several occasions during the film of “The Night of the Iguana”, and many say that they fell in love with the place. The Boardwalk Malecon is, without any doubt, a very pleasant place any time because of the shades of its palm trees

Local

and the multiple artistic expressions that can be found, such as the Papantla Flyers shows that take place at 18:00 hrs. daily, the paintings of local artists, the incredible sand sculptures, art galleries and the iconic Naval Museum, where it is possible to know at its 765 Yd. exhibition floor, about the close relation between Mexico and the sea since the Colony up to date. Trying a sea food snack or a menu at one of the many restaurants located alongside is almost a tradition. And for party lovers visiting a bar or night club while dancing to the rhythms of disco music, techno, dance, jazz, live music or karaoke is a must to enjoy the night in a big way! Whether you take a walk, a bike ride or do jogging, come and enjoy this wonderful area where you’ll always find something new.

Oct 5 - 11, 2020


13

News

Oct 5 - 11, 2020

82-year-old finishes primary school, learns to read

'If God gives me life, I will continue with my studies and finish high school'

A

n 82-year-old man has learned to read and graduated from elementary school in Oaxaca.

and homework. Learning at his age was not easy, he says, but his diligence and consistency paid off.

Timoteo Pacheco Rodríguez was awarded his diploma on Thursday by Miriam Liborio Hernández, state director of adult education. Pacheco’s grade point average was 9.1 out of 10.

His family supported his effort, including his grandchildren who helped him study.

“If God gives me life, I will continue with my studies and finish high school,” Pacheco said.

“It is never too late to learn and build dreams. It is an inspiration to many young men and women who have not been able to complete their studies,” he said.

The new graduate is originally from Pluma Hidalgo, Oaxaca, but has lived in the city of Oaxaca for several years. Pacheco sells coffee in the morning and devoted the afternoons to lessons, studying

Liborio congratulated Pacheco for his efforts.

Last year an 81-year-old woman from Chiapas also completed her primary school studies. Likewise,

in

2016

a

76-year-old

grandmother graduated from high school in Hidalgo. The National Institute for Adult Education (INEA) was created in 1981 to help adults and young people over the age of 15 complete their studies. In Mexico 3.6 million people do not know how to read and nearly half of those are adults over the age of 60. In 2019 more than 411,000 Mexicans obtained a diploma or learned how to read through INEA programs. Of those, 215,817 finished high school, and 96,645 graduated from primary school. Since its inception, more than 14 million people have benefited from INEA programs. Source: Milenio (sp)


14

Local

Oct 5 - 11, 2020

Turtle release in Puerto Vallarta, an experience from the sand into the sea

Complying with the required preventive measures, turtle camps in the destination are more than ready to welcome you.

E

very year, turtle release is a natural spectacle in Puerto Vallarta that visitors are looking forward to enjoying. Starting in the month of August all the way through December, you can experience releasing recently hatched baby turtles and see them take their first steps and prepare for the adventure that awaits in the Pacific Ocean. Turtle camps in the destination are ready to welcome you in small groups, complying with the health and hygiene preventive measures. One of them is Boca de Tomates Turtle Camp, located in the north of Puerto Vallarta, where a hatchery with more than 170 nests from Olive Ridley turtles, the main species that arrives at Bahia de Banderas, is found. Turtle release is an ideal activity for the whole family, where kids and adults can be a part of this heartwarming experience and watch how baby turtles follow their instinct and head towards the sea and their life in the ocean. Preventive Measures Release In Puerto Vallarta

For Turtle

In order to be able to release turtles in Puerto Vallarta, turtle camps are allowing groups of maximum 40 people, with safe distance measures, and mandatory use of

facemasks. First, an expert gives visitors a small environmental chat. Then, they are given a coconut shell and a hatchling is placed in the shell since you should not touch or hold a baby turtle with bare hands. Turtle release is carried out in this camp and the beaches of other hotels in the destination. This experience has turned into a very special moment for visitors and locals alike, since it also includes enjoying amazing sunsets, to prevent natural predators from attacking the hatchlings, such as birds and fish. You can release sea turtles for free, but, if you wish, you can give a donation to preserve this fascinating species and encourage the work done by the nonprofits in the area.

Adopt A Turtle’s Nest!

You can adopt your very own turtle’s nest. According to José Antonio Ramirez, leader of the Boca de Tomates camp, those interested can adopt a nest, and it will bear your name. And, when the hatchlings are born, you will be cordially invited to attend its release.

nonprofits. During the last year, various camps and volunteers identified 2,800 nests, and around 200,000 babies were released. These are encouraging numbers according to the statistics, since 1 out of 1,000 baby turtles reach adulthood.

Sandy Feet Turtles The Olive Ridley turtles, as well as the Humpback whales that arrive in the winter, have created a very intense and special bond with the region, thanks to their yearly visits. This turtle species arrive at various beaches in Puerto Vallarta and the Pacific to lay their eggs. When this happens, the eggs are moved to safe nurseries guarded by the Municipal Department of Ecology and volunteers from various associations and

So remember, if during your stay in Puerto Vallarta you find a turtle by the beach, it’s safe to keep a distance of 7 meters approximately, not take pictures with a flash since you can scare them away, and above all, not bother them because it can interrupt the spawning process. Be part of this wonderful experience, framed by the most amazing sunsets in Puerto Vallarta, and witness how baby turtles place their flippers on the sand for the first time to start their journey into the sea.


Oct 5 - 11, 2020

Games

15


Charities 16 Non-Profit and Charitable Organizations For visitors to Puerto Vallarta who wish to support the less privileged in our paradise, this is a list of some of the many organizations that could benefit from such kind gestures. If you would like your organization recognized here, please email details to cpsmedia.pv@gmail.com You can find all of our local charities online at vallartatribune.com Amigos de La Cruz de Huanacaxtle, A.C. – contributing to the quality of life in La Cruz through cultural, educational, environmental and charitable assistance programs. Tax Deductible. www. amigosdelacruz.org Contact Amy Welch amywelchpdx@comcast.net Alcoholics Anonymous: In English Puerto Vallarta Alanon Club – Basilio Badillo 329 recoverpv.com Amazing Grace Missions Assisting families in Magisterio & Progreso with necessities and job training and English. slw2014nv@gmail.com American Legion Post 14: raises resources and manpower to improve facilities needing building maintenance americanlegion14.org Amigos del Magisterio – Food delivered directly to workers at the PV dump, their families and schools in Magisterio and Volcanes. Also, food to New Beginnings, Pasitos de Luz, and Caritas. 100% of donations to the people, no overhead. amigosdelmagisterio.com lysephilrioux@ hotmail.com Asilo San Juan Diego Home for the Elderly – Contact: Lupita Sanchez Covarrubias 222-1257 or malupita88@ hotmail.com or mexonline.com\ asilosanjuandiego.htm Asociación Down – Assistance to persons with Down’s Syndrome – Contact: Ana Eisenring at 224-9577. Banderas Bay Women’s Shelter – Safe shelter for women & children victims of domestic violence. compassionforthefamily.org Becas Vallarta, A.C. – Provides scholarships to high school and university students. Tax-deductible in Mexico and USA. Polly Vicars at (322) 223-1371 or Buri Gray at (322) 221-5285. CANICA – Centre for Children with Cancer. Provides aid for treatment and services including transportation to GDL. Contact Director, Evelia Basañes 322-123-5688. Casa Hogar – A shelter for orphaned, abandoned, disadvantaged or vulnerable children. Luz Aurora Arredondo at 221 1908, casahogar_maximocornejo@hotmail. com Centro Comunitario SETAC-GLBT – Services the GLBT community, including treatment and referrals, education, English classes, HIV testing and counseling. Paco Arjona 224-1974

Clinica de Rehabilitación Santa Barbara – Rehabilitation of the handicapped. Contact: Laura Lopez Portillo Rodriguez at 224-2754. COLINA Spay and Neuter Clinic – Free and by-donation sterilization clinic in Old Town. Only open Saturdays, Contact: cez@rogers.com or 322-104-6609 CompassionNet Impact – Transforming the lives of people living in chronic poverty. Job creation, education, emergency & more. Tax-deductible. Cell: (322) 133-7263 or ric@4compassion.org Corazon de Nina A safe, loving, home-environment for 40+ children and youth rescued from high-risk situations. Donations & volunteers always welcome! Totally self-funded. www. fundacioncorazon.mx Cruz Roja (Red Cross) – Handles hospital and emergency service in Vallarta. It is the only facility that is authorized to offer assistance to injured people on the street. Contact: 222-1533, 222-4973 Desayunos para los Niños de Vallarta A.C. Feeding programs, education programs, day care centers for single mothers. 2234311 or 22225 72 Discapacitados de Vallarta, A.C. (DIVAC) association of handicapped individuals dedicated to helping one another. Ivan Applegate at 221-5153. Ecology and Conservation of Whales, AC. National Coordination Network for the Assistance of Entangled Whales. Biol. Astrid Frisch Jordán, Arce #541. Col. La Primavera Puerto Vallarta, Jal. 48325, Mexico, Tel/Fax: (322) 29 37 851

fibbcatalogo@yahoo.com Families At The Dump: Supporting families living in the landfill or garbage dump thru education and sustainable opportunities. familiesatthedump.org Fundacion Punta de Mita LDG. Ana Lilia Medina Varas de Valdés. ana@ fundacionpuntademita.org Tel. (329) 291 5053 Friends of PV Animals Volunteers working to enhance the lives of shelter animals. For info and donations visit friendsofpvanimals.com Grupo Ecológico de Puerto Vallarta: Arq. Luz del Carmen Pérez A cayro_13@ hotmail.com grupoecologico.com Horizonte de Paz: Welcoming shelter for men of all ages who are troubled w/alcohol & drug addiction.In great need of cash or material resources Contact MAYNOR Tel 281 0644 horizontedepaz@live.com International Friendship Club – Provides medical, educational and social services to those in need in Puerto Vallarta. www. ifcvallarta.com La Brigada de la Basura: A weekly meeting of neighborhood children to clean Vallarta Streets. Contact Que?Pasa 223-4006 Mexico Ministries & Mission, Inc. raises funds to the poor in Vallarta. Contact Fr. Jack+ 044 322 229-1129 christchurchbythesea.org Navy League – assists in the transportation of donated medical supplies from the U.S., organizes work groups to paint and repair facilities New Life Mexico – Challenging Child Poverty with health and education

Oct 5 - 11, 2020

programs. Philippa Vernon pvp@ newlifemexico.com Paraíso Felino AC Refuge and Adoption Centre for cats and kittens in the Bay of Banderas. Luis Donaldo Cel. (322) 120-4092 Pasitos de Luz – substitute home for low income children with any type of handicap, offers rehabilitation services and more. 299-4146. pasitosdeluz.org Purr Project – no-kill feline rescue located near Puerto Vallarta providing homeless cats and kittens a recuperative stay with the ultimate goal of adopting them out to loving homes, sterilized, vaccinated and disease free. www.purrproject.com PEACEAnimals – Free mobile spay/ neuter clinic operating 48 weeks a year, primarily in Puerto Vallarta. Tax-deductible. peaceanimals.org Refugio Infantil Santa Esperanza Orphanage for children aged 0-14. www.ccshf.ca SETAC - Effectively reduce the incidence of HIV / AIDS in Puerto Vallarta and ​promoting respect for human rights of people living with HIV / AIDS www.setac. com.mx SPCA PV – Provides long term no-kill shelter and vet services as well as rehabilitation and adoption to rescued animals. www.spcapv.com Vallarta Botanical Gardens - An award winning botanical garden that offers research & education of native plant life, city beautification programs, bird and butterfly watching, orchid garden and more etc. www.vbgardens.org




Millions discover their favorite reads on issuu every month.

Give your content the digital home it deserves. Get it to any device in seconds.