Page 1

Movement in Architecture

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

               Thesis|     Valerie O’ Leary     |     20035104 

1  

     

                                Word Count: 7064 


Movement in Architecture

      Movement in Architecture 

“How  can  architecture  encourage  movement  without  restricting a person’s free passage and decision‐making within  the built environment?”    A  thesis  submitted  to  Waterford  Institute  of  Technology,  Department of Architecture for partial fulfilment of the degree  of Bachelor of Architecture in the School of Engineering    By Valerie O’ Leary    Academic Year 2014/2015    © Valerie O’ Leary, 2014   

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

    2 


Movement in Architecture

        “―Bodies not only move in, but generate  space produced by and through their  movements. Movements of dance, sport,  and war are the intrusions of events into  architectural spaces. At the limit, these  events become scenarios or program…  independent but inseparable from the  spaces that enclose them”1    Bernard Tschumi 

                                                            1  Asofsky, D. D., 1992. Ritual in Architecture and the New England Holocaust Memorial,  s.l.: University of Michigan. 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

3


Movement in Architecture

 

Acknowledgements       Firstly  I  would  like  to  thank  the  Department  of  Architecture  tutors, especially Fifth Year mentors Aleksander Kostic, Fintan  Duffy and David Smyth, for their guidance and support during  my study in Waterford Institute of Technology.     Thank  you  to  my  classmates,  both  past  and  present  for  their  friendship, fun and empathy along the way.    Most importantly thank you to my parents and brothers for the  unwavering support, encouragement and love.     

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

    4 


Movement in Architecture

Introduction

Table of Contents 1.0  

Introduction………………………………………………………….7 1.1 Glossary of Terms…………………………………………………..…8  1.2 Thesis Abstract…………………………………………………………9  1.3 Research Methodologies………………………………………..10   

2.0  

Theory of Movement…………………………………………..11 

2.1 Introduction to Movement……………………………………..12  2.2 Rhythm & Pattern…………………………………………………..13  2.3 Light & Transparency………………………………………………14  2.4 Scale & Body in Space……………………………………………..15    3.0   

Freedom & Decision Making………………………………..17 

3.1 Freedom of Movement…………………………………………..18  3.2 Futurist Architecture & Movement…………………………18  3.3 Decision Making Space……………………………………………19    4.0   

Playscapes…………………………………………………………..21

4.1 Architecture of Play………………………………………………..22  4.2 Parkour in the City………………………………………………….23    5.0   

Case Studies…………………………………………………………24 

5.1 History of Movement……………………………………………..25  5.2 British Museum London – Foster & Partners………….30  5.3 Barajas Airport, Madrid – Richard Rodgers……………..31  5.4 Parc De La Villette – Bernard Tschumi……………………..32    6.0   

Design Brief…………………………………………………..…….33 

6.1 Introduction to Design Brief……………………………………34  6.2 Children’s Museum of the Arts……………………………….34  6.3 Design Aspirations………………………………………………….35  6.4 Constraints of Brief…………………………………………………36  6.5 Space Schedule………………………………………………………37 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

5


Movement in Architecture

Introduction

  7.0   

Site Analysis………………………………………………………..39 

7.1 Site Selection Criteria……………………………………………..40  7.2 Site Data…………………………………………………………………43  7.3 Iveagh Gardens……………………………………………………...44  7.4 Historical Development………………………………………….48    8.0   

Conclusion………………………………………………………..…50

9.0   

Reflective Chapter……………………………………………….52 

9.1 Brief & Site Update………………………………………………....53  9.2 Learning Experience & Process………………………………...55  9.3 Design Challenges………………………………………………..….57  9.4 Objectives & Achievements………………………………..……58    10.0

Appendices……………………………………………………….60 10.1 Design Charette 1…………………………………………..……61  10.2 Design Charette  2………………………………………………62  10.3 Design Submission……………………………………………...63   

11.0

References…………..……………………………………………75

12.0

List of Illustrations……………………………………..……..78 

13.0

Bibliography………………………………………………………..81

 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

6


Movement in Architecture

Introduction

Chapter 1 Introduction ____________________________________________ 1.1 Glossary of Terms  1.2 Thesis Abstract  1.3 Research Methodology  ____________________________________________     

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

    7 


Movement in Architecture

Introduction

1.1 Glossary of Terms Movement  The act or process of moving people or things from one place  or position to another.2  Freedom  The absence of necessity, coercion, or constraint in choice or  action.3  Parkour  The activity or sport of moving rapidly through an area, typically  in  an  urban  environment,  negotiating  obstacles  by  running,  jumping, and climbing.4   Ludic  Showing spontaneous and undirected playfulness.5  Playscape  A  playful  landscape  characterised  by  the  occurrence  of  enjoyment by the public and all those that interact with it. 6  Architectural Promenade  The  experience  of  walking  through  a  building  or  urban  environment.  The  complex  web  of  ideas  which  underpins  Le  Corbusier’s work, most specifically his belief in architecture as  a form of initiation.7   

                                                            2

Webster,  M.,  2004  The  Merriam  Webster  Dictionary.  Springfield:  Perfect  Learning  Corporation  3  ibid  4  ibid  5  J.A Simpson, 2010. The Oxford Dictionary of English. 2 ed. Oxford: Oxford University  Press.  6  Building Trust International, 2013. Playscapes Play Brief, s.l.: s.n.  7  Samuel F. Le Corbusier & the Architectural Promenade. Sheffield: Birkhauser 2010 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

8


Movement in Architecture

Introduction

1.2 Thesis Abstract This paper seeks to explore how, through design architects can  enhance the users experience in the built environment through  movement and the architectural promenade.   Our  bodies  are  extraordinarily  evolved  mechanisms  and  astoundingly  complex  pieces  of  engineering.  They  have  been  advanced and enhanced through evolution ‐ we are intended to  move. Architecture has always been designed with movement  in mind, whether it is intentional or unintentional. This thesis  aims  to  examine  and  reveal  the  numerous  ways  our  bodies  move  within  the  built  environment,  and  investigates  how  architecture  can  accommodate  freedom,  or  prescribe  human  movement.  The study will focus on examining the nature of movement and  play  within  the  built  environment.  Only  by  considering  the  meaning and nature of play and movement can we understand  how it can best be accommodated.  Museum  design  can  provide  great  insight  into  the  disparate  ways  humans  move  with  control,  and  make  decisions,  within  the built environment. From the public plaza to the heart of the  exhibition  spaces,  such  designs  provide  a  stage  for  human  movement through architecture. Therefore, in the design of a  children’s  museum  it  would  be  an  appropriate  setting  to  discover and evaluate how architects both facilitate and govern  freedom of movement within the built environment.    

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

9


Movement in Architecture

Introduction

1.2 Research Methodology Firstly, this thesis will draw on the principles of how movement  occurs within the built environment, not based on architecture  which moves, but rather the movement the human form within  architectural design. It will endeavour to explore what makes  us  move,  based  on  the  studies  and  principals  of  static  design  artwork, but also through the study and analysis of movement  in space within buildings throughout history.   Chapter three focuses on freedom of movement and how we  can control or allow freedom within the built environment. This  research  was  primarily  based  on  theories  of  Le  Corbusier’s  architectural promenade and the historical study of the Futurist  Movement  in  architecture  and  art.  This  decision  making  and  freedom  of  movement  was  further  explored  through  Design  Charette Two entitled “Decision Making Space”  Chapter four is concerned with spaces to play within the built  environment or playscapes. Research was primarily conducted  through  the  use of case studies, but also draws on  published  theories based on the history and development of play spaces  both for children and the wider community.   The research and methodology employed should contribute to  the design, within the built environment, a framework that will  create  a  free‐flowing  space  for  children  and  their  families  to  learn and move within.         

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

10


Movement in Architecture

Theory of Movement

Chapter 2 Theory of Movement ____________________________________________ 2.1 Introduction to Movement  2.2 Rhythm & Pattern  2.3 Light & Transparency  2.4 Scale & Body in Space  ____________________________________________

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

11


Movement in Architecture

Theory of Movement

2.1 Introduction to Movement “Movement is the design element that operates in the fourth  dimension ‐ time.”8  We  can  describe  movement  as  literal  or  compositional.  The  physical attributes of movement are part of particular designed  objects;  such  as  cars,  airplanes,  and  even  some  architectural  work such as that of Santiago Calatrava. Here we are referring  Figure 1: Giacomo Balla, Speed of a  Motorcycle  

to literal  movement.  Following  the  romantic  fascination  with  speed and movement in the early 20th century many painters  and artists began to concentrate on movement as a theme. The  challenge for these artists, and those working in static media,  was how to incorporate a sense of implied movement in a fixed  image that could not literally move.  Artists  tried  to  show  movement  through  diagonal  use  of  line  and location of images in the arrangement. This was brought to  life by futurist painters, such as Giacoma Balla, and the kinetic  art of Marcel Duchamp who used these concepts to celebrate  speed  and  movement.  This  in  essence  forms  the  basis  of  compositional movement.     It is this sense of compositional movement that challenges an  architect to create spaces which provide a stage for movement  within a stationary structure.  How can the architect design to  promote  or  encourage  movement,  within  a  static  built  environment?  

Figure 2: Marcel Duchamp, Nude   Descending a Staircase, No. 2 

The interaction  between  the  domain  of  our  bodies  and  the  domain of our dwelling places is constantly in motion. Whether  we are aware or innocent of this process, our bodies and our  movements  are  in  endless  dialogue  with  our  buildings.  The                                                               8

Jirousek, C., 1995. Art Design and Visual Thinking. New York: Cornell  University  Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

12


Movement in Architecture

Theory of Movement

critical interaction  of  body  form  and  movement  within  architecture deserves our careful attention.  Movement  and  procession  have  been  central  to  the  formulation  of  the  built  environment  dating  as  far  back  as  ancient Egyptian, Greek, and Roman architecture. Many of the  techniques  architects  use  in  modern  design  to  promote  movement date back to the methods used in the past, such as  rhythm  and  pattern,  light,  proportion  and  perception  of  our  Figure 3: Temple of Khons 

bodies within the structures we dwell in.   While  directional  movement  can  easily  be  manipulated  by  form,  such  as  that  of  Frank  Lloyd  Wright’s  Guggenheim  museum in New York, this thesis will question how architects  can  provoke  movement  in  a  more  subtle  and  free  manner.  Understanding  artistic  concepts  of  static  movement  provides  an  insight  into  how  architects  may  compose  or  choreograph  movement within space.   

2.2 Rhythm & Pattern

Figure 4: Light Control within Temple 

“Rhythm can be described as timed  movement through space; an easy,  connected path along which the eye follows  a regular arrangement of motifs.”  The occurrence of rhythm in architecture creates predictability  and direction in the configuration of the building. Visual rhythm  may be understood best by its relationship to rhythm in sound.  It  depends  largely  upon  the  fundamentals  of  pattern  making  and movement to achieve its effect. The parallels of rhythms in  Figure 5: Guggenheim New York One‐ Directional Movement 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

sound/ music  are  similar  to  the  idea  of  rhythm  in  a  visual 

13


Movement in Architecture

Theory of Movement

configuration, the  difference  being  that  the  timed  "beat"  is  detected by the eyes and body, rather than simply the ears. 9    The  underlying  pattern  or  repetition  within  a  building’s  structure  may  subtly  act  as  a  call  to  move  as  the  pattern  is  broken or disrupted. This pattern provides a state of coherence  Figure 6: Musical Rhythm  

within the whole building or built environment, the sense that  all  of  the  pieces  are  functioning  together,  to  attain  a  synchronisation  of  all  the  elements  within  the  rhythm  of  the  building.  Movement  within  this  harmony  is  achieved  by  alternation, graduation, emphasis and contrast of the repeated  pattern within the structure. 10   

2.3 Light & Transparency “The key is light and light illuminates the  shapes and shapes have an emotional 

Figure 7: Illustration of Plato’s Allegory of  the Cave – The Power of Light &  Knowledge  

power” 11  In  physical  terms,  transparency  is  thought  of  as  a  property  defined by the quantity of light passing through a material or  the ability to see through a particular entity. It is the control of  this transparency or passing through of light which may aid the  definition and choreography of movement through space. Light  serves  a  number  of  significant,  practical,  sensory  and  emblematic  purposes  in  architecture,  and  its  composition  of  movement is subject to endless refinement. 12  The transformation from darkness into light has the symbolic  value of good versus evil, and the connotations of knowledge  derived  from  light,  but  has  a  similar  value  in  terms  of 

Figure 8: Movement towards Light 

                                                            9

Jirousek, C., 1995. Art Design and Visual Thinking. New York: Cornell University   ibid  11  Le Corbusier, 1957. The Chapel at Ronchamp. London: Architectural Press.  12  Samuel, F., 2010. Le Corbusier & the Architectural Promenade. Shefield: Birkhauser  10

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

14


Movement in Architecture

Theory of Movement

movement. If deprived of the sensory value of light, we tend to  move towards the prospect of light. It is in our very nature as  human  beings  to  be  in  an  enlightened  space,  rather  than  deprived in the darkness.   Californian minimalist art of the 1960s and 1970s evoked how  geometric forms and use of light could affect the environment  and perception of the viewer. 13 The ambition of this movement  Figure 9: Doug Wheeler 1969 Minimalist  Art

was to create a form without using physical material, and create  a  mental  experience  of  space.  Contemporary  artist  John  McCracken believed that form alone is an abstract perception,  but  if  you  make  it  from  physical  materials,  such  as  wood  or  stone  then  it  overemphasises  the  physical  aspect.  It  removes  the mental perception and freedom of the space. The form of  minimalist  artists  became  a  matter  composed  of  energy  and  pure thought.14 This abstraction of form and control of light is  key  to  the  control  of  movement  without  physical  restriction  within architecture.    

2.4 Scale & Body in Space The  scale  and  proportion  of  our  bodies  and  relationships  to  Figure 10: James Turrell – Juke Green  1968 

each other  in  space  provide  a  rich  call  to  move  within  architecture. Architects most often design in plan and section  but the perception of the space, and experience from a human  scale  requires  the  utmost  attention  in  addressing  the  experience, movement and how we dwell within space. 15  Richard  Upjohn’s  design  of  the  Connecticut  State  Capitol  provides corridors, halls, and stairways which are faceted with 

Figure 11: Scale of Body In Space –  Modular Man and Furniture 

                                                            13

 Butterfield, J., 1996. The Art of Light & Space. Santa Monica: Abbeville Press   Coliptt, F., 1998. Between Two Worlds: John Mc Cracken. Art in America, Volume April    1998  15   Arnheim,  R.,  1975.  The  Dynamics  of  Architectural  Form.  Berkley:  University  of  California Press.  14

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

15


Movement in Architecture

Theory of Movement

body sized  articulations,  which  welcome  our  presence  in  the  building.  While  the  scale  of  the  overall  building  is  large  the  structure makes a complex but loose fit with the body. The body  has  many  places  and  options  to  move  and  dwell  within  the  space. The movements of the human body within and around  this building is also significantly affected by our haptic sense, by  the tactile qualities of the surfaces and edges encountered. 16  Figure 12: Foyer of Berlin Philharmonic  Concert Hall 

The relationship and positioning of other bodies within space  can also act as a call to move within a structure. It is almost a  sense  of  curiosity  and  exploration  upon  seeing  other  people,  and how they move within the spaces. Hans Scharoun’s Berlin  Philharmonic  Concert  Hall  created  slipping  cascades  of  stairs  over and under one another in diagonal relationships that begin  to  challenge  one’s  sense  of  order  and  orientation.17  This  diagonal  relationship  visually  inspires  movement  by  the  positioning of other people within the building. The movement 

Figure 13: Sketch of Disorientating effect  of Berlin Philharmonic Concert Hall 

within this space varies depending on the influence of a crowd  in contrast to when individuals visit the space.  Moore/Turnbulls  Faculty  Club  in  Santa  Barbara  has  a  similar  effect ‐ people and their paths spin out in an almost frenetic and  energised spatial configuration. Potential disorientation forces  on  us  an  awareness  of  our  own  movements,  as  well  as  our  spatial relationships to one another. Again, while Le Corbusier’s  Villa Savoye is a very forced articulation of movement in terms  of  form,  the  two  paths  of  vertical  circulation  produce  a  decidedly  multifaceted  periodic  pattern  of  space  time  relationships, experienced primarily through body movement,  and the relationship of other people within this space. 

Figure 14: Faculty Club Santa Barbara 

                                                            16  Moore, C. W. & Bloomer, K. C., 1977. Body Memory & Architecture. New Haven: Yale  University Press.  17  ibid 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

16


Movement in Architecture

Freedom & Decision Making

Chapter 3 Freedom & Decision Making ____________________________________________ 3.1 Freedom of Movement  3.2 Futurist Architecture & Movement  3.3 Decision Making in Space  ____________________________________________  

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

17


Movement in Architecture

Freedom & Decision Making

3.1 Freedom of Movement This  chapter  aims  to  examine  architectural  theory  regarding  movement and the ability to control or manipulate movement  and  freedom  of  movement  within  the  built  environment.  Freedom means different things to different people, for some  it is simply the status of not being imprisoned, for others it is  the right or capacity to act the way they would like, or do as  they please. In the context of this thesis freedom is the ability  Figure 15: Choice of Movement within  Space 

to make  choices  about  movement‐  not  to  be  constrained  by  form within the built environment.  

3.2 Futurist Architecture & Movement

The afore  mentioned  futurist  movement  of  the  early  20th  century  provides  intriguing  visions  of  movement  both  within  artwork, and the built environment. While the architecture has  similar ideals to that of the artwork, the addition of the  built  environment, coinciding with the glorification of the machine,  Figure 16: Superstudio Proposal  

provided a unique style of architecture, and stimulating insight  into movement and the relevance of the machine. 18  One of the neo‐futurist visions by Italian group Superstudio in  the  1960’s  promised  total  freedom  of  living,  on  an  infinite  gridded  platform  into  which  we  may  plug  for  energy,  information  or  nutritive  needs.  This  scenario,  however,  embodies a clear denial of the need for the interaction of body  and  architecture,  instead  it  emphasises  the  relationship  with  body, machine and movement.   

Figure 17: Superstudio Infinite Grid  

                                                            18  Blumm, C. S., 1996. The Other Modernism F.T. Marinetti's Futurist Fiction of power.  Berkeley: University of California Press. 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

18


Movement in Architecture

Freedom & Decision Making

Contrasting this ideal by Superstudio whereby movement and  freedom  of  living  is  paramount,  London  based  architectural  group Archigram again drew inspiration from technology but in  a much controlling fashion. The Walking City by Ron Herron had  the  idea  of  replacing  the  human  body  and  its  freedom  of  movement with a machine. Herron proposed enormous mobile  robotic structures which could interconnect with each other to  form large walking metropolises.  Figure 18: Archigram Machine Movement  

Advancements in  technology  has  resulted  in  some  of  these  futurist  ideas  being  implemented  at  a  smaller  level.  Through  advancement  in  technologies,  man  is  “moving”  faster  and  farther  than  ever  before,  but  this  movement  is  primarily  a  passive  experience  –  we  do  not  have  control  of  these  movements.19  Our  bodies  are  being  moved  or  propelled  in  space rather  than physically moving ourselves. In essence we  are  actually  experiencing  less  active  movement  in  the  horizontal  and  vertical  planes  than  ever  before,  by  using  mechanical  means  such  as  elevators,  escalators,  and  even  vehicles like cars. 

3.3 Decision Making in Space

Figure 19: Ron Herron A Walking City  

Le Corbusier’s prime motive when designing was to aid people  in the process of “savoir habiter”, knowing how to live20 and it  was  his  opinion  that  the  architectural  promenade  would  be  designed  to  “resensitise”  people  to  their  surroundings.21  In  designing in this way, buildings become a series of experiences,  beginning  with  the  approach  from  the  street,  pathway  or  square  and  drawing  a  person  inside  and  along  a  series  of  Figure 20: Decision Making  

experiences in space. In a way the architect becomes a type of                                                               19

Moore, C. W. & Bloomer, K. C., 1977. Body Memory & Architecture. New Haven: Yale  University Press.  20  Le Corbusier. The Marseille Block. London: Harville 1953  21  Menin S. & Samuel F. Nature & Space: Aalto and Le Corbusier.   London: Routledge  2003 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

19


Movement in Architecture

Freedom & Decision Making

choreographer, creating  spaces  which  anticipate  a  person’s  movement. It creates a dialogue, not only between people and  the built environment, but also between other people.  Le  Corbusier  endeavoured  to  create  a  framework  in  which  people could live their own lives, and make their own decisions,  whilst  dictating  strongly  exactly  what  that  framework  should  be.  This  paradox  is  what  makes  Le  Corbusier’s  work  so  interesting, however these experiments in teaching people how  to  live  were  generally  unsuccessful.  They  created  a  very  rigid  formwork,  such  as  that  of  the  Villa  Savoye,  whereby  the  movement through space was forced in a specific manner – this  Figure 21: Ground Floor of Villa Savoye  Showing Movement   

does not allow a freedom of movement and choice.  Although  the  end  product  of  Le  Corbusier’s  designs  were  generally unsuccessful in creating freedom, a lot can be learned  from  his  teaching  of  “savoir  habiter”,  in  terms  of  creating  a  decision  making  space  for  movement.  In  essence  it  is  a  questioning space, whereby choices are provided and questions  are  asked  which  offer  up  a  multitude  of  possibilities  for  movement and action (This decision‐making space is examined  further in Design Charette 2‐ see Appendix).  This decision‐making space does not happen within open space,  but  rather  at  threshold  and  circulation  points  in  the  built 

Figure 22: 2nd Floor of Villa Savoye  

environment. These may be disorientating spaces, in that they  are rarely clear or distinctly defined spaces, but provide several  options  for  movement,  and  call  for  choices  to  be  made.  The  material quality of the space is generally uniform, but provides  glimpses  into  the  ancillary  spaces  in  which  it  opens  up  to.    A  clear  example  of  these  decision  making  spaces  is  within  the  threshold spaces for the British Museum in London designed by 

Figure 23: Two Circulation Methods within  Villa Savoye  

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

Richard Rodgers (see Case Study). 

20


Movement in Architecture

Playscapes

 

Chapter 4 Playscapes ____________________________________________ 4.1 Architecture of Play  4.2 Parkour in the City  ____________________________________________  

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

21


Movement in Architecture

Playscapes

4.1 Architecture of Play “Play is free, is in fact freedom”22  Play  generates  memories  and  a  sense  of  place  in  the  built  environment, and is the truest sense of freedom of movement  and expression.  When children play in any environment, they  reinterpret  objects  and  negotiate  the  environment  in  a  different  way  to  adults,  and  as  such  explore  and  move  more  within  the  built  environment.  Play  activities  are  a  consistent 

Figure 24: Children at Play  

feature in  cultures  throughout  the  world  and  history,  and  although they may appear in very dissimilar forms, they share  an underlying conceptual construct. They are dependent upon  the context and framework in which they occur.23  There are two main approaches to designing play spaces: loose  parts, which use transportable objects and sculpture which are  placed within a site; and playscapes which combine play areas  with landscape design. 24  Figure 25: Merida Youth Movement –  Selgas Cano  

In stark  contrast  to  Le  Corbusier’s  approach  to  movement,  Bernard  Tschumi’s  work  allows  the  creation  of  space  to  be  generated  by  the  play  activities.  His  efforts  link  potential  movement  between  objects,  filling  the  gaps  through  activity  and  the  insertion  of  the  body,  event,  or  action.  Rather  than  designing to force a particular way of moving, Tschumi provides  a  stage  for  freedom  of  movement  to  occur  on.  This  is  most  prevalent in his design for the award winning Parc de la Vilette  in Paris. 

Figure 26: Tree Tectonics Urban Studio    

                                                            22

Huizinga,  J.,  1949.  Homo  Ludens:  A  Study  of  the  Play  Element  in  Culture.  2nd  ed.  London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.  23  ibid  24  The Architecture of Early Childhood, 2012. The State of Play Today   

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

22


Movement in Architecture

Playscapes

4.2 Parkour in the City Parkour  (derived  from  the  French  'parcours'  or  'course')  also  known as free‐running is a contemporary spectacle in which a  traceur  (practitioner  of  Parkour)  moves  through  the  built  environment  as  resourcefully  as  possible.  In  this  pursuit  of  efficient  or  free  movement,  traceurs  re‐negotiate  obstacles  which  may  lessen  their  pace  or  divert  them  from  an  optimal  Figure 27: Parkour Flow of Movement  

pathway in  un‐conventional  ways,  moving  over,  through,  or  under them. 25  Parkour is a highly accessible and distinctly urban play activity.  Its  re‐interpretation  and  creative  misuse  of  the  paths  and  frames of  the  city, acts as an appropriate  case study through  which to discuss the nature of play and freedom of movement  in  the  urban  environment.  By  exploring  the  way  in  which  traceur’s  navigate  the  architecture  of  the  city  contrarily,  we  may generate discussion regarding the design and management 

Figure 28: Parkour Playground Proposal –  Riverdale Park  

of public  space,  and  come  to  a  greater  and  more  creative  understanding of how play qualities and play elements may be  deployed in the city, to adapt freedom of movement in public  environments.26  Parkour strongly signifies the desire of public urban enthusiasts  for  freedom,  connection  with  place,  social  and  physical  interaction,  and  the  ability  to  re‐interpret  their  environment  through  appropriation.  Mikkel  Rugaard’s  “Street  Movement”  has attempted to address the idea of designing for freedom of  movement  and  expression.  Rugaard  acts  on  a  similar  level  to  Tschumi to define spaces and objects in the built environment,  so they become inspirational and invitational towards physical 

Figure 29: Designing the Undesigned –  Cornell University  

activity and  movement,  without  compromising  the  architectural vision and aesthetic value.                                                               25

Geyh, P., 2006. Urban Free Flow: A Poetics of Parkour. Media Culture Journal, 9(3).   Mirko, G., 2011. Parkour & Architecture, Brisbane: Queensland University 

26

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

23


Movement in Architecture

Case Studies

 

Chapter 5 Case Studies ____________________________________________ 5.1 Case Studies ‐ A History of Movement   5.2 British Museum, London   5.3 Barajas Airport, Madrid  5.4 Parc de la Villette, Paris  ____________________________________________

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

24


Movement in Architecture

Case Studies

5.1 Case Studies – A History of Movement This  case  study  was  carried  out  by  analysing  the  primary  movements  within  buildings  throughout  history.  In  each  case  the suggested movement and the factors which influence the  movement are identified in order to understand the impact of  control of movement within the built environment.    Temple of Khons – 1153 BC      Key Factors in Movement  

Level change at transitional  spaces 

Structural grid – set out in a  linear straight azis through  the centre of the building. 

Light changes within  different zones. 

Human scale and figure  evident in sculpture 

                        Figure 30 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

25


Movement in Architecture

Case Studies

The Parthenon – 447 BC 

Key Factors in Movement  

Temple was only designed to  be seen from the outside. 

Can only view the statue  throught open doors along  which a central axis provides a  direct path to the statue 

Controlled landscape approach  is key to the movement 

As procession brings you closer  the detail of the frieze and  columns become more evident 

Planners concieve the  promenade as a theatrical  event 

Emotions of the visitors was  choreographed to prepare  them for the ultimate glimpse  of Athena  

 

Figure 31 

The Pantheon 14 AD 

Key Factors in Movement  

Approach from Piazza della  Rotunda 

Liniar entrance through  collonade 

Control of light through the  oculus 

Circular interior form/structure 

Niches/monuments and  dwelling spaces at the  periphery   

Figure 32  Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

26


Movement in Architecture

Case Studies

Ibn Tulun Mosque 879 AD  Key Factors in Movement  

Position of the structural  columns and walls provides  direction to the Mihrab and the  direction to Mecca. 

Central fountain’s position acts  as a gathering/dwelling place  for purification. 

Multiple entrances into the  Ziyada before the courtyard  help control the movement of  the crowd during worshipping  hours. 

Ziyada provides a buffer of  movement into the courtyard  space.   Figure 33 

San Minato, Florence 1013AD 

Key Factors in Movement  

External approach via large set  of steps on the site 

Entrance points via the 3  doorways 

Strucutral grid 

Change in levels above/below  the choir 

Articulation of the vaulting 

Direct axis‐ liniar throught the  basilica   

Figure 34 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

27


Movement in Architecture

Case Studies

Villa Savoye –Poissy, France 1920’s    Key Factors in Movement  

Landscape apporach on site  begins the controlled  movement through the  building 

Centrally located ramp from  ground floor to roof level rigidly  controls the circulation 

Relationship of the ramp to  both vertical and horizontal  plane is important 

Relationship between the two  forms of vertical circulation  (the stairs and ramp) creates a  movment relationship between  people 

Light source from above  illuminates the vertical space of  the stairs  Figure 35 

Guggenheim Museum, New York 1950’s 

Key Factors in Movement  

Very controlled movement in  the museum environment 

Spiraling ramp through main  atrium space controls  movement 

Light source from centre of  atrium casts light down the  centre of the atrium  illuminating the ramp and  highlighting the circulation  space 

One directional movemennt up  and down the ramp 

No decision making process on  ramp   

Figure 36 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

28


Movement in Architecture

 

Case Studies

Kiasma Museum, Helsinki 1998   

Key Factors in Movement  

Lighting plays largest role in  direction and contorl of  movement. 

Ramp curves in one direction 

Relationship and interplay of  ramp and stairs similar to Villa  Savoye engages human  interaction 

Clearly defined journey through  space  

   

Figure 37 

Conclusion to Historical Case Studies    This  exercise  attempted  to  analyse  how  movement  is  defined,  and  controlled in buildings throughout history, in an effort to gain a better  understanding of the influences, and factors, which have an impact  on buildings and people’s movement within.  It  provided  an  insight  into  the  criteria  which  we  still  use  today  to  control somebody’s movement, however, it does not offer guidance  as  to  how  freedom  of  movement  may  be  achieved.  In  most  case  studies the pathway is quite rigidly defined and controlled. The result  of  this  does  not  offer  many  possibilities  for  freedom  of  choice  and  movement. 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

29


Movement in Architecture

Case Studies

5.2 British Museum, London – Foster & Partners

Figure 38: Threshold Space of Museum 

Figure 39: Atrium Space 

Figure 40: Circulation zone within Atrium 

Figure 41: Movement Study Examining Decision  Making Spaces & Flow of Movement  Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

30


Movement in Architecture

Case Studies

5.3 Barajas Airport, Madrid – Richard Rodgers Partnership       .  

Figure 42: Colour as Way‐finding method  within Structure 

Figure 43: Circulation Zones Grouped 

Figure 45: Decision Making Space and  Movement Study  Figure 44: Light & Implied Movement in  Undulations of Roof 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

31


Movement in Architecture

Case Studies

5.4 Parc de la Vilette, Paris – Bernard Tschumi

Figure 46: Play Space Within Structure 

Figure 47: Fixed Seating 

Figure 48: Tree‐Lined Pathway 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

Figure 48: Points of Constraint 

Figure 50: Forms Which Constrain  Movement 

Figure 51: Freedom of Movement Zones 

32


Movement in Architecture

Design Brief

Chapter 6 Design Brief ____________________________________________ 6.1 Introduction to Design Brief  6.2 Children’s Museum of the Arts  6.3 Design Aspirations  6.4 Constraints of Brief  6.4 Space Schedule  ____________________________________________

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

33


Movement in Architecture

Design Brief

6.1 Introduction to Design Brief The  purpose  of  this  thesis  is  to  explore  how  architecture  can  enhance the users’ experience in the built environment through  movement.  This  movement  will  be  brought  forward  to  the  design  of  a  museum  which  encourages  a  user  to  explore  the  exhibitions  to  the  fullest  extent,  without  following  a  specific  path.  This  type  of  movement  and  engagement  in  museum  design is not suitable in certain museum models (i.e. a museum  whereby  the  user  is  required  to  follow  a  specific  story  or  succession of events). Therefore, it is proposed that the design  brief  for  this  thesis  will  be  a  children’s  museum  of  the  arts,  whereby the visitor will be encouraged to explore and engage  with the environment through controlled movement.  The key  to this design brief will be providing circulation and movement  between and within the exhibition spaces, which is not forced  by  form,  but  is  encouraged  through  intuition  and  decision‐ making.  This  will  be  achieved  by  focusing  on  the  following  criteria: rhythm, light, and scale.   

6.2 Children’s Museum Of The Arts It is imperative to look beyond specific scholastic functions that  have  been  provided  by  museums,  and  acknowledge  their  Figure 52: Education‐Movement 

paramount influence on education – they stimulate individuals  of all ages to learn more.27  Firm  evidence  supports  the  connection  between  movement  and education. Indications from MRI data, anatomical studies,                                                               27

Merrit  E.  Museums  and  the  Future  of  Education  Leeds,  United  Kingdom.    Emerald  Group Publishing (2009)  

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

34


Movement in Architecture

Design Brief

and medical data show that movement increases our cognitive  processing,  and  our  number  of  brain  cells.28  If  kinaesthetic  learning is the way forward in education,29 it is imperative that  we design to promote this within modern museum design.   According  to  Susan  Griss,  the  arts  and  education  are  inseparable:   “You cannot study the arts without  learning thoughts of math, science, history,  and problem solving, nor can you be truly  educated if you are ignorant of the role of  the arts in culture and history.”30   

When we deliberately incorporate the arts into education, the 

benefits of  each  are  maximized.  This  children’s  museum  will  focus on the 7 traditional classifications of “Arts”; these being  Architecture, Literature, Painting, Sculpture, Music, Dance and  Theatre. It will provide a facility for both children and family to  explore and understand the arts, and engage in a participatory  way with all the faculties of the arts. In a sense, it will aim to  provide a movement through the building, in which the visitor  will become lost in the world of the arts, and discover and learn  by participating with the museum environment.    

6.3 Design Aspirations The building’s overall design reflects a mission similar to Daniel  Libeskind’s  proposal  for  the  Victoria  &  Albert  museum  in  London, whereby the visitor becomes lost in the experience of  the museum.  31 The movement and circulation which achieves                                                               28

Ibid   Griss, S. Creative Movement: A Language for Learning. Educational Leadership (1994)   Accessed 16 November 2014  30  ibid  29

31

Libeskind, D. Daniel Libeskind: The Space of Encounter. New York: Universe Publishing 

(2000).

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

35


Movement in Architecture

Design Brief

this goal will be exploratory. There will not be a clear form of  promenade, but rather a culmination of different pathways and  circulation methods. Way‐finding will be possible, not by visible  form  but  rather  on  an  intuitive  level.  Colour,  material,  light,  rhythm,  and  scale  will  provide  the  basis  for  this  intuition.  In  essence the aim will be to explore a labyrinth‐type layout so the  building  becomes  part  of  a  journey  of  discovery  and  participation. In all aspects of the design, the museum seeks to  provoke  movement,  and  encourage  and  inspire  children  (and  their  families)  to  learn  through  the  arts.  The  museum  will  become  a  space  of  opportunity  for  inquiry‐based  learning,  which inspires curiosity within the built environment. 

6.4 Constraints/ Restrictions of Brief In  designing  for  a  family  based  public  building  the  following  constraints  will  require  attention  through  the  design  and  site  selection process:32  

Access (for exhibition changes)  

Accessibility (for disability and elderly) 

Signage (Total Communication) 

Amenities (seating, toilets, changing facilities) 

Group Visitation (Schools/Large Groups of Children) 

Interactive Technology Management 

Mobility (Buggy use/storage) 

Public Transport Links 

Safety  

Temporary Spaces/Exhibitions 

Vantage Points for Play Areas 

                                                            32  Gurian E. H. Museum Space Program Planning.  Vieques PR, (2006) Accesssed 16th  November 2014 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

36


Movement in Architecture

Design Brief

The challenge  of  these  constraints  will  be  to  seamlessly  incorporate  these  areas  of  attention  into  the  movement  and  journey  of  discovery  within  the  structure,  without  compromising  the  interactive  and  exploratory  nature  of  the  museum.   The history and nature of the site will also have a restriction on  the building programme. It will be necessary to both transform  the landscape and parkland, but also respect the history of the  buildings  of  importance  and  historic  relevance  of  the  Iveagh  Gardens.

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

37


Movement in Architecture

Design Brief

6.5 Space Schedule I.D No.

Space/Activity

1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6

Entrance/Admission Entry Vestibule Reception/Information Point Admission/Tickets Museum Shop Group Meeting Space Toilet/Changing Facilities

2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8

Administration/Staff Facilities Curator’s Office Filing/Storage General Admin Office Security Station Small Meeting Room Staff Room Staff Toilet/ Changing Facilities Youth Program Coordinator Office

3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.7

Exhibition Spaces Architecture Exhibition Space Literature Exhibition Space Painting Exhibition Space Sculpture Exhibition Space Theatre & Dance Exhibition Space Music Exhibition Space

4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4

Area Required (Metres Squared)

Total

25 25 25 100 125 35 335

Total

15 10 15 15 25 25 25 15 145

Total

250 150 100 100 350 150 1100

Total

150 25 75 50 300

Total

250 50 50 100 450

Civic Amenities Café Buggy Storage / Rental Area Book Shop Lounge/Resting Space

5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4

Utilities Exhibition Storage Kitchen Plant/ Control Room For Interactive Exhibtions Toilet Facilities

6.0 6.2

Circulation Interior Circulation Zones (Large Free Flowing Spaces) Total Building Area

700 3030

Note:  External  circulation  will  also  play  a  role  in  the  control  of  movement within the complex: Site Area ≈ 37,867m2 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

38


Movement in Architecture

Site Selection

Chapter 7 Site Selection ____________________________________________ 7.1 Site Selection Criteria  7.2 Site Data  7.3 Iveagh Gardens  7.4 Earlsfort Terrace  7.5 Historical Development  ____________________________________________

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

39


Movement in Architecture

Site Selection

7.1 Site Selection Criteria The  chosen  location  for  the  thesis  design  will  be  within  the  Iveagh Gardens, Dublin 2, Ireland. As the brief for this design is  a National Children’s Museum, the population of children in the  area was a key factor in the choice of city. Dublin has more than  fifteen thousand children in city and county.  In selecting an appropriate site three different locations have  been  assessed  by  the  following  criteria;  proximity  to  other  cultural and educational buildings/areas of interest; proximity  and access to public transport; safety of the area for children;  flow  of  movement;  and  size  of  the  site  to  accommodate  the  Figure 53: Site Location Map 

children’s museum brief.   The  ideal  site  for  this  thesis  would  provide  options  for  developing a flow of movement and connections through the  site and building, so space and the option to create movement  on different levels is imperative. It would also be important to  have space on the site, to develop a safe external environment  for children and families to gather and play. Light plays a role in  the control of movement within the building; therefore it would  be preferable to have a site which is not overshadowed by other  buildings.   Following  this  set  of  criteria,  the  Iveagh  Gardens  provide      a  unique protected and safe setting within the heart of the city  for the development of a children’s museum and surrounding  “playscape” for the children of Dublin. 

Figure 54: Criteria for Site Selection 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

40


Movement in Architecture

Site Selection

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

41


Movement in Architecture

Site Selection

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

42


Movement in Architecture

Site Selection

7.2 Site Data Location:  Iveagh Gardens, Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 2, Ireland  52° 33′ 52″ N, ‐6° 26′ 07″ W  Current State:    

Public Gardens & Parkland  Classified  by  the  Office  of  Public  Works  as  a  National  Historic Property 

Site Area:  ≈ 37,867m2     Figure 57: Site Context Aerial Map 

 

Figure 58: Fountain Centrepiece 

Figure 60: Pop‐up Concert Venue within Iveagh Gardens 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

Figure 59: Iveagh Garden Waterfall 

Figure 61: Main Axis of the Iveagh Gardens 

43


Movement in Architecture

Site Selection

7.3 Iveagh Gardens The Iveagh Gardens was chosen as the most appropriate based  on  the  criteria  for  site,  selection,  and  also  the  potential  for  movement  design  development.  Although  initially  it  was  proposed that the corner of Earlsfort Terrace & Stephens Green  would  be  the  location  of  the  National  Children’s  Museum  it  became  clear  that  moving  into  the  gardens  had  the  greatest  potential for expansion for the development of an educational  and cultural quarter in Dublin City Centre.   An in depth study of the Dublin City Development Plan (2011‐ 2017)33  highlights  key  issues  which  would  be  required  to  address  within  the  design  project,  the  most  relevant  to  this  design brief being the cultural and transport system issues.   After  examining  the  current  public  and  private  transport  facilities against the model for the development plan, it became  clear  that  the  building  would  require  connections  to  public  transport,  to  create  a  more  linked  and  sustainable  system.  Parking  would  not  be  an  issue  on  this  site.  Both  current  and  proposed transport systems deem this site to be an appropriate  choice.   The  cultural  significance  is  clear  from  the  proximity  to  educational and cultural facilities, and the potential to link the  new proposal for the Children’s Museum to adjacent amenities  and existing  structures is ideal for the  development of a new  museum and playscape for children and the general public.   

                                                            33  Tierney, J., 2010. Dublin City Development Plan, Dublin: Dublin City Council. 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

44


Movement in Architecture

Site Selection

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

45


Movement in Architecture

Site Selection

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

46


Movement in Architecture

Site Selection

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

47


Movement in Architecture

Site Selection

7.4 Historical Development Having  examined  the  cultural  significance  of  the  surrounding  buildings of the site, the history of the site cannot be ignored.  The  site  is  steep  in  history  due  to  its  proximity  to  Stephen’s  Green, but also the National Concert Hall’s significance in both  culture and education.  The gardens were originally developed as Clonmell Lawns, by  John  Scott  the  First  Earl  of  Clonmell,  as  his  personal  garden.  Figure 65: Historical 6” Map (1829‐1841) 

However, when the Earl died his son inherited the property and  sold  it  for  public  use  in  1817  when  it  was  renamed  Coburg  Gardens.34  It  fell  into  disrepair  following  its  use  as  a  site  for  sheep grazing and waste disposal, until 1860, when it became  part  of  the  development  of  the  1865  Dublin  International  Exhibition. The National Concert Hall was originally built for the  exhibition,  complete  with  an  enormous  glass  house  iron  structure  to  the  east  of  the  site.  This  glass  structure  was 

Figure 66: Historical 25” Map (1897‐1913 

disassembled after  the  International  Exhibition  and  reassembled in London. 35  The  main  building  was  converted  into  the  central  building  of  University  College  Dublin  (UCD)  with  the  founding  of  the  National University of Ireland in 1908. UCD began to relocate to  the  new  Bellfield  campus  in  the  1960’s  so  a  portion  of  the 

Figure 67: Iron Glass House‐ Dublin  International Exhibition 

building was reopened as the National Concert Hall in 1981.   In 2007, UCD moved from the National Concert Hall complex to  their Belfield campus. Plans have been put in place to upgrade  the concert hall to a major multipurpose concert venue. 36 

Figure 68: Dublin International Exhibition  1865 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

                                                            34 

Casey, C., 2005. Dublin: The City within the Grand & Royal Canals and the Circular  Road with the Phoenix Park. Yale University Press.  35  Kelly, P. B. &. P. O., 2000. The National Concert Hall at Earlsfort Terrace: A History.  Dublin: Wolfhound Press.  36  Lyons, M., 2007. Farewell to the Terrace. The Irish Times, 15 May.    

48


Movement in Architecture

Site Selection

Figure 69: Dublin International Exhibition 1865 Official Catalogue Cover   

Figure 70: Dublin International Exhibition 1865 Plan of Building & Gardens 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

49


Movement in Architecture

Conclusion

Chapter 8 Conclusion ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________  

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

    50 


Movement in Architecture

Conclusion

8.0 Conclusion Designing for freedom is perhaps the most challenging aspect  of this thesis as within architecture there are always boundaries  and thresholds, spaces where control is put in place.    Following  this  in‐depth  investigation  into  movement,  and  freedom of movement in the built environment, it is clear that  designing for movement is an achievable feat, but to design for  freedom  of  movement  and  play  is  a  much  more  challenging  endeavour. Moving towards a design‐based investigation, it will  be necessary to address the movement and circulation of the  children’s museum and playscape environment not simply with  built form, but also through more intuitive ways.  While a building cannot be designed without material and form  the goal within the design aspect of this thesis will be to place  an emphasis on freedom of choice and movement in the built  environment,  by  focusing  on  the  design  tools  of  light,  transparency, rhythm, pattern and an awareness of scale and  the body in space.  The  design  of  the  children’s  museum  will  require  a  cohesive  incorporation of all of these elements, to create a child friendly,  but also a child scaled environment which children can explore  and play with little restriction of movement.   

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

51


Movement in Architecture

Reflective Chapter

   

Chapter 9 Reflective Chapter ____________________________________________ 9.1 Brief & Site Update  9.2 Learning Experience & Process  9.3 Design Challenges  9.4 Objectives & Achievements  ____________________________________________

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

52


Movement in Architecture

Reflective Chapter

9.1 Brief & Site Update Following  further  analysis  into  the  existing  and  historical  conditions of the site in the Iveagh Gardens it was evident that  great care and a delicate touch in terms of approach, would be  required to maintain its beauty as a public park. In keeping with  Glen  Murcutts  approach  to  architecture  in  the  landscape  “touch the earth lightly”  37 the original idea for the children’s  museum as a singular building changed to a series of pavilions  within the park which would be lightweight and sit sensitively  into  the  park  landscape.  The  decision  to  approach  the  landscape  with  such  sensitivity  was  primarily  due  to  the  historical significance of the trees within the park. The mature  trees were planted when the park was developed for the 1865  international  exhibition.  The  trees  were  planted  with  species  from  all  over  the  world  and  provides  an  amazing  mature  assortment of both native Irish and international trees within  the park.  Following this approach to the landscape the decision  was made that while inputting the new pavilion structures into  the landscape no trees would be cut down or moved from their  original  location  within  the  site.  This  provided  a  unique  challenge while situating the pavilions but also maintained the  natural and almost wild landscape between the trees whereby  the children could run play and explore within.   Prior  to  the  commencement  of  the  design  process,  detailed  research  was  not  completed  in  order  to  fully  understand  the  architecture of children and their requirements. This provoked  further research into childcare and educational philosophy and  the various documented ways of learning for children. Primary  to this research was an understanding of alternative methods  of  learning  to  that  of  the  Irish  school  system,  such  as  the                                                               37  Drew, P. (2000) Touch This Earth Lightly – Glenn Murcutt In His Own Words, Duffy &  Snellgrove, Sydney   

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

53


Movement in Architecture

Reflective Chapter

philosophies of the Steiner, Montessori, Reggio Emilia schools,  and  most  pertinent  to  the  parkland  study  the  Scandinavian  approach  to  education  being  based  primarily  outdoors  in  nature.  Nature  provides  a  constantly  moving  and  comprehensive  environment  full  of  enrichment  to  stimulate  children’s  minds  therefore  the  Scandinavian  schools  function  almost  entirely  outside. Architecturally, they provide only minimal installations  within  the  natural  setting  which  includes  child‐scaled  alcoves  and secret cubbies, as well as more challenging physical courses  and structures encouraging practical skills. It is with this same  intention that the brief for the children’s museum transformed  to  ensure  that  each  pavilion  would  provide  these  challenges  within movement and would be set into the most natural part  of  the  parks  –  within  the  trees.  As  a  result  of  this  further  research the brief, scale and nature of the play spaces changed  following the design requirement research. What was initially  named “exhibition spaces” within a large structure  (based on  current international models for children’s museums) has been  replaced with simple workshop and play space pavilions which  include small alcoves, shelters and spaces for decision making  and movement within the master plan of the park.  The  auxiliary  facilities  such  as  café,  group  meeting  zone,  parent’s  facilities  and  administration  have  all  been  incorporated  into  the  refurbishment  of  UCD’s  former  Aula  Maxima  which  also  provides  the  primary  entrance  point  into  the  park  from  Stephen’s  Green  which  had  not  been  initially  included within the initial site selection.    

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

54


Movement in Architecture

Reflective Chapter

9.2 Learning Experience & Process Following the additional research and amendments to the brief  and  site  specifics  I  endeavoured  to  begin  at  a  planning  scale  within the park and work in sequence down to a detail design  scale  for  the  pavilions.  This  was  a  process  which  I  believed  would  keep  the  project  on  track  and  maintain  a  steady  time  scale for the projects development and completion. However, I  realised after a few weeks that this type of systematic approach  in moving from a context scale to a building design scale was  not appropriate for a project of this nature. In order to design  the  movement  within  the  site,  there  was  a  need  to  plan  at  a  context scale, zoom in to a more detailed scale and back to a  planning scale. This process was key to the development of the  site  and  a  factor  which  hindered  my  progress  at  first  when  I  attempted to move from 1:1000 to 500 and so forth.   Once  this  process  of  work  had  been  rectified  site  models  became key  to the site strategy in attempting to find a focus  within the site. There were currently a few focal points within  the site given the water features, maze and rose garden present  in the garden however creating focus between the positioning  of the pavilions became a greater issue. This lack of focus made  it  inherently  difficult  to  justify  why  any  building  was  located  where it was. This in turn created issues in characterising the  pavilion, or setting any  particular  playscape  concretely within  the  park.  It  appeared  as  though  it  did  not  belong  in  any  particular location.   This particular issue of locating the pavilions and finding a focus  hindered  the  progress  of  the  project  greatly  as  it  was  near  impossible  to  design  the  pavilions  in  more  detail,  and  to  sit  delicately  in  the  landscape  as  I  had  aspired,  when  they  were  constantly shifting position within the park. Having attempted 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

55


Movement in Architecture

Reflective Chapter

to shift to a more detailed scale of 1:100 for some time, a final  model  based  study  on  the  site  strategy  became  key  to  the  progression.  In  working  with  a  transparent  material,  clearly  separating  and  identifying  the  elements  of  the  park  and  bringing  the  different  variations  of  movement  together  as  a  model  the  pavilion  locations  became  suitable  in  location  as  a  control point or decision making space. In these new locations  the pavilions acted as a catalyst for movement as it provided a  link  between  the  ground  paths  and  the  new  raised  walkway.  The pavilion shifts direction and propels the movement around  the  site  both  with  its  relationship  visually  to  opposite  or  adjacent buildings and the progressive scale of the next building  on the route.   Following this logical conclusion of the location of the pavilions  the task was to now focus on one particular area in the park and  complete  a  detailed  design  on  that  particular  pavilion.  The  Iveagh  Garden’s  attain  a  certain  degree  of  life  and  vibrancy  during  the  summer  months  when  concerts  and  food  festivals  take place in the park. With this in mind I endeavoured to create  a primary larger pavilion in the sunken garden of the park which  would both act as the theatre, dance and music section of the  children’s museum on the interior of the pavilion but would also  become a shelter like structure in the garden for activities all  year round. Again a model based research was the ideal process  to  investigate  this  shelter  type  structure.  Once  the  general  space  was  designed  through  model  making  I  focused  on  detailed  drawing  of  the  roof  structure.  This  ensured  that  the  greatest amount and assortment of movement could take place  within this one structure, from running underneath, on top, up  stairs,  ramps,  climbing  walls,  and  down  slides.  Choice  and  freedom of movement is abundant on and within this structure.      

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

56


Movement in Architecture

Reflective Chapter

9.3 Design Challenges The afore  mentioned  challenges during  the design  process of  the  project  were  secondary  to  the  lack  of  preparation  and  research that was completed regarding control and freedom of  movement in a landscape setting. The key components in which  my  initial  thesis  had  described  were  light,  scale  and  rhythm  within a building. However when the site context and history  led me to change the project from a singular entity to a series  of pavilions in the park, the application of these key elements  of  guiding  movement  in  a  landscape  were  weakened.  While  individually the pavilions did primarily adhere to the elements  of scale, light and rhythm in guiding the movement within, the  same  was  not  applicable  with  regard  to  the  movement  from  pavilion  to  pavilion  in  the  site.  A  physical  link  was  created  whereby light (or rather the movement from darkness to light)  could not be used to guide the user.  The primary challenges of the application of the thesis research  to the development of the site was to explore how architecture  can enhance freedom in what is currently a free flowing space,  how pavilions could be inserted in a minimally invasive way into  the historical fabric of the garden and how the insertion of this  built  form  can  provide  a  new  level  of  exploration,  play  and  movement  to  the  Iveagh  Gardens.  The  addition  of  these  pavilions  into  the  park  would  endeavour  to  transform  the  garden into a multifunctional urban park which acknowledges  the  existing  movement  around  the  site  while  providing  new  recreational  and  aesthetic  experiences  for  the  users  without  limitation. 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

57


Movement in Architecture

Reflective Chapter

9.4 Objectives & Achievements The  primary  objective  for  this  thesis  was  to  explore  how  architecture  can  encourage  movement  without  restricting  a  person’s  free  passage  and  decision‐making  within  the  built  environment  and  overall  I  believe  this  has  been  successful  within  the  overall  development  of  the  project.  While  architecture  inevitably  introduces  boundaries  and  built  form  into a landscape, the essence of freedom lies within the ability  to choose the way in which we move. Within the relatively open  nature of the Iveagh Garden’s, freedom was evident from the  onset, but solely on one level.    In  relation  to  the  site  strategy  the  idea  of  thickening  the  boundary wall and creating a microcosm for the children within  the gardens by creating a secondary level of movement raised  from the existing garden  walls into the trees, provides a new  level  of  choice  and  exploration  surrounding  the  park.    The  insertion  of  the  pavilions  as  nodal  points  which  propel  or  encourage movement and exploration from one end of the park  to the other, further enhances the willingness to discover and  experience the gardens.  Upon  examining  a  singular  structure  such  as  the  larger  performance pavilion the application of the original key points  of the thesis research was much more successful. The primary  structure of the building provides the elements of choice with  the  ramps,  walkways  and  slides  alongside  the  ability  to  run  under and through the building from one level of the gardens  to  the  sunken  former  archery  range.  The  building  does  not  obstruct  movement  but  rather  enables  further  movement  vertically from the sunken level to above the boundary walls of  the site. The use of light cast between the blades of the roof  structure encourage movement out from the corner of the site 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

58


Movement in Architecture

Reflective Chapter

radiating to the other pavilions and activities of the park. Again  using the rhythm of both the slides (vertically) and the rooftop  walkways (horizontally) alongside the varying spacing between  the elements inspires further exploration. Finally the balance of  scale  between  the  different  vertical  and  horizontal  elements  alongside the positioning of the various walkways ensures that  the  experience  of  other  users  making  different  decisions  and  taking  different  routes  across  and  down  the  buildings  encourages the movement of others on many different levels.   While the smaller pavilions within the site propel movement in  their  own  right  across  the  site,  if  the  project  was  to  develop  further  each  pavilion  would  aim  to  have  the  excitement  and  variance  of  movement  such  as  that  within  the  performance  pavilion but done so on a smaller scale. Although each pavilion  has the basic elements of light, scale and rhythm to guide the  user toward the next structure a more comprehensive study of  each individual building would enhance the research further.  In conclusion while overall the development was successful in  exploring  the  theory  of  designing  for  free  passage  and  movement, the initial research was not sufficient in preparation  for guiding movement on a landscape or master planning scale.  This  lack  of  preparation  initially  decelerated  the  amount  of  exploration completed within each individual structure within  the site. Within the final design of the performance structure it  provided multifaceted methods of movement and provides the  park  with  a  vibrant  and  playful  structure  to  be  used  all  year  round.  The  more  comprehensive  study  of  this  performance  pavilion albeit not a very complex space in program, did fulfil  the aspirations of the thesis by focusing on the design tools of  light, transparency, rhythm, pattern and an awareness of scale  and the body in space.      

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

59


Movement in Architecture

Reflective Chapter

     

Chapter 10 Appendices ____________________________________________ 10.1 Design Charette 1  10.2 Design Charette 2  10.3 Design Submission   ____________________________________________  

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

60


Movement in Architecture

Reflective Chapter

10.1 Design Charette 1 – The Dissembler [Dissembling,  to  define  it  in  outline,  would  seem  to  be  a  pretence for the worse in action and speech.]  The  Dissembler  is  the  sort  of  man  who  is  ready  to  accost  his  enemies  and  chat  with  them.  When  he  has  attacked  people  behind  their  back  he  praises  them  to  their  face,  and  he  commiserates  with  them  when  they  have  lost  a  lawsuit.  He  forgives those who speak abusively about him and <laughs at>  their abuse. When people want an urgent meeting he tells them  to call back later  and  never admits what he is doing but says  that he has the matter under consideration and pretends that  he has just arrived home or that it is too late or that he fell ill.  To applicants for a loan or a contribution< >that he has nothing  for sale, and when he has nothing for sale he says that he has.  He  pretends  not  to  have  heard,  claims  not  to  have  seen,  and  says that he does not remember agreeing. Sometimes he says  that he will think about it, at other times that he has no idea, or  that  he  is  surprised,  or  that  he  once  had  the  same  thought  himself. In general he is a great one for using expressions like ‘I  don’t believe it’, ‘I can’t imagine it’, ‘I am amazed’, ‘But that was  not  the  account  he  gave  me’,  ‘It  beggars  belief’,  ‘Tell  that  to  someone else’, ‘I don’t know whether I should disbelieve you or  condemn him’, ‘Are you sure you are not being too credulous?’  [Such  are  the  remarks,  tricks  and  repetitions  which  the  Dissembler  will  invent.  One  should  be  more  wary  of  disingenuous and designing characters than of vipers.]   

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

61


Movement in Architecture

Reflective Chapter

10.2 Design Charette 2 – Decision-Making Space The  task  within  Design  Charette  2  was  to  create  a  model  300mm x 300mm x 300mm to convey the essence of this thesis  project. As movement has largely complex factors within space,  the focus of this model was an examination of a questioning or  decision‐making  space.  The  concept  was  derived  from  the  exploration  of  labyrinths  and  mazes,  but  also  Le  Corbusier’s  “savoir habiter” aspect of the architectural promenade.  The  difference  between  maze  and  labyrinth  is  key  to  this  exploration  of  control  and  freedom  of  movement.  Labyrinths  have  one  pathway  which  leads  directly  from  the  entrance of the pathway to the goal, often by a complex and  winding  route.  The  route  however  is  unicursal  (has  only  one  direction).  This  explores  control,  as  the  user/visitor  of  a  labyrinth does not have choices to make, but rather must move  through a controlled path to the destination.  Mazes, however,  differ  in  this  aspect,  as  the  user  has  decisions  to  make  at  all  points  on  the  journey.  A  maze  follows  multiple  paths  (multicursal) and dead‐ends within the structure.  In order to portray a decision making space the final model of  this exploration followed a three dimensional maze structure,  where  decisions  are  required  to  be  made  not  only  on  the  horizontal axis, but also within the vertical realm. Following Le  Corbusier’s  model  of  a  decision  making  space  there  are  glimpses of light, cast through the voids in the model. Rhythm,  light and the scale of each block played a part in the design of  this  three‐dimensional  maze.  In  order  to  access  the  material  quality  and  portrayal  of  light  within  the  model,  grey/black  polystyrene was used as a stark contrast to the light being cast  within the space.     Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

62


Movement in Architecture

Valerie Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Leary 20035104

Reflective Chapter

63Â


Movement in Architecture

Valerie Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Leary 20035104

Reflective Chapter

64Â


Movement in Architecture

Valerie Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Leary 20035104

Reflective Chapter

65Â


Movement in Architecture

Valerie Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Leary 20035104

Reflective Chapter

66Â


Movement in Architecture

Reflective Chapter

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

67


Movement in Architecture

Valerie Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Leary 20035104

Reflective Chapter

68Â


Movement in Architecture

Valerie Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Leary 20035104

Reflective Chapter

69Â


Movement in Architecture

Valerie Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Leary 20035104

Reflective Chapter

70Â


Movement in Architecture

Valerie Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Leary 20035104

Reflective Chapter

71Â


Movement in Architecture

Valerie Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Leary 20035104

Reflective Chapter

72Â


Movement in Architecture

Valerie Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Leary 20035104

Reflective Chapter

73Â


Movement in Architecture

Valerie Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Leary 20035104

Reflective Chapter

74Â


Movement in Architecture

References

 

Chapter 11 References ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

75


Movement in Architecture

References

11.0 References   Arnheim, R., 1975. The Dynamics of Architectural Form. Berkley:  University of California Press.  Asofsky, D. D., 1992. Ritual in Architecture and the New England  Holocaust Memorial, s.l.: University of Michigan.  Blumm,  C.  S.,  1996.  The  Other  Modernism  F.T.  Marinetti's  Futurist  Fiction  of  power.  Berkeley:  University  of  California  Press.  Building  Trust  International,  2013.  Playscapes  Play  Brief,  s.l.:  s.n.  Butterfield,  J.,  1996.  The  Art  of  Light  &  Space.  Santa  Monica:  Abbeville Press.  Casey,  C.,  2005.  Dublin:  The  City  Within  The  Grand  &  Royal  Canals  and  the  Circular  Road  with  the  Phoenix  Park.  s.l.:Yale  University Press.  Coliptt, F., 1998. Between Two Worlds: John Mc Cracken. Art in  America, Volume April 1998.  Geyh, P., 2006. Urban Free Flow: A Poetics of Parkour. Media  Culture Journal, 9(3).  Griss, S., 1994. Creative Movement: A Language for Learning.  Mass: Educational Leadership.  Gurian, E. H., 2006. Museum Space Program Planning. Vieques:  PR.  Huizinga, J., 1949. Homo Ludens: A Study of the Play Element in  Culture. 2nd ed. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.  J.A  Simpson,  2010.  The  Oxford  Dictionary  of  English.  2  ed.  Oxford: Oxford University Press. 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

76


Movement in Architecture

References

Jirousek,  C.,  1995.  Art  Design  and  Visual  Thinking.  New  York:  Cornell University.  Kelly, P. B. &. P. O., 2000. The National Concert Hall at Earlsfort  Terrace: A History. Dublin: Wolfhound Press.  Le  Corbusier,  1957.  The  Chapel  at  Ronchamp.  London:  Architectural Press.  Libeskind,  D.,  2000.  Daniel  Libeskid:  The  Space  of  Encounter.  New York: Universe Publishing.  Lyons,  M.,  2007.  Farewell  to  the  Terrace.  The  Irish  Times,  15  May.   Merrit,  E.,  2009.  Museums  &  the  Future  of  Education.  Leeds:  Emerald Group Publishing.  Mirko, G., 2011. Parkour & Architecture, Brisbane: Queensland  University.  Moore,  C.  W.  &  Bloomer,  K.  C.,  1977.  Body  Memory  &  Architecture. New Haven: Yale University Press.  Samuel, F., 2010. Le Corbusier & The Architectural Promenade.  Shefield: Birkhauser.  The  Architecture  of  Early  Childhood,  2012.  The  State  of  Play  Today.  Available 

[Online]   at: 

http://www.thearchitectureofearlychildhood.com/2012/02/st ate‐of‐play‐today.html [Accessed 4th December 2014].  Tierney, J., 2010. Dublin City Development Plan, Dublin: Dublin  City Council.  Webster,  M.,  2004.  The  Merriam  Webster  Dictionary.  Springfield: Perfection Learning Corporation.   

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

77


Movement in Architecture

List of Illustrations

Chapter 12 List of Illustrations ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________

Valerie Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Leary 20035104

78Â


Movement in Architecture

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

List of Illustrations

Page

Figure Source  Cover Image  Produced by Author 

12 12  13  13  13  14  14  14  15  15  15  16  16  16  18  18  18  19  19  19  20  20  20  22  22  22  23  23  23  25  26  26  27  27  28  28  29  29  30  30  30  30  26  27  27  28 

Figure 1  Figure 2  Figure 3  Figure 4  Figure 5  Figure 6  Figure 7  Figure 8  Figure 9  Figure 10  Figure 11  Figure 12  Figure 13  Figure 14  Figure 15  Figure 16  Figure 17  Figure 18  Figure 19  Figure 20  Figure 21  Figure 22  Figure 23  Figure 24  Figure 25  Figure 26  Figure 27  Figure 28  Figure 29  Figure 30  Figure 31  Figure 32  Figure 33  Figure 34  Figure 35  Figure 36  Figure 37  Figure 38  Figure 39  Figure 40  Figure 41  Figure 42  Figure 32  Figure 33  Figure 34  Figure 35 

http://xroads.virginia.edu/ http://daphd.ie  Produced by Author  Ibid  Ibid  Ibid  http://s3.amazonaws.com/  Produced by Author  http://www.davidzwirner.com/  Ibid  http://lifeofanarchitect.com  http://www.wgbh.org/  Produced by Author  http://www.arthistory.ucr.edu/  Produced by Author  http://www.penccil.com/  Ibid  http://archkiosk.com/  Ibid  Produced by Autor  Ibid  Ibid  Ibid  http://guildford.gov.uk  http://archdaily.com  http://playscapes.com  https://fupingchuan.wordpress.com  http://www.185augusta.com/  https://fupingchuan.wordpress.com  Produced by Author  Ibid  Ibid  Ibid  Ibid  Ibid  Ibid  Ibid  Ibid  Ibid  Ibid  Ibid  Ibid  Ibid  Ibid  Ibid  Ibid 

79


Movement in Architecture

List of Illustrations

28 29  29  30  30  30  30  31  31  31  31  32  32  32  32  32  34  40  40  41  42  43  43  43  43  43  45  46  47  48  48  48  48  49  49 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

Figure 36  Figure 37  Figure 38  Figure 39  Figure 40  Figure 41  Figure 42  Figure 43  Figure 44  Figure 45  Figure 46  Figure 47  Figure 48  Figure 49  Figure 50  Figure 51  Figure 52  Figure 53  Figure 54  Figure 55  Figure 56  Figure 57  Figure 58  Figure 59  Figure 60  Figure 61  Figure 62  Figure 63  Figure 64  Figure 65  Figure 66  Figure 67  Figure 68  Figure 69  Figure 70 

Ibid Ibid  Ibid  Ibid  http://www.rsh‐p.com/  Ibid  Ibid  Ibid  Produced by Author   http://archdaily.com  Ibid  ibid  Ibid  Produced by Author  Ibid  Ibid  Ibid  Ibid  Ibid  Ibid  Ibid  Ibid  http://dublinrocks.ie  http://heritageireland.ie   Ibid  Ibid  Produced by Author  Ibid  Ibid  http:/osi.ie  Ibid  http:/archiseek.com  Ibid  https://archive.org/  Ibid 

80


Movement in Architecture

Bibliography

Chapter 13 Bibliography ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

81


Movement in Architecture  

   Bibliography 

13.0 Bibliography Arnheim,  R.,  1975.  The  Dynamics  of  Architectural  Form,  London: University of California Press.  Binelli,  M.,  2012.  Detroit  City  is  the  Place  to  Be.  New  York:  Metropolitan Books.  Carey,  K.  E.,  2009.  Architecture  &  The  Motion  of  Life,  2009:  Montana State University.  Castledon,  R.,  1990.  The  Knossos  Labyrinth,  New  York:  Routledge  DeCamp,  M.  L.,  2012.  The  Architecture  of  Play,  Boston:  Tufts  University.  Deicher,  C.,  2012.  Laban  Based  Movement  and  Architectural  Education, New York: s.n.  Dlalex, G., 2006. Go With the Flow: Architecture, Intrastructure  and the Everyday Exzperience of Mobility, Helsinki: University of  Art & Design Helsinki.  Estremadoyro,  V.,  2003.  Transparency  and  Movement  in  Architecture,  Virginia:  Virginia  Polytechnic  Institute  &  State  University.  Fletcher, B., 1961. A History of Architecture. 20th ed. New York:  Scribner.  Hall, P., 2014. Cities of Tomorow. 4th ed. West Sussex: Blackwell  Publishers.  Higgins, W. C., 2010. Urban Regeneration: Enabled by Mobility  Centric Architecture, Boston: M.I.T Press.  Holl,  S.,  2009.  Urbanisms  Working  with  Doubt,  New  York:  Princeton Architectural Press. 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

82   


Movement in Architecture  

   Bibliography 

Holscher, C.,  2008.  Movement  &  Orientation  in  Built  Environments:  Evaluating  Design  Rationale  &  User  Cognition,  Bremen: University of Bremen.  Ingold,  T.,  2000.  Perception  of  the  Environment,  New  York:  Routledge.  Kanekar, A., 1992. Celebration of Place: Processional Rituals &  Urban Form, Boston: M.I.T Press.  Lefebvre, H., 2014. Toward an Architecture of Enjoyment, 2014:  University of Minnesota.  Macleod, S., 2012. Museum Making ‐ Narratives, Architectures,  Exhibitions. New York: Routledge.  Meyer, C., 2006. Designing to Inspire Movement, Indiana: Ball  State University.  Samuel, F., 2007. Le Corbusier in Detail. 1st ed. Oxford: Elsevier  Limited.  Terzian, D., 1997. How Color and Light Change our Perception  of  Space,  Time  &  Movement  in  Architecture,  Boston:  M.I.T  Press.     

 

Valerie O’ Leary 20035104

83   

Movement in Architecture Design Thesis  

Completed thesis with final design and reflective chapter.

Movement in Architecture Design Thesis  

Completed thesis with final design and reflective chapter.

Advertisement