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2012–2013 LifeMap Handbook / Planner


Table of Contents How to Use This Handbook . . . . . . . . . 5 Your Valencia Online Resources . . . . . . 6 The Answer Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 My Life Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Life Goals Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Interpreting Your Responses . . . . . . . . 10 My Career Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . My Career Planner in Atlas . . . . . . . . . Career Environment Assessment . . . . . Career Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Internships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

11 11 12 13 13

My Educational Goals Assessment . . . . Choosing a Path . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Your Catalog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . My Education Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Degrees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DirectConnect to UCF . . . . . . . . . . . . Transfer Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

14 17 18 18 18 19 20

Choosing My Classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Time Management Assessment . . . . . . Choosing the Right Types of Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Honors Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paying for Classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

21 22 23 23 23

Success Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Success Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Student Success Class (SLS 1122) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Strategies for Success . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Tips from Valencia Faculty . . . . . . . . . 27 Working with Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Resolving Conflict with Faculty . . . . . 28 Succeeding as a Returning Student . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Time Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Your “To Do” List for the Week . . . . . 32 Study Tips: Concentration Aids . . . . . 33 Test Anxiety: Keeping Calm . . . . . . . . 33 Computing Your GPA . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Types of Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Financial Aid Assessment . . . . . . . . . . 36 Finding Additional Money . . . . . . . . . 37 Valencia Resources and Learning Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Student Handbook Committee: Chanda Torres (Editor), Shirley Boyette, John Britt, Deidre Holmes Dubois, Lazaro Camacho, Jocelyn Morales, Chris Beck, Melissa Tchen and Darla Sharpe. Special thanks to Joyce Romano and Sonya Joseph for their guidance and support.

Learning Support Centers . . . . . . . . . . . Tutoring Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BayCare Student Assistance . . . . . . . . . . Campus and Community Involvement . Student Clubs and Organizations . . . . . . Ways to Get Involved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

38 41 41 42 43 44

Lifelong Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tips to Optimize Learning . . . . . . . . . My Portfolio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Student Core Competencies . . . . . . . .

46 48 48 48

Atlas Quick Reference Guide . . . . . . . . 51 Setting Up My Atlas Account . . . . . . . 51 Register/Withdraw from a Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52-53 View My Grades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Send an E-mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Academic Policies and Procedures . . . . 55 Student Rights, Responsibilities and Conduct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Withdrawing from a Class . . . . . . . . . 55 Academic Standards, Warning, Probation, Suspension . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Academic Dishonesty . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Student Academic Dispute . . . . . . . . . 58 AIDS Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Drugs and Alcohol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Drug-Free Campuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Equal Access–Equal Opportunity . . . . 60 Smoke-Free Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Lost and Found . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Parking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Privacy Rights of Students . . . . . . . . . .62 Student Conduct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Student Conduct Code Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Student Conduct Code Sanctions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Student Conduct Code Appeals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Student Academic Dispute and Administrative Complaint Resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Valencia Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Valencia Vocabulary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Valencia College District Map . . . . . . . 82

Valencia College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097; phone number 404-679-4500) to award the Associate in Arts, Associate in Applied Science, Associate in Science and Bachelor of Science degrees.

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A MESSAGE FROM THE VICE PRESIDENT  OF STUDENT AFFAIRS

If you have a purpose in which you can believe, there’s no end to the amount of things you can accomplish. - Marian Anderson Welcome to Valencia! We believe that identifying your purpose is key to the process of establishing your goals and making a plan to accomplish them. This LifeMap Student Handbook is one of the ways in which we support your journey by providing a framework, expectations, resources and people that are all focused to help you make the most of your college experience.

achieve your goals. This Student Handbook is one of the LifeMap resources. It contains self-assessments, chapters on life, career, educational goals and the Valencia resources to support them, success skills, Valencia programs, policies, procedures, references and a weekly calendar to keep track of important deadlines and class assignments. Even more help can be found on Atlas, including the My LifeMap tab, where you’ll find a set of “apps” for planning and tracking your progress. Meinthemaking.com is a site that combines all that Valencia has to offer to support LifeMap into a searchable database.

Planning is important to your success at Valencia. We know that students who succeed have a plan – a plan to graduate, a plan to start And then there’s the people: Valencia staff, a career and a plan to set and accomplish your faculty and friends. The power of one-on-one help can’t be underestimated when it comes to life goals. reaching your goals. Whatever help you need, Great minds have purposes, others have wishes. please let us know.

~Washington Irving

LifeMap is Valencia’s system for guiding you in identifying and achieving your career and educational goals. It is your guide for figuring out “what you need to do when” in order to

Purpose is the place where your deep gladness meets the world’s needs. - Frederick Buechner I’ll see you soon at graduation! You’ll be the class of 20__?

Sincerely,

Dr. Joyce C. Romano Vice President of Student Affairs jromano@valenciacollege.edu 2


ADVICE FROM THE 2011 DISTINGUISHED GRADUATE

Hello Valencia Student: Congratulations on your decision to continue your education at Valencia College. Valencia College was named the number one community college in the nation by the Aspen Institute in 2011. You will be receiving an exceptional education as well as an incredible college experience. Please be sure to take advantage of all the amazing opportunities Valencia has to offer. Valencia offers an array of activities ranging from clubs, student organizations and a multitude of programs that fit just about every student interest. There are countless opportunities to further develop your leadership skills as well as improve your everyday techniques by taking advantage

of programs and services like the skillshop program and the learning support centers. You only have the college experience once, so grab hold of it, and take in everything that you can. Whether you’re a student with tons of responsibilities or a dual enrollment student, take a chance. You can do this by speaking to a student in your class, joining a club/organization or starting one up yourself. You can also voice your opinion with Student Government, stop by an event or just commit any free time you have to volunteer, but make something of your time at Valencia. Most importantly, reach for the stars and push forward because when you leave Valencia, a job, or this world, you want to know that your time here was not wasted. Good luck!

Shardeh Berry

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LifeMap

is...

LifeMap is the process of setting goals for your life, career and education. It is something that you must define for yourself. Once you do, it gives you direction. It will get you from point A to point B, point C and so on, until you are living the life you have always wanted. Your LifeMap will guide you through college: every class you take, every professor you talk to, every tutoring session, every resource used in Atlas and every student service you seek out. Everything falls into place when you start with LifeMap.

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HOW TO USE THIS HANDBOOK 1. Progress Through the Sections The LifeMap Student Handbook is divided into sections that guide you through the ideal process for setting goals in life and creating plans to reach them. Each section also contains valuable self-assessments to help you learn more about yourself and your goals. Assessments: Life Goals, page 9 Career Goals, page 11 Educational Goals, page 14 Choosing My Classes, page 21 Success Skills, page 25 Financial, page 36 Lifelong Learning, page 46

2. Know Your Resources Find locations, phone numbers and hours of operation for the many resources at Valencia. See the Valencia Directory on page 73.

3. Take Action Read and complete each section in the handbook. Use the LifeMap tools in Atlas to assist in your planning. Connect and engage with others for support and information.

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YoUR ValenCIa onlIne ResoURCes Atlas provides you access to Valencia’s online resources. Log on to receive important announcements, stay on track with school, plan for your future and access valuable LifeMap tools and many other resources. atlas .valenciacollege .edu Communication Atlas provides you with an e-mail account that is Valencia’s official communication method with you (registration appointments, financial aid information, etc .) . Check it often! Engagement Within the Atlas community, there are course chat links, an “Ask an Advisor” e-mail link, online groups, bulletin boards and announcements . Log View and Access Your Academic Records on and engage with faculty, students and staff . Atlas is your first resource for obtaining Planning Atlas connects you to the My LifeMap tab, which information and answers concerning your academic record (e .g ., view grades, complete contains six useful online planning tools . Check a degree audit, view holds, etc .) . Always know them out today! where you stand academically . To help you Registration calculate your GPA, see Measuring Your Success View, select and register for classes . Track your on page 34 . financial aid and make payments to the college . My current GPA is __________ My overall GPA is __________

For more Atlas help, refer to the Atlas Quick Reference Guide on page 51. 6


GET THE ANSWERS HERE Many academic questions can be answered by using the information and tools in your catalog and Atlas account. When you have additional questions about admissions and registration, financial aid, academic advising or other Valencia-related issues, or if you need to submit documents, the Answer Center should be your first stop. An Answer Center is located on each campus and all are staffed with Student Services Specialists who are available to help you on a walk-in basis. Locations: East Campus Building 5, Room 211 Lake Nona Building 1, Room 149

West Campus SSB, Room 106 Winter Park Campus Room 210

Osceola Campus Building 2, Room 150

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MY LIFE GOALS What’s most important to your future? Rank the following 1-4 (1 being the most important, 4 being the least). ____ Family ____ Career ____ Money ____ Health What do you want to be when you “grow up?” This question has been haunting us for most of our lives. Actually, the answer may have been more clear to you when you were younger. Ask the average kindergarten class and you’ll get an array of definitive answers: astronaut, basketball player, nurse, teacher. As we get older, we learn that life is more complicated and the answers are not as clear. While it may be difficult to think about your life goals at this time, it is important to have some general ideas about what you are interested in, because your decisions about a career and your education (i.e., college degree) should flow from your general goals in life.

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Life Goals Assessment Here is a checklist that will help you evaluate your life goals. What things are important to you? (In some categories, more than one response may apply.)

Personal q A healthy and attractive appearance q Physical activities/exercise q Flexibility and freedom in career and life q Independent nature q Strong self-confidence Education q A degree I can complete in 2-3 years q A degree I can complete in 4-5 years q A degree that requires graduate study q A degree that requires high levels of math and science q A degree that requires high levels of reading and writing Lifestyle (Socio-economic status) q Upper middle class to wealthy (live in the best part of town, buy whatever I want, whenever I want) q Middle class (live in a nice house, pay all bills and save money for future, send children to college, travel) q Working class (live in a decent house, pay all bills) Relationships q A satisfying and fulfilling marriage q Remain unmarried q Have children q Maintain good family relationships (parents, siblings, etc.) q The love and admiration of many friends q A few good friends Spirituality/Social Consciousness q Be an active member of my spiritual community q Religion/spirituality is not important to me q Have a personal definition of the meaning of life q Make a personal contribution to society (outside of my job) q Serve as a community/national/international leader Work q A challenging and rewarding career q A job where I can leave responsibilities behind when I leave work q National or international fame q Freedom within my work setting q Work in an office setting q Work in a variety of physical locations, some outdoors q Flexible work hours q A stable job where continued employment is not at risk q An entrepreneurial job where I can create my own future

Life Goals

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Interpreting Your Responses Personal - Your personal interests and goals can often be incorporated into your career goal. Interest in health and physical appearance may lead to a career as a personal trainer or plastic surgeon. An independent nature and desire for flexibility may lead to a career or ownership in a self-directed business. Education - The amount and type of education you will need is closely tied to the career that you seek. Most careers have a required level of education to get started and then expect higher levels of education for career advancement. In general, more education is also related to higher salaries, although that is not always the case. Through education, you can also discover career opportunities that you didn’t know existed when you started. Lifestyle - In general, higher-paying jobs require more education, more risk and/or more dedication to work. High-paying, stable jobs usually require graduate school and job commitment that continues after work hours and on weekends. Similarly, the business entrepreneur who makes big bucks typically took a lot of risk on his/her own and spent a lot of time and energy to start and build his/ her business.

Relationships - The balance of work and family commitments is the major issue for modern-day adults. Magazines and self-help books abound on how to have it all. The truth is that each of us has only 24 hours a day and we have to make choices on how to allocate our time. Family commitments and choices like marriage, raising children and/or caring for aging parents are important factors to consider when thinking about specific job requirements, such as job location, required travel and work hours. Spirituality/Social Consciousness - These values have an impact on the amount of time and energy that you want to have to devote to them. Your commitment to a particular community, the kind of community and social ties may also determine your flexibility in moving to other parts of the state, country or world. Work - Beyond the specific skills and interests needed for different careers, jobs vary as to the work setting, responsibilities that continue after the work day, geographical flexibility required, amount of risk or change in the profession and amount of freedom associated with work hours or where the work is done.

Based on your responses to the checklist and the interpretation provided, describe your life goal in each of the areas below. Keep this as a reference as your ideas may change. Revisions are always allowed. As of _____________________, my life goals are:

(fill in date)

Personal Education

Lifestyle

Relationships

Spirituality/Social Consciousness

Work

Developed by J. Romano, 1999. Revised by J. Romano and C. Klinger, 2011. This summary can assist you as you explore the next section: Career Goals. It may be helpful to discuss your ideas with a faculty member during office hours, an academic advisor/counselor in Student Services, a career advisor/counselor in the Career Center or anyone else who can help you explore your priorities. For additional assessments, please visit facts.org.

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MY CaReeR Goals What do you want most out of a career? Rank the following 1-4 (1 being the most important, 4 being the least) . ____ Something I love to do ____ Lots of money ____ Job security/stability ____ Job growth opportunities Valencia is committed to helping students become lifelong learners and to be successful in their chosen majors, leading to fulfilling careers . Creating a career and education plan will guide you toward degree completion, university transfer and/or workforce transition . As you research new information, you can always adjust your plan .

My Career Planner My Career Planner, located under the My LifeMap tab in Atlas, guides you through the career planning process . Here, you can take assessments, conduct career and major exploration, and select and save your career, major and occupational goals . Use My Career Planner to identify career questions you would like to discuss with a career advisor or counselor . Once you have completed the process, you can continue to explore different occupations, national salaries, job outlooks and training needs at the U .S . Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics Web site: bls .gov .

Life Goals

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CAREER ENVIRONMENT ASSESSMENT Review the following list of work environment values and mark those that are most important to you. q Working with others – Working directly with individuals or groups q Working with things – Designing, repairing or managing products q Helping others – Providing assistance or support to individuals or groups q Impact on society – Providing services or information that has a direct impact on society/the community q Working alone – Working independently on solo projects q Competition – Working in a competitive work environment or industry, competing with co-workers or other businesses q Creativity – Freedom to create, design and develop your own ideas q Working in an office setting – Having your own designated workspace indoors q Working outdoors – Daily work is outside of the office setting q Traveling – Traveling nationally or internationally 3–5 times per month q Working from 9am–5pm – Standard workday structure q Supervision – Direct responsibility for others q Routine – Structured workday with minimal change or variation q Advancement – Clear opportunities for future career advancement q High salary – Awarded monetarily for good work q Personal recognition – Recognition and fame are key benefits to a job well done q Variety – Work offers a wide range of duties and skills

Now, list your top three work environment values and describe how these values match your career choice. 1._____________________________________________________ 2._____________________________________________________ 3._____________________________________________________ How can you bring more of these values into your daily work life? ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ How can you develop these values in your life outside of work? ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________

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Career Development Exercise

The Career Center

What is your career aspiration?_____________

• Decide on a career and major.

What degree(s) is/are required for this career? ____________________________________

• Discover options for careers related to your major.

____________________________________

• Choose a major to support your career interests.

Is this degree offered at Valencia or your first choice university for transfer?______________ What are the top three skills needed for this profession?_____________ ,_____________ , _ ____________________________________

• Get information on factors you need to consider in making a career decision: education level, salary, working conditions, skills, certification or license requirements, number of openings projected in 5­to 10 years and more.

Internship and Workforce Services

• Develop a career plan.

Another great way to prepare for the workforce is to participate in an internship. It will allow you to get first-hand experience in a specific job field, learn outside of the classroom and develop successful work habits. Students may receive credit for internships based on the number of hours worked each week, the employment responsibilities and satisfactory completion of internship assignments. Contact Internship and Workforce Services for more information: valenciacollege.edu/ipo.

• Transition to a four-year college or university. Access transfer information for Florida colleges and universities and resources for out-of-state institutions. Also, try collegesource.org.

I would like to do an internship at _________________ (company/organization name). East Campus, Bldg. 5-230A, 407-582-2037 Osceola Campus, Bldg. 2-263, 407-582-4196 West Campus, Bldg. SSB-206, 407-582-1035 Winter Park Campus, Bldg. 1-214, 407-582-1035

• Transition to employment. The Career Center staff can help you with your job search in the following ways: Prepare a résumé Develop a cover letter Practice interviewing techniques Videotape a practice interview • Transition to graduate school. Find information about law, medical, dental, pharmacy, physical therapy and other professional schools. Your future is NOW – contact the Career Center for assistance:

Study Abroad and Global Education Be prepared to work, study, and live in a global community abroad and locally. Build your understanding of cultural diversity, increase language acquisition and develop intercultural competence. I plan to develop global skills by ___________________________________ . I would like to study abroad in ______________________________ (location).

East Campus, Bldg. 5-230, 407-582-2259 Osceola Campus, Bldg. 2-151, 407-582-4897 West Campus, Bldg. SSB-206, 407-582-1464 Winter Park Campus, Bldg. 1-214, 407-582-6882

valenciacollege.edu/careercenter

Please view the Study Abroad website for more information: valenciacollege.edu/international/studyabroad.

Career Goals

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MY EDUCATIONAL GOALS Which degree(s) do you plan to earn? (Check all that apply below and write in your desired major, if you know it.) q Associate in ____________ q Bachelor’s in ____________ q Master’s in ______________ q Doctorate in _____________

Once you have established your life and career goals, it’s time to set your Educational Goals to help get you there. The best way to reach them is to create an education plan and see an advisor who will help guide you. You’ll need both short-term goals - what you’ll need to accomplish here at Valencia - and long-term goals - what you’ll do after Valencia - whether it’s transferring to a university or entering the workforce. And don’t forget that learning is a lifelong journey. You’ll want to update, retrain or even change paths as the world and your work environment grow and change!

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MY EDUCATIONAL GOALS ASSESSMENT Of the statements below, check those that apply to you and fill in the blanks where you can. q 1. I know what level of education/degree(s) is/are needed to be successful in my career choice of__________________________. q 2. I know I need to major in________________________________ at a university to be successful in my career. q 3. I know ________________________________ (college or university) offers my chosen major. q 4. I know that the _________________________________ degree option at Valencia is the best choice to prepare for a major in _____________________________ at the university level. q 5. I have researched which common prerequisite courses are needed to enter the university at junior standing. q 6. I know I will have _____________ elective credits to complete after I finish my common course prerequisites. q 7. I have determined that the following elective courses would be best for my career choice:_______________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ q 8. I plan to participate in the following activities to help me achieve my true academic potential:______________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ For any of the statements above that you were unable to complete, review the corresponding suggestion on the following page for help in planning your education.

Educational Goals

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MY EDUCATIONAL GOALS ASSESSMENT Continued 1. You can learn what educational level is needed for exploring a particular career by visiting the Career Center on any campus or by researching the specific job title in My Career Planner in Atlas. 2. To determine which major you should pursue for a particular career title, you can visit the Career Center, review the requirements listed in the want ads or job applications, discuss it with faculty/staff members or talk to a professional who works in that career field. 3. You can find out if a particular major is offered at any of the state colleges or universities in Florida by visiting facts.org. To learn about private or out-of-state colleges, you can search the individual college catalogs online. Visit a Valencia Career Center for additional assistance. 4. You can research Valencia’s degree options in the college catalog, specific program sheets or by visiting valenciacollege.edu/ programs. If you need additional assistance, please visit the Student Services Office on any campus. 5. Common course prerequisites can be found in the transfer plan and pre-major listings in the Valencia catalog, at facts.org and within the university catalogs under the specific degree requirements. 6. You can determine the number of electives you will need by completing a My Education Plan and/or a degree audit in Atlas. 7. You can verify which elective courses to take by talking with a professional in the field, your faculty members, academic advisors/ counselors and/or a Career Center advisor/counselor. 8. Valencia offers support activities such as tutoring, supplemental learning, co-curricular activities and many more options listed in this handbook and the college catalog. Remember, if you cannot find the help you need, just ask someone. Educational Goals – Valencia “To Do” List q Discover which Valencia program is right for you. q Use My Education Plan under the My LifeMap tab in Atlas for building a plan up to graduation. q See an advisor/counselor to check your plan and stay on track. q Plan ahead for a smooth transition to a university or the workforce.

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CHOOSING A PATH To determine your educational goals, you will need to understand the differences between the degrees that Valencia offers and decide which one fits best with your goals.

DEGREE & CERTIFICATE OPTIONS A.A.

Associate in Arts (with Transfer Plan Options)

A.A.

Associate in Arts (Pre-Major)

A.S. Associate in Science

ARTICULATED

A.S.

TO B.A./B.S.

A.A.S. Associate in Applied Science

T.C.

Technical Certificate

A.T.C. Advanced Technical Certificate

A.T.D. Applied Technology Diploma

Prepares you to transfer to a Florida public university or college as a junior. You may focus on a specific area of study by following one of Valencia’s A.A. transfer plans. • Choose from 30 transfer plans

Prepares you to transfer to a Florida public university or college as a junior as you complete the majority of prerequisites within a specific major. “Articulated” premajors prepare you to transfer to a specific university. • Choose from 11 Pre-Majors

Prepares you to enter a specialized career field. Also transfers to the B.A.S. (Bachelor of Applied Science) program offered at some universities. • Choose from 32 areas of study

Prepares you to enter a specialized career field and pursue a bachelor’s degree in the same field by transferring to a specific university. Valencia offers five articulated A.S. degrees: • Business Administration • Criminal Justice Technology • Hospitality and Tourism Management • Nursing R.N. • Paralegal Studies Prepares you to enter a specialized career field. This degree does not transfer to a university. Valencia offers one A.A.S. degrees: • Hospitality and Tourism Management

Prepares you to enter a specialized career field or upgrade your skills for job advancement. Credits earned can be applied toward a related A.S. or A.A.S. degree program.

Prepares those who have previously received degrees to enhance their skills in a specialty area. Valencia offers three Advanced Technical Certificates: • Computed Tomography • Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Polysomnography Technology

Prepares you to enter a specialized career field and to take the credentialing exam in that field. Valencia offers one Applied Technology Diploma: • Emergency Medical Technology (EMT)

© 2010 Valencia Community College - ASP101210-05

Educational Goals

Choose the career path that will help you reach your goals for the future.

BACHELOR’S BACHELOR’S BACHELOR’S BACHELOR’S BACHELOR’S BACHELOR’S BACHELOR’S

WORK BACHELOR’S BACHELOR’S WORK BACHELOR’S BACHELOR’S BACHELOR’S WORK BACHELOR’S BACHELOR’S WORK WORK WORK BACHELOR’S WORK WORK BACHELOR’S A.S. DEGREE WORKWORK A.S. DEGREE DEGREE A.S. WORK A.S. DEGREE DEGREE A.S. WORKWORK A.S. DEGREE WORK WORK

WORK WORK

A.S. DEGREE A.S. DEGREE

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YoUR CaTaloG Your Valencia College catalog contains all the requirements you need to complete the degree or certificate you’ve chosen as well as all the policies you need to know about . Read it carefully . Details are important . One important note: Valencia updates and changes the catalog every year . The catalog in effect when you entered is valid for five years, provided you are continuously enrolled, and you should follow it until you graduate . However, if you change your major, you will then need to follow the catalog that is in effect for that year . The Online Catalog, found at valenciacollege .edu/catalog, is the most up-to-date and accurate . My Education Plan Once you know all the requirements for your degree, you’ll want to develop a term-by-term plan of which courses you will take and when you will take them . The LifeMap tool in Atlas for this is My Education Plan . Using it will ensure that you include every course, don’t take courses you don’t need and know when you’re ready to graduate . The staff in the Atlas Labs are great at helping if you get stuck . Once you’ve created a plan, use it every term to help you register . See Your Advisor/Counselor One of the best things you can do to be sure you are on track for graduation is to see your advisor . Advisors for A .A . Degree Students: Go to the Student Services office on the campus of your choice . Program Advisors for A .S . Degree and Certificate Students: For the most up-to-date information on your major and career, see your assigned Career Program Advisor . You can find their locations and contact information by going to valenciacollege .edu/helpas and following the directions . Associate in Arts Degree The Associate in Arts (A .A .) degree is designed for the student who plans to transfer to a college or university for a bachelor’s degree . An A .A . degree provides the foundational coursework equivalent to that offered in the freshman and sophomore years at Florida’s state universities . You have three methods for completing your 18

A .A . Degree: • The A.A. General Studies provides you with the general education and elective courses you need for a bachelor’s degree . If you know what your university major will be, you can customize your A .A . in order to complete the prerequisite courses for your intended major . • The A.A. Transfer Plans have preselected all of the specific general education and elective courses for selected university majors . Follow these guidelines and you’ll graduate on time with all of the required prerequisites . • The A.A. Pre-Major is designed for the student who plans to transfer to a college or university, having met a majority of the prerequisites within a specific major . Valencia offers nine premajors: Art; Studio/Fine Art; Dance Performance; Music Performance; Sign Language Interpretation; Theatre/ Drama/Dramatic Arts; Engineering; Architecture; Information Technology; and Computer Science . Articulated Pre-Majors are designed for transfer to a specific public or private university into a specific major . Associate in Science Degree The Associate in Science (A .S .) degree prepares you to enter a specialized career field and move directly into the workforce after completing your program at Valencia . To earn an A .S . degree, you must complete approximately 45 college-level credit hours in a specialized career field and at least 15 college-level credit hours in general education . Bachelor of Science The bachelor’s degree is an upper-level degree that offers students an opportunity to continue their education . Valencia College offers two Bachelor of Science degrees . One is in Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology with concentrations in Computer Systems, Electrical/Electronic Systems and Laser and Photonics, and the other Bachelor of Science degree is in Radiologic and Imaging Sciences with concentrations in Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Quality Management . Go to valenciacollege .edu/ bachelordegrees for more information .


DirectConnect to UCF If you are planning to transfer to the University of Central Florida after you complete your degree at Valencia, DirectConnect is the best way to get there. A unique partnership between Valencia and UCF, DirectConnect provides Valencia grads guaranteed admission to UCF and ensures a smooth transition.

How Do I Sign Up? You can indicate your desire to DirectConnect to UCF at any time during your college career by visiting the Answer Center at any campus or the UCF advisor on the East, Lake Nona, Osceola or West campuses.

Educational Goals

19


TRANSFER CHECKLIST Transferring to a four-year university is an exciting step in your academic goals. This checklist will help you make a smooth transition to the college or university of your choice. Before Completing A.A. or A.S. to B.S. Degree q Explore universities you are interested in to learn specific admission and degree requirements for the major of your choice. q Limited access degree programs may have separate applications. q Restricted access programs may require prerequisite courses. q Determine prerequisites required for your major. q Note Grade Point Average requirements, if any. q Education majors take the General Knowledge Test. q Other _____________________ Graduating from Valencia q Print graduation checklist from Atlas. q Print a detailed degree audit on Atlas (use landscape orientation). q Take checklist and degree audit to counselor/academic advisor for graduation check. q Apply for graduation in Atlas by the deadline date. Application for Admission q Check university/college deadline dates. q Enter date submitted _______. q Enter date of acceptance _______. q Request campus housing _______ (if on campus, you must  have immunization for Bacterial Meningitis and Hepatitis B). Application for Financial Aid q Check university/college deadline dates. q Identify university/college FAFSA (Free Application for Federal  Student Aid) code. q Complete the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid). q Follow up on any additional information requests. Transcripts (Official transcripts from all institutions attended) q Date official transcript was sent (during last term at Valencia) _______. q Date official transcript was sent after degree awarded _______. Start Right at the University q Attend the first Orientation possible _______. q Meet with academic advisors. q Register for classes early. q Tour campus and find classrooms. q Know tuition payment deadline.

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CHOOSING MY CLASSES What is the most convenient time for you to take classes? q Mornings q Afternoons q Evenings q Weekends q Online

One of the decisions you will make every term is course scheduling. When creating your course schedule, refer to the My Education Plan that you created in Atlas. This way, you can be sure to select courses that will keep you on track for completing your degree. If your education plan is completed accurately, you will know your graduation date. It is also important to make sure that your schedule choices accommodate your other life commitments. If you work the night shift, it may not be a good idea for you to take an 8 a.m. class. It doesn’t allow for a whole lot of time for sleep, which is necessary for you to perform well. Scheduling is an important key to your continued success at Valencia. As your personal schedule changes, it is understandable that you will need to adjust your school schedule from term to term. This is why Valencia offers classes online and at all five campuses, on various days at different times. Listed on the next page are a number of the activities required each week. Think about each one carefully and decide how much time you need to spend on each item per day and per week. After you have totaled up all the items that apply to you, see how much free time you have left each day and each week.

Educational Goals

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TIME MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENT Estimate how many hours a week you spend on each task and fill it in the right-hand column. Maximum Hours: 24 hours per day/168 hours per week

Activity Education

Hrs. per Week Travel time to/from class Regularly scheduled classes Study/Review (2 hrs. per credit) Library, special projects Class preparation (homework)

Work

Preparing for work Travel time to/from work Working Winding down from work

Personal

Dressing/personal grooming Preparing meals and eating Outside physical activity Family time Social activities Personal activities Sleep Other activities TOTAL HOURS USED: Maximum Hours:

168

(Subtract total hours used from maximum hours)

Schedule Considerations Consider that you should plan to spend a minimum of two hours in out-of-class work each week for every one hour you are in class. This includes time for reading assignments, library research, homework assignments and study groups. With this formula, each three-hour course may take a total of nine hours of your time each week. So if you are enrolled in four three-hour courses (which is full-time enrollment), that adds up to a minimum of 36 hours per week in school work (class attendance and assignments). So full-time enrollment is like having a fulltime job! Consider this when you are deciding on the number of hours you can manage at a part-time job and still do well in your school work. We really don’t recommend that you enroll as a full-time student if you are also working full-time. Time management tips are included in the Success Skills section of this handbook. 22


CHOOSING THE RIGHT TYPES OF COURSES Valencia offers many different styles and delivery methods for courses. Feel free to mix and match the following types of courses within your class schedule to suit your learning style. Web-Enhanced/Facilitated - A course that uses some Web-based technology to facilitate an on-site course. It uses a course management system (Blackboard) or Web pages to post course information. Online - A course in which all of the content is delivered online using the college-approved course management system (Blackboard). Hybrid - A course that blends online and face-to-face instruction. What makes a course hybrid is simply the mix between modes of delivery.

the course in the past and serves as a mentor and tutor for the class. valenciacollege.edu/ studentsuccess/sl Learning in Community (LinC) - Learning in Community (LinC) is a program of linking two or more courses into one integrated course. Professors from different disciplines tie their courses together around a common theme. valenciacollege.edu/linc

Computer-Assisted Instruction - ComputerAssisted Instruction for mathematics addresses varied learning styles through the use of audio, video, animation and highly interactive guided Flex Start - Classes that start on a day other lessons. The program provides individual than the official first day of classes for fall, instruction and support. During class times, spring or summer full terms. Even though certain terms are shorter than others, the same there is more individual support from the amount of information is covered and students professor and a tutor. are required to complete the same number of Honors Program - For qualifying students, assignments within a shorter time frame. Honors classes offer a unique intellectual experience with special emphasis on creativity, Supplemental Learning - These are courses critical thinking and interactive learning. taught by a professor with the assistance of a valenciacollege.edu/honors Supplemental Learning Leader. A Learning Leader is a student who successfully completed

­­Paying for Classes Tuition and fees are due in full by the fee payment deadline. Please refer to the online calendar for important dates and deadlines: valenciacollege.edu/calendar. The accepted forms of payment are: Money order

Personal check 0326

PAY

2186616843:

Credit card

3211358” 326

Cash

Methods of Payment Include: • Internet (through your Atlas account) • In person at any campus Business Office (see page 74 for hours and locations) • By mail: send check or money order to Valencia College, P.O. Box 4913, Orlando, FL 32802 Please allow sufficient time for mail delivery. • Higher One account (see page 80) • Tuition Installment Plan (TIP) through your Atlas account online TIP requires a nonrefundable enrollment fee. Payments are interest-free monthly installments, which you may pay through a variety of options. For additional information, please visit the Business Office on any campus.

Choosing My Classes

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SUCCESS SKILLS Success is a choice you make. To reach your goals, it helps to know what you really want and how to go about getting it. You have untapped potential. Your destination is up to you. There are many steps you can take to be successful at Valencia. We have already discussed having a career and educational plan, course scheduling and working with academic advisors/counselors to form learning partnerships. Other success strategies are important and can be personalized to fit your individual needs. These success skills are useful now, in future education and in the workplace. Some of the questions you should be able to answer after reading this section are: • What do I need to do to become a successful student at Valencia? • How can I further develop my skills for success? • Where can I go for help on campus?

Student resources I plan to use to do better in school (Check all that apply below.) q Visiting professors during office hours to discuss course material q E-mailing professors with questions about assignments q Using LifeMap tools in Atlas q Visiting the tutoring or academic support centers q Visiting the library for its electronic and printed resources q Setting up a study group with classmates q Attending Skillshops offered on campus: valenciacollege.edu/studentservices/skillshops.cfm

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SUCCESS SKILLS ASSESSMENT Many different assessments measure the skills students possess to assist them in achieving academic and career success. Several of these can be found in My Career Planner in Atlas, the Student Success course or by meeting with a career or academic advisor/counselor. The key to such assessments is to determine if the skills you think you possess are skills that you have truly mastered.

Part 1. This short exercise will assess your mastery of individual skills. Circle three skills from the list below that you possess, or add your own: Listening

Evaluating

Communicating Clearly

Analysis

Research

Processing Information

Being Inquisitive

Infer and Deduct

Innovativeness

Critical Thinking

Precision

Responsiveness

Comparing and Contrasting

Mathematical Computation

Being Imaginative Logic Planning

Problem Solving Timeliness Creativity Reading Comprehension

Part 2. Now, for each of your three skills, write two concrete examples of when you successfully used that skill. If you are not able to come up with two examples quickly, you may not be as strong in that skill as you thought. Skill 1:__________________________________________________ Example A:_______________________________________________ Example B:_______________________________________________ Skill 2:__________________________________________________ Example A:_______________________________________________ Example B:_______________________________________________ Skill 3:__________________________________________________ Example A:_______________________________________________ Example B:_______________________________________________

Success Skills

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SUCCESS GOALS – SOME SKILLS TO DEVELOP These academic, personal, leadership and teamwork skills are critical to your development as a master student while in college and in your future career.

Academic Skills (Core Competencies) Think - Be able to think critically, creatively and logically; solve problems and use the results; use technology; access information and apply data gathered. Value - Prioritize your plans; be responsible for your time; practice integrity. Communicate - Listen, understand and learn; read, comprehend and use written materials, including graphs, charts and displays; write effectively. Speak fluently and competently with peers and professors; present material to small and large groups. Act - Set goals and priorities in work and personal life; initiate and persist to get the job done. Personal Leadership Skills Positive attitudes and behaviors - Build selfesteem and confidence; take a positive attitude toward learning; concentrate on growth and personal health. Responsibility - Manage time, money and other resources to achieve goals. Adaptability - Adopt a positive attitude toward change; be able to identify and suggest new ideas to get the job done. Teamwork Skills Work with others - Understand and work within the culture of the group; plan and make decisions with others and support the outcomes; lead when appropriate, mobilizing the group for high performance.

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Student Success (SLS 1122) Finally, a class that makes you better at all your other classes! Student Success is a three-credit-hour elective that teaches you how to be a better student. In Student Success, you’ll learn how to manage your time, take notes and tests better, identify your learning style, set meaningful educational and career goals, read and write more effectively and use Valencia resources. Register for SLS 1122 and chart your course for success.


Strategies for becoming a SUCCESSFUL VALENCIA STUDENT Manage your time. You have 168 hours in a week. How well you use them can determine how successful you really are. Plan and evaluate goals regularly. To be successful, you should understand where you are and where you want to be. Listen and process information. You must be able to listen and take in a lot of information. You must also be able to decide what information is important to your success and filter out the rest.

Take action and responsibility. Make educated decisions for yourself, realizing that these decisions can affect others. Understand your core values and how they relate to the values of your community. College requires developing new skills. Habits that worked in high school are not always effective in the college classroom. Be prepared to be challenged and don’t consider your first year as the 13th grade.

Communicate your needs. You must be able to communicate effectively in writing and in speaking with individuals and groups.

Tips from Valencia Faculty Let’s face it, faculty were once successful students­­­– that’s how they were able to complete college and graduate school. Here are some tips from the Valencia faculty, who know what it takes to make it. Read and understand the course syllabus. It will tell you what the professor expects, what his or her priorities are for your learning, attendance policies and what/when assignments are due. If anything is unclear to you, ask your professor for clarification. Build a master calendar. Include all your work and school obligations in this schedule. Be sure to include blocks of time for study and research/writing. This will help you see in advance and plan for two tests on one day,

for example. It will help you to be proactive rather than reactive in approaching your academic assignments. Don’t skip class – EVER (unless you are really sick or have a real emergency). Attendance does count, even on the first day of classes. You paid for your college education. Don’t rob yourself by missing classes. Do all readings and assignments on schedule. Falling behind is self-perpetuating, and coming to class unprepared makes you less able to understand the new material and ask useful questions. Sit up front. This will allow you to avoid distractions and focus on your subject.

Success Skills

27


Talk to your professors. All of your professors were students once, so they can offer helpful advice about how to be a successful student. Become familiar with your professors’ office hours, which designate times they will be available on campus or online, and use them to get acquainted or discuss course-related issues and questions you may have.

Set measurable academic and personal goals each term. A major difference between students who do well and those who don’t is that students who succeed have clearly defined goals.

Review often. Study your notes and review highlights from the text frequently rather than waiting until the day before a test.

enjoy working. Exchange phone numbers and consider studying together. If you miss class, call them and find out what you missed.

Don’t withdraw from a course without first talking to your professor and an academic advisor/counselor. There may be solutions to your difficulties that you do not see on your own, or there may be consequences to withdrawing from a course that you don’t know.

Be respectful of others. This includes the professor, your peers and any visiting lecturers/ speakers in your classroom. One way to do this is to turn off any electronics that could interrupt the class. Doing so will show your professor that you’re interested and show your classmates that you respect them.

Working with Faculty Faculty and students should work together as learning partners to create an environment for learning in the classroom. As a master student, you will take responsibility for your own learning and seek the information you need to achieve academic success. Faculty are interested in working with you to support your success and are available to assist you in a variety of ways. However, it is your responsibility to seek additional information and assistance when you need it.

Resolving Conflict with Faculty If you have a conflict with a faculty member, try to resolve it by talking to him or her privately during his or her office hours. If you need help to prepare for this meeting, talk with an academic advisor/counselor in Student Services.

Accept personal responsibility for your academic progress. Successful students tend to be realistic and recognize that their success Ask about/investigate student support or failure is primarily determined by their services. Tutoring, computer labs, writing and efforts. Students who are not successful often language labs, advising and counseling services, blame outside forces (professors, work, family) library resources and career development for their lack of progress. services are all available free of charge. Use Get to know your classmates. Make friends them early and often to strengthen your work. with one or two students with whom you

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If you are not able to resolve the conflict with the faculty member, you should contact a campus ombudsman to discuss additional methods of resolving the conflict. valenciacollege.edu/students/disputes


SUCCEEDING AS A STUDENT RETURNING TO COLLEGE In our current economic times, it is not unusual to find that returning to college is the right step to take to prepare for a better future through updating current skills or developing new ones. The number of nontraditionally aged students (25 or older) returning to college campuses has continued to grow in recent years. From 2006 to 2017, the National Center for Education Statistics anticipates a rise of 10 percent in enrollments of people under 25, and a rise of 19 percent in enrollments for those 25 or over.* Students who return to school after a long break from their studies can find it difficult to assume the role of student again. While going back to school can be challenging and stressful, it can also be exhilarating and rewarding if you prepare properly. Here are some tips to help ease your transition. Start slowly. If you feel overwhelmed by multiple obligations, you may benefit from taking just one or two classes during your first couple of terms to ease back into the student role. Develop a network of support. Count on family and friends to support you through tough times like exam periods. Study groups, both online and in person, can be a great resource for tips and encouragement, as can counselors or staff in Student Services. Get organized. Utilize the Time Management Assessment on page 22 to create a study schedule that also takes into consideration the time you will spend at work and with family and friends, etc. Identify all your available resources. Familiarize yourself with the LifeMap tools such as My Education Plan available through your Atlas account. There are also other resources devoted to making every Valencia

student an academic success, such as those listed below: • A computer lab open to students (use your Atlas ID and password to log in) • The Math Support Center for help in all math classes on a walk-in basis • The Communications Center for help with reading, writing and speech • The English for Academic Purposes (EAP) Lab for English language learners • The Language Lab for foreign language classes • Audio Visual Services for videos and recordings • The Tutoring Center for arranging appointments for help in other subjects • The Testing Center for taking exams Please refer to page 38 for specific campus-based services. *SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (2009). Digest of Education Statistics, 2008 (NCES 2009-020), Chapter 3.

Success Skills

29


Connect with your professors and advisors/counselors. Your professors want you to succeed, so if you are having problems in a class, do not hesitate to ask questions or seek their advice. Your Academic Advisor/ Counselor will guide you through your program of study and is also a very important contact for you. Although earning a college degree requires discipline and commitment, the rewards that come from being a college graduate outweigh the sacrifices. You can do it!

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Once you have created a schedule, utilize the calendar in your planner and make “to do� lists to stay on track.


TIME MANAGEMENT We each get 24 hours a day in which to live our lives — you, your mother, President Obama, Oprah, Bill Gates, Rihanna. You cannot buy an extra minute, hour or day. People who get things done have no more time to do things than people who don’t get things done. You manage your time now. But are you managing it effectively? The chart on the next page will provide you with information to assess how well you manage your time. To effectively manage your time, you must set priorities. In other words, you must decide which of your projects are most important and what needs to be done now. A good way to begin prioritizing what you need to accomplish is to make a list of the items. Then decide what needs to be done now, soon or later. It is important that you spend as much time as possible on “now” priority items. When you spend your time on “now” items, you are doing the most important task at hand. If time permits, you can then proceed to “soon” and then “later” priority items. However, to use your time most effectively, you need to complete all “now” items before moving into the other two categories. On your list, exclude routine items and include important items — what you need to accomplish that might not be accomplished without special attention.

Ways to Manage Your Time More Effectively Handle items at once. Most matters can be dealt with as they arise. Don’t reshuffle paper needlessly. You’ve heard this before: “Don’t put off until tomorrow what you can do today.” Accomplish it in one session. To accomplish a major item (or even small ones), assemble your material so you can attack the project in one session. This saves time in reassembling your thoughts and materials. Make decisions. You may be afraid to make a decision if you fear that your decision may be wrong. If you make an early decision, you have time to review reactions to the decision. Then, if the decision was wrong, you have time to make necessary changes. Remember, not making a decision is a decision in itself.

Tackle big problems. Don’t put off important projects because they seem too big to handle. Break the big project into several smaller ones. Structure a daily “To Do” list. There are many ways to develop a list of items you need to do. Establish a priority system that works for you. Keep your list in this planner, in your phone, in a journal tucked in your backpack or on a calendar you post in a prominent place at home. (Lake in, 1973)

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Your “To Do� List for the Week Instructions: 1. Make a list of the items you need to accomplish in a typical week. 2. After making the list, give each item a priority rating of now, soon or later. 3. Indicate the date when you complete an item.

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Priority

Item I Need to Do

Date Completed


STUDY TIPS Concentration Aids • Select a quiet location to study. • Select a comfortable environment (not too hot/cold or dark/bright). • Focus on one thing at a time.

• Know that emotional distress reduces your ability to concentrate. • Understand that drugs (alcohol, caffeine, nicotine, sleeping or diet pills) alter your ability to concentrate.

• Arrange your work space so that your eyes aren’t drawn to other jobs that need • Recognize that lack of sleep is a major reason for poor concentration. to be done. •  Know your most productive time of day • Be reasonable with the demands you put and plan to do the “high energy” tasks on your attention span. at that time. Presentation/Project/Test Anxiety: Keeping Calm Prepare well in advance. Keep up day to day, if you can, but don’t judge yourself harshly if you don’t. Avoid last-minute cramming. Don’t go without sleep the night before (though four or five hours may be enough). Stop studying an hour or so before the test, and relax and compose yourself. Know the time and place of the test and what you need to bring. Be on time, neither too early nor too late, with books or supplies. Don’t rush. Don’t talk about the test with classmates immediately beforehand if you know it raises your anxiety level. To do so may nourish group paranoia. Read over the test and plan your approach. Ascertain point values per part, time limits for each section and which question you’ll start with. Don’t hesitate to ask for clarification from the professor or proctor if you have questions about directions or procedures; otherwise, anxiety may start to build up because you aren’t sure what you are expected to do. Develop an aggressive, yet realistic attitude. Approach the test vigorously determined that you will do your best, but also accept the limits of what you know at the moment. Don’t blame yourself for what you don’t know.

Activity reduces anxiety. If you go blank and can’t think of anything to write, go on to another question or another part of the test. On an essay, jot down anything you can recall on scratch paper to stimulate your memory and get your mind working. Relax yourself physically during the test if you notice that you are not thinking well or are tense. Pause, lay your test aside and take several slow, deep breaths. Concentrate on your breathing. Do this if you notice that you are worrying excessively about one problem, not reading carefully or forgetting information you know. Pay attention to the test, not to yourself or others. Don’t waste time worrying, doubting yourself, wondering how other people are doing or blaming yourself. Don’t worry about what you should have done; pay attention to what you can do. Speak with a counselor if you continue having test anxiety after applying the suggestions above. Identify assignments other than tests that may make you anxious. Some classes will require individual speeches or group presentations, for example, and those events can also make you anticipate a negative outcome. Most of the strategies here can help you with those assignments, too.

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MEASURING YOUR SUCCESS How Do I Calculate My Term GPA? Your Grade Point Average (GPA) is a weighted average of all your for-credit college work. This means a grade in a fourcredit-hour course will change your GPA more than the same grade in a threecredit-hour course. Your GPA also gets harder to change when you have taken more courses. To calculate your estimated GPA, you would do the following: For each course, multiply the course credit hours by the grade you receive to get the “quality points” for that course. Your grades have the following numerical equivalents: each A is 4 points, each B is 3 points, each C is 2, each D is 1 and each F is 0. Add up the quality points for each course. For example, suppose you were taking the following courses:

Course Credit Hours Grade Received/Points ENC 1102 MAC 2311 PEM 1171 SPC 1608 TOTAL

e l p Exam

Total Quality Points

3

x

A (4)

=

12

5

x

C (2)

=

10

2

x

B (3)

=

6

3

x

D (1)

=

3

=

31

13

Divide the result by the total credit hours to get your term’s GPA. In this case, your GPA for the term would be 31 ÷ 13 which equals 2.38.

Course Credit Hours Grade Received/Points

Total Quality Points

Total You can also calculate your GPA online at valenciacollege.edu/studentservices/calculator.cfm. 34


FINANCIAL AID Financing a college education is an important part of the academic experience. However, it is hard to focus and maintain a high standard of academic excellence when you are always wondering how you are going to pay for your classes. Financial aid advising is provided through in-person confidential visits. Students interested in applying for financial aid should contact the Answer Center on any campus. Financial aid forms and sources can be found at valenciacollege.edu/finaid. Are You Eligible? In general, to receive financial aid at Valencia, you must meet the following criteria: • Be accepted as a degree-seeking student to an A.A., A.S. or B.S. degree program, or • Be accepted as a certificate-seeking student in an eligible vocational program • Be making satisfactory academic progress (see Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid Recipients in the college catalog) • Be a U.S. citizen, national or permanent/ lawful resident • Be enrolled at least half time (six credit hours for most programs) • Not be in default on a prior student loan • Not owe a repayment of a federal grant • Not have an existing financial obligation to Valencia • Be registered for Selective Service, if required • Have a high school diploma or G.E.D. certificate • Not be convicted of the sale or possession of illegal drugs • Provide all requested information for the completion of your financial aid file Types of Aid Grants - Grants are forms of aid that generally do not have to be repaid; however, in certain instances, repayment may be required. They are awarded to students who show financial need on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Scholarships - Like grants, scholarships generally do not have to be repaid; however, in certain instances, repayment may be required. They are awarded based on various

Instructions for Applying 1. Start a file folder to keep copies of all your financial aid paperwork. Make photocopies of each form you submit. 2. Verify your official college record reflects a financial aid-qualified degree or certificate. 3. Provide the Admissions Office with a copy of your official final high school transcript or G.E.D. certificate, or if you are a transfer student, provide copies of your official college transcripts from each school you have attended. 4. Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online at fafsa.gov. Be sure to include Valencia’s federal code number (006750) when you list the institutions that you want to receive your results. 5. Search and apply for other types of financial aid.

factors, such as academic talent, participation in certain activities, special interests or financial need. Scholarship requirements and application procedures vary depending upon the criteria set by the scholarship provider. Loans - Student loans must be repaid, but usually have a fairly low interest rate. Loans may come from the government or a commercial lender, such as a bank or credit union.

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FINANCIAL ASSESSMENT It is important to understand more about finances and financial aid as you progress in your college education. You can find more information in My Financial Planner, located under My LifeMap tab in Atlas and at valenciacollege.edu/finaid and valenciacollege.edu/finaid/resources.cfm. My Financial Planner is going to help you budget your journey through college. Through this tool, you will learn how to spend and save money wisely, borrow better, organize your finances and read your credit report. You will also learn how to choose the right and wrong loans for you, and the difference between buying and leasing a car. As a student, you will go through a series of modules that will give you valuable information to guide you through graduation. Below is an additional Financial assessment that can assist you in learning more about your finances. Part 1. Please circle below the financial literacy skills and financial aid terms that you believe you need to improve. Check as many responses as may apply to you. q Budgeting

q Interest Rates

q Grants

q Income Taxes

q Credit Scores

q Credit Cards

q Student Loans

q Savings Account

q Personal Loans

q Scholarships

q Income Verification q Checking Account

q Work Study

q Investments

q Debt

q Satisfactory Academic Standing

Part 2. Complete the following exercises to enhance your knowledge and skills related to financial literacy and financial aid. Select at least three areas from the above exercise and explain why it is important to increase your knowledge. 1._____________________________________________________ 2._____________________________________________________ 3._____________________________________________________ It is important to understand the different types of financial aid terms. Putting concepts into your own words helps you to fully understand their meaning. In the space below, define each term. You can reference the definitions provided in this financial section of the handbook. Grants:

Scholarships:

Loans:

What types of resources did you find in the student handbook, financial aid website and My Financial Planner that are significant to you?

These resources were helpful because‌

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How to Find Additional Money for College Research local scholarships first. In general, the smaller the geographical area a scholarship covers, the better your chances of winning. Begin with your Atlas account and Valencia’s Financial Aid Web site at valenciacollege.edu/finaid. Your next stop should be the college aid section of your public library. Most libraries will have a number of books about financial aid, including scholarship guides, such as the College Board’s Scholarship Handbook. They also may have information on local scholarships. Check membership organizations and employers. Organizations of all types and sizes sponsor scholarships, so leave no stone unturned. Explore categories you might not have considered, such as religious, community service, fraternal, military, union, and professional. And don’t forget your parents. Many large companies offer scholarships or tuition programs for children of employees. If you are uncertain, ask your parent to check with his or her Human Resources department. Use a free online scholarship search. A scholarship search usually collects information on hundreds of awards and compares your student characteristics with scholarship restrictions. Based on your answers to a questionnaire, you will receive a list of possible scholarships. It is up to you to decide which ones you will try for.

Remember: You should never have to pay for scholarship information. If you’re asked to pay a fee for “exclusive” scholarship leads, there’s a good chance your scholarship service is really a scholarship scam.

Most of the information you will be asked for on a scholarship search questionnaire will be easy to come up with — year in school, citizenship, state of residence, religion, ethnic background, disability, military status, employer, membership organizations and so forth. Beyond those questions, you will have to give some thought to your academic, extracurricular and career plans. You should ask yourself: • Do I want to participate in a competition? If so, what are my talents and interests? • What subject do I plan to major in? • What career do I plan to pursue? • Do I want to apply for all types of aid or only scholarships? Your answers to these questions will help determine your scholarship eligibility. Take your time brainstorming and don’t overlook anything –­­the more personal characteristics you discover, the more scholarships you could potentially apply for.

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Valencia Resources and Learning Assistance

Libraries Each campus library provides a variety of books, pamphlets and audiovisual materials that support course-related research and other learning needs. Also, each campus provides computer workstations with access to the Internet and more than 120 online databases.

assignments, reference documentation, library instruction, interlibrary loan and technologies. For additional information, including hours of operation, visit valenciacollege.edu/library.

You may use and check out materials at any campus. Librarians and other qualified staff can assist you with research for course

Learning Support Centers East Campus • The Academic Success Center (ASC) (Bldg. 4, Room 101) houses all of the learning support services listed below. Note: Services are available to students at no cost; however, a current Valencia ID is required for most services. • The ASC Tutoring and Information Desk provides tutoring support and learning materials for students (e.g., calculators, headsets). Regarding tutor support, the Tutoring Center has designed several approaches to tutoring with walk-in assistance and workshops. In an effort to provide more efficient, fast and friendly service, the bulk of ASC general tutoring is walk-in tutoring. Students can meet with 38

tutors at specified times throughout the day — no appointment necessary. Walk-in assistance is provided for Accounting, Anatomy & Physiology, Business, Economics, Education, Humanities, Computers, Office Systems Technology, Biology, Microbiology, Music, Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Psychology, Physics, Sign Language and Speech. In an effort to expand Humanities, Education and Science tutorial services, the Tutoring Center is currently offering selected Education, Science and Humanities course workshops. Workshop sessions will maximize retention and develop a greater understanding of course material. Contact the Academic


Success Center Information Desk for more • The Student Computer Center has more details. For specific walk-in times/subjects than 130 personal computers equipped and workshop information, we encourage with Microsoft Office 2010 programs, you to visit our Web site at valenciacollege. such as Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Access edu/east/academicsuccess/tutoring. The and Publisher. Additionally, lab computers availability of tutors is not guaranteed. The have Internet access and are configured for Tutoring Center, however, strives to provide most online applications used at Valencia, quality tutoring for many courses offered including Blackboard, Atlas, CourseCompass at Valencia. For more Tutoring Center and MyMathLab. There are also two information, including employment as a scanners and two printers available. The Valencia tutor, visit the Academic Success Computer Center staff provides class Center Information Desk located on the first presentations on the use of PowerPoint, floor of Bldg. 4 or call the desk at (407) 582formatting Word for MLA and Blackboard 2540. If you can’t get help with a specific basics. Printing is on a pay-for-print area (after having met with our tutors), please basis using a printing card, which can be inform the Tutoring Desk. purchased for $1 from vending machines in the lab. (This same card is used on most • The Testing Center provides make-up campuses.) tests, testing for students who need accommodations, state exams and PERT testing on Saturdays.

• The Communications Center provides writing support for all disciplines. Writing consultants work with students on a walk-in basis and provide feedback about the strengths and weaknesses of students’ academic writing. Software for English for Academic Purposes (EAP) lab work, and for many reading and writing courses, is also available, as are PERT reviews for reading and sentence skills. • The Math Support Center provides help for all levels of math and consists of two separate areas called the SPA (Specialized Preparatory Area) and the MSC (Math Support Center). - The Specialized Preparatory Area (SPA) assists students with math skills and helps them prepare for the prep competency exam. 

- The Math Support Center (MSC) assists students with all college-level math skills. Both areas do PERT reviews and workshops. • Language Labs (Foreign Language and EAP) provide support to foreign language and EAP students and faculty. The labs are used as a learning space for classes, as well as for students completing homework and individual lab work. The labs provide software focusing on the development of foreign language and English proficiency. Open lab hours are available.

Osceola Campus • The Language Lab (Bldg. 3, Room 103) serves students in English for Academic Purposes, Spanish and Portuguese courses. In order to ensure student success in language courses, this lab offers computer applications and personal assistance from qualified staff. The lab is open Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday and Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, call (407) 582-4207 or (407) 582-4903 or visit valenciacollege.edu/ osceola/mainlab/language.asp. • The Learning Center (LC) (Bldg. 3, Room 100) is the primary academic support area for Osceola students. The LC houses the Writing Center, Tutoring Center and an open computer area, which includes the Communication Labs and Math Labs. The LC is open Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, call (407) 582-4146 or visit valenciacollege.edu/ osceola/learningcenter. • The Math Depot (Bldg. 1, Room 142) provides alternative learning resources to help students understand a concept via online resources, math manipulatives, study sessions and one-on-one help from our staff. Also, help is available for the Beginning Algebra State Exam by providing additional resources to help you study. While the Math Depot is

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geared toward developmental math courses, no one who needs help is turned away. For more information, call (407) 582-4856 or visit valenciacollege.edu/ osceola/math/mathdepot.cfm.  Osceola Campus labs and support services information is subject to change with the anticipated opening of Building 4 in January 2013. West Campus • The Math Center (Bldg. 7, Room 240) provides learning support services for all levels of mathematics. Its resources include interactive software, instructional videos and a knowledgeable staff. The Math Center houses the Math Open Lab for software-assisted lab time; the Math Comp House, which assists developmental math students with testing skills; the Hands-On Math Rooms, which contain tools to better understand mathematics concepts; and the Tutoring Center, with walk-in tutoring for mathematics and one-on-one tutoring for a variety of subjects. Group study rooms are available for all students, staff and faculty members. For more information, visit valenciacollege.edu/west/lss/math. • A Computer Assistance Center is located on the first floor of the Library (Bldg. 6), and all currently enrolled students may use it to complete work for Valencia courses. Software is available for the following disciplines: Spanish, French, German, English, grammar, reading, math, algebra, statistics, calculus, chemistry, economics, American government, nursing and accounting. A variety of other programs, such as Excel, Lotus, Word Perfect, PowerPoint and Microsoft Word are also available. While the lab is primarily for course-related work, personal work is allowed at times posted within the center. 40

• The Communication Center (Bldg. 5, Room 155) provides learning support services for Prep Reading, Prep English and EAP students seeking to improve their reading, writing, grammar and speech skills. In addition, the Communications Center includes the Writing Center, which is open to all Valencia students in all disciplines and offers writing assistance, as well as individual speech, grammar and reading consultations; the English for Academic Purposes (EAP)/ Foreign Languages Lab, where students may practice their speaking and listening skills; and the Video Speech Lab, where students may record their speeches. For more information, visit valenciacollege.edu/west/ lss/communications. Winter Park Campus • Designed primarily for developmental math students, although college-level math students are also invited and welcomed, the Math Support Center (Room 138) provides a comfortable and caring environment in which students may prepare for tests and exams, complete homework assignments and engage in group study. To facilitate such activities, the Math Support Center offers individualized tutoring from professional support personnel and also provides solutions manuals, videotaped lectures and software programs — all of which correspond to current Valencia mathematics books. For more information, call (407) 582-6912. • The Communications Student Support Center (CSSC) (Room 136) is designed to help foster a community of academic excellence and shared responsibility between faculty and students. It assists students in the development of reading, writing, speech, study and critical thinking skills. For students enrolled in developmental-level reading and English classes, the CSSC provides one-on-one assistance in such areas as reading comprehension, grammar and sentence skills and paragraph and essay development. Students may also work on their instructor-assigned lab materials in the CSSC. The CSSC offers computer-based tutorials, worksheets and workshops. For more information, call (407) 582-6818.


• The Library (Room 140) offers an open computer lab to currently enrolled Valencia students. The computers may be used to type papers, search references and databases, conduct Internet searches, access your Atlas account and check e-mail. In addition to computers, the library offers resources to assist with learning needs. It also offers a quiet study room for students to work uninterruptedly. For more information, call (407) 582-6814. Tutoring Assistance Valencia offers tutorial assistance at no charge to students for academic courses in which they are currently enrolled. Opportunities also exist for students who would like to be tutors. Tutoring services are specific to each campus and information about tutoring services is available at the Information Station on each campus. See the Valencia Directory for hours and locations.

Student Assistance Services BayCare Life Management’s Student Assistance Program (SAP) is a valuable resource for students. BayCare Counselors are available 24/7 via phone. In addition, students can set up an appointment to meet with a licensed counselor at a location near one of our campuses. The first 3 counseling sessions are free to students; funds are provided from the Student Activity budget. BayCare supports students in a compassionate, caring manner, helping them meet work/life challenges and achieve a positive academic experience. This service is anonymous, confidential and free for all students. Students’ needs or concerns can be addressed immediately. BayCare’s direct contact information can be found on the back of your Valencia Student Identification Card. BayCare’s website is baycare.org/sap and the phone number is (800) 878–5470.

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CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT Campus involvement is a great way to make the most of your college experience. It will help you to increase your career and educational opportunities; make friends and establish useful networks; learn about your strengths and improve your skills; and have fun while interacting with other students, staff and faculty. Some options for participating: • Campus clubs/organizations • Leadership and career workshops • Volunteer activities

• Intramural sports • Student Government • Student Leader teams

Student Development offers opportunities in leadership development, student government, community service and recreational activities. To start getting involved on campus and with your future, visit Student Development on any campus. valenciacollege.edu/studentdev Student Development Locations East Campus, Bldg. 5-212, (407) 582-2313 Lake Nona, Bldg. 1-147, (407) 582-7101 Osceola Campus, Bldg. 2-131, (407) 582-4158 West Campus, Bldg. 3-147, (407) 582-1607 Winter Park Campus, Bldg. 1-122, (407) 582-6893

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STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION (SGA) As a student at Valencia, you are automatically a member of the Student Government Association (SGA). Officers of your SGA are elected annually by the student body and are the official liaisons between you and the administration. The three purposes of SGA at Valencia are representation, advocacy and service. SGA representatives welcome your input, are happy to answer your questions and encourage your active participation. Student Clubs/Organizations Valencia College recognizes student organizations on campus that exist to promote the social, physical and educational well-being of students. All organizations are open to any Valencia College student. Types of student organizations recognized on the campuses are: • Career – Organizations established for students with an interest in a specific career. • Honorary – Organizations established for students who have met certain prescribed standards, usually requiring a high GPA. • Service – Groups whose primary goal is to provide service to the college and community. • Social – Groups that combine social activities with educational goals and service projects. • Special Interest – Groups that seek to unite people who have common interests in areas such as politics, religion, hobbies, etc. valenciacollege.edu/studentdev/clubs2.cfm

Some of the many clubs and organizations include: • A2CS — African-American Cultural Society • Mosaic Literary Magazine • Amnesty International • Phi Beta Lambda • Anime Club • Phi Theta Kappa • Book Club • Platform Theatre Company • Brain Bowl • Psychology Club • Caribbean Student Association • Radiography Student Association • Dental Hygienists Association • Respiratory Care Student Association • Future Hospitality Leaders of America • Sonic Audio • Gay/Straight Alliance • Student Government • Haitian Student Association • Students for Liberty • LASO — Latin American Student • Teachers of Tomorrow Association • Ultrasound Association • MARS Club • Veterans The Student Development Office on each campus can provide you with a list of campus clubs and organizations. valenciacollege.edu/studentdev Success Skills

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MORE WAYS TO GET INVOLVED Brain Bowl - Brain Bowl is an academic competition similar in nature to Jeopardy, but consisting of four subject areas: Humanities, Mathematics, Social Sciences and Natural Science. Players travel around the state and to Georgia for competitions. Valencia’s teams are consistently among the best in the nation. For details, contact Student Development on any campus. Campus Activities -Various cultural and entertainment events are planned on a regular basis. Such activities may include films, concerts, plays and speakers. Check out the campus activities calendar for each campus online at valenciacollege.edu/calendar.

Recreation, Wellness & Intramural Competition - Intramural competition and wellness programs are available on the East and Osceola campuses. Competition is open to all Valencia students and staff. Student Leaders - Valencia has a dynamic group of students who serve as Student Leaders. These students serve as Welcome Team members, Peer Educators and Atlas Access staff. These students can be found helping other students learn about the college and themselves.

Student Newspaper - The college’s awardwinning student newspaper, Valencia Voice, is published weekly during fall and spring Leadership Development - Valencia College terms. The paper is distributed online at offers its students leadership training and valenciavoice.com. It is written and edited by experience. Our graduates have demonstrated a student staff on all campuses but also accepts their abilities by occupying influential news, features, cartoons and opinion pieces positions in almost every profession. They have from other students. Editors and reporters are also played key roles in the development of expected to take one of the College Newspaper Central Florida by participating in a variety of lab courses. Students do all of the writing, organizations that enhance our communities. editing, page design, graphic arts, photography and ad selling. Interested students should Many leadership opportunities exist consult with the editors and/or advisor in through participation in student clubs and Bldg. 3, Room 151, on the West Campus. organizations. More than 40 organizations exist, each requiring officers. Conference Valencia Volunteers - Valencia Volunteers experiences are also available to provide encourages students to participate in campus leadership training to the members of clubs. and community activities through increasing Also, almost every college committee is in need awareness of volunteer opportunities, referring of students to participate as voting members. students to volunteer positions both on and off campus, coordinating special volunteer Student Development sponsors leadership programs that foster development of leadership events and recognizing Valencia students who perform volunteer service. Students may skills. Two of the most notable events are arrange for volunteer experiences in order the annual Student Leadership Symposium to explore potential careers, enhance course and the Start Right Convocation. These are learning and gain personal enrichment. opportunities for students from all campuses and centers to explore leadership theories and practices and to interact with each other. Literary Magazines - Campus publications of literary and art works of students, faculty and staff are produced periodically. The publications are The Alchemist (Osceola Campus), Arete (East Campus), Mosaic (Winter Park) and The Phoenix (West Campus).

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Visual and Performing Arts

Located on the East Campus, Valencia’s fine arts complex holds cultural events such as plays, film festivals, choral and instrumental music concerts, dance performances and visual arts exhibits throughout the year. Stop by the Anita S. Wooten Gallery anytime to check out the changing exhibits of original art or take in a live performance at the Performing Arts Center or the Black Box Theater. Call the Box Office at (407) 582-2900 for show dates and ticket information.

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LIFELONG LEARNING What are some ways you’ll continue learning after graduating from Valencia? (Check all that apply.) q Transfer to a four-year college or university. q Earn a technical certificate. q Take periodic classes or workshops to update job skills. q Join a professional organization. q Read about topics that interest me. q Other________________________________________ ____________________________________________

When you enrolled at Valencia, you made an educational commitment to yourself, whether it was for career advancement, self-discovery or to transition to a fouryear university. As you complete this educational phase in your life, how do you prepare for the next phase?

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LIFELONG LEARNING ASSESSMENT Answer the questions below to review where you are in the learning process and reflect on how you will continue learning after you graduate. What have I learned so far? ____________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ How does what I’ve learned apply to my life goals?__________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ How do I document this learning?_______________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ What work/achievements should I include in my resume or My Portfolio in Atlas? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ What are my goals after graduating from Valencia?__________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ What areas do I still need improvement in?________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ What topics do I want to learn more about?________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ What are some ways that I plan to continue to learn and improve after graduating from Valencia? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________

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TIPs To oPTIMIze YoUR leaRnInG Reflect on what you have learned . Start a journal, write in it every day and use the materials learned in your classes to continue the learning process . The more you apply what you have learned to your life, the more relevant the material will become to you, and the easier it will be to learn .

My Portfolio My Portfolio, located under the My LifeMap tab in Atlas, is a Web-based portfolio that allows you to save examples of your academic work, request review and feedback from faculty, create a public résumé of your achievements and link your work to goals that you have set in My Career Planner. Keep your best writing assignments and other academic work here so you can easily show examples of your best academic performances . This will be useful to you as you prepare university, scholarship and employment applications, write a résumé or prepare for a job interview .

ValenCIa ColleGe: sTUDenT CoRe CoMPeTenCIes The faculty of Valencia College has established four core competencies that describe the learning outcomes for a Valencia graduate . They are THINK, VALUE, COMMUNICATE and ACT . These general competencies can be applied in many situations and must be developed over a lifetime . They specify how learning can be expressed and assessed in practice . They enable students and faculty to set learning goals and assess learning within and across the many disciplines of human inquiry . Use the descriptions and examples of academic work for each to measure your own learning outcomes . For more information, visit valenciacollege .edu/competencies .

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CORE COMPETENCIES Think

Value

Think clearly, critically and creatively; analyze, synthesize, integrate and evaluate in many domains of human inquiry.

Make reasoned judgments and responsible commitments.

To think, you must: a. Analyze data, ideas, patterns, principles perspectives

To value, you must: a. Recognize values as expressed in attitudes, choices and commitments b. Distinguish among personal, ethical, aesthetic, cultural and scientific values

b. Employ the facts, formulas and procedures of the discipline

c. Employ values and standards of judgment from different disciplines

c. Integrate ideas and values from different disciplines

d. Evaluate your own and others’ values from individual, cultural and global perspectives

d. Draw well-supported conclusions

e. Articulate a considered and self-determined set of values

e. Revise conclusions consistent with new observations, interpretations or reasons

How and where must you value? • With empathy and fair-mindedness

How and where must you think? • With curiosity and consistency

• Individually and in groups

• Individually and in groups Samples of my work demonstrate that I can: • Identify data, ideas, patterns, principles perspectives • Use facts, formulas and procedures

Samples of my work demonstrate that I can: • Identify values expressed in feelings, attitudes, beliefs, choices and commitments • Recognize my own and others’ values • Distinguish among personal, ethical, aesthetic, cultural and scientific values

• Draw well-supported conclusions • Integrate ideas and values from different disciplines • Revise my conclusions in light of new observations, interpretations or reasons

• Employ values and standards of judgment from different disciplines • Evaluate my own and others’ values from global or universal perspectives • Commit to actions consistent with a considered and self-determined set of values

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Communicate

Act

Communicate with different audiences using varied means.

Act purposefully, effectively and responsibly.

To communicate, you must:

To act, you must: a. Apply disciplinary knowledge, skills and values to educational and career goals

a. Identify your own strengths and need for improvement as a communicator b. Employ methods of communication appropriate to your audience and purpose c. Evaluate the effectiveness of your own and others’ communication How and where must you communicate? • By speaking, listening, reading and writing • Verbally, nonverbally and visually • With honesty and civility • In different disciplines and settings

b. Implement effective problem-solving, decision-making and goal-setting strategies c. Act effectively and appropriately in various personal and professional settings d. Assess the effectiveness of personal behavior and choices e. Respond appropriately to changing circumstances How and where must you act? • With courage and perseverance • Individually and in groups

Samples of my work demonstrate that I can: • Identify my own strengths and weaknesses as a communicator • Analyze audiences to improve communication in various settings • Communicate in different contexts, settings and disciplines • Evaluate effectiveness of my own and others’ communication

• In your personal, professional and community life Samples of my work demonstrate that I can: • Act effectively and appropriately in different contexts and settings • Implement problem-solving and decisionmaking strategies • Manage my time and activities in daily life • Apply disciplinary knowledge, skills and values to my goals • Plan for and implement desirable change in response to circumstances

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aTlas - sTUDenT QUICK RefeRenCe GUIDe

setting Up My atlas account Please allow 3 to 5 business days after turning in an Admissions application before setting up an Atlas account . Go to atlas .valenciacollege .edu . • Click Sign up for an account located below the Login Box • Click Atlas Usage Statement

The pin must be 8 to 20 characters AlphaNumeric combination (no hyphens, periods or spaces) . Once you have entered all information, click Submit . The computer will then generate your individual Username and e-mail address . Note: We encourage you to write the information down in a secure location.

• Click Accept the above conditions • Enter information in the appropriate boxes Do not use dates to answer your secret question .

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After Logging In

5. Student Detail Schedule

1. View My Valencia Identification Number

• Click the Registration tab

• Right under the My Atlas tab, click Show VID

• Click the Register for classes link

• Once you have seen the VID, click OK

• Select Term and click Submit

• Click the Student Detail Schedule link • Then go to File, then to Print

2. Check Holds • Click the Registration tab • Click the Transcripts, Grades and Holds link • Click the View Holds link

Note: This is the schedule that you will need for the bookstore and when speaking with Academic Advisors. This schedule will show a listing of your registered courses, class times, room numbers and class professors.

• Follow the links that will tell what kind of hold you have and where to take care of it

6. Pay My Valencia Bills Online

Note: Financial holds paid online (e.g. parking, short-term loan default) will not be removed from your account until you contact the business office.

• Click the Online Payment Options link

3. Check My Financial Aid Status • Click the Students tab • Click My Financial Aid link • For more information, refer to the Financial Aid Guide located at valenciacollege.edu/finaid • To check balance - Select Student Tab, then click Term Balance Less Anticipated Financial Aid link

• Click the Registration tab • The next screen contains your Account Balance and Fee Payment information. Look at the Total Amount Due and make note of it before proceeding. • Select payment type: S ubmit Your Payment Online Sign up for a TIP Payment plan • Fill in all fields for credit card information, then click Submit Payment. CLICK ONLY ONE TIME. It may take several moments for the payment to be processed.

Note: A positive number is how much you owe. A negative number is your anticipated refund.

• Print payment receipt and keep it in a safe location in the event you need it to show proof of payment

4. Register for Classes

Note: You must pay 100% of the account balance to complete your registration. Please pay before the payment due date to avoid courses being dropped for nonpayment.

• Click the Registration tab • Click the Register for classes link • Follow steps 1-5 • When you have finished adding and dropping courses, click Submit Changes below to complete online registration • Go to Registration Fee Assessment

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7. Withdraw from Class

10. Send an E-mail

• Click the Registration tab

• Click the e-mail icon at top right of the page

• Click the Register for Classes link • Click Step 3–Register for Classes/Withdraw from Classes • Select the term you wish to view, and click the Submit Term button

• Once inside, click NEW • Type in the address of the person you are sending mail to

• The screen will show your current classes

• If you need to search for a person, click To link (left side of the address field)

• Select Withdraw (web) by clicking the drop-down box next to the class(es) you wish to withdraw from

• Fill in first and/or last name • Double click the correct name then click ok

• Once you have completed your changes, click Submit Change

• When finished composing mail, click Send button at top or left of the page

Note: To ensure the withdrawn classes have been removed from your schedule, please view or print a new “Detail Schedule,” which should include the updated changes. 8. See My List of Courses (This is not a copy of your schedule) • Click the My Courses tab • Click the Click here to link • Click the individual course name to access that course’s homepage • To e-mail your professor, click the link under his or her name or click the name on the course homepage 9. View My Grades • Click the Registration tab • Click the Transcripts, Grades and Holds link • Click the Final Grades link

11. Use LifeMap Tools • Click the My LifeMap tab • Select desired LifeMap tool • There are several tools to choose from, including My Education Plan, My Job Prospects, My Portfolio and My Career Planner • Also, check out MeInTheMaking.com for resources that will help you create your own LifeMap 12. Higher One Debit Card • Click the Student tab • In Business Office Channel, click the Valencia Higher One Debit Card link • For more information, refer to: valenciacollege.edu/higherone or valenciadebitcard.com or higherone.com

• Submit the term • Scroll down to view grades for each class Note: The grade of “M” means the grade is missing. Please check the account again in 2 to 3 days for the proper grade or contact the professor.

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13. Do a Degree Audit

15. Request Official Transcripts

• Click the Registration tab

• Click the Registration tab

• Inside the Path to Graduation box, click the My Academic Progress (Degree Audit) link

• Click the Transcripts, Grades and Holds link

• Select the term (current term is the term you are in right now)

• Follow instructions for choosing an address, then click Continue

• Click Request Official Transcripts

• Click Generate New Degree Audit at bottom of the page

• Select Student Transcript and for course level select Credit, review mailing address to make sure it is correct, then click Continue at bottom of screen

• Select the program desired and then Generate Request • Choose Detailed Requirements

• Fill in required information and click Continue

• Print this out if you have any questions and bring it to see a specialist in the Answer Center • What If Analysis: If the program you would like to audit is not within your “New Degree Audit,” you can request a “What If Analysis”

• Review information and click Submit Request

­­

Note: There is a $3.00 charge per transcript. Please allow at least 48 hours for your request to be processed. 16. Join a Group

14. Change Address and Phone Number • Click the Registration tab

• Click the Groups icon located at the top right of the page after the Calendar icon

• Click the Update my Address link

• Follow the on-screen steps to join a group

• Choose the Update Address(es) and Phone(s) link

For more information

• Click Current, enter ending date and click Submit

Atlas Help Desk: (407) 582-5444­­­

• From the Type of Address to Insert pull-down menu, select Mailing

Complete Atlas Quick Reference Guide: valenciacollege.edu/atlas/documents/ AtlasQuickRef.pdf

• Update your information • Click Submit Note: If you are a Valencia employee or a work study student, you will need to change your address with Human Resources.

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E-mail: askatlas@valenciacollege.edu

Atlas How-To: valenciacollege.edu/students/howto


VALENCIA POLICIES AND PROCEDURES For a complete list of official policies and updates, please visit the online policy manual valenciacollege.edu/policies or the catalog valenciacollege.edu/catalog. Student Rights, Responsibilities & Conduct Valencia College is an educational institution committed to providing students with involvement in institutional decision making. This involvement takes many forms. Student Government leaders are elected on the campuses and serve as the official voice of the students to the administration on matters important to students. Students serve as voting members on collegewide and campus committees. The college offers a student leadership development program that not only trains current and potential student leaders, but solicits student input on issues related to student life. Campus Presidents meet regularly with students to obtain feedback on college operations and how they impact campus life for students. A survey is conducted regularly asking currently enrolled students about their perceptions of the specific services and programs offered by the college. Students are continually encouraged to contact their Student Government officers or campus Student Development Coordinators to volunteer to become active in college committees and/ or activities. These and other initiatives by Valencia staff and student leaders assist the college in being proactive in evaluating and acting on student needs. In addition to the numerous opportunities for involvement in and impact on institutional decision making at the college, Valencia students are also responsible for adhering to applicable federal, state, local and college laws, ordinances and policies. The purpose of this section of the planner is to clarify, as much as possible, what you and the college should expect of each other in the areas of student rights, responsibilities and conduct.

Withdrawing From a Class Don’t withdraw from a course without first talking to your professor and/or an academic advisor/counselor/student services specialist. Students entering Valencia College will follow a Withdrawal/Forgiveness policy that restricts the number of times a student may withdraw from or repeat a course. This policy was mandated by the Florida College System and is in effect at all Florida state and community colleges. Generally, students may attempt a college-level or vocational credit course two (2) times during which they may withdraw or earn a letter grade. On the third attempt in the same course, students will pay the full cost of instruction (out-of-state fees) and may not withdraw but will receive a letter grade. Students who wish to attempt the same course a fourth or subsequent time must submit an appeal to the Dean of Students by the deadline date listed in the college calendar or the Valencia website: valenciacollege.edu. Students submitting an appeal must justify extenuating circumstances. It is important to note that an attempt is defined as enrollment past the drop/refund deadline. For further description of this procedure, see the current Valencia College catalog. Withdrawal Rules and Procedures The Withdrawal Deadline for each term is published in the college calendar. Refer to Policy 04-07 “Academic Progress, Course Attendance and Grades, and Withdrawals” for the full policy. If you withdraw, or are withdrawn by the professor for excessive absences or other

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reasons, on or before the withdrawal deadline, you will receive a W (Withdrawn) as your final grade in the course.

by your professor. If you receive a “below C notice,” you should meet with the professor immediately. The fact that you did not receive a “below C notice” at mid-term does not guarantee that you will pass the course.

After the deadline, you may be withdrawn by the professor for excessive absences. Read each course syllabus to understand what you need to do to avoid being withdrawn by your professor. Academic Warning Talk to your professor about any special If your term GPA falls below 2.0, you will circumstances you are experiencing. be put on academic warning. To be removed from academic warning at the end of the next term, you must achieve a minimum cumulative I (Incomplete) GPA of 2.0. When you are placed on academic If you request or receive an “I,” you must warning, it is strongly recommended that you complete the required course work by the talk with an academic advisor/counselor to end of the following full term. The professor discuss your educational plan and Valencia’s will change your grade from “I” to the academic support services before your next appropriate grade of “A”–“F.” If you receive registration. an “I,” you may still withdraw from the class in the following term. If you do withdraw, the professor will change your grade from “I” to “W.” If you receive an “I” and do not withdraw or complete the required course work by the end of the following full term, your grade will automatically be changed from an “I” to an “F” (Failing). Effect of Withdrawal on Your Grade Point Average If you receive a “W,” you will not receive credit for the course and the “W” will not be calculated in your grade point average. For a complete listing of withdrawal deadlines, please refer to the college calendar. Find the college calendar within this student planner or look online at valenciacollege.edu/calendar. Academic Standards, Warning, Probation, and Suspension (College Policy 6Hx28:08-01) Academic Standards To maintain satisfactory academic progress at Valencia, you must achieve a minimum term grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 each term. Successful completion of a course is defined as a grade of “A.” “B,” “C” or “D” except for those specific courses that require a grade of “C” or better for successful completion. Mid-Term Warning If you are making a grade lower than “C” at or about mid-term, you will be notified 56

Academic Probation If your term GPA falls below 2.0 for two successive terms, you will be placed on academic probation. It is required that you meet with an academic advisor/counselor to discuss your educational plan and make use of Valencia’s academic support services. Under this status, you must obtain an academic advisor’s/counselor’s approval of your proposed course schedule before registering for the next term. To be removed from probation, you must achieve a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0. Academic Suspension If while on probation, you have two terms in which you earn less than a 2.0 GPA, you will be placed on academic suspension for the following term (fall, spring or summer). Under Academic Suspension, You: 1. Are officially prohibited from enrolling in credit courses at Valencia for one term (fall, spring or summer). 2. May register only for continuing education courses at Valencia. 3. Must submit a letter requesting readmission to the Dean of Students of the appropriate campus by the Suspension Readmission Deadline established by Valencia and listed in the college calendar. 4. Will be readmitted on academic probation permitted to return. Under this status,


you must meet with an assigned academic advisor/counselor to complete a success plan and obtain the academic advisor’s/counselor’s approval of your proposed course schedule before registering for the next term. 5. Must achieve a minimum 2.0 GPA for each term. If you do not achieve a term GPA of 2.0 while on probation following a suspension, you will be placed on Academic Suspension again. 6. Will return to Good Academic Standing when your cumulative GPA is at least 2.0. Appeal of Academic Suspension You have the right to appeal an academic suspension decision.

to the responsible student, following a discussion of the matter with the student and any other appropriate persons. Academic penalties may include, without limitation, one or more of the following: loss of credit for an assignment, examination, or project; withdrawal from course; a reduction in the course grade; or a grade of “F” in the course. 2. The professor may choose to consider the act of academic dishonesty to be a violation of the Valencia Student Code of Conduct, and may refer the matter for resolution in accordance with Policy 10-03. Disciplinary penalties for academic dishonesty may include, without limitation, warning, probation, suspension and/or expulsion from the college.

To appeal a suspension decision, you must first discuss your concerns with the Dean of Students, or designee, of the appropriate 3. The professor may choose to consider the campus, who may reverse a suspension act of academic dishonesty as warranting decision. The decision of the Dean of Students, both academic and disciplinary sanctions. In or designee, is final. this case, a professor should refer the matter for resolution in accordance with Policy 10Academic Dishonesty 03, Student Code of Conduct, and when (College Policy 6HX28:08-11) appropriate, should withhold any academic sanctions until such time as the disciplinary process is concluded and the student has All forms of academic dishonesty are prohibited been found responsible for violating college at Valencia College. Academic dishonesty policy. If the student is found responsible for includes, but is not limited to, plagiarism, violating the Student Code of Conduct, the cheating, furnishing false information, forgery, professor may then assign academic sanction alteration or misuse of documents, misconduct in addition to any assigned disciplinary during a test situation, and misuse of sanction. identification with intent to defraud or deceive. All work submitted by students is expected to be the result of the students’ individual thoughts, research and self-expression. Whenever a student uses ideas, wording or organization from another source, the source shall be appropriately acknowledged.

If the student disagrees with the decision of the professor, the student may seek a review of the decision subject to and in accordance with Policy 10-13, Student Academic Dispute and Administrative Complaint Resolution.

Anyone observing an act of academic dishonesty may refer the matter to the Students shall take special notice that the assignment of course grades is the responsibility professor, as an academic violation, and/or to the Dean of Students or designee, as a violation of the student’s individual professor. of the Student Code of Conduct (6Hx28:10When the professor has reason to believe that 03). an act of academic dishonesty has occurred, the professor may proceed in one of three ways: 1. The professor may choose to consider the act of academic dishonesty to be an academic offense, and using his/her academic judgment may assign an academic sanction Policies and Procedures

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Student Academic Dispute (College Policy: 6Hx28: 08-10) Final Grades If you think that your final course grade is not representative of your performance according to the evaluation system defined and used by your professor, you have recourse through the student academic dispute process to seek a change of grade. Here are the steps you must take in the dispute process: 1.  Meet with the professor to learn how the grade was determined and to examine the evidence. 2.  If your concern is not resolved, you should meet with the professor’s academic department dean. 3.  If your concern is still not resolved, you can choose to meet with the Campus President or submit your concern in writing to the Student Final Grade Resolution Committee. For both Campus President and the Student Final Grade Resolution Committee, these guidelines must be followed:

a) Only final course grades may be disputed.

b) “W” and “I” grades may not be disputed.

c) You must fill out an official form requesting that the Student Final Grade Resolution Committee review your case. The form is available in the Campus President’s office on each campus.

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calculated in accordance with the grading system as defined by the faculty member. Review Process An informal review will be conducted by the Student Final Grade Resolution Committee. The review will provide you an opportunity to present your position and supporting facts. You will be required to provide the committee an advance copy of the major issues, documents to be included, and names of persons you expect to attend the review, within five working days prior to the review. The committee is the final judge of what and who are to be included and excluded in the review, and has the right to adjourn and reconvene at a later time, if necessary, to complete the review. After the review, the committee will make a recommendation to the Campus President, who will notify you in writing as to the resolution of the dispute. In the case of a denial of a grade change, the decision of the Campus President on the committee recommendation will be final. For non-final grades and matters involving academic progress toward graduation, you should speak to campus ombudsmen. Go to the Campus President’s office to get their names and contact information. AIDS Policy (College Policy 6HX28:02-04)

Valencia College recognizes that discrimination against individuals diagnosed as having Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS); Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Related Complex (ARC); or a d) To request a review, you must file the person determined to be positive for the completed form in the appropriate Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is Campus President’s office within 60 expressly prohibited by Florida law under days after receiving the final grade in the provisions of the Human Rights Act the course. of 1977, as amended by Section 760.50, e) The Student Final Grade Resolution Florida Statutes, 1988, which accords to such Committee will act only upon a infected individuals every protection made to complaint that an instructor applied handicapped persons under Section 504 of his or her system for determining the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Pub. L. No. final course grades in an inconsistent 93-112). or arbitrary manner in violation of In accordance with the law, Valencia College college policy, in substantial and will offer students and employees with AIDS material noncompliance with the the same opportunities and benefits offered course syllabus or other formal to other students and employees while at the course-related materials, or was not


same time attempting to balance their rights to an education and to employment against the rights of other students and employees to an environment in which they are protected from contracting the disease. Drugs and Alcohol Valencia College, through its policies and programs, is dedicated to providing an atmosphere that encourages: • The reinforcement of a positive, drug-free lifestyle;

and alcohol by Valencia College students or employees on college premises or as part of any college activity. The president or a designee is authorized to impose disciplinary sanctions on students and employees (consistent with local, state and federal law), up to and including expulsion or termination of employment and referral for prosecution, for violations of standards of conduct required by this policy. For the purpose of this policy, a disciplinary sanction may include the completion of an appropriate rehabilitation program.

• Respect for laws and rules prohibiting the use Procedure of illegal drugs and the abuse of alcohol; The president or a designee shall, at a • An understanding of the effects of drugs, minimum, take the following steps to including alcohol, on personal health and implement a drug prevention program by: safety; and A. Making an annual distribution in • The value of sound personal health and writing to each employee and to each safety. student who is taking one or more classes for any type of academic credit Policy 6HX28:08-04 prohibits the possession, except for continuing education sale or consumption of alcoholic beverages on units, regardless of the length of the campus. student’s program of study, of: Policies 6HX28:70-08.1 and 6HX28:10.082

prohibit the possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students on college premises or as part of any college activity. The college may impose disciplinary sanctions up to and including expulsion and referral for prosecution for violations of these policies.

1.  Standards of conduct that clearly prohibit, at a minimum, the unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees on college property or as part of any college activities;

Please come by Student Services for information about activities and referrals.

2.  A description of the applicable legal sanctions under local, state or federal law for the unlawful possession or distribution;

Drug-Free Campuses (College Policy 6Hx28:10-08) Specific Authority: 240.319 FS., 6A-14.0247 FAC.  aw Implemented: Drug-Free Schools and L Communities Act, Amendments of 1989, Public Law 101-226; Section 22 amends provisions of the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act of 1986 and the Higher Education Act of 1965. 34 CFR Part 86. Policy In compliance with the provisions of the federal Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989, Valencia College will take such steps as are necessary in order to adopt and implement a program to prevent the unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs

3.  A description of the health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol; 4.  A description of any drug or alcohol counseling, treatment, or rehabilitation or re-entry programs that are available to employees or students; and 5.  A clear statement that the college will impose disciplinary sanctions on students and employees (consistent with local, state and federal law), and a description of those sanctions, up to and including expulsion or termination of employment and referral for prosecution, for violations of the standards of conduct required by this policy. For the purpose of this policy, a disciplinary sanction may include

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the completion of an appropriate rehabilitation program. B. Establishing and conducting a biennial review by the college of its program to: 1.  Determine its effectiveness and implement changes to the program if they are needed; and 2.  Ensure that the disciplinary sanctions described in this policy are consistently enforced. Equal Access–Equal Opportunity Valencia supports equality of opportunity and access to education for students. The college will not deny admission or participation in any educational program or activity on the basis of any legally prohibited discrimination including but not limited to such factors as race, sex, national origin, color, religion, age, veterans status, sexual orientation, disability and marital status. The college will investigate charges of unlawful discrimination. Unlawful discrimination includes unfair treatment on the basis of race, age, religion, disability, color, marital status, sex, national origin and sexual orientation. Concerns and complaints should be directed to the Dean of Students on your campus. Smoke-Free Policy Policy: 6Hx28:10-05, Valencia is proud to go 100% smoke-free We are committed to providing a safe and healthy learning environment for our students, employees and visitors. In recent years, we have made improvements toward healthier campuses with the implementation of LEED-certified buildings, employee wellness programs and recycling efforts. Smoke-free campuses will further promote the health, safety and wellbeing of members of the Valencia community by reducing exposure to secondhand smoke on Valencia campuses. Effective August 2012, all of Valencia’s campuses will be smoke-free. This includes all property and facilities owned, leased or operated by Valencia, including buildings,

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bridges, walkways, sidewalks, parking lots and garages, on-campus streets and driveways, grounds, on-campus LYNX bus stops and shelters, exterior open spaces and personal vehicles in these areas. For more information on the policy or resources, visit valenciacollege. edu/sharetheair. Security Valencia Alert Emergency Messaging System Sign up for Valencia Alert — If there is ever a crisis or emergency on campus, find out right away. Receive instant notifications via e-mail or text message. To register, look for the Valencia Alert link on your My Atlas homepage. Campus security personnel are on duty day and night to control traffic and parking, and provide for the safety and welfare of students, faculty and staff. Security will assist with vehicle services, which include unlocking vehicle doors and providing a jump-start. REMEMBER, security is everyone’s responsibility, so please lock your vehicle and safeguard your property. Report all suspicious activities to the Security Office. The Clery Act requires all institutions of higher education to report annual campus crime statistics. In 2009, there was a total of 10 incidents reported. By category, there were 1 robbery offense, 1 burglary offense, 4 motor vehicle thefts, 1 liquor law violation and 3 drug abuse violations. Security Call Boxes Security call boxes are located on the perimeters of the East, West, and Osceola Campuses. The call boxes are white. They will activate when the door is opened and send an alarm over the security radio system. When the alarm is sent, a security officer will respond to that location.


Parking Lot Emergency Call Boxes There are yellow emergency call boxes attached to various light poles in our parking lots that are identified by a large blue sign with white lettering. To activate the call box, you only need to open the door, which will transmit the location of the alarm over the Security Department radio system. An officer will be dispatched to that location to provide assistance.

Unpaid citations will result in an administrative hold on all college records. Students with a hold will not be authorized to receive grades, request transcripts or register for classes until delinquent fines are paid.

Lost and Found A lost and found depository is maintained in the Security Office on every campus. All found articles should be turned in to the campus Security Office. Parking Students should familiarize themselves with parking regulations, student parking locations and restrictions. Parking decals are free, required for all vehicles and available in the Security Offices on each campus. They are valid for one calendar year only. Parking decals give holders the privilege of parking on campus, but regretfully we cannot guarantee the holder a parking space. A lack of space is not considered a valid excuse for violation of any parking regulation. While on campus, students must park in designated student parking areas only. Student parking is designated with white stripes. Failure to park in assigned parking areas will result in a parking fine. The college will assume no responsibility for loss or damage to any vehicle, or its contents, while operated or parked on the property of Valencia College. Types of Parking Fines Amount 1. Improper parking in: • Spaces designated “Disabled Only” $250.00 • Fire Lanes $40.00 • Designated curb areas, wood area, grass areas, visitor’s area or motorcycle area $10.00 2. Failure to display decal $10.00 3. Improper display of decal $10.00 4. All other violations $10.00 * Parking fines double after 15 days from date of issue. Policies and Procedures

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Privacy Right of Students (Student Records) (College Policy 6HX28:7B-02) You have the right to review your records. Statute 20, United States Code, section 1232g and regulations adopted pursuant thereto, hereafter referred to as the Code, requires that each student be notified of the rights accorded him/her by the Code. The following is provided as basic general information relative to the Code. A copy of the complete Code is available in the Libraries on both the East and West Campuses.

written consent to release the information to the student’s parents, or (2) the parents provide evidence that the student is a dependent of the parents as defined in Section 152 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954. Except as required for use by the president in the discharge of his official responsibilities as prescribed by laws, regulations of the state board, and board policies, the designated custodian of such records may release information from these records to others only upon authorization in writing from the student or upon subpoena by a court of competent jurisdiction.

The Code provides for a category of student information termed “directory information.” Directory information will be available to all Student Conduct persons on request unless the student places a (College Policy 6Hx28:08-03) “confidential hold” on his/her records. Valencia College has identified the following as directory Specific Authority: 1006.60 FS information. Law Implemented: 1006.60 1. Student’s name 2. Major field of study 3. Dates of attendance 4. Dates of degrees and awards received If you refuse to permit Valencia to release directory information, you must inform the Admissions/Records Office in writing. Your decision to refuse the release of directory information also means that your name will not appear on recognition lists or in news releases, etc. You must give written consent for the release of information to third parties. The confidential hold will remain on your record until you submit written consent to release the hold. All other information, such as health and medical records, disciplinary records, records of personal counseling, required student and family financial income records, transcripts or student permanent records, student placement records and other personally identifiable information shall be open for inspection only to the student and members of the professional staff of Valencia who have responsibility for working with the student, and, when appropriate, to the parents or guardian of the student. Such information will not be released to third parties without the written consent of the student. Once a student reaches the age of 18 or is enrolled in a post-secondary program, parents no longer have any right under the Code unless (1) the student gives 62

Policy: I. General Principles A. Purpose: Valencia College is dedicated to the advancement of knowledge and learning and also to the development of responsible personal and social conduct. The primary purpose for the maintenance of discipline in the college setting is to support a civil environment conducive to learning and inquiry. B. Inherent Authority: The college reserves the right to take necessary and appropriate action to protect the safety and well-being of the campus community. This Code is adopted for the appropriate discipline of any student (or student organization) who acts to impair, interfere with, or obstruct the orderly conduct, processes, and functions of the college. This Code may apply to acts conducted on or off campus when relevant to such orderly conduct, processes, and functions. It is the intention of the Board that authority for student discipline ultimately rests with the College President. The President delegates this authority to the Vice President for Student Affairs, and the Vice President delegates this authority to each campus


Dean of Students. The campus Dean of Students is responsible for implementing the student disciplinary system. The President, the Vice President for Student Affairs, or the campus Dean of Students or designee may take direct jurisdiction of any case due when it is determined by the circumstances that taking direct jurisdiction is the best way to resolution. As appropriate, the campus Dean of Students or designee will work collaboratively with the Campus President’s office and campus Security in addressing student conduct issues. C. Interpretation of Regulations and Standard of Conduct: To the extent feasible and practical, disciplinary regulations at the college are in writing in order to give students general notice of prohibited conduct. The regulations are not a criminal code; they should be read broadly and are not designed to define misconduct in exhaustive terms.

deemed to have given his or her consent to the policies of the college, the State Board of Education, and the laws of Florida. By enrolling at Valencia College, a student assumes the responsibility for becoming familiar with and abiding by the general rules of conduct listed in this Code. Violation of any of these may lead to disciplinary sanctions. A student may be accountable to both governmental authorities and to the college for acts that constitute violations of law and this Code. Student conduct allegedly constituting a felony or misdemeanor offense may be referred to appropriate law enforcement agencies for prosecution. Disciplinary proceedings at the college will not be subject to challenge on the grounds that criminal charges involving the same incident have been filed, prosecuted, dismissed, reduced or otherwise resolved or that such proceedings constitute double jeopardy.

D. Proceedings:

II.

Disciplinary proceedings conducted pursuant to the Code shall be informal, fair and expeditious. Procedures governing criminal or civil courts, including formal rules of evidence, are not applicable. Deviations from the procedures in this Code shall not invalidate a proceeding or decision, except where such deviation has clearly resulted in significant prejudice to an accused student or to the college. College jurisdiction regarding discipline is generally limited to conduct of any student or registered student organization that occurs on college premises. However, the college reserves the right to impose discipline based on any student conduct, regardless of location, that may adversely affect the college community.

A. Student  Student as used in this code means:

E. Violations of Local, State and Federal Law:

4.  Student groups and organizations, which may be held collectively responsible when violations of this Code by those associated with the group or organization have received

Any student who accepts the privilege extended by the laws of Florida of attendance at Valencia College is

Definitions

1.  All persons taking Valencia courses, both full-time and part-time; and/or 2.  All persons who are not officially enrolled for a particular term but have a continuing relationship with Valencia or intend to enroll in the next term. This provision is intended to include within the definition of students those persons enrolled in the spring and fall semesters who engage in misconduct during the summer and students who are first-time enrollees who engage in misconduct prior to the time of enrollment; and/or 3.  All persons who are attending classes on a Valencia campus although they may be enrolled students in other higher education institutions; and/or

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consent or encouragement of the group or organization or of the group’s or organization’s leaders or officers. B. Campus Campus means: 1.  All land, buildings, facilities, and other property — including adjacent streets and sidewalks — in the possession of or owned, used, or controlled by Valencia. III. Grounds for Discipline A. The college may impose discipline for violation of, or an attempt to violate, any college policies or campus regulations. Violations or attempted violations include, but are not limited to, the following types of misconduct: 1. All forms of academic misconduct, including, but not limited to, cheating, fabrication, plagiarism, or facilitating academic dishonesty. 2. Other forms of dishonesty, including, but not limited to, fabricating information or knowingly furnishing false information or reporting a false emergency to the college or to college officials acting in the performance of their duties. 3. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any college document, record, key, electronic device, or identification. 4. Theft of, conversion of, or damage to or destruction of any property of the college or property of others while on college premises, or possession of any property of the college or others stolen while on college premises.

Information Technology Resources Policies and related procedures. 6. Use of Valencia technology, including, but not limited to, computers, network, and wireless Internet, to access materials disruptive to the learning environment, including without limitation sexually explicit or violent content. 7. Unauthorized entry to, possession of, receipt of, duplication of, or use of the college’s name, insignia, or seal. 8. Unauthorized entry to, possession of, receipt of, or use of any college properties, equipment, resources, or services. 9. Violation of policies, regulations, or rules governing college owned or operated facilities or leased facilities. 10. Physical abuse, including, but not limited to, rape, sexual assault, sex offenses, and other physical assault; threats of violence; or conduct that threatens the health or safety of any person. 11. Sexual harassment, as defined in college policy (see Policies 6Hx28:02-01, 0202, and 02-03): Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when:

a) Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of instruction, employment, or participation in other college activity;

b) Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as a basis for evaluation in making academic or personnel decisions affecting an individual; or

5. Theft or other abuse of computing facilities or computer time, including, but not limited to, unauthorized entry into a file to use, read, or change the contents or any other purpose; unauthorized transfer of a file; unauthorized use of another individual’s identification or password; use of computing facilities to interfere with the work of another student, faculty member, or college official; use of computing facilities to interfere with a college computing system; or other violations of policy 6Hx28:04-38, 64

c) Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive college environment. In determining whether the alleged conduct constitutes sexual harassment, consideration shall be given to the record of the incident as a whole and to the totality of the circumstances, including the


context in which the alleged incidents 16. Obstruction or disruption of teaching, occurred. research, administration, disciplinary procedures, or other college activities, 12. Stalking behavior when an individual including, but not limited to: willfully, maliciously, and repeatedly engages in a knowing course of conduct directed at a specific person which reasonably and seriously alarms, torments, or terrorizes the person, and which serves no legitimate purpose.

13. The use or display of “fighting words” by students to harass any person(s) on college property, on other property to which these policies apply as defined in campus implementing regulations, or in connection with official college functions or college sponsored programs. “Fighting words” are those personally abusive epithets which, when directly addressed to any ordinary person, are, in the context used and as a matter of common knowledge, inherently likely to provoke a violent reaction whether or not they actually do so. Such words include, but are not limited to, those terms widely recognized to be derogatory references to race, ethnicity, religion, sex, sexual orientation, disability, and other personal characteristics. “Fighting words” create a hostile and intimidating environment that the student uttering them should reasonably know will interfere with the victim’s ability to pursue effectively his or her education or otherwise to participate fully in college programs and activities. 14. Wearing styles or articles of clothing that cause disruption of the learning environment or intimidation of others in the learning environment, or violate published classroom protocols of individual professors, subject to the requirements of law. 15. Hazing or any action or situation that recklessly or intentionally endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a student for purposes including, but not limited to, initiation or admission into or affiliation with any organization operating under the sanction of a postsecondary institution, as prohibited by 1006.63, FS, and Valencia Policy 6Hx28:10-17.

a) Violence committed against any member or guest of the college community.

b) Forcible interference with the freedom of movement of any member or guest of the college.

c) Obstruction of the normal processes, activities, and functions of the college community.

d) Assault or battery upon college security officers.

e) Disruptive activities as defined and prohibited in accordance with the criminal provisions of Section 877.13, Florida Statutes.

17. Disorderly or lewd conduct. 18. Participation in a disturbance of the peace or unlawful assembly. 19. Failure to identify oneself to, or comply with directions of, a college official or other public official acting in the performance of their duties while on college property or at official college functions, or resisting or obstructing such college or other public officials in the performance of or the attempt to perform their duties. 20. Unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, use, or sale of, or the attempted manufacture, distribution, dispensing, or sale of controlled substances, identified in federal and state law or regulations. 21. Manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, use, or sale of, or the attempted manufacture, distribution, dispensing, or sale of alcohol that is unlawful or otherwise prohibited by, or not in compliance with, college policy or campus regulations. 22. Possession, use, storage, or manufacture of explosives, firebombs, or other destructive devices. 23. Except as expressly permitted by law, possession, use, or manufacture of a firearm or other weapon. 24. Violation of the conditions contained

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in the terms of a disciplinary action imposed under this Code.

of any other person engaged in violations of chapter 893 within a state college or community college;

25. Violation of the terms of any disciplinary sanction imposed in accordance with this Code.

26. Aiding, Solicitation, and Attempt. A person is in violation of this Code if he or she:

2. If the student voluntarily discloses his or her violations of chapter 893 prior to his or her arrest; or

3. If the student commits himself or herself, or is referred by the court in lieu of sentence, to a state-licensed drug abuse program and successfully completes the program.

a) intentionally aids or abets another in the commission of any offense(s) mentioned in this Code;

b) requests, hires, encourages, or otherwise solicits another person to commit any offense mentioned in this Code, either intending that the other person commit the offense or with the knowledge that the other person intends to commit the offense; or

c) attempts to commit any offense mentioned in this Code.

27. The college shall enforce the provisions of Section 1006.62, Florida Statutes, hereinafter set forth in full, as follows:

B. The college will follow the mandates of Public Law 90-575, which provides in part that students at an institution of higher learning who, after notice and hearing, are found guilty of substantial disruption will not be eligible for financial assistance provided by the federal government. IV. Standards of Classroom Behavior

A. Primary responsibility for managing the classroom environment rests with a) Each student in a community college the faculty. Faculty members are or state college is subject to federal authorized to define, communicate, and state law, respective county and and enforce appropriate standards of municipal ordinances, and all rules decorum in classrooms, offices, and and regulations of the State Board of other instructional areas under their Education or board of trustees of the supervision. Students who engage in institution. any prohibited or unlawful acts that b) Violation of these published laws, result in disruption of a class may be ordinances, or rules and regulations directed by the faculty member to leave may subject the violator to the class for the remainder of the class appropriate action by the institution’s period. Longer suspensions from class authorities. or dismissal on disciplinary grounds c) Each president of a community must be preceded by a disciplinary college or state college may, after conference or hearing, as set forth in the notice to the student of the charges Implementing Procedures of this Code. and after a hearing thereon, expel, suspend, or otherwise discipline Examples of such disruptive or distracting any student who is found to have activities include, but are not limited to, the violated any law, ordinance, or rule following: or regulation of the State Board of Education or of the board of trustees 1. Activities that are inconsistent with of the institution. A student may be commonly acceptable classroom entitled to waiver of expulsion: behavior and are not conducive to the learning experience, such as excessive 1. If the student provides substantial tardiness, leaving and returning during assistance in the identification, class, and early departure when not arrest, or conviction of any of his previously authorized; or her accomplices, accessories, co-conspirators, or principals or 66


2. Activities that violate previously prescribed classroom guidelines or constitute an unreasonable interruption of the learning process; and 3. Side discussions that are irrelevant to the subject matter of the class, that distract from the learning process, or impede, hinder, or inhibit the ability of other students to obtain the full benefit of the educational presentation.

Student Conduct Code Procedures Reporting Violations of Student Conduct Code

Any college student, faculty, or staff member may report a student(s), student group, or student organization suspected of violating the Student Code of Conduct to the campus Dean of Students or designee. Normally, a written complaint to the campus Dean of Students B. Academic dishonesty allegations may be will be requested promptly after the occurrence processed by the professor as academic or discovery of the alleged infraction(s), violations and/or may be processed although the campus Dean of Students may in accordance with student conduct initiate disciplinary processes without a written procedures set forth in this Code. complaint. Those reporting cases are normally Students may be subject to both the expected to participate in the proceedings and Student Conduct Code and academic provide information relevant to the matter in sanctions as determined in the academic the disciplinary process. judgment of the professor in cases where there is a combination of alleged Steps in Student Conduct violations of academic and Resolution Process nonacademic regulations. Any student determined by the professor to have The first step in the process is an informal been responsible for engaging in an act conference between the student(s) and the of academic dishonesty shall be subject Dean of Students or designee. During this to a range of academic penalties (apart conference, the Dean of Students or designee from any sanctions that may be imposed will discuss the alleged violation with the pursuant to the Code) as determined student and may reach an understanding by the professor, which may include, about its circumstances and sanctions that will but not be limited to, one or more result in a final determination by the Dean of of the following: loss of credit for an Students or designee on the alleged violation. assignment, examination, or project; a If a final determination is not reached at this reduction in the course grade; or a grade point, the Dean of Students or designee will of “F� in the course. refer the case to Mediation or for a Disciplinary Conference.  Mediation Mediation is a confidential process whereby two or more parties voluntarily meet with an impartial mediator to communicate their concerns and needs to each other and to reach their own agreement on the resolution of the case. The participants in mediation are responsible for keeping their agreement or renegotiating it, if necessary. In the event that the participants do not reach a full and final resolution, the case will be referred back to the Dean of Students or designee.

Policies and Procedures

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Disciplinary Conference The campus Dean of Students or designee may convene and conduct the Disciplinary Conference with the Student Conduct Committee. He or she may participate in hearing deliberations and discussions. Recommendations of the Student Conduct Committee are determined through consensus. The Dean of Students or designee will make a final determination of the outcome. A campus-based Student Conduct Committee will be established by the Dean of Students or designee to resolve disciplinary issues. The Student Conduct Committee will consist of two or more members comprised of: One (1) Dean of Students who chairs the Student Conduct Committee and one (1) or more additional members selected at the discretion of the Dean of Students or designee based on the particulars of the student conduct case, which may include representatives of the Campus President’s office, faculty, academic deans, security staff, students, and other student affairs staff.

6. Persons who participate in providing information at the Disciplinary Conference will be asked to affirm that their testimony is truthful. Persons who participate in providing information at the Disciplinary Conference will be excluded from the conference except when providing information to the Student Conduct Committee. The student(s) referred for disciplinary action may attend the entire conference except for the deliberation by the Student Conduct Committee. All parties will be excluded during Student Conduct Committee deliberations, which will not be recorded or transcribed. Sanctions

Sanctions for violating provisions of this Code may result in suspension or dismissal from the college. Significant mitigating or aggravating factors will be considered when sanctions are imposed, including the present Procedural protections are provided to students demeanor and past disciplinary record of the offender, the nature of the offense, and referred for disciplinary action in Disciplinary the severity of any damage, injury or harm Conferences. A partial description is provided resulting from it. Repeated violations of any here. Please look at the full policy and part of this Code may also result in suspension procedures for the details. or dismissal. Sanctions for students and 1. A written notice of the specific charges student organizations that may be imposed in at least 24 hours prior to the scheduled accordance with this Code include, but are not conference. limited to: 2. Reasonable access to the case file prior “Warning” – notice, oral or written, that to and during the conference. prohibited conduct may be cause for additional 3. An opportunity to respond to the disciplinary action if repeated in the future. evidence. “Censure” – a written reprimand for violation 4. A right to be accompanied by an advisor of specified regulations, including a warning (advisor role is limited to consultation). that prohibited conduct may be cause for additional disciplinary action if repeated in the 5. The Dean of Students will exercise future. control over the proceedings to avoid needless consumption of time and “Disciplinary Probation” – status assigned to achieve orderly completion of the for a designated period of time, during which hearing. Formal rules of evidence any other violation of the Code may result will not be applicable in disciplinary in suspension or dismissal from the college. proceedings conducted pursuant to the Students on disciplinary probation may not Student Code of Conduct. The Dean of hold or run for any elected or appointed Students or designee will abide by the positions. Additional conditions appropriate to rules of confidentiality and privilege, the violation may be imposed. but will admit all other matters that are “Restitution” – repayment to the college or relevant. others affected for damages resulting from a violation of this Code. 68


“Suspension” – exclusion from college premises and other privileges or activities for a period of time as set forth in the suspension notice. This action will be permanently recorded on the student’s record. “Dismissal” or “Expulsion” – permanent termination of student status and exclusion from college premises, privileges, and activities. This action will be permanently recorded on the student’s record. “Other Sanctions” – other sanctions may be imposed instead of or in addition to those specified above.

4. Without limitation, examples of other sanctions for offenses committed by student organizations include cancellation of events or revocation of the registration or official recognition of a student organization; and restrictions on the use of, or removal from, campus facilities. The Vice President for Student Affairs, Dean of Students or designee may impose any of the above immediately as an Interim Sanction if needed to protect the welfare of the student(s) referred for disciplinary action, others involved in the alleged violation, or the college community. The interim sanction will be effective immediately without prior notice whenever there is evidence that the continued presence of the student at the college poses a substantial and immediate threat to himself or herself, to others, or to the stability and continuance of normal college functions.

1. Without limitation, examples of other sanctions for individual nonacademic offenses also include fines; withholding of diplomas or transcripts pending compliance with rules, completion of any student judicial process or sanction, or payment of fines; restrictions on the use of or removal from campus facilities; Appeals community service; educational requirements; or research projects. Any disciplinary determination arrived at through a disciplinary conference and resulting 2. Without limitation, examples of other in suspension or dismissal may be appealed to sanctions for individual academic honesty offenses also include reduction the Vice President for Student Affairs by the respondent within seven days after the notice of grade, denial of academic credit, of suspension or dismissal is delivered to the and invalidation of university credit or address on record for the student in the Office of the degree based upon such credit. of the Registrar. In addition to any other penalties that may be imposed, an individual may be denied admission or further registration, and the college may invalidate academic credit for work done by a student and may invalidate or revoke the degree based upon such credit if it is determined that the student has made false, fraudulent, or incomplete statements in the application, residence affidavit, or accompanying documents or statements in connection with, or supplemental to, the application for admission to or graduation from the college.

Appeals will be reviewed by the Vice President for Student Affairs to determine their viability as soon as possible after they are received. The Vice President for Student Affairs will determine viability based on whether there is new information that significantly alters the finding of fact, evidence of improper procedure, findings that are against the weight of the evidence, or excessive sanctions. The decision of the Vice President for Student Affairs about the viability of the appeal is final.

3. Without limitation, sanctions may be imposed for individuals who engage in conduct that violates this policy for the student to provide a personal action plan to ensure that there will be no further disruption to the learning environment.

Policies and Procedures

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Student Administrative Complaint Resolution (College Policy 6Hx28:08-10) Student Academic Dispute Resolution (Final Course Grades, Non-Final Course Grades and Matters Involving Academic Progress Toward Graduation) Procedure: Student Administrative Complaint Resolution Valencia staff leaders are a resource for students seeking assistance in resolving issues with nonacademic matters. The chart below lists the appropriate staff leaders who can assist with designated issues. Students may follow the progression of staff assistance in an administrative area, starting with the first response level, to bring resolution to the issue. For a full version of the policy, please refer to valenciacollege.edu/generalcounsel.

Issues

First Level

Advising/Counseling

Dean of Students

Application

Manager, Answer Center

Bookstore

Manager, Bookstore

Discrimination Counselor Entry Testing (CPT)

Student Services Specialist, Assessment

Faculty Concerns

Academic Dean

Financial Aid

Coordinator, Financial Aid

Florida Residency

Manager, Answer Center

Graduation

Assistant Director, Admissions

Harassment Counselor Library

Library Services Supervisor or Librarian

New Student Orientation

Coordinator, New Student Orientation

Parking

Field Supervisor, Security

Refund Requests

Assistant Director, Admissions

Registration

Manager, Answer Center

Security

Field Supervisor, Security

Student Accounts

Coordinator, Business Office

Student Activities

Coordinator, Student Development

Students with Disabilities

Manager, Students with Disabilities

Transcripts

Assistant Director, Admissions continued on next page

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Student Administrative Complaint Resolution (cont.) (College Policy 6Hx28:08-10)

Second Level

Third Level

Assistant Director, Admissions

Director, Admissions and Registration

Director, Bookstore Dean of Students Director, Standardized Testing Campus President Director, Financial Aid Assistant Director, Admissions

Director, Admissions and Registration

Director, Graduation and Records Dean of Students Director, Library

Campus President

Dean of Students Manager, Security Director, Admissions and Registration Dean of Students Manager, Security Bursar Director, Student Development Director, Students with Disabilities Program Director, Admissions and Registration continued on next page

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Student Administrative Complaint Resolution (cont.) (College Policy 6Hx28:08-10)

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Assistant Vice President

Vice President

Student Affairs

Student Affairs

Admissions and Records

Student Affairs

Budget and Logistical Services

Administrative Services

Compliance, Diversity and Equity

Human Resources and Diversity

Student Affairs

Student Affairs

Chief Learning Officer

College Transitions

Student Affairs

Admissions and Records

Student Affairs

Admissions and Records

Student Affairs

Compliance, Diversity and Equity

Human Resources and Diversity

Curriculum and Articulation

Chief Learning Officer

Student Affairs

Student Affairs

Safety, Security and Risk Management

Administrative Services

Admissions and Records

Student Affairs

Student Affairs

Student Affairs

Safety, Security and Risk Management

Administrative Services

Financial Services

Administrative Services

Student Affairs

Student Affairs

Student Affairs

Student Affairs

Admissions and Records

Student Affairs


Valencia DIRECTORY

To reach an office by phone, please dial 407-299-5000, then the four-digit extension. See campus maps for building locations. Office

Location

Extension

Hours*

Days

Answer Center/ Financial Aid

East Campus Bldg. 5-211

Ext. 2654, 2605, 8am-7pm 2312 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Osceola Campus Ext. 4143 Bldg. 2-150

8am-7pm 9am-5pm

West Campus Ext. 1507 SSB-106

8am-7pm Monday-Thursday 9am-5pm Friday

Winter Park Bldg. 1-210

Ext. 6885 Ext. 6892

8am-7pm 9am-5pm

Alumni Relations

West Campus Bldg. 8-107

Ext. 5483

8am-4:30pm

Assessment

East Campus Ext. 2770 Bldg. 5-237

8am-6pm 9am-2pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Lake Nona Ext. 7104 Bldg. 1-206

8am-6pm 9am-2pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Monday-Thursday Friday

Monday-Thursday Friday Monday-Friday

Osceola Campus Ext. 4860 Bldg. 2-127

8am-6pm Monday-Thursday 9am-2pm Friday Saturday by Appointment Only

West Campus Ext. 1101 SSB-235

8am-6pm Monday-Thursday 9am-2pm Friday 8am-10am Saturday go to 7-219

Winter Park Ext. 6086 Bldg. 1-104

8am-6pm 9am-2pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Atlas Access Labs

East Campus Ext. 2209 Bldg. 5-213

8am-7pm 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Lake Nona Ext. 7104 Bldg. 1-236a

8am-7pm 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Osceola Campus Ext. 4134 Bldg. 2-130

8am-7pm 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

West Campus Ext. 1105 SSB-142

8am-7pm Monday-Thursday 9am-5pm Friday

Winter Park Ext. 6878 Bldg. 1-217

8am-7pm 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Bookstore

East Campus Bldg. 5-120

Ext. 2537, 2569, 7am-7pm 2577, 2578 7am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Lake Nona Bldg. 1-135

Ext. 7103

8am-5pm

Monday-Friday

Osceola Campus Ext. 4160 Bldg. C

8am-7pm 8am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

(*Friday hours are 8am–Noon during the summer) 73


Office

Location

Extension

Hours*

Days

Bookstore (Cont.) West Campus Ext. 1471, 1166, 7am-7pm Monday-Thursday Bldg. 1-142 1771, 1165 7am-5pm Friday Bldg. 2-121 7am-5:30pm Monday-Thursday 7am-5pm Friday

Winter Park Ext. 6950 Bldg. 1-101

8am-7pm 8am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Business Office

East Campus Ext. 2387 Bldg. 5-214

8am-6pm 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Osceola Campus Ext. 4130 Bldg. 2-155

8am-6pm 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

West Campus Ext. 1200, 1201, 8am-6pm Monday-Thursday SSB-101 1112 9am-5pm Friday

Winter Park Bldg. 1-206

Career Center

East Campus Ext. 2259 Bldg. 5-230

8am-7pm 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Osceola Campus Ext. 4873 Bldg. 2-151

8am-7pm 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

West Campus Ext. 1464, 1351 SSB-206

8am-7pm Monday, Tuesday 9am-5pm Wednesday-Friday

Winter Park Ext. 6882 Bldg. 1-214

8am-7pm 9am-5pm

Dental Hygiene Clinic

West Campus Bldg. 10-126A

Call for hours

Food Service

East Campus Ext. 2575 Bldg. 5

7am-7pm 7am-2pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Osceola Campus Ext. 4162 Bldg. D

7:30am-7pm 7:30am-2pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

West Campus Ext. 1193 Bldg. 2

7am-6:30pm 7am-2pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Ext. 6055, 6897, 9am-6pm 6894 9am-5pm

Ext. 1305 Ext. 1879

Monday-Thursday Friday

Monday-Thursday Friday

LRC Little Bean 7:30am-8:30pm Monday-Thursday 7:30am-2pm Friday 9am-1pm Saturday HSB Little Bean 7:30am-8:30pm Monday-Thursday 7:30am-1pm Friday Building 11 7:30am-8:30pm Monday-Thursday 7:30am-1pm Friday

Winter Park Vending Machines in Student Lounge

(*Friday hours are 8am–Noon during the summer) 74


Office

Location

Extension

Hours*

Days

International Student Services

East Campus Ext. 2220 Bldg. 5-217

8am-5pm 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

West Campus SSB-146

Ext. 1343 Ext. 5830

8am-5pm 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

East Campus Internship and Workforce Services Bldg. 5-230

Ext. 2037, 2726

Call for hours

Ext. 4832

8:30am-5pm

Monday-Friday

Ext. 1034

8:am-5pm

Monday-Friday

Osceola Campus Bldg. 2-263

West Campus SSB-206

East Campus Ext. 2459 7am-10pm Monday-Thursday Bldg. 4-201 7am-8pm Friday­­­ 8am-4pm Saturday 2pm-8pm Sunday Library

Lake Nona Ext. 7107 Bldg. 1-330

Osceola Campus Ext. 4155, Bldg. 2-104 4154

8am-9pm 8am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

7am-10pm 7am-5pm 8am-12 noon

Monday-Thursday Friday Saturday

West Campus Ext. 1574 7:30am-10pm Monday-Thursday Bldg. 6 7:30am-5pm Friday 9am-1pm Saturday 2pm-6pm Sunday

Winter Park Ext. 6814 Bldg. 1-140

8am-8pm 8am-6pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Office for Students East Campus Ext. 2229 8am-5pm Monday, Wednesday, with Disabilities Bldg. 5-216 Thursday 8am-7pm Tuesday 9am-5pm Friday

Osceola Campus Ext. 4167 Bldg. 2-140A

8am-5pm 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

West Campus Ext. 1523 SSB-102

8am-5pm Monday-Thursday 9am-5pm Friday

Winter Park Ext. 6887 Bldg. 1-212

10am-7pm 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

(*Friday hours are 8am–Noon during the summer) 75


Office

Security

Location

Extension

Downtown Center Ext. 3000

Hours*

Days

6am-7pm

Monday-Friday

East Campus Ext. 2000 24 hours 7 days a week 5-220 Office Hours 7am-10pm Monday-Friday 7am-12pm Saturday

Lake Nona Ext. 7000 Bldg. 1-150

8am-10pm 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Osceola Campus Ext. 4000, 4199 24 hours 7 days a week Port. L Office Hours 7am-6pm Monday-Thursday 7am-3:30pm Friday West Campus Ext. 1000, 1448 24 hours 7 days a week SSB-170 Office Hours 7am-10pm Monday-Friday 7am-2pm Saturday Winter Park Ext. 6000 Bldg. 1-100 Office Hours

7am-10:30pm 7:30am-1pm 7am-9pm

Monday-Friday Saturday Monday-Friday

Student Development

East Campus Ext. 2313 Bldg. 5-212

8am-7pm 9am-5:00pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Lake Nona Ext. 7101 Bldg. 1-147

8am-7pm 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Osceola Campus Ext. 4158 Bldg. 2-131

8am-7pm 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

West Campus Ext. 1607 Bldg. 3-147

8am-7pm 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Winter Park Ext. 6893 Bldg. 1-122

8am-7pm 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Student Services

East Campus Ext. 2312, 2322 8am-7pm Bldg. 5-210 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Lake Nona Ext. 7102 Bldg. 1-149

8am-7pm 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Osceola Campus Ext. 4192 Bldg. 2-140

8am-7pm 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

West Campus Ext. 1339, 1343, 8am-7pm Monday-Thursday SSB-110 1840 9am-5pm Friday

Winter Park Ext. 6885 Bldg. 1-203

8am-7pm 9am-5pm

East Campus Ext. 2337, 2428, 7am-10pm Testing & Assessment Center Bldg. 4-124 7am-8pm

Monday-Thursday Friday Monday-Thursday Friday

8am-4pm Saturday Osceola Campus Ext. 4149, 4156 Bldg. 2-125

8am-8:30pm Monday-Thursday 8am-5pm Friday 8am-11:45am Saturday

West Campus Ext. 1323 8am-8pm Monday-Thursday Bldg. 7-219 8am-4pm Friday 9am-1pm Saturday (*Friday hours are 8am–Noon during the summer) 76


Office

Location

Extension

Hours*

Days

8am-7pm 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Winter Park Ext. 6086 8am-8pm Bldg. 1-104 8am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Testing & Lake Nona Ext. 7104 Assessment Center Bldg. 1, Room 206 (Cont.)

Tutoring Services East Campus Ext. 2540 7am-10pm Monday- Thursday Bldg. 4-101 7am-8pm Friday 8am-4pm Saturday

Lake Nona Ext. 7106 Bldg. 1-230 B

8am-9pm 8am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Osceola Campus Ext. 4146 8am-9:30pm Monday-Thursday Bldg. 3-100 8am-5pm Friday 8am-1pm Saturday West Campus Ext. 1633 Bldg. 7-240

8am-8pm Monday-Thursday 8am-7pm Friday 9am-2pm Saturday 11am-4pm Sunday

Winter Park Ext. 6817, 6820 Bldg. 1-136, 138

8am-5pm 8am-3pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Veterans Affairs

East Campus Ext. 2607 Bldg. 5-210

8am-7pm 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

Osceola Campus Ext. 4807, 4808 Bldg. 2-140

8am-7pm 9am-5pm

Monday-Thursday Friday

West Campus Ext. 1159 SSB-110

8am-7pm Monday-Thursday 9am-5pm Friday

Winter Park Bldg. 1-203

Call for hours

Ext. 6892

(*Friday hours are 8am–Noon during the summer) 77


Valencia VOCABULARY Active Student – A student who has been enrolled in credit courses at Valencia within the 24 months prior to the beginning of the upcoming term. Academic Year – Year that begins with the fall term in August, extends through spring term and ends with the summer term the following August. Accreditation – Certification that the college has met established standards and is nationally recognized by appropriate accrediting agencies. Valencia’s major accrediting agency is the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). ACT (American College Testing) – College entrance testing program that may be used for placement in college-credit English and mathematics courses. Advanced Placement (AP) – College credits earned prior to enrollment at Valencia College through certain examinations, such as those administered by the College Entrance Examination Board. Alumni: Valencia Student – Current students may join the Valencia Alumni Association for free as a “student member.” Visit valenciacollege.edu/ alumni for more information. Answer Center – The Answer Center is where all student service activities begin. This is the first stop for admission to the college and to discuss financial aid, inquire about assessment and orientation and receive basic educational advising. A professional staff member, known as a Student Services Specialist, will meet with a student visiting the Answer Center to assist in the following areas:

• Admissions: Residency and deadlines • Financial Aid: Award information, proper

documentation and deadlines

AP and CLEP

commencement information and deadlines

• Transcripts: High school, college/university,

• Graduation: Proper documentation,

• Referrals: Referrals to other offices (as necessary)

Articulation Agreement for the A.A. Degree – Agreement between Florida’s public colleges and universities assuring junior-level status to students who complete the college general education and graduation requirements in university parallel (A.A. degree) programs. Articulated A.S. to B.A./B.S. – Prepares you to enter a specialized career field and pursue a bachelor’s degree in the same major by transferring to a specific university. Ask Atlas – Online help within Atlas. Assessment – Initial and subsequent evaluation of students to aid in placement and progress in reading comprehension, writing, English proficiency and mathematics.

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A.A. (Associate in Arts) With Transfer Plan Options – Prepares you for transfer to a Florida public university to pursue a bachelor’s degree. A.A. transfer plans prepare you for a specific area of study. A.A. (Associate in Arts) Pre-Major – Prepares you for transfer to a Florida public university to pursue a bachelor’s degree, with the majority of prerequisites met within a specific major. Pre-majors that are “articulated” prepare you to transfer to a specific major and university. A.S. (Associate in Science) – Prepares you to enter a specialized career field. Also transfers to the B.A.S. degree (Bachelor of Applied Science) offered at some universities. Atlas – Valencia’s online learning community, customized to each individual’s interests, that links students, faculty and staff to one another and to powerful learning resources such as LifeMap (Valencia’s systematic approach for assistance in planning and achieving educational and career goals), online registration, grades, financial aid and academic records. Atlas features defined alphabetically in this Glossary: Ask Atlas, Degree Audit, E-mail, Groups, My Atlas, My Career Planner, My Courses, My Education Plan, My Job Prospects, My LifeMap, My Portfolio, My Financial Planner Atlas Access Lab – Located on each campus, a lab of computers for access to Atlas and educational and career planning tools including My Education Plan, My Career Planner, My Job Prospects and other career planning programs. Atlas E-mail – Atlas e-mail is the official form of communication from Valencia to students. Atlas e-mail accounts follow the format (first initial) (last name) (assigned number if there is more than one person in Atlas with the same first initial and last name) @ mail.valenciacollege.edu. Audit – Credit course taken as non-credit. Career Programs – Applied Technology Diploma, Associate in Applied Science and Associate in Science Degrees, Technical Certificate and Vocational Credit Certificate programs with courses designed to prepare students for specialized occupations. Career Program Advisors – Staff with specialized training to answer specific questions about requirements and program completion of A.A.S. and A.S. degrees, certificate and diploma programs. Catalog, Governing – The Valencia Catalog in effect at the time of a student’s initial enrollment at Valencia. Its graduation requirements can be followed for the five academic years that the catalog is valid.


C.E.U. (Continuing Education Unit) – One C.E.U. is awarded for every 10 contact hours of instruction in an organized continuing education/ noncredit course. CLAS (College Level Academic Skills) – Created by the Florida State Board of Education, requires students to demonstrate proficiency in communication and computation prior to graduating. See valenciacollege.edu/ assessments/clasp for details. CLEP (College Level Examination Program) – From the College Board, general and subject exams covering material taught in college courses. Credit for courses may be granted to students who achieve specific scores on the exams. College Night – An evening for students, prospective students, families and friends to visit Valencia to meet representatives of more than 100 colleges and universities. Please see college calendar for details. College Developmental Courses – Courses in reading, writing, mathematics and English as a second language designed to assist students who do not place in college-level course work in the corresponding skill area(s) on entry assessment. These courses do not apply toward any associate degree. Common Program Prerequisites – The State of Florida has identified Common Program Prerequisites for all university programs. These prerequisites must be completed by all students entering the specific program. Continuing Education – Courses and programs designed to meet the professional development and training needs of the workforce. Continuous Enrollment – From your initial term of registration, enrollment each subsequent major (fall and spring) term. Corequisite – A course required to be taken at the same time as another course. Course Load – Number of credit hours a student carries in a term. Course Reference Number (CRN) – Course number used in Atlas for registration via the Web or assisted registration. Credit by Examination – College credit in specified subjects granted by successful completion of local or national tests. Credit Hour – An hour of credit usually equals an hour per week that a class meets per full term. Laboratories usually equate to one credit. Degree Audit – Formal list of the courses a student has completed and still must complete in order to qualify for graduation in a specific degree program. Students can view their degree audits in Atlas at any time.

Division – Academic administrative unit responsible for a set of departments. Drop – Procedure student uses at specific times to remove a course from his/her class schedule without penalty. Dual Enrollment – Enrollment by a high school student in one or more courses that count for credit in both high school and college. EAP – College-developmental and college-level courses in English as a Second Language for Academic Purposes taught for non-native speakers of English. ELPA (English Language Proficiency Assessment) – Generic term, at Valencia, for any English language proficiency assessment for non-native speakers of English. See LOEP. Enrollment Verification – Certification of registration for particular term (available five days after the Drop/Refund Deadline via Atlas account). Entry Assessment – An evaluation of basic skills to determine initial placement in reading, mathematics and English courses. FACTS.ORG (Florida Academic Counseling and Tracking for Students) – The State of Florida’s Web site about Florida colleges and universities that provides information on institutions and degree programs, admission requirements, financial aid, scholarships, students’ academic records, degree audits and transfer requirements. Fee – A financial charge for courses and services. Flex Start – Classes that start on a day other than the official first day of classes for fall, spring or summer full terms. Foreign Language Requirement – The requirement by the state of Florida that students transferring to the university must have earned two years of sequential foreign language at the high school level or the equivalent at a community college and the inclusion of this requirement in Valencia’s A.A. degree requirements. Freshman – A student who has completed less than 30 college-level credits toward a degree. Full Cost of Instruction Fee - The amount, exclusive of state funding, established by the college to pay all costs associated with teaching a course. The amount is equivalent to non-Florida resident tuition. Full-Time Student – Enrollment for 12 or more credit hours in fall, spring or summer terms. General Education – Specific number of credit hours of basic liberal arts courses required as foundation in university parallel A.A. Degree. General Education courses also are required in A.S. Degree programs.

Department – Academic discipline related to each course, e.g. English, Geology, Sociology.

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Gordon Rule – State Board of Education rule that requires students to complete successfully 12 credit hours of course work in which they must demonstrate written skills and six credit hours of mathematics course work at the level of college algebra or higher. GPA (Grade Point Average) – Obtained by dividing quality points earned (based on grades) by credit hours. GPAs range from 4.0 downward. Following are the types of GPAs calculated at Valencia:

Institutional GPA: All course work at Valencia Overall GPA: All course work (including college developmental)

Program GPA: Only course work applied toward program requirements

Term GPA: All course work attempted and earned for a given term

Transfer GPA: All course work from other institutions

Grade – Alphabetical measure of academic achievement ranging from excellent (A) to failure (F). Grade Forgiveness – Refers to a more recent grade in a course replacing a previous grade in the same course when certain conditions are met. Graduation Application – The online application a student must submit via the Atlas account to be awarded a degree. This application must be submitted by the deadline date listed in the College Calendar. Grant – Funds, which do not require repayment, awarded for college expenses to qualified students in financial need. Groups – Atlas online learning communities through which Valencia students, faculty and staff can “meet” around topics of mutual interest. Hybrid Course – A course that blends online and face-to-face instruction. What makes a course hybrid is simply the mix between modes of delivery. HigherOne –The company that Valencia College partnered with to disburse student refunds electronically in order to provide students with a fast, secure and convenient way to access their funds by offering various refund choices. Inactive Student – A student who has not been enrolled in credit courses at Valencia within the 24 months prior to the beginning of the upcoming term. Independent Study – Capable students may acquire course credits at their own pace through nonclassroom, student-faculty interaction. An additional fee is charged. International Student – A student who has entered the United States on a nonimmigrant visa, most often an individual on a student visa. Immigrants, refugees and U.S. citizens who do not speak English as a native language are not classified as international students at Valencia.

80

Late Registration – Registration for courses that occurs just prior to the term in which the courses are being taught and also the registration period during which a late registration fee may be assessed. LifeMap – LifeMap is the process of setting goals for your education, career and life. It is something that you must define for yourself. Once you do, it gives you direction. LOEP (Levels of English Proficiency) – Test used for assessment of English language proficiency of non-native speakers of English. (Students who take the LOEP also will write an essay to be used with the LOEP for course placement.) Math Path – The sequence of math courses and prerequisites at Valencia. Me In The Making – One of the My LifeMap tools found in Atlas, Me In The Making connects students to Internet resources that can help them succeed in school, at work and in life. My Atlas – Home page to Atlas that provides personal and campus messages, academic resource links, headline news links, links to forms and links to the Valencia home page. Sign on at atlas. valenciacollege.edu. My Career Planner – Valencia’s Web-based tool in Atlas that provides assessments, exploration of careers and majors and the ability to select and save career, major and occupational goals. My Courses – Atlas page that provides links to course home pages for students and faculty. My Education Plan – Valencia’s Web-based educational planning tool in Atlas that allows students to plan their degree completion requirements, project the time it will take to complete a degree and save up to three educational plans. My Financial Planner – Valencia’s Web-based finance tool in Atlas that allows you to search for scholarships and plan how you will pay for college. My Job Prospects – Valencia’s Web-based tool in Atlas to learn about job and occupational information in Central Florida through an easily searchable database. My LifeMap – Atlas page that describes the LifeMap System and provides links to educational and career planning tools including My Education Plan, My Career Planner, My Job Prospects, My Portfolio and My Financial Planner. My Portfolio – Valencia’s Web-based tool in Atlas through which students save examples of their academic work, receive faculty reviews, post an online résumé and link learning to the Valencia Student Core Competencies of Think, Value, Communicate and Act. Nonimmigrant Student – A student who has entered the United States on a nonimmigrant visa, most often an individual on a student visa.


Official Transcript – A transcript Valencia receives electronically or in a sealed envelope from another educational institution or an evaluation agency. A transcript issued to the student may be considered official by Valencia as long as the seal on the sending institution’s envelope has not been broken.

SGA (Student Government Association) – Official representatives of the student body to the administration in matters concerning student life. Skillshops – Mini courses on a variety of topics offered at all campuses for Valencia students to enhance the college experience, e.g. personal, academic, career.

Online Courses – College credit courses offered through technologies that include Internet discussion Sophomore – A student who has completed at least groups, e-mail, online conferences and other Web30 college-level credits toward a degree. based instructional strategies. Spirit Day – Annual event created to provide Orientation – Prior to registering for courses, students, faculty and staff the opportunity to interact students new to Valencia must participate in a outside of the classroom in an informal setting each New Student Orientation program that includes fall term. information on educational planning and college Student Activities – Various college-sanctioned resources, a campus tour and group advising. projects, endeavors, contests and functions of a Parts of Term – Courses that start and end on co-curricular nature engaged in by students. various dates throughout any fall, spring or summer Student Classification – Pertains to active or term. inactive, full-time or part-time, freshman or Part-Time Student – Student enrolled for fewer sophomore, audit or credit, degree-seeking or nonthan 12 credit hours in the fall, spring or summer degree-seeking, career or university parallel, etc. terms. Student Development – Located on each campus P.E.R.T. (Postsecondary Education Readiness to provide access to and coordination of campus Test) Prerequisite – Primary statewide assessment activities, student clubs, student government, photo used for placement in English, reading and math. IDs and information services. Probation – A status given to students who fail to Subject Prefix – The three letter code related to maintain satisfactory academic progress. each course offering, e.g. ENC, MAT, TPA. Provisional Student – A student who has not met all necessary requirements for admission and, thus, has restrictions on the courses that may be taken. Quality Points – The value, ranging from 4 to 0, for grades from A to F for all courses completed, used in determining a grade point average. (Also see GPA.) Registration – The process of selecting courses and class times for an academic term. Advanced, Open and Late Registration are conducted through a student’s Atlas account via the Web, and Assisted Registration is completed in person in a campus Atlas Access Lab. Residency – To qualify for in-state fees, students must sign a residency form and provide documents confirming that they have resided in Florida 12 consecutive calendar months prior to the start of classes for the term in which they wish to enroll. Residency for Degree – Percentage of courses (25%) that must be completed at Valencia in order for a degree to be awarded. SAT (Scholastic Assessment Test) – College entrance test that may be used for placement in college-credit English and mathematics courses. Scholarships – Financial assistance for tuition and fee payment granted by donors to qualified recipients.

Suspension – Student status under which a student is not permitted to attend college for a specific period of time. TABE (Test of Adult Basic Education) – An entry assessment used for certain applied technology diploma and vocational certificate programs. Transcript – A student’s academic record, which includes course work and final grades for all credits attempted and earned at an educational institution. Transient Student – A student who takes classes at another college for a short time. For example, a Valencia student who lives in Miami might take classes at Miami Dade College over the summer. To do this, you need permission from Valencia. See an advisor and use FACTS.ORG to ensure a smooth transition. Valencia Voice – Valencia’s student-run newspaper is published weekly online at valenciavoice.com. Coverage includes Valencia news, local and national news, features and opinion pieces. Withdrawal – Removal from a course(s) at the student’s request or by a faculty member or the college. No credit is awarded for the course. Tuition and fees are not refunded.

Servicemembers Opportunity College – Programs and special services designed to meet unique needs of active-duty military personnel.

81


COLLEGE DISTRICT MAP Downtown Center 190 South Orange Avenue Orlando, Florida 32801 (407) 299-5000

Lake County Orange County

4

Walt Disney World

East Campus 701 N. Econlockhatchee Trail Orlando, Florida 32825 (407) 299-5000

417

Osceola Campus 1800 Denn John Lane Kissimmee, Florida 34744 (407) 299-5000 Osceola County Residents (407) 847-9496 West Campus 1800 South Kirkman Road Orlando, Florida 32811 (407) 299-5000 Winter Park Campus 850 West Morse Boulevard Winter Park, Florida 32789 (407) 299-5000 Criminal Justice Institute 8600 Valencia College Lane Orlando, Florida 32825 (407) 582-2663 Sand Lake Center 2411 Sand Lake Road Orlando, Florida 32809 (407) 582-6688 Valencia Campus at Lake Nona 12350 Narcoossee Road Orlando, Florida 32832 足足(407) 299-5000

82


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83


NOTES

84


PLAN WITH A PURPOSE LifeMap is all about planning for your goals. A big part of that is staying organized and managing your time, areas where this planner definitely comes in handy. Use it to list your assignments, test dates, appointments and work schedule – and refer to it daily to keep yourself on track. Stay on top of important dates and deadlines. These can be found in the Academic Calendar at the beginning of this planner, as well as throughout the weekly calendar pages. Please check the Valencia website for calendar updates and changes: valenciacollege.edu/calendar Look for the signpost icons. The icons found throughout this calendar will help guide you through your college experience. They indicate what your next steps should be, depending on where you are in your degree path. To find the steps that apply to you each week, look for the icon that applies to you.

Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)


2

Aug 27

Assisted Registration Begins

Aug 27

Aug 22

Aug 18

Aug 17 May 14–Aug 17

Aug 17

Aug 10

Aug 10

July 27

Aug 10

July 20

June 15 July 13

May 25

May 22

May 14

1st 8 Weeks H1

Oct 18

Oct 20

Oct 19

Oct 18

Aug 17 May 14–Aug 17

Aug 17

Aug 10

Aug 10

July 27

Aug 10

July 20

June 15 July 13

May 25

May 22

May 14

2nd 8 Weeks H2

Aug 27

Aug 22

Aug 18

Aug 17 May 14–Aug 17

Aug 17

Aug 10

Aug 10

July 27

Aug 10

July 20

June 15 July 13

May 25

May 22

May 14

1st 10 Weeks TWJ

* Must meet all eligibility criteria including verification and transcript evaluation. ** After this payment deadline, fees are due each Tuesday and Thursday until the Drop/Refund Deadline.

Final Fee Payment

Aug 22

Faculty Report

Aug 23

Aug 21

Late Registration Begins - Fees Assessed With Initial Enrollment

Academic Assembly (Collegewide)

Aug 18

Fee Payment Deadline: FRIDAY (5pm) Deadline For Registration Period

Senior Citizen and State Employee Registration Begins

Aug 17

Aug 17 May 14–Aug 17

Financial Aid SAP Appeal Priority Deadline

Aug 10

Aug 10

Application Priority Deadline Associate Degree

Suspension Readmission Request Deadline

July 20

Financial Aid Priority Deadline For Upcoming Term* (1st Full Friday)

July 27

June 15 July 13

International Student Application Deadline Student Out of Country Student In Country

Aug 10

May 25

Open Registration Begins New And Returning Students

Fourth Attempt Appeal Deadline

May 22

Advanced Registration Begins New Students

Application Priority Deadline Baccalaureate Degree

May 14

Advanced Registration Begins Returning Students

Full Term 1

Sept 27

Oct 3

Sept 28

Sept 28

Aug 17 May 14–Aug 17

Aug 17

Aug 10

Aug 10

July 27

Aug 10

July 20

June 15 July 13

May 25

May 22

May 14

2nd 10 Weeks TWK

Any revisions to this calendar made during the year will be found in the Academic Calendar in the official online catalog.

Aug 27

Aug 22

Aug 18

Aug 17 May 14–Aug 17

Aug 17

Aug 10

Aug 10

July 27

Aug 10

July 20

June 15 July 13

May 25

May 22

May 14

1st 5 Weeks TR1

Sept 27

Oct 3

Sept 28

Sept 28

Aug 17 May 14–Aug 17

Aug 17

Aug 10

Aug 10

July 27

Aug 10

July 20

June 15 July 13

May 25

May 22

May 14

2nd 5 Weeks TR2

Academic Calendar 2012–2013 • Important College Calendar Dates • FALL

Sept 24 Sept 20

Nov 1

Sept 21

Sept 21

Aug 17 May 14–Aug 17

Aug 17

Aug 10

Aug 10

July 27

Aug 10

July 20

June 15 July 13

May 25

May 22

May 14

Middle 8 Weeks-LSC

Nov 7

Nov 2

Nov 2

Aug 17 May 14–Aug 17

Aug 17

Aug 10

Aug 10

July 27

Aug 10

July 20

June 15 July 13

May 25

May 22

May 14

3rd 5 Weeks TR3


3

Dec 9

Nov 2

Faculty Final Date to Enter Withdrawal

Veteran's Affairs Deferral Deadline

Dec 18

Dec 17 (9 am) Dec 18

Dec 17 (9 am)

Nov 5*

Nov 5*

Nov 5

**LCM

Oct 12

Oct 18

Oct 9 Oct 11

Sept 14

Sept 5–14

Sept 4

Sept 4

Aug 27

Aug 27

Aug 27

1st 10 Weeks TWJ

* Final exams are scheduled for the last class period for these parts of the term. **LCM = Last Class Meeting

Aug 21–24, Dec 17 Oct 9 Oct 11 Sept 3, Nov 21–25, Dec 21–Jan 1

Dec 18

Dec 17 (9 am)

Dec 16*

Dec 16*

Oct 19*

Dec 16

Oct 19*

**LCM

Nov 30

Oct 9 Oct 11

Sept 14

Oct 27–Nov 15

Oct 26

Oct 26

Oct 20

Oct 20

Oct 20

2nd 8 Weeks H2

Oct 19

**LCM

Sept 28

Oct 18

Oct 9 Oct 11

Sept 14

Sept 5–14

Sept 4

Sept 4

Aug 27

Aug 27

Aug 27

1st 8 Weeks H1

Faculty Work Days (Credit Classes Do Not Meet) Collegewide Faculty Work Day (Credit Classes Do Not Meet) Osceola and Lake Nona Faculty Work Day (Credit Classes Do Not Meet) West, East, Winter Park College Closed (Credit Classes Do Not Meet)

Dec 18

Nov 2

Withdrawal Deadline – “W” Grade (11:59pm)

Dec 17 (9 am)

Oct 18

Spirit Day

Final grades viewable in Atlas

Oct 9 Oct 11

College Nights - Osceola West

Grades Due (Faculty Submission Deadline)

Sept 14

Graduation Application Deadline

Dec 16

Sept 5–14

No Show Reporting Period

Term Ends

Sept 4

Drop/Refund Deadline (11:59pm)

Dec 9

Sept 4

Change of Major & Credit To Audit Deadline

Dec 10–16

Aug 27

Full Cost of Instruction Appeal Deadline

Final Exams

Aug 27

Proof of Florida Residency Deadline

Day and Evening Classes End

Aug 27

(First Day of Classes for Each Term)

Day & Evening Classes Begin

Full Term 1

For the complete Academic Calendar, visit valenciacollege.edu/calendar

Dec 18

Dec 17 (9 am)

Dec 16*

Dec 16*

Dec 16

**LCM

Nov 16

Oct 18

Oct 9 Oct 11

Sept 14

Oct 10–19

Oct 9

Oct 9

Oct 3

Oct 3

Oct 3

2nd 10 Weeks TWK

Dec 18

Dec 17 (9 am)

Oct 1*

Oct 1*

Oct 1

**LCM

Sept 21

Oct 9 Oct 11

Sept 14

Sept 5–14

Sept 4

Sept 4

Aug 27

Aug 27

Aug 27

1st 5 Weeks TR1

Dec 18

Dec 17 (9 am)

Nov 6*

Nov 6*

Nov 6

**LCM

Oct 26

Oct 18

Oct 9 Oct 11

Sept 14

Oct 10–19

Oct 9

Oct 9

Oct 3

Oct 3

Oct 3

2nd 5 Weeks TR2

Dec 18

Dec 17 (9 am)

Dec 16*

Dec 16*

Dec 16

**LCM

Dec 7

Oct 9 Oct 11

Sept 14

Nov 14–23

Nov 13

Nov 13

Nov 7

Nov 7

Nov 7

3rd 5 Weeks TR3

Dec 18

Dec 17 (9 am)

Nov 18*

Nov 18*

Nov 18

Nov 2

Oct 18

Oct 9 Oct 11

Sept 14

Oct 2–11

Oct 1

Oct 1

Sept 24

Sept 24

Sept 24

Middle 8 Weeks-LSC


4

Dec 14

Jan 3

Dec 15

Jan 3

Jan 3

Jan 7

Financial Aid SAP Appeal Priority Deadline

Late Registration Begins - Fees Assessed With Initial Enrollment

Faculty Report

Senior Citizen and State Employee Registration Begins

Assisted Registration Begins

Jan 7

Jan 3

Dec 15

Jan 3

Dec 14

Dec 14

Dec 14 Oct 22–Dec 14

Nov 9

Dec 7

Nov 16

Oct 19 Nov 16

Nov 2

Oct 30

Oct 22

1st 8 Weeks H1

Feb 22

Feb 28

Feb 22

Feb 22

Jan 3

Dec 14

Dec 14

Dec 14 Oct 22–Dec 14

Nov 9

Dec 7

Nov 16

Oct 19 Nov 16

Nov 2

Oct 30

Oct 22

2nd 8 Weeks H2

Jan 7

Jan 3

Dec 15

Jan 3

Dec 14

Dec 14

Dec 14 Oct 22–Dec 14

Nov 9

Dec 7

Nov 16

Oct 19 Nov 16

Nov 2

Oct 30

Oct 22

1st 10 Weeks TWJ

*Must meet all eligibility criteria including verification and transcript evaluation. ** After this payment deadline, fees are due each Tuesday and Thursday until the Drop/Refund Deadline.

Final Fee Payment

Dec 14

Suspension Readmission Request Deadline

Dec 7

Application Priority Deadline Associate Degree

Fourth Attempt Appeal Deadline

Nov 16

Financial Aid Priority Deadline For Upcoming Term*

Nov 9

Oct 19 Nov 16

International Student Application Deadline Student Out of Country Student In Country

Dec 14 Oct 22–Dec 14

Nov 2

Open Registration Begins New And Returning Students

Fee Payment Deadline: FRIDAY (5pm) Deadline for Registration Period

Oct 30

Advanced Registration Begins New Students

Application Priority Deadline Baccalaureate Degree

Oct 22

Advanced Registration Begins Returning Students

Full Term 1

Feb 8

Feb 11

Feb 8

Feb 8

Jan 3

Dec 14

Dec 14

Dec 14 Oct 22–Dec 14

Nov 9

Dec 7

Nov 16

Oct 19 Nov 16

Nov 2

Oct 30

Oct 22

2nd 10 Weeks TWK

Any revisions to this calendar made during the year will be found in the Academic Calendar in the official online catalog.

Jan 7

Jan 3

Dec 15

Jan 3

Dec 14

Dec 14

Dec 14 Oct 22–Dec 14

Nov 9

Dec 7

Nov 16

Oct 19 Nov 16

Nov 2

Oct 30

Oct 22

1st 5 Weeks TR1

Feb 8

Feb 11

Feb 8

Feb 8

Jan 3

Dec 14

Dec 14

Dec 14 Oct 22–Dec 14

Nov 9

Dec 7

Nov 16

Oct 19 Nov 16

Nov 2

Oct 30

Oct 22

2nd 5 Weeks TR2

Academic Calendar 2012–2013 • Important College Calendar Dates • SPRING

Mar 22

Mar 25

Mar 22

Mar 22

Jan 3

Dec 14

Dec 14

Dec 14 Oct 22–Dec 14

Nov 9

Dec 7

Nov 16

Oct 19 Nov 16

Nov 2

Oct 30

Oct 22

3rd 5 Weeks TR3

Jan 18

Jan 22

Jan 18

Jan 18

Jan 3

Dec 14

Dec 14

Dec 14 Oct 22–Dec 14

Nov 9

Dec 7

Nov 16

Oct 19 Nov 16

Nov 2

Oct 30

Oct 22

Middle 8 Weeks-LSC


5

Jan 18

Feb 8

Mar 22

Apr 4

Mar 22

Graduation Application Deadline

Learning Day

Withdrawal Deadline – “W” Grade (11:59pm)

Faculty Final Date to Enter Withdrawal

Veteran's Affairs Deferral Deadline

May 4

Final grades viewable in Atlas

Commencement

Apr 30

Apr 29 (9am)

Feb 27

Feb 27*

Feb 27

**LCM

Feb 8

Feb 8

Jan 18

Jan 16–25

Jan 15

Jan 15

Jan 7

Jan 7

Jan 7

1st 8 Weeks H1

Jan 3–4, Apr 29 Jan 21, Mar 4–10

Apr 30

Apr 29 (9am)

Apr 28

Apr 28*

Apr 28

**LCM

Apr 12

Jan 18

Mar 14–23

Mar 13

Mar 13

Feb 28

Feb 28

Feb 28

2nd 8 Weeks H2

*Final exams are scheduled for the last class period for these parts of the term. **LCM = Last Class Meeting

Faculty Work Days (Credit Classes Do Not Meet) Collegewide College Closed (Credit Classes Do Not Meet) Collegewide

Apr 29 (9am)

Apr 30

Grades Due (Faculty Submission Deadline)

Apr 28

Jan 16–25

No Show Reporting Period

Term Ends

Jan 15

Drop/Refund Deadline (11:59pm)

Apr 21

Jan 15

Change of Major & Credit To Audit Deadline

Apr 22–28

Jan 7

Full Cost of Instruction Appeal Deadline

Final Exams

Jan 7

Proof of Florida Residency Deadline

Day and Evening Classes End

Jan 7

(First Day of Classes for Each Term)

Day & Evening Classes Begin

Full Term 1

For the complete Academic Calendar, visit valenciacollege.edu/calendar

Apr 29 (9am) Apr 30

Apr 30

Apr 29 (9am)

Apr 28

Apr 28*

Mar 24

Apr 28

Mar 24*

**LCM

Apr 5

Jan 18

Feb 19–28

Feb 18

Feb 18

Feb 11

Feb 11

Feb 11

2nd 10 Weeks TWK

Mar 24

**LCM

Feb 22

Feb 8

Jan 18

Jan 16–25

Jan 15

Jan 15

Jan 7

Jan 7

Jan 7

1st 10 Weeks TWJ

Apr 30

Apr 29 (9am)

Feb 10

Feb 10*

Feb 10

**LCM

Feb 1

Feb 8

Jan 18

Jan 16–25

Jan 15

Jan 15

Jan 7

Jan 7

Jan 7

1st 5 Weeks TR1

Apr 30

Apr 29 (9am)

Mar 24

Mar 24*

Mar 24

**LCM

Mar 16

Jan 18

Feb 19–28

Feb 18

Feb 18

Feb 11

Feb 11

Feb 11

2nd 5 Weeks TR2

Apr 30

Apr 29 (9am)

Apr 28

Apr 28*

Apr 28

**LCM

Apr 19

Jan 18

Apr 2–11

Apr 1

Apr 1

Mar 25

Mar 25

Mar 25

3rd 5 Weeks TR3

Apr 30

Apr 29 (9am)

Mar 25

Mar 25*

Mar 24

**LCM

Mar 1

Feb 8

Jan 18

Jan 29–Feb 4

Jan 28

Jan 28

Jan 22

Jan 22

Jan 22

Middle 8 Weeks-LSC


6

Apr 26

Apr 26

Apr 27

May 2

May 2

May 6

Financial Aid SAP Appeal Priority Deadline

Late Registration Begins - Fees Assessed with Initial Enrollment

Faculty Report

Senior Citizen and State Employee Registration Begins

Assisted Registration Begins

May 6

May 2

May 2

Apr 27

Apr 26

Apr 26

Apr 26

Apr 26 Feb 11–Apr 26

Apr 15

Apr 26

April 5

Feb 15 Apr 12

Feb 22

Feb 19

Feb 11

1st 6 Weeks Term A (H1)

Jun 14

Jun 8

Jun 15

Jun 14

Jun 14

Apr 26

Apr 26

Apr 26

Apr 26 Feb 11–Apr 26

Apr 15

Jun 7

April 5

Feb 15 Apr 12

Feb 22

Feb 19

Feb 11

2nd 6 Weeks Term B (H2)

May 6

May 2

Apr 27

Apr 26

Apr 26

Apr 26

Apr 26 Feb 11–Apr 26

Apr 15

Apr 26

April 5

Feb 15 Apr 12

Feb 22

Feb 19

Feb 11

1st 8 Weeks TWJ

* Must meet all eligibility criteria including verification and transcript evaluation. **After this payment deadline, fees are due each Tuesday and Thursday until the Drop/Refund Deadline.

Final Fee Payment

Apr 26

Suspension Readmission Request Deadline

Apr 26

Application Priority Deadline Associate Degree

Fourth Attempt Appeal Deadline

April 5

Financial Aid Priority Deadline For Upcoming Term*

Apr 15

Feb 15 Apr 12

International Student Application Deadline Student Out of Country Student In Country

Apr 26 Feb 11–Apr 26

Feb 22

Open Registration Begins New And Returning Students

Fee Payment Deadline: FRIDAY (5pm) Deadline for Registration Period

Feb 19

Advanced Registration Begins New Students

Application Priority Deadline Baccalaureate Degree

Feb 11

Advanced Registration Begins Returning Students

Full Term 1

May 30

Jun 4

Jun 1

May 30

Apr 26

Apr 26

Apr 26

Apr 26 Feb 11–Apr 26

Apr 15

May 24

April 5

Feb 15 Apr 12

Feb 22

Feb 19

Feb 11

2nd 8 Weeks TWK

Any revisions to this calendar made during the year will be found in the Academic Calendar in the official online catalog.

May 6

May 2

Apr 27

Apr 26

Apr 26

Apr 26

Apr 26 Feb 11–Apr 26

Apr 15

Apr 26

April 5

Feb 15 Apr 12

Feb 22

Feb 19

Feb 11

1st 4 Weeks TR1

May 30

Jun 4

Jun 1

May 30

Apr 26

Apr 26

Apr 26

Apr 26 Feb 11–Apr 26

Apr 15

May 24

April 5

Feb 15 Apr 12

Feb 22

Feb 19

Feb 11

2nd 4 Weeks TR2

Jun 27

Jul 2

Jun 29

Jun 27

Apr 26

Apr 26

Apr 26

Apr 26 Feb 11–Apr 26

Apr 15

Jun 21

April 5

Feb 15 Apr 12

Feb 22

Feb 19

Feb 11

3rd 4 Weeks TR3

Academic Calendar 2012–2013 • Important College Calendar Dates • SUMMER


7

Jul 30

Aug 1 (9am)

Aug 2

Term Ends

Grades Due (Faculty Submission Deadline)

Final grades viewable in Atlas

Aug 2

* Final exams are scheduled for the last class period for these parts of the term. **LCM = Last Class Meeting

College Closed (Credit Courses Do Not Meet)

Aug 2

Aug 1 (9am)

Jul 30

Jul 30*

Jul 30

Jul 19

**LCM

May 17

Jun 25–Jul 4

Jun 24

Jun 24

Jun 18

Jun 18

Jun 18

Term B (H2)

2nd 6 Weeks

Aug 2

Aug 1 (9am)

Jul 2

Jul 2*

Jul 2

Jun 14

**LCM

May 17

May 14–23

May 13

May 13

May 6

May 6

May 6

TWJ

1st 8 Weeks

May 2–4 (Summer Full and A term) June 18 (Summer A term) June 14, 17 (Summer B term) July 31 (Summer Full and B term) Aug 1 (Summer B term) May 27, July 4

Aug 1 (9am)

Jun 17

Jun 17*

Jun 17

May 31

**LCM

May 17

May 14–23

May 13

May 13

May 6

May 6

May 6

Faculty Work Days (Credit Classes Do Not Meet) Collegewide

Jul 30

**LCM

Faculty Final Date to Enter Withdrawal

Jul 30

May 17

Graduation Application Deadline

Final Exams

May 14–23

No Show Reporting Period

Day and Evening Classes End

May 13

Jun 28

May 13

Drop/Refund Deadline (11:59pm)

Jul 5

May 6

Change of Major & Credit To Audit Deadline

Veteran's Affairs Deferral Deadline

May 6

Full Cost of Instruction Appeal Deadline

Withdrawal Deadline – “W” Grade (11:59pm)

May 6

Proof of Florida Residency Deadline

Term A (H1)

1

Day & Evening Classes Begin (First Day of Classes for Each Term)

1st 6 Weeks

Full Term

For the complete Academic Calendar, visit valenciacollege.edu/calendar

Aug 2

Aug 1 (9am)

Jul 30

Jul 30*

Jul 30

Jul 12

**LCM

May 17

Jun 11–20

Jun 10

Jun 10

Jun 4

Jun 4

Jun 4

TWK

2nd 8 Weeks

1st 4 Weeks

Aug 2

Aug 1 (9am)

Jun 3

Jun 3*

Jun 3

May 24

**LCM

May 17

May 14–23

May 13

May 13

May 6

May 6

May 6

TR1

2nd 4 Weeks

Aug 2

Aug 1 (9am)

Jul 1

Jul 1*

Jul 1

Jun 21

**LCM

May 17

Jun 11–20

Jun 10

Jun 10

Jun 4

Jun 4

Jun 4

TR2

3rd 4 Weeks

Aug 2

Aug 1 (9am)

Jul 30

Jul 30*

Jul 30

Jul 19

**LCM

May 17

Jul 9–18

Jul 8

Jul 8

Jul 2

Jul 2

Jul 2

TR3


JULY 2012 MONDAY

TUESDAY

25

26

2

3

WEDNESDAY 27

Final Grades in Atlas SUMMER TERM - A

4

Independence Day

College Closed - Collegewide

9

10

11

16

17

18

23

24

25

30

31

Final Exams

1

Day & Evening Classes End SUMMER TERM - FULL & B Term Ends SUMMER TERM - FULL & B

JUNE 2012 S M T W T F S 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

JULY 2012 S M T W T F S 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4

AUGUST 2012 S M T W T F S 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


THURSDAY 28

FRIDAY 29

SATURDAY/SUNDAY 30

1

5

6

7

8

12

14

13

15

19

20

Financial Aid (for Upcoming Term) Priority Deadline FALL TERM First Day of Ramadan (Islamic Fast Observance)

26

27

21

22

28

29

2

3

4

5

NOTES:

Tisha B’Av (Jewish Fast Observance)


JUNE/JULY 2012

MONDAY

25

TUESDAY

26

WEDNESDAY

27


THURSDAY

FRIDAY

28

29

•W  ithdrawal Deadline for “W” Grade SUMMER TERM - FULL

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

30

1

JULY 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4


JULY 2012

MONDAY

2

TUESDAY

3

WEDNESDAY

4

Independence Day •C  ollege Closed Collegewide


THURSDAY

5

FRIDAY

6

SATURDAY

7

SUNDAY

8

JULY 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4


JULY 2012 Review My Education Plan in Atlas to plan for your Fall course selections.

MONDAY

9

TUESDAY

10

WEDNESDAY

11


THURSDAY

12

FRIDAY

13

SATURDAY

14

SUNDAY

15

JULY 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4


JULY 2012

MONDAY

16

TUESDAY

17

WEDNESDAY

18


THURSDAY

19

FRIDAY

20

•F  inancial Aid (for Upcoming Term) Priority Deadline FALL TERM First Day of Ramadan (Islamic Fast Observance)

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

21

22

JULY 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4


JULY 2012

MONDAY

23

TUESDAY

24

WEDNESDAY

25


THURSDAY

26

FRIDAY

27

SATURDAY

28

SUNDAY

29

Tisha B’Av (Jewish Fast Observance)

JULY 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4


JULY/AUGUST 2012

MONDAY

30

TUESDAY

31

• Final Exams •D  ay & Evening CLasses End SUMMER TERM FULL & B •T  erm Ends SUMMER TERM FULL & B

WEDNESDAY

1


THURSDAY

2

FRIDAY

3

SATURDAY

4

SUNDAY

5

JULY 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4


AUGUST 2012 MONDAY 30

TUESDAY 31

WEDNESDAY 1

Summer Full & Term B Credit Classes Do Not Meet (College Is Open) - Collegewide

6

7

13

14

20

21

27

Day & Evening Classes Begin FALL TERM

8

Lailat ul-Qadr (The Night of Fate)

Faculty Begin Term

28

15

22

29

Assisted Registration Begins FALL TERM Proof of Florida Residency Deadline FALL TERM

JULY 2012 S M T W T F S 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4

AUGUST 2012 S M T W T F S 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

SEPTEMBER 2012 S M T W T F S 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6


THURSDAY 2

FRIDAY 3

SATURDAY/SUNDAY

Final Grades Viewable in Atlas SUMMER TERM - FULL & B

4

5 Summer Term B Credit Classes Do Not Meet (College Is Open) - Collegewide

9

10

Fourth Attempt Appeal Deadline FALL TERM

11

12

16

17

Initial Fee Payment Deadline FALL TERM Financial Aid SAP* Appeal Priority Deadline FALL TERM

23

24

18

19

Eid ul-Fitr (Celebration of the End of Ramadan)

25

26

30

31

1

2

NOTES:

* SAP means Satisfactory Academic Progress


JULY/AUGUST 2012 Welcome to the 2012 Career Pathways high school graduates, President’s Scholarship students, and Bridges to Success scholarship students. After you register through Atlas, be sure to check your fees. Remember that you can pay fees and access your Financial Aid status online.

MONDAY

30

TUESDAY

31

WEDNESDAY

1

•S  ummer Full &Term B Credit Classes Do Not Meet (College Is Open) - Collegewide


THURSDAY

2

•S  ummer Term B Credit Classes Do Not Meet (College Is Open) - Collegewide

FRIDAY

3

•F  inal Grades Viewable in Atlas SUMMER TERM - FULL &B

SATURDAY

4

SUNDAY

5

AUGUST 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


AUGUST 2012 Access your detailed schedule in Atlas. Get help in the Atlas Access Lab if you need it.

MONDAY

6

TUESDAY

7

Tisha B’Av (Jewish Fast Observance)

WEDNESDAY

8


THURSDAY

FRIDAY

­­­9

10

•F  ourth Attempt Appeal

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

11

12

AUGUST 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


AUGUST 2012 Apply for December graduation.

MONDAY

13

TUESDAY

14

WEDNESDAY

15


THURSDAY

16

FRIDAY

17

• Initial Fee Payment Deadline •F  inancial Aid SAP* Appeal Priority Deadline FALL TERM

SATURDAY

18

SUNDAY

19

* SAP means Satisfactory Academic Progress

AUGUST 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


AUGUST 2012 Be sure to get your books and supplies before you go to class.

MONDAY

20

TUESDAY

21

•F  aculty Begin Term FALL TERM

WEDNESDAY

22


THURSDAY

23

FRIDAY

24

Lailat ul-Qadr (The Night of Fate)

SATURDAY

25

SUNDAY

26

AUGUST 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2012

27

MONDAY •D  ay & Evening Classes Begin

•A  ssisted Registration Begins •P  roof of Florida Residency Deadline FALL TERM

TUESDAY

28

WEDNESDAY

29


THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

30

31

1

2

AUGUST 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Life-Long Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


SEPTEMBER 2012 MONDAY

TUESDAY

27

WEDNESDAY

28

3

Labor Day

4

29

Drop/Refund Deadline FALL TERM

5

College Closed - Collegewide

10

17

11

Rosh Hashanah (Jewish New Year)

24

AUGUST 2012 S M T W T F S 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Patriot Day

12

18

19

25

26

SEPTEMBER 2012 S M T W T F S 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6

Yom Kippur (Jewish Day of Atonement)

OCTOBER 2012 S M T W T F S 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10


THURSDAY 30

FRIDAY 31

SATURDAY/SUNDAY 1

2

6

7

8

9

13

14

Graduation Application Deadline FALL TERM

15

16

20

21

22

23

27

28

29

30

NOTES:


AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2012 Check out the welcome back activities on your campus. Get a telephone number or e-mail address from another student in each of your classes so you can study together and share notes.

MONDAY

27

TUESDAY

28

WEDNESDAY

29


THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

30

31

1

2

SEPTEMBER 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6


SEPTEMBER 2012 Go to your campus library and learn how to access the useful resources there. Meet with a career advisor to discuss your career plans.

MONDAY

3

Labor Day •C  ollege Closed Collegewide

TUESDAY

4

•D  rop/Refund Deadline FALL TERM

WEDNESDAY

5


THURSDAY

6

FRIDAY

7

SATURDAY

8

SUNDAY

9

SEPTEMBER 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6


SEPTEMBER 2012 Need help with a class? Visit the Tutoring Center. valenciacollege.edu/tutoring Obtain college applications from the four-year schools you are considering.

MONDAY

10

TUESDAY

11

Patriot Day

WEDNESDAY

12


THURSDAY

13

FRIDAY

14

• Graduation Application Deadline FALL TERM

SATURDAY

15

SUNDAY

16

SEPTEMBER 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S 26 2 9 16 23 30

M T W T F S 27 28 29 30 31 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29 1 2 3 4 5 6


SEPTEMBER 2012 Organize a study group to prepare for mid-terms. Conduct a degree audit in Atlas to plan the completion of your Valencia degree.

MONDAY

17

Rosh Hashanah (Jewish New Year)

TUESDAY

18

WEDNESDAY

19


THURSDAY

20

FRIDAY

21

SATURDAY

22

SUNDAY

23

SEPTEMBER 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6


SEPTEMBER 2012

MONDAY

24

TUESDAY

25

WEDNESDAY

26

Yom Kippur (Jewish Day of Atonement)


THURSDAY

27

FRIDAY

28

SATURDAY

29

SUNDAY

30

SEPTEMBER 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Life-Long Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6


OCTOBER 2012 MONDAY 1

8

First Day of Sukkot (Feast of Tabernacles)

Columbus Day

TUESDAY 2

9

WEDNESDAY 3

College Night (Osceola Campus)

10

Credit Classes Do Not Meet (Osceola Campus Only)

15

22

Advanced Registration Begins (Returning Students) SPRING TERM

29

16

17

23

24

30

SEPTEMBER 2012 S M T W T F S 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6

Advanced Registration Begins (New Students) SPRING TERM

OCTOBER 2012 S M T W T F S 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

31

Halloween

NOVEMBER 2012 S M T W T F S 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


THURSDAY 4

FRIDAY 5

SATURDAY/SUNDAY 6

7

11

College Night (West Campus)

12

13

14 Credit Classes Do Not Meet (West, East & Winter Park Campuses Only)

18

Spirit Day

20

19

21

25

26

Eid Al-Adha (Festival of Sacrifice)

27

28

1

2

3

4

NOTES:

End of Sukkot


OCTOBER 2012 Get Involved! Join a club on campus; visit Student Development on any campus for more information. valenciacollege.edu/studentdev

MONDAY

1

First Day of Sukkot (Feast of Tabernacles)

TUESDAY

2

WEDNESDAY

3


THURSDAY

4

Rosh Hashanah (Jewish New Year)

FRIDAY

5

SATURDAY

6

SUNDAY

7

End of Sukkot

OCTOBER 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10


OCTOBER 2012 Attend College Night to learn about four-year college options.

MONDAY

8

Columbus Day

TUESDAY

9

•C  ollege Night Osceola Campus •C  redit Classes Do Not Meet Osceola Campus Only

WEDNESDAY

10


11

THURSDAY •C  ollege Night West Campus •C  redit Classes Do Not Meet West, East & Winter Park Campuses Only

FRIDAY

12

SATURDAY

13

SUNDAY

14

OCTOBER 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10


OCTOBER 2012 Spirit Day is coming! Join the fun. Check out the online activity calendar for specific activities. valenciacollege.edu/calendar

MONDAY

15

TUESDAY

16

WEDNESDAY

17


THURSDAY

18

• Spirit Day

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

19

20

21

OCTOBER 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10


OCTOBER 2012 Use My Career Planner or visit the Career Center to explore university majors and line up prerequisites you need.

MONDAY

22

•A  dvanced Registration Begins (Returning Students) SPRING TERM

TUESDAY

23

WEDNESDAY

24


THURSDAY

25

End of Sukkot

FRIDAY

26

Eid Al-Adha (Festival of Sacrifice)

SATURDAY

27

SUNDAY

28

OCTOBER 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10


OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2012 Graduating in May? Register early and apply for graduation in your Atlas account. Develop an education plan in Atlas (My Education Plan) and review it with an academic advising staff member.

MONDAY

29

TUESDAY

30

•A  dvanced Registration Begins (New Students) SPRING TERM

WEDNESDAY Halloween

31


THURSDAY

1

FRIDAY

2

SATURDAY

3

SUNDAY

4

OCTOBER 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10


NOVEMBER 2012 MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

29

30

31

5

6

12

13

14

19

20

21

26

27

28

Eid Al-Adha (Festival of Sacrifice)

7

College Closed - Collegewide

OCTOBER 2012 S M T W T F S 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

NOVEMBER 2012 S M T W T F S 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

DECEMBER 2012 S M T W T F S 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5


THURSDAY 1

FRIDAY 2

Withdrawal Deadline for “W” Grade FALL TERM

SATURDAY/SUNDAY 3

Open Registration Begins (New & Returning Students)

4

8

9

Daylight Saving Time Ends

10

11

15

Muharram (Islamic New Year)

16

Financial Aid (for Upcoming Term) Priority Deadline SPRING TERM

Veterans Day

17

18

22

Thanksgiving Day

23

24

College Closed - Collegewide

25 College Closed - Collegewide

29

30

1

2

NOTES:


OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2012 Register for your Spring classes.

MONDAY

29

TUESDAY

30

WEDNESDAY

31


THURSDAY

1

FRIDAY

2

•W  ithdrawal Deadline for “W” Grade FALL TERM •O  pen Registration Begins (New & Returning Students) SPRING TERM

SATURDAY

3

SUNDAY

4

Daylight Saving Time Ends

NOVEMBER 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


NOVEMBER 2012 It’s National Career Development Month. Visit the Career Center to see the great information and resources that are available. valenciacollege.edu/careercenter

MONDAY

5

TUESDAY

6

WEDNESDAY

7


THURSDAY

8

FRIDAY

9

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

10

11

Veterans Day

NOVEMBER 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


NOVEMBER 2012 Learn about internship opportunities from the Internship and Placement Office. valenciacollege.edu/ipo

MONDAY

12

TUESDAY

13

WEDNESDAY

14


THURSDAY

15

Muharram (Islamic New Year)

FRIDAY

16

•F  inancial Aid (for Upcoming Term) Priority Deadline SPRING TERM

SATURDAY

17

SUNDAY

18

NOVEMBER 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


NOVEMBER 2012 Enroll for Spring Term classes. If you haven’t already completed it, enroll in SLS1122–Student Success.

MONDAY

19

TUESDAY

20

WEDNESDAY •C  ollege Closed Collegewide

21


THURSDAY

22

Thanksgiving Day •C  ollege Closed Collegewide

FRIDAY

23

•C  ollege Closed Collegewide

SATURDAY

24

 ollege Closed •C Collegewide

SUNDAY

25

•C  ollege Closed Collegewide

NOVEMBER 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2012

MONDAY

26

TUESDAY

27

WEDNESDAY

28


THURSDAY

29

FRIDAY

30

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

1

2

NOVEMBER 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Life-Long Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


DECEMBER 2012 MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

26

27

28

3

4

5

10

Final Exams FALL TERM

Final Exams

18

17

24

11

Christmas Eve

Final Grades Viewable in Atlas FALL TERM

25

Christmas Day

12

Final Exams

19

26

First Day of Kwanzaa

College Closed - Collegewide

31

New Year’s Eve

1

2

College Closed - Collegewide

NOVEMBER 2012 S M T W T F S 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

DECEMBER 2012 S M T W T F S 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5

JANUARY 2013 S M T W T F S 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


THURSDAY 29

FRIDAY

SATURDAY/SUNDAY

30

1

2

6

7

8

9

Day & Evening Classes End FALL TERM 1st Day of Chanukah (Festival of Lights)

13

Final Exams

14

Final Exams Initial Fee Payment Fourth Attempt Appeal Suspension SPRING TERM

15

Final Exams

16

Final Exams Term Ends FALL TERM Last Day of Chanukah

20

22

21

College Closed - Collegewide

23 College Closed - Collegewide

27

29

28

College Closed - Collegewide

30 College Closed - Collegewide

3

4

5

6

NOTES:


NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2012 Check the final exam schedule and plan your study time. Find a quiet study place to prepare for exams.

MONDAY

26

TUESDAY

27

WEDNESDAY

28


THURSDAY

29

FRIDAY

30

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

1

2

DECEMBER 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5


DECEMBER 2012

MONDAY

3

TUESDAY

4

WEDNESDAY

5


THURSDAY

6

FRIDAY

7

SATURDAY

8

SUNDAY

9

•D  ay & Evening Classes End FALL TERM 1st Day of Chanukah (Festival of Lights)

DECEMBER 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5


DECEMBER 2012

MONDAY

10

•F  inal Exams FALL TERM

TUESDAY

11

• Final Exams

WEDNESDAY • Final Exams

12


THURSDAY

13

• Final Exams

FRIDAY

14

• Final Exams • Initial Fee Payment  ourth Attempt •F Appeal SPRING TERM

SATURDAY

15

• Final Exams

SUNDAY

16

• Final Exams •T  erm Ends FALL TERM Last Day of Chanukah

DECEMBER 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5


DECEMBER 2012 Have a safe holiday break. Look up your grades and complete a Degree Audit in Atlas.

MONDAY

17

TUESDAY

18

•F  inal Grades Viewable in Atlas FALL TERM

WEDNESDAY

19


THURSDAY

20

•C  ollege Closed Collegewide

FRIDAY

21

•C  ollege Closed Collegewide

SATURDAY

22

•C  ollege Closed Collegewide

SUNDAY

23

•C  ollege Closed Collegewide

DECEMBER 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5


DECEMBER 2012

MONDAY

24

Christmas Eve •C  ollege Closed Collegewide

TUESDAY

25

Christmas Day •C  ollege Closed Collegewide

WEDNESDAY First Day of Kwanzaa •C  ollege Closed Collegewide

26


THURSDAY

27

•C  ollege Closed Collegewide

FRIDAY

28

•C  ollege Closed Collegewide

SATURDAY

29

•C  ollege Closed Collegewide

SUNDAY

30

•C  ollege Closed Collegewide

DECEMBER 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Life-Long Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5


DECEMBER 2012/JANUARY 2013

MONDAY

31

•C  ollege Closed Collegewide

TUESDAY

1

•C  ollege Closed Collegewide

WEDNESDAY

2


THURSDAY

3

•C  redit Classes Do Not Meet Collegewide

FRIDAY

4

 redit Classes •C Do Not Meet Collegewide

SATURDAY

5

SUNDAY

6

DECEMBER 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Life-Long Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5


JANUARY 2013 MONDAY 31

TUESDAY 1

New Year’s Day

WEDNESDAY 2

Last Day of Kwanzaa

College Closed - Collegewide

7

Day & Evening Classes Begin Assisted Registration Beings SPRING TERM

8

9

Proof of Florida Residency Deadline SPRING TERM

14

15

21

Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Drop/Refund Deadline SPRING TERM

16

22

23

29

30

College Closed - Collegewide

28

DECEMBER 2012 S M T W T F S 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5

JANUARY 2013 S M T W T F S 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

FEBRUARY 2013 S M T W T F S 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


THURSDAY 3

Faculty Begin Term

FRIDAY

SATURDAY/SUNDAY

4

5

Financial Aid SAP* Appeal Priority Deadline SPRING TERM

6 Credit Classes Do Not Meet - Collegewide

10

11

12

13

17

18

Graduation Application Deadline SPRING TERM

19

20

24

25

26

27

31

1

2

3

NOTES:

* SAP means Satisfactory Academic Progress


DECEMBER 2012/JANUARY 2013

MONDAY

31

New Year’s Eve •C  ollege Closed Collegewide

TUESDAY

1

New Year’s Day Last Day of Kwanzaa •C  ollege Closed Collegewide

WEDNESDAY

2


THURSDAY

3

• Faculty Begin Term •F  inancial Aid SAP* Appeal Priority Deadline

FRIDAY

4

SATURDAY

5

SUNDAY

6

* SAP means Satisfactory Academic Progress

JANUARY 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


JANUARY 2013

MONDAY

7

•D  ay & Evening Classes Begin •A  ssisted Registration Begins SPRING TERM •P  roof of Florida Residency Deadline SPRING TERM

TUESDAY

8

WEDNESDAY

9


THURSDAY

10

FRIDAY

11

SATURDAY

12

SUNDAY

13

JANUARY 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


JANUARY 2013 Access a Federal Financial Aid Application for 2013-2014 from Atlas.

Apply for May graduation.

MONDAY

14

TUESDAY

15

•D  rop/Refund Deadline SPRING TERM

WEDNESDAY

16


THURSDAY

17

FRIDAY

18

•G  raduation Application Deadline SPRING TERM

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

19

20

JANUARY 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


JANUARY 2013 Introduce yourself to all of your professors and make a note of their office hours.

MONDAY

21

Martin Luther King Jr. Day •C  ollege Closed Collegewide

TUESDAY

22

WEDNESDAY

23


THURSDAY

24

FRIDAY

25

SATURDAY

26

SUNDAY

27

JANUARY 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2013 Attend a campus activity or club meeting; check out your campus activities calendar for more information. valenciacollege.edu/calendar

MONDAY

28

TUESDAY

29

WEDNESDAY

30


THURSDAY

31

FRIDAY

1

SATURDAY

2

SUNDAY

3

JANUARY 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


FEBRUARY 2013 MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

28

29

30

4

5

6

12

13

11

18

Advanced Registration Begins (Returning Students) SUMMER TERM

Presidents’ Day

25

19

Advanced Registration Begins (New Students) SUMMER TERM

26

JANUARY 2013 S M T W T F S 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Ash Wednesday

20

27

FEBRUARY 2013 S M T W T F S 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

MARCH 2013 S M T W T F S 24 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6


THURSDAY 31

FRIDAY 1

SATURDAY/SUNDAY 2

3

7

8

9

10 College Closed - Collegewide

14

Valentine’s Day

16

15

17

21

22

Open Registration Begins (New & Returning Students) SUMMER TERM

23

24

28

NOTES:

1

2


JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2013 Attend a Student Government Association meeting. It’s not too early to begin applying to universities you want to enter in the summer or fall.

MONDAY

28

TUESDAY

29

WEDNESDAY

30


THURSDAY

31

FRIDAY

1

SATURDAY

2

SUNDAY

3

FEBRUARY 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


FEBRUARY 2013 Attend a Black History Month event. Meet with an advisor in Student Services to plan classes for Summer Term. Review My Education Plan in Atlas to plan for your summer course selections.

MONDAY

4

TUESDAY

5

WEDNESDAY

6


THURSDAY

7

FRIDAY

8

•C  ollege Closed Collegewide

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

9

10

FEBRUARY 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


FEBRUARY 2013 Visit the Career Center – see what great information is available. valenciacollege.edu/careerdevelopment Visit the Tutoring Center for help in your classes. valenciacollege.edu/tutoring

11

MONDAY •A  dvanced Registration Begins (Returning Students) SUMMER TERM

TUESDAY

12

WEDNESDAY

13

Ash Wednesday


THURSDAY

14

Valentine’s Day

FRIDAY

15

SATURDAY

16

SUNDAY

17

FEBRUARY 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


FEBRUARY 2013 Find campus events through the activity calendar. valenciacollege.edu/calendar Graduating in August? Register early and apply for graduation in your Atlas account.

18

MONDAY Presidents’ Day

19

TUESDAY •A  dvanced Registration Begins (New Students) SUMMER TERM

WEDNESDAY

20


THURSDAY

21

FRIDAY

22

•O  pen Registration Begins (New & Returning Students) SUMMER TERM

SATURDAY

23

SUNDAY

24

FEBRUARY 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


FEBRUARY/MARCH 2013

MONDAY

25

TUESDAY

26

WEDNESDAY

27


THURSDAY

28

FRIDAY

1

SATURDAY

2

SUNDAY

3

FEBRUARY 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Life-Long Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


MARCH 2013 MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

25

26

27

4

5

6

College Closed - Collegewide

11

12

13

18

19

20

25

26

1

2

FEBRUARY 2013 S M T W T F S 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

First Day of Passover

27

3

MARCH 2013 S M T W T F S 24 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6

APRIL 2013 S M T W T F S 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11


THURSDAY 28

FRIDAY

SATURDAY/SUNDAY

1

2

3

7

8

9 College Closed - Collegewide

10

Daylight Saving Time Starts

College Closed - Collegewide

14

16

15

17

21

22

Withdrawal Deadline for “W” Grade SPRING TERM

23

24

28

29

Good Friday

5

6

7

NOTES:

Palm Sunday

30

31

4

St. Patrick’s Day

Easter


FEBRUARY/MARCH 2013 Update My Education Plan in your Atlas account. The Atlas Access Lab is open for student use and can help answer questions you may have about using Atlas.

MONDAY

25

TUESDAY

26

WEDNESDAY

27


THURSDAY

28

FRIDAY

1

SATURDAY

2

SUNDAY

3

MARCH 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 24 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6


MARCH 2013 Apply for scholarships—many have deadlines in April and May. Update or change your address in Atlas.

MONDAY

4

•C  ollege Closed Collegewide

TUESDAY

5

•C  ollege Closed Collegewide

WEDNESDAY  ollege Closed •C Collegewide

6


THURSDAY

7

•C  ollege Closed Collegewide

FRIDAY

8

•C  ollege Closed Collegewide

SATURDAY

9

•C  ollege Closed Collegewide

SUNDAY

10

Daylight Saving Time Starts •C  ollege Closed Collegewide

MARCH 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 24 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6


MARCH 2013 Celebrate Women’s History Month by attending a campus program. Find campus events through the activity calendar. valenciacollege.edu/calendar

MONDAY

11

TUESDAY

12

WEDNESDAY

13


THURSDAY

14

FRIDAY

15

SATURDAY

16

SUNDAY

17

St. Patrick’s Day

MARCH 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 24 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6


MARCH 2013 Organize a study group to prepare for Spring Term final exams.

MONDAY

18

TUESDAY

19

WEDNESDAY

20


THURSDAY

21

FRIDAY

22

•W  ithdrawal Deadline for “W” Grade SPRING TERM

SATURDAY

23

SUNDAY

24

Palm Sunday

MARCH 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 24 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6


MARCH 2013

MONDAY

25

TUESDAY

26

First Day of Passover

WEDNESDAY

27


THURSDAY

28

FRIDAY

29

Good Friday

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

30

31

Easter

MARCH 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 24 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6


APRIL 2013 MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

1

2

8

9

10

15

16

17

22

Final Exams SPRING TERM

Last Day of Passover

23

Final Exams

3

24

Final Exams

Earth Day

29

30

MARCH 2013 S M T W T F S 24 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6

Final Grades Viewable in Atlas SPRING TERM

APRIL 2013 S M T W T F S 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

1

MAY 2013 S M T W T F S 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


THURSDAY 4

FRIDAY 5

SATURDAY/SUNDAY

Financial Aid (for Upcoming Term) Priority Deadline SUMMER TERM

6

Financial Aid Priority Deadline SUMMER TERM

7

11

12

13

14

18

20

19

21

25

Final Exams

26

Final Exams

Day & Evening Classes End SPRING TERM

27

Final Exams

28

Final Exams

Initial Fee Payment Deadline SUMMER TERM Fourth Attempt Appeal Deadline SUMMER TERM Financial Aid SAP* Appeal Priority Deadline SUMMER TERM

2

3

Term Ends SPRING TERM

4

5

NOTES:

* SAP means Satisfactory Academic Progress


APRIL 2013

MONDAY

1

TUESDAY

2

WEDNESDAY

3


THURSDAY

4

FRIDAY

5

•F  inancial Aid (for Upcoming Term) Priority Deadline SUMMER TERM

SATURDAY

6

SUNDAY

7

APRIL 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11


APRIL 2013 Enroll in SLS1122-Student Success. Register for an Atlas account and get oriented with it. If you need help, visit the Atlas Access Lab.

MONDAY

8

TUESDAY

9

WEDNESDAY

10


THURSDAY

11

FRIDAY

12

SATURDAY

13

SUNDAY

14

APRIL 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S 31 7 14 21 28 5

M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 12 13 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 23 24 25 26 27 29 30 1 2 3 4 6 7 8 9 10 11


APRIL 2013

MONDAY

15

TUESDAY

16

WEDNESDAY

17


THURSDAY

18

FRIDAY

19

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

20

21

• Day & Evening Classes End SPRING TERM

APRIL 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S 31 7 14 21 28 5

M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 12 13 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 23 24 25 26 27 29 30 1 2 3 4 6 7 8 9 10 11


APRIL 2013 Attend a workshop on job interviewing skills. Practice with a video interview. Be sure you are prepared for final exams.

MONDAY

22

• Final Exams SPRING TERM Earth Day

TUESDAY

23

• Final Exams

WEDNESDAY • Final Exams

24


THURSDAY

25

• Final Exams

FRIDAY

26

• Final Exams • Fourth Attempt Appeal SPRING TERM • Initial Fee Payment Deadline SUMMER TERM • Financial Aid SAP* Appeal Priority Deadline SUMMER TERM

SATURDAY

27

• Final Exams

SUNDAY

28

• Final Exams • Term Ends SPRING TERM

* SAP means Satisfactory Academic Progress

APRIL 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S 31 7 14 21 28 5

M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 12 13 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 23 24 25 26 27 29 30 1 2 3 4 6 7 8 9 10 11


APRIL/MAY 2013

MONDAY

29

TUESDAY

30

•F  inal Grades Viewable in Atlas SPRING TERM

WEDNESDAY

1


THURSDAY

2

FRIDAY

3

SATURDAY

4

SUNDAY

5

APRIL 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Life-Long Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11


MAY 2013 MONDAY 29

6

Day & Evening Classes Begin Full & Term A SUMMER TERM

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

30

1

7

8

14

15

21

22

28

29

Assisted Registration Begins SUMMER TERM Proof of Florida Residency Deadline SUMMER TERM

13

Drop/Refund Deadline SUMMER TERM

20

27

Memorial Day

Shavuot (Festival of Weeks)

College Closed - Collegewide

APRIL 2013 S M T W T F S 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

MAY 2013 S M T W T F S 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

JUNE 2013 S M T W T F S 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6


THURSDAY 2

Faculty Begin Term

FRIDAY 3

SATURDAY/SUNDAY 4

Commencement

Summer Full & Term A Credit Classes Do Not Meet - Collegewide

5

Cinco de Mayo (Observance of Mexican-American Ancestry)

Summer Full & Term A Credit Classes Do Not Meet - Collegewide

9

10

11

12

16

17

Graduation Application Deadline SUMMER TERM

18

19

23

24

25

26

30

31

1

2

NOTES:

Mother’s Day


APRIL/MAY 2013 Celebrate the completion of your degree at Valencia’s commencement ceremony.

MONDAY

29

TUESDAY

30

WEDNESDAY

1


THURSDAY

2

• Faculty Begin Term • Summer Full & Term A Credit Classes Do Not Meet (College Is Open) Collegewide

FRIDAY

3

• Summer Full & Term A Credit Classes Do Not Meet (College Is Open) Collegewide

SATURDAY

4

• Commencement • Summer Full & Term A Credit Classes Do Not Meet (College Is Open) Collegewide

SUNDAY

5

Cinco de Mayo (Observance of MexicanAmerican Ancestry)

MAY 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S 28 5 12 19 26 2

M 29 6 13 20 27 3

T 30 7 14 21 28 4

W T F S 1 2 3 4 8 9 10 11 15 16 17 18 22 23 24 25 29 30 31 1 5 6 7 8


MAY 2013

MONDAY

6

• Assisted Registration Begins • Day & Evening Classes Begin - Full & Term A SUMMER TERM • Proof of Florida Residency Deadline SUMMER TERM

TUESDAY

7

WEDNESDAY

8


THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

9

10

11

12

Mother’s Day

MAY 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S 28 5 12 19 26 2

M 29 6 13 20 27 3

T 30 7 14 21 28 4

W T F S 1 2 3 4 8 9 10 11 15 16 17 18 22 23 24 25 29 30 31 1 5 6 7 8


MAY 2013

MONDAY

13

• Drop/Refund Deadline SUMMER TERM FULL & A

TUESDAY

14

WEDNESDAY

15


THURSDAY

16

FRIDAY

17

• Graduation Application Deadline SUMMER TERM

SATURDAY

18

SUNDAY

19

MAY 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S 28 5 12 19 26 2

M 29 6 13 20 27 3

T 30 7 14 21 28 4

W T F S 1 2 3 4 8 9 10 11 15 16 17 18 22 23 24 25 29 30 31 1 5 6 7 8


MAY 2013 Update your degree plan with My Education Plan in Atlas in the Atlas Access Lab. Graduating in December? Register early and apply for graduation in your Atlas account.

MONDAY

20

TUESDAY

21

WEDNESDAY

22


THURSDAY

23

FRIDAY

24

SATURDAY

25

SUNDAY

26

MAY 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S 28 5 12 19 26 2

M 29 6 13 20 27 3

T 30 7 14 21 28 4

W T F S 1 2 3 4 8 9 10 11 15 16 17 18 22 23 24 25 29 30 31 1 5 6 7 8


MAY/JUNE 2013

MONDAY

27

Memorial Day •C  ollege Closed Collegewide

TUESDAY

28

WEDNESDAY

29


THURSDAY

FRIDAY

30

31

SATURDAY

1

SUNDAY

2

MAY 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Life-Long Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


JUNE 2013 MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

27

28

29

3

4

5

10

11

12

17

18

Summer Term B Credit Classes Do Not Meet (College Is Open) - Collegewide

Day & Evening Classes Begin Term B SUMMER TERM

19

Summer Term A Credit Classes Do Not Meet (College Is Open) - Collegewide

24

25

26

1

2

3

MAY 2013 S M T W T F S 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

JUNE 2013 S M T W T F S 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6

JULY 2013 S M T W T F S 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10


THURSDAY 30

FRIDAY 31

SATURDAY/SUNDAY 1

2

6

7

8

9

13

15

14

16 Summer Term B Credit Classes Do Not Meet (College Is Open) - Collegewide

20

22

21

23

27

28

Withdrawal Deadline for “W” Grade SUMMER TERM - FULL

29

30

4

NOTES:

5

6

Father’s Day


MAY/JUNE 2013 Register for the Transfer Orientation Program at the four-year school you are attending. Request official transcripts in Atlas with your final term grades posted.

MONDAY

27

TUESDAY

28

WEDNESDAY

29


THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

30

31

1

2

JUNE 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S M T W T F S 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6


JUNE 2013 Need help with a class? Go to the Tutoring Center.

MONDAY

3

TUESDAY

4

WEDNESDAY

5


THURSDAY

6

FRIDAY

7

SATURDAY

8

SUNDAY

9

JUNE 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S 26 2 9 16 23 30

M T W T F S 27 28 29 30 31 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29 1 2 3 4 5 6


JUNE 2013 Learn about internship opportunities from Internship and Workforce Services.

MONDAY

10

TUESDAY

11

WEDNESDAY

12


THURSDAY

13

FRIDAY

14

• Summer Term B Credit Classes Do Not Meet (College Is Open) - Collegewide

SATURDAY

15

SUNDAY

16

Father’s Day

JUNE 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S 26 2 9 16 23 30

M T W T F S 27 28 29 30 31 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29 1 2 3 4 5 6


JUNE 2013

MONDAY

17

• Summer Term B Credit Classes Do Not Meet (College is Open) - Collegewide

TUESDAY

18

• Day & Evening Classes Begin Term B SUMMER TERM • Summer Term A Credit Classes Do Not Meet (College is Open) - Collegewide

WEDNESDAY

19


THURSDAY

20

FRIDAY

21

SATURDAY

22

SUNDAY

23

JUNE 2013 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S 26 2 9 16 23 30

M T W T F S 27 28 29 30 31 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29 1 2 3 4 5 6


JUNE 2013

MONDAY

24

TUESDAY

25

WEDNESDAY

26


THURSDAY

27

FRIDAY

28

• Withdrawal Deadline for “W” Grade SUMMER TERM - FULL

SATURDAY

29

SUNDAY

30

JUNE 2012 Introduction to College (0–15 credit hours completed) Progression to Degree (16–44 credit hours completed) Graduation Transition (45–60+ credit hours completed) Lifelong Learning (updating and improving skills)

S 26 2 9 16 23 30

M T W T F S 27 28 29 30 31 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29 1 2 3 4 5 6


NOTES:

Š2012 Valencia College / STU120711-05


Valencia College Student Handbook Planner 2012-13  

Valencia College Student Handbook Planner 2012-13

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