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Valencia College I.

Executive Summary ........................................................................................................ 1

II.

Process Used to Develop the QEP ................................................................................ 2 Leading the Work .............................................................................................................. 3 The QEP Leadership Team .................................................................................. 3 QEP Core Team .................................................................................................... 3 Valencia’s QEP Design Principles .................................................................................... 4 QEP Development Timeline .............................................................................................. 5 Phase 1 – Education and Planning ....................................................................... 5 Phase 2 – Narrowing the College’s Strategic Focus ............................................. 6 Phase 3 – Building Consensus ............................................................................. 7 Phase 4 Design and Articulation ......................................................................... 10

III.

Identification of the Topic ............................................................................................ 11

IV.

Desired Student Learning Outcomes .......................................................................... 14 Student and Institutional Outcomes .................................................................... 15

V.

Literature Review and Best Practices ......................................................................... 16 Defining First-year Student Success ................................................................... 17 Institutional Support / The New Student Experience ........................................... 18 The New Student Experience Course ................................................................. 20 Curricular / Front Door General Education Alignment in the First –Year ............ 22 The New Student Co-Curricular Experience ....................................................... 23

VI.

Actions to be Implemented .......................................................................................... 24

VII.

Implementation Timeline .............................................................................................. 28

IX.

Resources ...................................................................................................................... 50

X.

Assessment ................................................................................................................... 56

XI.

References and Appendices ........................................................................................ 68

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Valencia College “Compared to twenty years ago, the first-year experience is now firmly ingrained in the consciousness of American higher education, and efforts to help first-year students succeed have expanded and diversified” (Upcraft, Gardner, & Barefoot, 2005).

I.

Executive Summary

Valencia College faculty and staff members have been involved in a deliberate collaborative process since November 2011 to discuss and design the Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) that is part of the decennial review of accreditation with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). Valencia’s QEP effort is a reflection of the intersection between our past initiatives, work completed by QEP design teams, new requirements regarding developmental education from the Florida legislature, and the practical demands of committing to a Quality Enhancement Plan that is both meaningful and manageable. The design process was formally presented and adopted by multiple levels of College governance and consisted of four phases: Education and Planning, Narrowing the Colleges Strategic Focus, Building Consensus, and QEP Design and Articulation. The process invited and engaged substantial numbers of students, faculty and staff (Appendix 1 – QEP development participants). Valencia College’s QEP is to create a New Student Experience (NSE) that will provide a coordinated experience for all new students with fewer than 15 college-level credits at Valencia. The plan has curricular and co-curricular components that will be implemented and enhanced over the next five years, but with the majority of the scale of proposed initiatives achieved within the first three years. The New Student Experience will include a required credit-earning course and an extended orientation to college; student success skills integrated into select program introduction courses; front door general education alignment, and career and academic advising to include the development of an individualized education plan. We envision the new student 1


Valencia College experience will result in enhanced curricular and co-curricular student engagement, leading to the successful completion of the first 15 college-level credits at Valencia. Wherever possible, the curricular aspects of the new student experience will be offered in partnership with faculty in academic and career programs.

II.

Process Used to Develop the QEP

In preparation for the decennial review of accreditation with the SACS, Valencia College has developed a Quality Enhancement Plan – a carefully designed course of action that addresses a well-defined and focused topic or issue related to enhancing student learning and/or the environment supporting student learning and accomplishing the mission of the institution. Broad-based institutional participation and consensus among constituent groups were at the heart of the decision-making process used to determine Valencia’s QEP topic. Valencia College’s long tradition of collaboration in both governance and project implementation gave a natural framework for QEP development. Over the past 10 years, Valencia has been continually engaged in national, grant-related projects focused on improving student learning and success. This work has been framed since 2000 in the language of our “Big Ideas.” By this we mean, “development of several key ideas that serve as fulcrums for change, signifiers for emerging organizational culture, and rallying points for action (Shugart, et. al., 2011 p.123). Major initiatives emerging from Big Ideas have included Achieving the Dream (AtD), Foundations of Excellence (FoE), and the Developmental Education Initiative (DEI). Most recently, The Wal-Mart PRESS for Completion Grant for Completion grant has funded faculty and staff members to redesign and rebrand the College’s student success course, Student Life Skills (SLS 1122). The intent of the grant is to advance the work of earlier AtD strategies by requiring Student Life Skills of all students, in turn impacting the current QEP development process. Since Valencia has the distinction of a wide mix of program and campus types, 2


Valencia College different approaches to collaboration are needed. During the formation of the QEP, opportunities for participation in this project were designed to build on College traditions and address our different constituencies (staff, administrative, faculty, and students) in a variety of campus environments. Leading the Work The QEP Leadership Team The Leadership Team was formed in November 2011. It consisted of four faculty leaders representing campuses across College, the Assistant Vice President for Assessment and Institution Effectiveness, and the Vice President of Student Affairs. The faculty participants were selected through an open, internal application and interview process with co-chairs of the College Learning Council, and recommended by each of three Campus Presidents and the Vice President of Student Affairs. The initial work of the QEP Leadership Team was to identify the key components of a QEP, as guided by The Principles of Accreditation: Foundations for Quality Enhancement Handbook, and to develop a timeline that would guide the QEP work. In January of 2012, faculty and administrative staff participants were added to the Leadership Team; these additional members became part of the QEP Core Team, selected by their respective stakeholder group or administrative leader. The QEP Core Team was comprised of the following members: §

§ § §

QEP Leadership Team - 4 Additional Faculty Members - VP for Academic Affairs and Planning - AVP for Institutional Effectiveness and Planning 3 Campus Deans of Learning Support 3 Academic Deans Support Areas: • Student Affairs • Faculty Development • Academic Affairs • Institutional Research • Student Success • Institutional Assessment

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Valencia College The Leadership Team met weekly from December 2011 through March 2013 and the QEP Core Team met monthly from December 2011 through January 2013. Valencia’s QEP Design Principles The first two tasks of the QEP Core Team were to develop design principles to guide the work and to begin the design phases. The QEP design principles were articulated by Valencia’s QEP Core Team on February 24, 2012 and endorsed by the College Learning Council, part of the College’s formal governance structure, at its April 5, 2012 meeting. The articulated design principles state that Valencia College’s Quality Enhancement Plan and its development should meet the following objectives: 1. Demonstrate the link between the regional accreditation process and Valencia’s focus on student learning and success 2. Demonstrate a tangible and meaningful connection to the College’s Learningcentered past and the current focus on the student experience 3. Focus on improvement that is meaningful to the College as a whole yet sufficiently focused to provide clarity of emphasis 4. Build upon other institutional activities and priorities wherever possible (e.g., the 2008-2015 Strategic Plan, Campus Plans, Program Reviews for the Associate of Arts and Science Degrees, Direct Connect, etc.) 5. Focus on work that will engage a wide range of faculty and staff and their disciplines or areas of responsibility 6. Clearly communicate the ways for faculty and staff to participate in the design and implementation process 7. Specifically encourage the involvement of adjunct faculty 8. Make effective use of the process for faculty and staff development 9. Strengthen institutional capabilities that transcend the focus of the QEP (e.g., learning assessment, data collection and use, etc.) 10. Intentionally engage documented best practices from across the country whenever possible 11. Build on the habits of collaboration practiced at Valencia in a way that recognizes the new role that campuses and campus leadership play in our institution

Once the design principles were established, the work of the QEP Core Team was divided into four phases; each of which was designed to lead to the identification of Valencia’s next Big Idea, which was to become the focus of our QEP. The plan for the QEP development was reviewed and approved by the QEP Core Team, the Senior Leadership Team, the College Learning Council, the College Planning Council, the Instructional Affairs Committee (Academic 4


Valencia College and Student Affairs deans), the Student Affairs Leadership Team and the Faculty Council, all of which represent the full range of College stakeholders (Appendix 1 – QEP development participants). QEP Development Timeline Phase 1 — Education and Planning Beginning in the Spring of 2012, faculty, staff, and students entered into the exploration phase of QEP design. The objectives of this phase were to 1) review Valencia LearningCentered Journey/College History (to include AtD, FoE, DEI), 2) examine Valencia’s Big Ideas and Strategic Goals, 3) review Campus Plans for inspiration and alignment, and 4) offer campus-based information sessions concerning the design process and to discuss ways interested parties could get involved. A QEP web site was created to document the process, share materials, and invite comment. During this phase, the QEP Core Team reviewed the history of collaborative governance at Valencia and the impact it has had on planning and implementation of college-wide projects. In addition, the team met with previous and existing Valencia employees to review the history of our work; invited outside speakers, including Dr. Betsy Barefoot, who helped us to open the dialogue about Valencia’s next Big Idea; examined and discussed the cultural and functional differences between campuses at Valencia and the current transition to a more campus-driven model; and presented participation opportunities for faculty, staff, and students. As has been a habit of collaboration at Valencia as part of our learning-centered work, reading circles were planned by the QEP Core Team to take place in Summer 2012 around the themes of: Student Purpose, New Student Experience, and Internationalizing the Curriculum using the sources of: Roadtrip Nation, (Marriner & Gebhard, 2008); Bridges Out of Poverty, (Payne, DeVol & Smith, 2009); articles on internationalizing the curriculum (Childress, 2006; Skidmore, Marston, & Olson, 2005.)

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Valencia College Phase 2 — Narrowing the College’s Strategic Focus In June 2012, members of the QEP Core Team and the Senior Team (President, VicePresidents, Campus Presidents, and Faculty Leaders) met with approximately 200 Valencia employees, representing all constituencies of the College, at the annual Big Meeting to uncover common themes regarding student learning. The Big Meeting has traditionally been an opportunity for a large representation of the Valencia community to assemble in one place to share data about student learning, to reflect on our progress to date, and to identify areas in need of greater institutional focus (see Appendix 2 for the agenda).The summer Reading Circles then focused on examining the topics introduced at the Big Meeting as well as exploring ideas on best practices to improve student learning. The Reading Circles engaged groups of faculty and staff members who met on each campus to discuss how their experiences with students were reflected in readings. Discussion of the results and findings of the Reading Circles and Big Meeting led to the articulation of four themes related to student learning. These themes, expressed as Emerging Ideas, became the focus of work completed in the next phase of the QEP design. •

Student Purpose: Emerging Idea - Students with some sense of their purpose in life and in college are more likely to be engaged, to learn and to succeed in college.

Student Learning: Emerging Idea - More than any other time in history, student learning can happen anywhere and at any time. Changes in the conditions for student learning require that we think differently about how we engage students in the learning process.

Student Navigation: Emerging Idea - To be successful, Valencia students not only need an educational plan, but they also need clear and specific directions for navigating the demands of college.

New Student Experience: Emerging Idea - To support learning, students need a holistic experience that is academically and socially engaging while providing connection and direction.

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Valencia College Phase 3 — Building Consensus On September 7, 2012, the QEP Leadership team hosted the QEP Kick-Off Session. During this event, QEP leaders reviewed the purpose of the QEP and its relationship to Valencia’s Big Ideas, introduced the four new emerging ideas, and invited faculty and staff to join a Big Idea Group (BIG). During Fall 2012, a total of 14 BIGs – including approximately 280 faculty and staff — met across the College to further explore and dissect unpack each of the four emerging ideas as they related to Valencia and its students. The work of each group was guided by a series of questions (Appendix 3) intended to help narrow the focus of institutional efforts identified in Valencia’s Strategic Plan. In October 2012 an online survey (Appendix 4) was sent to all enrolled students asking about their experience and thoughts concerning each of the four emerging ideas. In November 2012, QEP faculty leaders also organized student forums to discuss the four emerging ideas. Each campus hosted at least one student forum led by a member of student government or leadership that was guided by a set of questions centered on the four emerging ideas (Appendix 5 – student forum questions). The recurring theme surfacing from the BIGs and student discussion forums was Valencia students need a coordinated, required, new student experience to guide them toward the successful completion of their first 15 college-level credits at Valencia. On November 16, 2012, all 14 groups converged to share their findings and to summarize key Certificate outcomes. The QEP Leadership Team, faculty leaders, and Senior Team met in Dallas after the December 2012 SACS Annual Meeting to review the input from all constituent groups and to decide on a plan for improved student learning at the College.  These discussions led to the

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Valencia College creation of the QEP Vision Statement1 for the New Student Experience (NSE) and the model for the Student Success Pathway (see figure 1: Student Success Pathway Graphic). In early 2013, members of the QEP Leadership Team presented the New Student Experience proposal during Valencia’s Learning Day and at a series of campus presentations requesting final comments, recommendations, suggestions, and feedback. The QEP topic was finalized in March 2013, following a Summit meeting2. This Summit was an open, collaborative, decision-making forum at which the general vision and outcome for Valencia’s proposed QEP was reviewed, discussed, and approved by an overwhelming majority. Of the 130 faculty and staff members gathered, 111 voted to move forward. Eleven people voted for the plan, but expressed caution or concern; no one rejected the plan.  

                                                                                                                      1

New Student Experience Vision Statement - Valencia College provides a coordinated experience for all new students. The New Student Experience includes a required credit-earning course and provides an extended orientation to college, integrated student success skills, and career and academic advising, which includes the development of an individualized education plan. We envision that the new student experience will result in curricular and co-curricular student engagement, leading to the successful completion of the first 15 college-level credits at Valencia. 2

Summit meetings are another Valencia practice whereby representatives from all of the governing councils and relevant constituencies meet to make important decisions in a timely manner.

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Valencia College

Figure 1. Student Success Pathway 9 Â


Valencia College Phase 4 — QEP Design and Articulation After receiving overwhelming support for the New Student Success Pathway from Summit participants, we established design teams with four areas of focus: Student Transition to Valencia, the New Student Curricular Experience, the New Student Co-curricular Experience, and Student Progression to Degree. Faculty, staff, and college leaders were invited to participate in the design work of the New Student Experience during May and June 2013. Phase four included a series of scheduled meetings providing an opportunity for focused design work in each taskforce area as well as opportunities to hear updates on taskforce progress. The design taskforces began their work with specific guidelines outlined below: The Design Taskforces 1. Introduction to Valencia: The Introduction to Valencia Taskforce will explore and recommend a common introduction to Valencia. The introduction includes any activities students’ first experience prior to the start of class. With a particular focus on Valencia’s existing Start Right3 and college readiness efforts, this team will work to improve the steps to enrollment for students. The introduction to Valencia will prepare students for success starting with the first day of class. Topics to be discussed: New Student Orientation, a common advising and course selection process, and improving the college placement (PERT) process and student preparedness for class. The redesigned introduction to Valencia will be deliberately connected to the common curricular experience. 2. Common Curricular Experience The Common Curricular Experience Taskforce will explore and develop a common, credit-earning course, focused on student success in college. The course will be designed for all new students and will be completed by all students during their first 15 college credit hours at Valencia. The taskforce will explore and propose curriculum designed to help students identify their purpose, explore career interests, determine an educational goal, and create a connected educational plan. Additional topics include acclimating students to college learning and introducing all students to college learning support programs. The common curricular experience will include a focus on co-curricular engagement. 3. Co-Curricular Engagement The Co-curricular Engagement Taskforce will explore and design a system for students to learn about opportunities to become connected to the Valencia learning                                                                                                                       3

Start Right began as a goal in Valencia’s 2001-2004 Strategic Learning Plan to ensure that students experience extraordinary learning success in their earliest encounters with the College and establish a solid foundation for success in future learning

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Valencia College community. The taskforce will identify types of learning communities on campus, create opportunities for students to experience clubs and organizations, and design activities deliberately aimed to engage students with faculty and staff members. Additionally, internships, service learning, Honors, and study abroad opportunities will be embedded within the new student experience. 4. Progression to Degree Readiness The Progression to Degree Readiness Taskforce will develop a connection between the new student experience and each student’s selected field of study. At the completion of the new student experience, students will be prepared for learning within a selected pre-major (A.A.), or academic program (A.S.). The hand-off to the program will ensure students have identified a major or a program of study, have created an appropriate educational plan which reflects current academic goals, and have identified the support systems provided by the College to ensure learning (student services, learning support, and academic programs). The work completed by these four design taskforces in early Summer 2013 represents 18 months of faculty and staff collaboration resulting in a clearer focus for moving our QEP efforts forward. Valencia’s District Board of Trustees participated in a discussion about the recommended plan at its July 2013 meeting. Trustees provided enthusiastic support and useful feedback on the Student Success Pathway. While we would like to focus our attention on all four areas of the New Student Experience as outlined above in our foundational QEP collaborations, we recognize that the scope of such work is significant and sizeable; therefore, our QEP commits to the development of the common curricular experience and the co-curricular engagement pieces. The plans developed in the other areas will continue to be considered in the College’s normal planning and development cycles.

III.

Identification of the Topic

In our process to develop the QEP, it was important to ensure the connection to the College's past in order to build an authentic continuation of our work. A brief review of Valencia's history was integral to our QEP development, allowing us to build upon other institutional priorities and practices wherever possible. 11


Valencia College Since the late 1980s, Valencia’s dedication to improving student success has expanded and grown into articulated priorities like the Start Right goal, part of our 2001-2004 Strategic Learning Plan. Valencia understands that students who establish connection and direction at the College as early as possible in their academic career will persist longer and meet with greater success. Therefore, Valencia has been dedicated to providing students with opportunities to begin their college experiences with a clear focus and connection to the College. Understanding the importance of connection and direction to college early in students’ experience, Valencia has expanded its Strategic Learning Plan goals to include Building Pathways and Learning Assured. The Building Pathways goal is Valencia’s proactive approach to the more traditional (and more passive) open-door commitment of community colleges. Via this goal, we challenge ourselves to go beyond merely opening the door to college to intentionally clearing the way for prospective and enrolled students to register, enroll and progress through college. This means we will provide programs and services enabling prospective and current students to develop personal and professional aspirations and a clear path to realizing those aspirations. We know for the majority of those seeking a college education and careers in our community, a successful path will include a successful experience at Valencia. Learning Assured represents Valencia’s goal for continuing commitment to create experiences and conditions we know will lead to success, when our students also do their part. Learning Assured is rooted in the earliest commitments to the curriculum and to advisement made by the founding faculty and staff in 1967. By creating the conditions that assure learning, and by encouraging and guiding students toward the kinds of behaviors that lead to success, Valencia can control a great deal (though certainly not all) of the learning equation, enabling students who will partner with us. We believe “that students experience extraordinary learning success in their earliest encounters with the College and establish a solid foundation for success in future learning” and 12


Valencia College that students consider Valencia to be “a better place to start” (Starting Right, 2009). The focus on students’ front door experience lead us to develop a series of Start Right practices beginning in 2002 with an application priority deadline, a financial aid priority deadline, required entry assessment and first term registration in developmental education courses, required new student orientation, a tightly controlled pre-requisite checking system, and modification of the course add/drop procedures so students cannot add a class after it has met once. All of this was aimed to get all students in the right courses on the first day, ready to learn and to make the first minute of the first class a learning minute. Achieving the Dream (AtD) (2004-2009) brought a renewed focus on student success at the front door course level by identifying six courses with high enrollment and low success. Faculty and staff members designed, implemented and expanded a series of strategies for these courses based on the learning community model. AtD also influenced the discipline of creating a culture of inquiry and evidence that examined disaggregated measures of student success by gender, race/ethnicity and socioeconomic background. Bringing strategies to scale in a large, multi-campus college was another contribution of AtD, resulting in improved student success in the specified AtD courses. The Developmental Education Initiative (DEI) grew from our AtD work, resulting in a set of college success skills. This work was formally endorsed by the College Learning Council, and thus integrated into developmental and front door courses by the faculty who were involved with the initiative. Improved practices emerging from our AtD and DEI experiences exemplify Valencia’s commitment to an authentic continuation of our work to improve student outcomes. To keep the AtD momentum going, Valencia participated in the Foundations of Excellence (FoE) self-study (2009- 2010). From this collaborative process we identified a coordinated and integrated New Student Experience as the important next step in building a comprehensive system to support student success at the front door of our students’ college experience. The FoE Report contained a series of recommendations, many of which have been 13


Valencia College implemented through various departmental efforts; however, the recommendation for a common curricular experience for new students was not achievable at that time. Valencia’s history with a “first-year student” course dates back to the late 1980’s when grant programs provided the resources to implement a Student Success (SLS) course as a three credit, college-level elective. As part of our learning-centered initiative starting in the mid 1990’s, robust debates about requiring SLS for all students revealed that one student success course did not fit the needs of all students nor all academic programs. This prevailing view prevented a final decision to make this course a requirement. Although Valencia data indicated that students who took the course had higher persistence and completion rates; some argued there was a strong sample bias due to student’s self-selection into the course. In 2005, our AtD plan included requiring the course, at first for new students who started in all three developmental education disciplines (reading, writing and math), then adding the course for students who started in two developmental education disciplines, and so on. The first group required to take SLS was implemented in Fall 2006 and the data model selected to study the impact was the rate of change in that student group’s persistence compared to other students. With the strong emphasis in AtD on data informed decisions, the rate of change was judged to be not sufficient to justify expanding the course requirement. Given this history, it is not surprising that the idea of a common curricular experience for all new students surfaced again during the development of the QEP. A major difference in the conversation this time has been a commitment to re-design the course around newly developed and agreed to course learning outcomes and to allow the creation of different sections of the course tailored for particular majors. There will also be an option to infuse the course learning outcomes into existing introductory Associate in Science program courses.

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Valencia College

IV.

Desired Student Learning Outcomes Valencia College’s QEP is a reflection of the intersection between our past initiatives,

work completed by the QEP design teams, new requirements regarding developmental education from the Florida legislature, and the practical demands of committing to a QEP that is both meaningful and manageable. The QEP is to create a New Student Experience that will provide a coordinated experience for all new students with fewer than 15 college-level credits at Valencia. The plan has curricular and co-curricular components that will be implemented and enhanced over the next five years, but with the majority of the scale of the proposed initiatives achieved within the first three years. The New Student Experience will include a required credit-earning course and an extended orientation to college; integrated student success skills; front door general education alignment, and career and academic advising, which includes the development of an individualized education plan. We envision the new student experience will result in improved curricular and co-curricular student engagement, leading to the successful completion of the first 15 college-level credits at Valencia. By design, the curricular aspects of the New Student Experience will be offered in partnership with faculty in academic and career programs. Student and Institutional Outcomes As a result of students’ participation in the New Student Experience, students will achieve the following outcomes: • • • • • • •

successfully complete a college-credit bearing course designed to facilitate a comprehensive introduction to Valencia and the skills associated with success in college, develop an educational plan and course schedule to ensure timely success, complete college-prep classes and be prepared for college-level work, successfully complete the first 15 college-level credits at Valencia, develop academic behaviors associated with success in college, discover a plan for college as part of a purpose in life, and engage Valencia as a place for learning and community.

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Valencia College Student Learning Outcomes Programmatic Student Measures for Valencia’s QEP will focus on new student learning and engagement as a result of curricular and co-curricular experiences built around the “6 P’s” of the New Student Experience. These measures will be considered in light of quantitative and qualitative research on the new student experience. The following 6 P’s were developed by faculty and staff members: •

Purpose: Students will create a personal purpose statement that outlines and articulates their values, goals, interests, and strengths in relation to their educational and career aspirations,

Pathway: Students will choose an academic program aligned with their educational/career goals, interests, strengths, and values,

Plan: Students will design an education plan that include goals for learning and a financial plan,

Preparation: Students will apply college success skills,

Personal Connection: Students will demonstrate effective communication skills with diverse groups, and

Place: Students will demonstrate awareness of college support systems.

V.

Literature Review and Best Practices

Kuh et al. (2005) state that persistence and degree completion must improve if postsecondary education is to meet the needs of our nation and our world. Forty-five out of 100 students who enter community college for the first time will leave without a credential (ScottClayton, 2011). While not all students enter post-secondary education with a desire to complete a degree or certificate, most first-time students enter with the intent to graduate (Habley, Robbins, & Bloom, 2012). At Valencia, like most colleges, the highest student attrition occurs in the first fifteen credit hours (or first-year and prior to the second year) of a student’s experience with us (Puyana & Shugart, 2001). Research suggests inadequate knowledge about how to navigate college, lack of financial and family support, and failure of students to identify a clear 16


Valencia College academic path may be to blame for this high percentage of “early leavers” (Cho & Karp, 2013; Scott-Clayton, 2011; Puyana & Shugart, 2001). Scott-Clayton (2011) identifies another potentially significant barrier to completion; her structure hypothesis argues that it is not just the individual student who is responsible for the dropout phenomenon, but that institutions are also part of the problem. Student success and persistence is a function of both “who students were before they entered college and what happened to them after they enrolled,” according to Astin’s Input-Environment-Outcomes Model (Upcraft, Gardner, & Barefoot, 2005, p. 30). Often, the educational settings in which students are asked to learn are part of the root cause for high attrition rates, especially during the first-year (Scott-Clayton, 2011). Therefore, what institutions do to foster student success in the first-year of college is of particular importance to student success and retention (Kuh et al., 2005; Tinto, 2005). A first-year experience should build shared, connected learning among students and between courses; provide academic support connected to the classroom and student needs; and include frequent feedback to students and faculty about student learning (Tinto, 2005). Finally, students need structure. Too often community colleges, with their myriad program, degree, and certificate options, leave students without a structured and/or clear path to follow from initial college entry to degree completion. Students may also get overwhelmed or take too many unnecessary courses to continue through to graduation (Scott-Clayton, 2011). Students who are given relatively little room for individual deviation will be more likely to persist and succeed (Cho & Karp; 2013; Scott-Clayton, 2011). Defining First-year Student Success Upcraft, Gardner, and Barefoot (2005) define success among first-year students as making progress on becoming a truly educated person. They suggest at its most basic level, first-year success includes students’ successful completion of courses taken in the first-year and continued enrollment into the second year; however, they also include the following dimensions as part of their definition: 1) successful completion of courses with an acceptable grade point 17


Valencia College average, and 2) development of the higher-order intellectual skills necessary to become an educated person, to include critical thinking, problem solving, and reflective judgment (p. 28) In 2011 Valencia’s College Learning Council approved the following definition of college success skills: “….academic, cognitive and behavioral skills that enable a student to achieve optimal learning gains...” Valencia’s QEP-focused definition of student success expands our 2011 college success skills definition to include the student outcomes in the New Student Experience Vision Statement (Upcraft et al., 2005). Institutional Support/The New Student Experience While it is up to students to determine what they want to do in college and plan how to do it, students need clear signposts and the norms and nudges of an institution to guide them through this academic process; they need well-designed intentional support (Scott-Clayton, 2011; Yohalem & Jensen, 2012). For example, in a quantitative study conducted by Rosenbaum, Deil-Amen, and Person (reported in Scott-Clayton, 2011), nearly half of study participants indicated they did not have enough information about program requirements or prerequisites, and 26% were unsure about which courses counted toward a degree. In order to foster successful students and to improve retention and persistence, institutions must make student success a primary focus of their work and hold a deep sense of responsibility to, acceptance of, and respect for their students (Barefoot et al., 2005). Institutions also need to recognize all students, even the “best” ones, need support and should offer such support through an “intentional array of structures that help students achieve more than they, or the institution, ever imagined” through the development and implementation of supportive social and educational communities (Barefoot et al., 2005, p. 382). As we have noted, student success is largely determined by a student’s experience during his or her first-year of college; therefore, institutions need to make efforts to create or reinvent first-year experiences that fully engage the student (Upcraft et al., 2005).

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Valencia College Habley, Robbins, and Bloom (2012) describe five sociological variables linked to attrition to include a student’s 1) academic potential, 2) normative congruence, 3) grade performance, 4) intellectual development, and 5) friendship support. While this study finds formal academic performance is the dominant factor in student persistence, Tinto suggests institutions that are P. committed to the “development of supportive social and educational communities in which all students are integrated as competent members” will have higher retention rates. (as cited in Habley et al., 2012, p. 21) Tinto (2005) also identifies six conditions within institutions that support student success: 1) institutions must be committed to the goal of increasing student success, expressed in the willingness to invest resources and provide the incentives and rewards necessary to enhance student success, 2) institutions must express consistent high expectations for learning and provide educational settings to support these expectations, especially during students’ first-year of college, 3) institutions must provide students with academic, social, and financial support, 4)institutions must provide students with frequent feedback about their performance, 5) institutions must provide students with opportunities to get academically and socially involved, and finally 6) institutions must provide learning environments that foster learning and actively engage students; specifically, students thrive in learning and educational communities that involve them in the learning process. In an evaluation of thirteen colleges and universities representing excellence in the design and implementation of a first-year experience for students, Barefoot et al. (2005) finds institutions are more likely to foster students who are more successful and who graduate in greater numbers when they place a high priority on the first-year experience. This priority includes providing all first-year students with an experience that is 1) deeply embedded, broadly distributed, intentional, comprehensive and 2) widely supported by and involving a wide range of the faculty, staff, and administrators. For example, Barefoot et al. reported that at Lehman College of the City University of New York, located in the Bronx, most students are first 19


Valencia College generation students and economically disadvantaged. As a result of their Coordinated Freshman Program, whose focus is on developing a Freshman Year Initiative (FYI) for all firsttime, full-time entering students, grade point averages increase, retention rates rise 28%, and five-year graduation rates more than double. The foundational importance of students’ first-year experiences has prompted a number of colleges and universities to implement first-year experiences that include comprehensive curricular and co-curricular initiatives (Messineo, 2012). While psychological evidence suggests that individuals’ intrinsic motivation and sense of self-determination may increase given personal choices and freedoms, lack of proper structure can lead to mistakes, delay, and dissatisfaction among students. The theory of bounded rationality, (Simon, 1976), suggests college students need structured options and exposure to structured programs of study as soon as possible in their academic career and they do not flourish in unstructured, complex decisionmaking situations (Pennington, 2012; Scott-Clayton, 2011). In fact, Pennington reports “community-college students who enter a specific program of study within their first-year are much more likely to earn credentials and/or transfer than are students who enter a concentration a year or two later” (2012, p. 2). Summary findings from the 2012 Valencia QEP Summer Reading Circles and Big Idea Groups on Student Navigation support this idea of structured support. As a result of these collaborative sessions, faculty and staff members, Valencia students and college administrators, agree students need more guidance about what to expect in and from college as well as in navigating their way through their first-year of college so it’s a manageable, supported experience. The New Student Experience Course The development of a first-year seminar or course dates back to 1877, when Johns Hopkins University began to recognize that in-coming freshman entered college with a unique set of needs (Hunter & Linder, 2005). Today, student success courses are defined as courses 20


Valencia College centering on the individual needs of first-time students. They commonly facilitate learning, build communities, and orient students toward college by providing them with study skills, information about the institution, and general advising (Cho & Karp, 2013; Hunter & Linder, 2005). Within higher education, research indicates students who participate in a first-year seminar or student success course during their first year of college are more successful in school, experience a range of positive academic outcomes, and persist more than students who do not take such a course (Cho & Karp, 2013). Cho and Karp’s research of the Virginia Community College System yields a statistically significant association between students who enrolled in a student success course in their first 15 credit hours. They find these students are 10 percent more likely to earn college-level credits in their first year and to persist to their second year. An academic course offers a time-honored, logical structure to provide students with navigation and a “freshman seminar is one of the most powerful predictors of first-year student persistence into the sophomore year” (Upcraft et al., 2005, p. 41). Howard and Jones (2000) find students who participate in a freshman seminar leave with increased perceptions of efficacy related to the college experience, are more prepared for college, and have greater knowledge of academic and personal resources on campus. They also find that students who take a freshman seminar course have a higher sophomore retention rate, higher grade point averages, and increased knowledge about campus services and activities. Student success courses should be, therefore, designed to foster better understanding of the institution, enhance academic interest and integration, and provide students with opportunities for social integration (Upcraft et al., 2005). Eighty-seven percent of the colleges that participated in the most recent National Survey of First-year Seminars, conducted by the National Resource Center, First-year Experience and Student Transition, report offering a first-year seminar of some type. The survey finds: Of the 890 institutions that reported offering a first-year seminar, over forty percent (41.1% ) reported extended orientation seminar as the primary first-year seminar type. 21


Valencia College Academic seminar with uniform academic content was reported as the primary first-year seminar by 16.1% institutions, followed by academic seminar on various topics (15.4%), hybrid (15.3%), basic study skill seminar (4.9%), pre-professional or discipline-linked (3.7%), and other (3.5%). (p.1) Curricular/Front Door General Education Alignment in the First-year Often, students contribute minimal effort to understanding the material in general education courses because they view them as unnecessary and unrelated to their major requirements (Vander Schee, 2011). Vander Schee suggests offering general education courses early in students’ academic career is important because general education courses “should teach students knowledge for life” and “foster students’ achievement in their academic pursuits and beyond” (p. 382). Vander Schee conducted a study at a liberal arts college that developed a First-year Seminar series in which new students were required to take a first-year seminar course paired with a first-year composition course, math course, and one course from the general education core. The First-year Seminar series also included a Perspectives session in “which additional faculty members introduced students to various disciplines in the liberal arts general education curriculum” (p. 383). Vander Schee finds that students who participated in the First-year Seminar series left with increased appreciation, raised awareness, greater confidence, and enthusiasm for the liberal arts general education curriculum. In addition, students made connections between general education courses and their majors, and felt less anxious and confused about course selections. Research suggests students need structured academic programs that accelerate their progress toward degrees (Pennington, 2012). Though some critics may argue offering students too much structure may limit their creativity and freedom of choice, others point to the success of programs like college Honors and cohort programs, which set prescribed courses and pathways for students (Pennington, 2012; Scott-Clayton, 2011). Lake Area Technical Institute, 22


Valencia College for example, has found success with requiring full-time attendance in a cohort-based technical program where students progress together through a prescribed series of courses (Gonzalez, 2012).A thoughtful, structured program of study that supports students and provides them with guidance and an overview of the entire college experience while limiting their choice are important trends in community college and will help to alleviate the high percentage of dropouts and non-completers (Gonzalez, 2012). The New Student Co-curricular Experience To be successful in college, students need to be ready for a multitude of challenges (Adams, 2013). According to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (2012), the United States ranks thirteenth among 25 countries in graduation from higher education institutions, and graduation rates continue to grow at a below-average rate in the United States. The topic of student retention has been the subject of various studies; however, no one model adequately explains the processes by which college students make a decision to leave an institution or to persist to graduation (Siegel, 2011). For a college-student retention plan to be effective, it must provide a comprehensive new student experience that includes a variety of opportunities for student engagement at the front door. A college retention plan must be tailored to student needs, involving a wide range of faculty and staff members, and be flexible enough to fit the campus culture (Siegel, 2011). Historically, terms like academic and non-academic, curricular and co-curricular, oncampus and off-campus experiences have been used to identify the two distinct silos of the college learning experience (Kuh, 1996). But according to Kuh, this division is counterproductive to the creation of a seamless learning environment for students. A seamless learning environment from the perspective of how the student experiences the college means all members of the college are involved in linked programs and activities that make a connection between academics and the out-of-class dimensions of student learning. Kuh (1996) explains “In a seamless learning environment, students are encouraged to take advantage of the 23 Â


Valencia College learning resources that exist both inside and outside the classroom” (p. 136). According to Pascarella and Terenzini (1991), the two strongest interventions that could positively influence student learning are: 1) meaningful interaction with faculty, staff, and peers, and 2) providing students with opportunities to be intensely involved in academic tasks. A college’s culture has a direct impact on how these two interventions are executed and an indirect influence on student expectations and performance at the college (ACPA, 1994, p. 1). As for all of our other initiatives, we have read, discussed, and reflected on current research on teaching and learning in higher education before making a decision about the focus of our QEP. We are confident that we can implement our plan, because we have developed it in a manner that reflects our long tradition of evidence-based practice and collaborative decisionmaking.

VI.

Actions to Be Implemented

The curricular aspect of Valencia’s QEP will have two components – (1) a redesigned new student experience course required of all degree-seeking new students within their first 15 college-level credits at Valencia and (2) alignment with a limited range of front-door, general education course options. The New Student Experience Course With the support of funds from the Wal-Mart PRESS for Completion Grant, Valencia faculty members and campus Deans of Learning Support participated in focused discussions during the 2012-13 academic year concerning the redesign of the New Student Experience course and have developed a specific plan to finish the course design in Fall 2013 in order to pilot the new course on all campuses in Spring 2014. The course revision includes a thorough review and revision of course learning outcomes and the development of instructional strategies

24


Valencia College and assessments to achieve those outcomes. The New Student Experience course, or a meaningful and measureable experience with the student learning outcomes of the course, will be required within the first 15 college-level credits at Valencia of all degree-seeking, first time in college and transfer students with fewer than 15 college level credits. In order to meet the needs of Valencia’s students, and the diversity of educational paths they follow, the revised New Student Experience course will be experienced by students in one of three ways: 1. The NSE basic course that has been redesigned and rebranded as a result of the input received from the QEP design process, 2. A variation of the redesigned NSE course designed to integrate the student learning outcomes of the course with the students’ emerging career interests as indicated by the selection of meta-major designated by the State of Florida, or 3. NSE course student learning outcomes embedded in meaningful and measurable ways within pre-existing curricular and co-curricular experiences associated with programs of study that already require the maximum credit hours allowed (Associate in Science programs). Front Door General Education Alignment Starting in Fall 2014, degree-seeking students enrolling at Valencia for the first time will have a limited range of courses from which to choose for their first 15 college-level credits. Within the first 15 college credit hours, students will be required to enroll in the New Student Experience course (SLS1122, 3 credits), ENC1101 (3 credits), and a mathematics course appropriate to the student’s selected meta-major (3 credits). The remaining 6 credits of the first 15 college-level credits will be drawn from the 1000-level courses in their Associate in Science Degree and/or the 1000-level General Education Core Courses in humanities (3 credits), science (3 credits), or social science (3 credits). We are mindful no 1000-level Social Science courses are currently identified in the newly established General Education Core. We anticipate the proposed limitations to course options for new students at Valencia will likely create logistic and scheduling challenges needing to be addressed as part of the planning and implementation process. The following Front Door courses are planned: 25


Valencia College 3 Credits - Introduction to College (Required) SLS1122 New Student Experience 3 Credits – Communications (Required) ENC 1101 English Composition I 3 Credits – Mathematics (Required based on the student’s selected “Meta-Major” Pathway) MAC 1105 College Algebra MGF 1106 Liberal Arts Mathematics I MGF 1107 Liberal Arts Mathematics I STA2023 Statistical Methods (Statway Pathway Courses) 3 Credits – Humanities (Selected from one of the four courses below) ARH 1000 Art Appreciation HUM 1020 Introduction to Humanities MUL 1010 Music Appreciation THE 1020 Theatre Appreciation 3 Credits – Science (Selected from one of the five courses below) BSC 1005 General Biology CHM 1020 Chemistry for Liberal Studies PHY 1053 Fundamentals of Physics ESC 1000 Introduction to Earth Science AST 1002 Astronomy 3 Credits: Speech (SPC1608) or Interpersonal Communications (SPC 1017) The curricular design of these front door courses will also be encouraged to include the integration of the College Success Skills identified through our Developmental Education Initiative in order to connect and reinforce the student learning outcomes in the New Student Experience course. Co-Curricular As part of the New Student Experience, Valencia will encourage every degree-seeking first time in college and transfer student with fewer than 15 college level credits entering Valencia to engage in meaningful, co-curricular experiences that are measurably connected to the learning outcomes of the New Student Experience. The co-curricular activities will allow students to discover, create, and reinforce their academic pathways. This builds on a long 26


Valencia College tradition at Valencia which arose out of learning-centered discussions in the middle 1990’s and lead to LifeMap, our developmental advising system, which places career and education plans as the centerpiece and focus of new students’ experience. The co-curricular component of Valencia’s QEP will involve the creation of a series of co-curricular student engagement experiences intended to reinforce each student’s selected academic pathway. For the QEP, we are committed to the creation of a system that will track and award recognition to new students as they complete the first College Readiness Certificate. The College Readiness Certificate (CRC) will be designed to support Valencia’s response to the changes to developmental education in the state of Florida, which makes entry assessment and developmental course enrollment optional for students who began high school in Florida in 2003 or later, or who are in active military service. The co-curricular experience will also be based on the New Student Experience learning outcomes and could start as part of the student’s enrollment process. Engagement activities should be finished by the completion of 15 college-level credits, and may include the following: • • • • • • •

the voluntary completion of entry assessments on academic skills, career interests and college readiness, academic advising prior to enrollment based on the individual assessments, selection of a program of study or meta-major, a plan for achieving full college readiness including use of college academic support and learning resources, readiness for online learning, and personal engagement in the College.

To further encourage participation, CRC completion may also be noted on a student’s transcript, earned as a Notice of Achievement for a student’s portfolio, or earned as a student recognition cord to be worn at commencement. Co-curricular learning activities will encourage new students to discover, create, and reinforce their academic pathways and instill a sense of belonging to the Valencia culture. Other Certificates to be developed may include: Academic/Co-curricular Engagement; 27


Valencia College Career/Internship Engagement; or Service/Volunteerism Engagement. Each Certificate will have an established list of engagement activities from which students will choose in order to satisfy the requirements for completion.

VII.

Implementation Timeline The plan in Table 1 details the progression to full implementation of the New Student

Curricular and Co-curricular Experience, with accompanying faculty and staff development for each stage in the progression. The plan follows a sequential model of designing, piloting, and integrating each component on a term-by-term basis. We are confident the plan is reasonable and comprehensive and our goals can be achieved within the terms of our institutional focus, energy, and resources. Consensus to require the NSE course was achieved by committing to develop the curriculum in different versions based on student degree intention identified by recent state legislation. All versions of the course will share the same learning outcomes; the differences will be in terms of customized learning experiences or methods of delivery. Recent Florida legislation has introduced the framework of meta-majors that identify eight general bachelor’s degree areas. The new law was prompted in part to help Associate in Arts students select the appropriate pre-requisite courses, particularly in math and English, for their intended bachelor’s degree. Associate in Science degrees that may transfer to a bachelor’s degree program can be included in the meta-major framework. Florida colleges are required to implement the metamajors as part of each student’s entry into college by Fall term 2014. Florida colleges are also required to capture and report on student’s intended bachelor’s degree and their choice of transfer institution upon their completion of 30 credit hours. Many of the Associate of Science degrees do not have any elective credit to which the New Student Experience course might be added. However, a number of them do have an introduction to the discipline course into which 28  


Valencia College the learning outcomes can be imbedded or added as part of a required co-curriculum. During the evolution of the QEP, multiple discussions led us to the agreement to commit to the development of these three versions of the New Student Experience course in order to encompass the variety of our students’ educational pathways. The NSE course implementation sequence chart provided in (Appendix 7) describes the steps to design, pilot, and integrate this curriculum, for a “NSE Basic Course,” “NSE Majors Course” and “NSE Associate in Science Course.” As referenced in Section III, this commitment to develop different versions of the NSE course based on student program of study was an important change from previous times at Valencia when there was resistance to the idea of a required NSE course. An underlying current in Valencia’s success in improving student learning outcomes is a deep and authentic commitment to faculty and staff development based on a wide range of competency-based programming. The QEP faculty development plan builds on a foundation that supports all faculty members as they expand their professional practices and examine their ongoing development in the seven Essential Competencies of a Valencia Educator. (Appendix 8). Our coordinated and comprehensive Office of Faculty and Instructional Development provides programming on pedagogy, course design, curriculum, and student development.  The intention of Valencia's faculty development programming is to engage teachers, scholars and practitioners in continuous improvement processes that result in enhanced student learning. Similarly, the Valencia staff professional development programming formalizes the identification of areas for professional improvement and provides programs to staff members to improve their professional skills. The QEP faculty/staff development plan is an important component that will support the curricular and co-curricular program development. Please note that the details of assessment activities are included in Section X.

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Valencia College

Valencia College QEP Implementation 2013-14 Fall Term 2013 Curricular Faculty/Staff Development New Student Experience (NSE) Basic Course: • Design and implement New Student Experience Course Design Workshop Series for 30 faculty members. • New Student Experience Faculty Leadership Team (7 ) • Design and implement revised Step-by-Step faculty selected to lead the design of the New Student development course for faculty members who will teach the Experience (NSE) course including learning outcomes NSE pilot courses in Spring. and curriculum development. • Design and implement additional faculty development course • NSE Faculty Leadership Team leads a selected faculty (s) to supplement Step-by-Step faculty development course team (30) through a curriculum design process of the for faculty members who will teach the NSE pilot courses in NSE course to design lesson plans that align with one or Spring. more course learning outcomes. Design NSE pilot for Spring including selection of faculty, assessment plan, and student enrollment plan. Co-Curricular for all NSE courses Faculty/Staff Development • Form College Readiness Certificate (CRC) design group of • Design and implement staff development course(s) on outcomesstudent affairs staff and faculty to develop learning outcomes based co-curricular design and assessment (to support CRC and for the CRC that align with the course learning outcomes of NSO development) in coordination with faculty development (for the NSE course, design CRC activities/programs that support later integration as required course within LifeMap Certification for the NSE learning outcomes, and prepare learning materials staff). for the CRC. • Design and implement staff development course or job aid for pilot • Pilot in Fall a new co-curricular engagement program, documenting system. Student Engagement Tracks, already planned for the Lake • Design faculty and staff development opportunities to connect Nona Campus, as a means to document co-curricular advisors with faculty teaching NSE courses. learning and student engagement. • Obtain assessments from the Lake Nona Campus Student Engagement Tracks to inform the design of the College Readiness Certificate (CRC). • Design a pilot for the CRC for Spring to align with the NSE course pilot; link outcomes to NSE course lesson plans and developmental education initiatives. • Implement pilot documenting system utilized at Lake Nona. • Redefine New Student Orientation (NSO) outcomes to align with NSE course. 30


Valencia College Spring Term 2014 Curricular

Faculty/Staff Development Implement the revised Step-by-Step faculty development course for faculty teaching the NSE course in future terms. Offer supplemental faculty development course(s) based on specific learning activities for faculty teaching the NSE course. Conduct assessment of NSE faculty development programs from participants and make any necessary improvements.

NSE Basic Course • Pilot six (6) sections of the NSE course with approximately 150 students. • Develop enrollment plans to expand the NSE course to 50% of new students for Fall 2014 (projected 256 sections, 6,144 students college wide).

NSE Majors Course • Design NSE course with focus on Transfer Business Majors to be piloted in Fall 2014. • Design NSE course with focus on Transfer Health Sciences Majors to be piloted in Fall 2014. • Design NSE course with focus on Transfer STEM Majors to be piloted in Fall 2014.

Design and implement faculty development course(s) for faculty designing NSE Majors courses; (integrate as elective course within faculty development LifeMap Certification Program.)

NSE Associate in Science Course • Design the integration of NSE course learning outcomes into Information Technology A.S. introduction courses for pilot in Fall 2014. • Design the integration of NSE course learning outcomes into Arts & Entertainment A.S. introduction courses for pilot in Fall 2014.

Design and implement faculty development course(s) for faculty integrating NSE course learning outcomes into AS program introductory courses; (integrate as elective course within faculty development LifeMap Certification Program).

• • • • •

Co-Curricular Design Implement the CRC with students enrolled in the NSE pilot courses. Implement the assessment plan for the CRC pilot. Plan strategy for recruiting Fall 2014 students into preenrollment CRC. Redesign New Student Orientation to align with NSE course, CRC, and developmental education strategies. Work with Office for Information Technology to automate requirements for new students and determine system documentation for CRCs.

• •

Faculty/Staff Development • Design and implement sessions at Student Affairs Professional Development Conference focused on the CRC. • Implement staff development course(s) on outcomes-based cocurricular design and assessment (to support CRC and NSO development) in coordination with faculty development (for later integration as required course within the LifeMap Certification for staff). • Implement faculty and staff development opportunity to connect advisors with faculty teaching NSE courses. 31


Valencia College • Design LifeMap Certification Program for staff, in coordination with faculty development. • Design & implement staff development course for NSO facilitators (consider integration as elective course with LifeMap Certification Program for staff). • Conduct assessment of staff development courses and make necessary improvements.

Summer Term 2014 Curricular NSE Basic Course • • • •

Review assessment data and make improvements to the course byNSE Faculty Leadership Team and pilot faculty. Build online resources for the course by NSE Faculty Leadership Team and pilot faculty. Finalize program assessment plan, including assessment data and course improvements by NSE Faculty Leadership Team and pilot faculty. Develop enrollment plans for the expansion of the NSE course to 50% of new students for Spring 2015 (projected 123 sections, 2,952 students college wide).

Faculty/Staff Development • Revise the Step-by-Step faculty development course according to the course improvements. • Implement the revised Step-by-Step faculty development course for all remaining faculty who will teach the NSE course in future terms. • Offer supplemental faculty development course(s) based on specific learning activities for faculty who will teach the NSE course. • Offer faculty development course(s) for faculty integrating NSE course learning outcomes into AS program introductory courses. • Conduct assessment of NSE faculty development courses and make necessary improvements. • Design and implement first annual New Student Experience Professional Development Day for faculty and staff (Julyapproximately 200 faculty/staff).

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Valencia College

• • • •

Co-Curricular for all NSE courses Implement CRC into entry processes for new student enrollment aligned with developmental education strategies. Implement CRC with students enrolled in the NSE pilot courses and revise based on assessments. Pilot revised New Student Orientation (NSO) curriculum with students participating in CRC and in NSE course. Test automation of NSE requirements and transcripts in the student administrative system.

• • • • •

Faculty/Staff Development Implement staff training on new NSO curriculum. Prepare advising staff for the expanded implementation of the CRC to pre-enrolled students. Develop Student Administrative System (Banner) training for Student Affairs staff related to automated requirements and documentation of CRC. Continue/Complete design of LifeMap Certification program for staff, in coordination with faculty development. Conduct assessment of staff development courses and make necessary changes.

Valencia College QEP Implementation Plan - 2014-2015 Fall Term 2014 Curricular Faculty/Staff Development NSE Basic Course • Offer the revised Step-by-Step faculty development program for • Expand the NSE course to 50% of new students for Fall 2014 “new” faculty who will teach the NSE course in future terms (one faculty development course, up to 30 faculty members). (projected 256 sections, 6,144 students college wide). • Offer supplemental faculty development course(s) for faculty who • Implement program assessment plan for NSE course. will teach the NSE course based on specific learning activities • Develop enrollment plans to expand NSE course to 50% of (e.g. students’ development of purpose). new students for Summer 2015 (projected 79 sections, 1,896 • Conduct assessment of NSE faculty development programs from students college wide). participants. • Improve NSE faculty development programs based on assessments. • Implement LifeMap Certification program for new NSE full-time faculty (one-cohort) and existing NSE faculty, part-time and fulltime (one cohort). NSE Majors Course • Offer faculty development course(s) for faculty piloting and • Pilot two (2) sections of the NSE course for Transfer designing NSE course with focus on Transfer Major. Business Majors with approximately 50 students. • Pilot two (2) sections of the NSE course for Transfer Health Sciences Majors with approximately 50 students. • Pilot two (2) sections of the NSE course for Transfer STEM Majors with approximately 50 students. • Design NSE course with focus on Transfer Education Majors to pilot in Spring 2015. 33


Valencia College NSE Associate in Science Course • Pilot one (1) A.S. Information Technology programs’ introduction course(s) with embedded NSE learning outcomes. • Pilot one (1) A.S. Arts & Entertainment programs’ introduction course(s) with embedded NSE learning outcomes. • Design NSE integrated course learning outcomes into introduction courses for A.S. Criminal Justice/Paralegal/Fire Science programs for pilot in Spring 2015. • Design NSE integrated course learning outcomes into introduction courses for A.S. Engineering Technology Associate in Science programs for pilot in Spring 2015.

• • • • •

Co-Curricular for all NSE courses Fully implement College Readiness Certificate (CRC). Pilot Transfer Business and Transfer Health Sciences CRCs Review assessment data and improve CRC. Make adjustments and finalize Banner functions that support College Readiness Certificates; move to full implementation prior to Spring 2015 registration. Review feedback on NSO pilot and make improvements to implement in Spring 2015.

• • • •

34

Offer faculty development course(s) for faculty piloting and designing NSE course learning outcomes into A.S. program introductory courses.

Faculty/Staff Development Implement LifeMap Certification program for new staff, in coordination with faculty development. Implement training for CRC documentation (Banner) for Student Affairs staff. Implement staff training on new NSO curriculum. Conduct assessment of staff development courses and make necessary improvements.


Valencia College Spring Term 2015 Fall Term 2014 •

NSE Basic Course • •

Expand NSE course to 50% of new students for Spring term 2015 (projected 123 sections, 2,952 students college wide). Develop enrollment plans for the expansion of the NSE course to 100% of new students for Fall term 2015 (projected 360 sections, 8,640 students college wide).

• • • • •

NSE Majors Course • Integrate NSE Transfer Business Majors course as needed for student enrollment. • Integrate NSE Transfer Health Sciences Majors course as needed for student enrollment. • Integrate NSE Transfer STEM Majors course as needed for student enrollment. • Pilot two (2) sections of the NSE course for Transfer Education Majors with approximately 50 students. • Design NSE course with focus on Transfer Social Science/Human Services Majors to be piloted in Fall 2015. NSE Associate in Science Course • Integrate NSE course learning outcomes into all sections of A.S. Information Technology programs’ introduction course(s). • Integrate NSE course learning outcomes into all sections of A.S. Arts & Entertainment programs’ introduction course(s).

35

Faculty/Staff Development Offer the revised Step-by-Step faculty development program for “new” faculty who will teach the NSE course in future terms (one faculty development course, up to 30 faculty members). Offer supplemental faculty development course(s) for faculty who will teach the NSE course based on specific learning activities (e.g. students’ development of purpose). Conduct assessment of NSE faculty development programs from participants. Improve NSE faculty development programs based on assessments. Implement LifeMap Certification program for new NSE fulltime faculty (one-cohort) and existing NSE faculty, part-time and full-time (one cohort). Offer faculty development course(s) for faculty integrating, piloting and designing NSE course with focus on Transfer Major.

Offer faculty development course(s) for faculty integrating, piloting and designing NSE course learning outcomes into A.S. program introductory courses.


Valencia College •

• • • •

Pilot one (1) embedded NSE course learning outcome in introductory course(s) for A.S. Criminal Justice Technology/Paralegal/Fire Science programs. Pilot one (1) embedded NSE course learning outcome in introductory course(s) for A.S. Engineering Technology programs. Design the integration of NSE course learning outcomes in introductory course(s) for A.S. Business/Accounting/ Office Systems Technology programs in Fall 2015. Co-Curricular for all NSE courses Introduce the CRC to graduating high school students and parents. Continue to offer, assess, and implement changes to CRC as needed. Develop NSO curriculum to align with General Education redesign. Communicate CRC to students, faculty and staff.

• • •

Faculty/Staff Development Implement LifeMap Certification program for new staff, in coordination with faculty development. Implement training for CRC documentation (Banner) for Student Affairs staff. Conduct assessment of staff development courses and make necessary improvements.

Summer Term 2015 Curricular NSE Basic Course •

• •

Implement the expansion of the NSE course to 50% of new students for Summer 2015 (projected 79 sections, 1,896 students college wide). Implement a formative and summative assessment of the NSE teaching and learning experience. Develop enrollment plans to expand NSE course to 100% of new students for Spring 2016 (projected 173 sections, 4,152 students college wide).

• • • • • • 36

Faculty/Staff Development Offer the revised Step-by-Step faculty development program for “new” faculty who will teach the NSE course in future terms (one faculty development course, up to 30 faculty members). Offer supplemental faculty development course(s) for faculty who will teach the NSE course based on specific learning activities (e.g. students’ development of purpose). Conduct assessment of NSE faculty development programs from participants. Improve NSE faculty development programs based on assessments. Implement LifeMap Certification program for new NSE full-time faculty (one-cohort) and existing NSE faculty, part-time and fulltime (one cohort). Design and implement second annual New Student Experience


Valencia College

Co-Curricular for all NSE courses Implement new NSO curriculum that includes developmental education changes, general education redesign, and introduction of the CRC.

• • •

Professional Development Day for faculty and staff (Julyapproximately 200 faculty/staff); content to focus on student engagement strategies based upon CCSSE data and QEP/program assessment data. Faculty/Staff Development Continue to implement LifeMap Certification program for new staff, in coordination with faculty development. Continue to implement training for CRC documentation (Banner) for Student Affairs staff. Provide staff development for new NSO curriculum.

Valencia College QEP Implementation Plan - 2015-2016 Fall Term 2015 Curricular Faculty/Staff Development NSE Basic Course • Offer the revised Step-by-Step faculty development program for “new” faculty who will teach the NSE course in future terms (one • Implement the expansion of the NSE course to 100% of new faculty development course, up to 30 faculty members). students for Fall term 2015 (projected 360 sections, 8,640 • Offer supplemental faculty development course(s) for faculty who students college wide) by deans. will teach the NSE course based on specific learning activities • Implement a formative and summative assessment of the (e.g. students’ development of purpose) NSE teaching and learning experience by faculty teaching • Conduct assessment of NSE faculty development programs from NSE course. participants. • Develop enrollment plans to expand of the NSE course to • Improve NSE faculty development programs based on 100% of new students for Summer 2016 (projected 111 assessments. sections, 2,664 students college wide). • Implement LifeMap Certification program for new NSE full-time faculty (one-cohort) and existing NSE faculty, part-time and fulltime (one cohort). NSE Majors Course • Offer faculty development course(s) for faculty integrating, piloting • Integrate NSE Transfer Education Majors course as and designing NSE course with focus on Transfer Major. needed for student enrollment. • Pilot two (2) sections of the NSE course for Transfer Social Sciences/Human Services Majors with approximately 50 students. • Design pilot NSE course with focus on Transfer Humanities/Communications Majors for Spring 2016. 37


Valencia College NSE Associate in Science Course • Integrate NSE course learning outcomes into all sections of A.S. Criminal Justice/Paralegal/Fire Science programs’ introduction course(s). • Integrate NSE course learning outcomes into all sections of A.S. Engineering Technology programs’ introduction course(s). • Pilot one (1) embedded NSE course learning outcomes in A.S. Business/Accounting/Office Systems Technology programs’ introduction course(s). • Design the integration of NSE course learning outcomes in introductory course(s) for A.S. Hospitality/Culinary programs for pilot in Spring 2016. Co-Curricular for all NSE courses • Implement CRC programs fully. • Review CRC assessment data and make improvements. • Review NSO assessments and make improvements for Spring term 2016.

Offer faculty development course(s) for faculty integrating, piloting and designing NSE course learning outcomes into A.S. program introductory courses.

Faculty/Staff Development Implement LifeMap Certification program for new staff, in coordination with faculty development. • Implement training for CRC documentation (Banner) for Student Affairs staff. • Conduct assessment of staff development courses and make necessary improvements. Spring Term 2016 Curricular Faculty/Staff Development NSE Basic Course • Offer the revised Step-by-Step faculty development program • Implement the expansion of the NSE course to 100% of for “new” faculty who will teach the NSE course in future terms new students for Spring term 2016 (projected 173 (one faculty development course, up to 30 faculty members).. sections, 4,152 students college wide). • Offer supplemental faculty development course(s) for faculty • Implement formative and summative assessments of the who will teach the NSE course based on specific learning NSE teaching and learning experience by appropriate activities (e.g. students’ development of purpose). faculty. • Conduct assessment of NSE faculty development programs from participants. • Improve NSE faculty development programs based on assessments. • Implement LifeMap Certification program for new NSE fulltime faculty (one-cohort) and existing NSE faculty, part-time and full-time (one cohort). 38 •


Valencia College NSE Majors Course • Integrate Transfer Social Science/Humanities course are needed for student enrollment. • Pilot two (2) sections of the NSE course for Transfer Humanities/Communications Majors with approximately 50 students. • Design NSE course with focus on Transfer Public Safety Majors to be piloted in Fall 2016 NSE Associate in Science Course • Integrate NSE course learning outcomes into all sections of A.S. Business/Accounting/Office Systems introductory course(s). • Pilot one (1) embedded NSE course learning outcomes in introductory course(s) for A.S. Hospitality & Culinary programs. • Design the integration of NSE course learning outcomes in introductory course for A.S. Nursing program for pilot in Fall 2016. • Design the integration of NSE course learning outcomes in introductory course(s) for A.S. Allied Health programs for pilot in Fall 2016. Co-Curricular for all NSE courses • Review data on 2014 HS graduates who participated in CRC; and implement changes to CRC recruitment and design as needed.

• •

39

Offer faculty development course(s) for faculty integrating, piloting and designing NSE course with focus on Transfer Major.

Offer faculty development course(s) for faculty integrating, piloting and designing NSE course learning outcomes into A.S. program introductory courses.

Faculty/Staff Development Implement LifeMap Certification program for new staff, in coordination with faculty development. Implement training for CRC documentation (Banner) for Student Affairs staff. • Conduct assessment of staff development courses and make necessary improvements.


Valencia College Summer Term 2016 Curricular NSE Basic Course •

Develop enrollment plans to expand NSE course to 100% of new students for Summer term 2016 (projected 111 sections, 2,664 students college wide).

Co-Curricular for all NSE courses Continue to implement and assess CRC.

• •

Faculty/Staff Development • Offer the revised Step-by-Step faculty development program for “new” faculty who will teach the NSE course in future terms (one faculty development course, up to 30 faculty members). • Offer supplemental faculty development course(s) for faculty who will teach the NSE course based on specific learning activities (e.g. students’ development of purpose). • Conduct assessment of NSE faculty development programs from participants. • Improve NSE faculty development programs based on assessments. • Implement LifeMap Certification program for new NSE fulltime faculty (one-cohort) and existing NSE faculty, part-time and full-time (one cohort). • Design and implement third annual New Student Experience Professional Development Day for faculty and staff (Julyapproximately 200 faculty/staff); content to focus on student engagement strategies based upon CCSSE data and QEP/program assessment data. Faculty/Staff Development Continue to implement LifeMap Certification program for new staff, in coordination with faculty development. Continue to implement training for CRC documentation (Banner) for Student Affairs staff.

Valencia College QEP Implementation Plan - 2016-2017 Fall Term 2016 Curricular Faculty/Staff Development NSE Basic Course • Offer the revised Step-by-Step faculty development program for “new” faculty who will teach the NSE course in future terms • Implement formative and summative assessments of the (one faculty development course, up to 30 faculty members). NSE teaching and learning experience by appropriate faculty. 40


Valencia College • • • • NSE Majors Course • Integrate Transfer Humanities/Communications Majors course as needed for student enrollment. • Pilot two (2) sections of the NSE course for Transfer Public Safety Majors with approximately 50 students. • Design NSE course with focus on Transfer Manufacturing/Construction Majors for pilot in Fall 2017. NSE Associate in Science Course • Integrate NSE course learning outcomes into all sections of introductory course(s) for A.S. Hospitality/Culinary programs. • Pilot one (1) embedded NSE course learning outcomes in introductory course for A.S. Nursing program. • Pilot one (1) embedded NSE course learning outcomes in introductory course for A.S. Allied Health programs. • Design the integration of NSE course learning outcomes in introductory course(s) for A.S. Landscaping/ Horticulture programs for pilot in Spring 2017. Co-Curricular for all NSE courses • Continue to implement and assess CRC.

• •

41

Offer supplemental faculty development course(s) for faculty who will teach the NSE course based on specific learning activities (e.g. students’ development of purpose) Conduct assessment of NSE faculty development programs from participants. Improve NSE faculty development programs based on assessments. Implement LifeMap Certification program for new NSE fulltime faculty (one-cohort) and existing NSE faculty, part-time and full-time (one cohort). Offer faculty development course(s) for faculty integrating, piloting and designing NSE course with focus on Transfer Major.

Offer faculty development course(s) for faculty integrating, piloting and designing NSE course learning outcomes into A.S. program introductory courses.

Faculty/Staff Development Continue to implement LifeMap Certification program for new staff, in coordination with faculty development. Continue to implement training for CRC documentation (Banner) for Student Affairs staff.


Valencia College Spring Term 2017 Curricular •

NSE Basic Course • Implement a formative and summative assessment of the NSE teaching and learning experience by appropriate faculty.

• • • • NSE Majors Course • Integrate Transfer Public Safety Majors course as needed for student enrollment. • Pilot two (2) sections of the NSE course for Transfer Manufacturing/Construction Majors with approximately 50 students NSE Associate in Science Course • Integrate NSE course learning outcomes into all sections of A.S. Nursing program introduction course. • Integrate NSE course learning outcomes into all sections of A.S. Allied Health introduction course(s). • Pilot one (1) embedded NSE course learning outcome in introductory course(s) for A.S. Landscaping/Horticulture programs. Co-Curricular for all NSE courses • Continue implementation and assessment of CRC.

• •

42  

Faculty/Staff Development Offer the revised Step-by-Step faculty development program for “new” faculty who will teach the NSE course in future terms (one faculty development course, up to 30 faculty members).. Offer supplemental faculty development course(s) for faculty who will teach the NSE course based on specific learning activities (e.g. students’ development of purpose). Conduct assessment of NSE faculty development programs from participants. Improve NSE faculty development programs based on assessments. Implement LifeMap Certification program for new NSE fulltime faculty (one-cohort) and existing NSE faculty, part-time and full-time (one cohort). Offer faculty development course(s) for faculty integrating, piloting and designing NSE course with focus on Transfer Major.

Offer faculty development course(s) for faculty integrating and piloting NSE course learning outcomes into A.S. program introductory courses.

Faculty/Staff Development Continue to implement LifeMap Certification program for new staff, in coordination with faculty development. Continue to implement training for CRC documentation (Banner) for Student Affairs staff.


Valencia College Summer Term 2017 Curricular NSE Basic Course • Implement formative and summative assessments of the NSE teaching and learning experience by appropriate faculty.

Co-Curricular for all NSE courses Continue implementation and assessment of CRC.

• •

43

Faculty/Staff Development • Offer the revised Step-by-Step faculty development program for “new” faculty who will teach the NSE course in future terms (one faculty development course, up to 30 faculty members). • Offer supplemental faculty development course(s) for faculty who will teach the NSE course based on specific learning activities (e.g. students’ development of purpose). • Conduct assessment of NSE faculty development programs from participants. • Improve NSE faculty development programs based on assessments. • Implement LifeMap Certification program for new NSE fulltime faculty (one-cohort) and existing NSE faculty, part-time and full-time (one cohort). • Design and implement fourth annual New Student Experience Professional Development Day for faculty and staff (Julyapproximately 200 faculty/staff); content to focus on student engagement strategies based upon CCSSE data and QEP/program assessment data. Faculty/Staff Development Continue to implement LifeMap Certification program for new staff, in coordination with faculty development. Continue to implement training for CRC documentation (Banner) for Student Affairs staff.


Valencia College Valencia College QEP Implementation Plan - 2017-2018 Fall Term 2017 Curricular Faculty/Staff Development NSE Basic Course • Offer the revised Step-by-Step faculty development program • Implement formative and summative assessments of the for “new” faculty who will teach the NSE course in future terms NSE teaching and learning experience by appropriate faculty. (one faculty development course, up to 30 faculty members). • Offer supplemental faculty development course(s) for faculty who will teach the NSE course based on specific learning activities (e.g. students’ development of purpose). • Conduct assessment of NSE faculty development programs from participants. • Improve NSE faculty development programs based on assessments. • Implement LifeMap Certification program for new NSE fulltime faculty (one-cohort) and existing NSE faculty, part-time and full-time (one cohort). NSE Majors Course • Offer faculty development course(s) for faculty integrating, • Integrate Transfer Manufacturing/Construction Majors piloting and designing NSE course with focus on Transfer Major. course as needed for student enrollment. NSE Associate in Science Course • Integrate NSE learning outcomes into all sections of Landscaping/Horticulture AS introduction course(s). Co-Curricular for all NSE courses • Continue to implement and assess CRC.

• •

44

Offer faculty development course(s) for faculty integrating, piloting and designing NSE course learning outcomes into A.S. program introductory courses.

Faculty/Staff Development Continue to implement LifeMap Certification program for new staff, in coordination with faculty development. Continue to implement training for CRC documentation (Banner) for Student Affairs staff.


Valencia College

Spring Term 2018 Curricular NSE Basic Course • Implement formative and summative assessments of the NSE teaching and learning experience by appropriate faculty.

• • • • • •

NSE Majors Course • Continue to schedule NSE Meta-majors courses and sections as needed for student enrollment. NSE Associate in Science Course • Continue to schedule integrated NSE A.S. introductory courses and sections as needed for student enrollment. •

Co-Curricular for all NSE courses Continue implementation and assessment of CRC.

• •

45

Faculty/Staff Development Offer the revised Step-by-Step faculty development program for “new” faculty who will teach the NSE course in future terms (one faculty development course, up to 30 faculty members). Offer supplemental faculty development course(s) for faculty who will teach the NSE course based on specific learning activities (e.g. students’ development of purpose). Conduct assessment of NSE faculty development programs from participants. Improve NSE faculty development programs based on assessments. Implement LifeMap Certification program for new NSE fulltime faculty (one-cohort) and existing NSE faculty, part-time and full-time (one cohort). Offer faculty development course(s) for faculty integrating, piloting and designing NSE course with focus on Transfer Major. Offer faculty development course(s) for faculty integrating, piloting and designing NSE course learning outcomes into A.S. program introductory courses.

Faculty/Staff Development Continue to implement LifeMap Certification program for new staff, in coordination with faculty development. Continue to implement training for CRC documentation (Banner) for Student Affairs staff.


Valencia College

Summer Term 2018 Curricular •

NSE Basic Course •

Implement formative and summative assessments of the NSE teaching and learning experience by appropriate faculty.

• • • • •

NSE Majors Course • Continue to schedule NSE Meta-majors courses and sections as needed for student enrollment.

NSE Associate in Science Course • Continue to schedule integrated NSE A.S. introductory courses and sections as needed for student enrollment.

Co-Curricular for all NSE courses Continue to implement and assess CRC.

• •

46

Faculty/Staff Development Offer the revised Step-by-Step faculty development program for “new” faculty who will teach the NSE course in future terms (one faculty development course, up to 30 faculty members). Offer supplemental faculty development course(s) for faculty who will teach the NSE course based on specific learning activities (e.g. students’ development of purpose). Conduct assessment of NSE faculty development programs from participants. Improve NSE faculty development programs based on assessments. Implement LifeMap Certification program for new NSE fulltime faculty (one-cohort) and existing NSE faculty, part-time and full-time (one cohort). Design and implement fifth annual New Student Experience Professional Development Day for faculty and staff (Julyapproximately 200 faculty/staff); content to focus on student engagement strategies based upon CCSSE data and QEP/program assessment data. Continue to offer faculty development course(s) for faculty piloting and designing NSE course with focus on Transfer Major. Continue to offer faculty development course(s) for faculty integrating NSE course learning outcomes into A.S. program introductory courses.

Faculty/Staff Development Continue to implement LifeMap Certification program for new staff, in coordination with faculty development. Continue to implement training for CRC documentation (Banner) for Student Affairs staff.


Valencia College

VIII. Organizational Structure

Like many of Valencia College’s programs, the QEP will be college-wide and implemented on multiple campuses. Valencia is decentralized in terms of leadership, with Campus Presidents given the autonomy to make decisions about a range of programs and practices. At the same time, we know that the majority of our students take classes on more than one campus during their time with us. We therefore strive to provide a consistent experience in terms of the services students receive, regardless of the campus they attend for any given course. We also measure and report student success and evaluate program success using college-wide metrics. Most importantly, leaders across the campuses promote Valencia’s collaborative culture and are committed to maintaining the essence of our approach to learningcentered education. While we appreciate and respect our different campus cultures and functions, we are mindful to provide a cohesive and connected Valencia experience for our students, regardless of which campus(es) they attend. With this idea of campus-based but college-wide programs in mind, Valencia’s Senior Team met with the QEP Leadership Team in June 2013 to develop plans for the implementation of the QEP. Figure 2 provides a graphic representation of organizational structure needed to make this project a success.

47


Valencia College

Figure 2. NSE Organizational Chart

The New Student Experience will be led by a director (to be hired in Fall 2013), who is the college-wide point of contact for the NSE. The director is responsible for oversight and supervision of the QEP’s five year implementation plan. The director will report to Joyce Romano, VP of Student Affairs and Susan Ledlow, VP of Academic Affairs and Planning. These two “sponsors” of the work will facilitate the provision of College resources, and ensure that QEP work is fully integrated into other college-wide initiatives. Our plan also calls for the addition of a full-time Assistant Director of Assessment (to be hired in Fall 2013) to our Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Planning.

48


Valencia College We have learned from previous initiatives similar to the QEP that substantial support for data collection, analysis, and presentation is required; therefore, our current staff cannot absorb the additional duties to be generated by the QEP. Support for faculty development will be provided by Wendi Dew, Director of Faculty and Instructional Development. Campus activities will be led by their respective Deans of Learning Support and Deans of Students. They will be responsible for supervising faculty for the NSE course, collecting data for evaluation purposes, and participating on the college-wide Core Team. The Core Team will bring information about progress on implementation from the campuses to the college-wide staff, and information about college-wide services and initiatives to the campus-based teams. Courses will be taught by a new type of faculty member, who both teaches and advises new students. NSE faculty will be hired on a 12 month contract and will teach during the Fall, Spring, and first Summer Terms. During August and December, when demand for advising is at its peak, they will work as advisors, primarily with new students.

IX.

Resources A spreadsheet detailing cost to the College for the five years of implementation is found

at the end of this section. Justification for line items and costs are outlined below. Personnel Investment – Over 5 Years: $6,456,393 The College plans to hire 3 full-time employees to manage the QEP: • • •

C-Level New Student Experience (NSE) Director - $75,000 per year B-Level Assistant Director of Assessment - $61,500 per year Staff Assistant II - $32,000 per year

In addition, the College will hire nine 12-month NSE Faculty members ($60,000 each) to teach the NSE Course in Years Two and Three for a total of 18 new faculty members. The 49


Valencia College personnel investment also includes faculty stipends (outlined below) and fringe benefits. Some of the stipends will be paid with existing grant funds. The funding sources are provided on the budget worksheet. Descriptions of roles and responsibilities are found in the section on Organizational Structure. All salaries and benefits are calculated using standard college rates. •

Instructional Designer (part time) - $24,960 each year This is a technical support in course design to support for the development of the New Student Experience Curricular and Co-Curricular learning experiences.

Faculty Leadership Stipends for Fall 2013 Term - $20,664 Two faculty members (one SLS and one non-SLS) from three campuses (East, West, and Osceola) estimated at $1,722 each for six credit hour reassigned/stipend to work on SLS curriculum redesign.

Faculty Development Fellow Stipend/Reassigned Time for Fall 2013 and Spring 2014 - $3,444 and continuing each year Fund a three credit hour reassigned time/stipend for a Faculty Development Fellow estimated at $1,722 to work with the Faculty Leadership Team to provide faculty development support during the SLS course redesign.

Faculty Work on New Lesson Plans and Strategies - $15,000 Thirty total faculty members, $500 each for two lessons or strategies.

Faculty Development Course Development - $4,500 Three faculty members from the PRESS Faculty Leadership Team to develop the new Step-by-Step faculty development course and six faculty members college-wide to develop new Faculty Development courses which supplement Step-by-Step training in specific areas of the redesigned curriculum; $500 each.

Compensation for Facilitating New Faculty Development Courses - $6,600 Facilitate eight redesigned Step-by-Step faculty development courses (co-taught) for current and prospective SLS faculty members (two each from Osceola, East, and West campuses, and one on Winter Park and Lake Nona) and facilitate six faculty development courses to supplement redesigned SLS course curriculum; $300 each.

Faculty Reassigned Time in Spring 2014 for Course Development - $5,166 Three faculty members to pilot the course and collect formative and summative data on new course, make improvements to the course curriculum, and develop online resources for SLS course; $1,722 each.

Faculty Development Facilitators to Teach LifeMap Certificate - $17,600 Two sections of Lifemap Certification per year; $2,200 each section.

Staff Development Facilitators to Teach LifeMap Certificate - $17,600 Two sections of Lifemap Certification per year; $2,200 each section.

50


Valencia College •

Faculty Stipends to Create Meta-Majors of the NSE Course - $6,400 Eight total Meta-Majors (two Meta-Majors per year developed by two Faculty Members) = $800 per Meta-Major).

Faculty Stipends to Integrate the NSE Course to the A.S. Programs - $26,400 Thirty-three total A.S. Degrees (two integrations per year developed by two Faculty Members) = $800 per A.S. Degree).

Destinations Annual program - $75,000 annually This is a six-week faculty development program held annually in the summer to focus faculty development on a topic of strategic importance to College initiatives. Funds include stipends for faculty facilitators and faculty participants, program presenters, and materials.

IT Consultant Stipend - $120,000 The IT consultant will work on Banner programming and other technology needs associated with the project. As discussed in the narrative, students must take the NSE course within the first 15 credit hours at the institution and programming will be needed to track co-curricular certificates as well as to ensure registration requirements are met. The estimated cost is $60,000 for both Year One and Year Two.

Travel Expenses: $112,500 •

Conference attendance for first-year experience related conferences - $112,500 15 people per year @ at an estimated cost of $1,500 each. $1,100 will come from Staff and Program Development (SPD) funds and the remaining $400 will come from the QEP Budget.

Administrative Costs: $194,000 •

Administration of Community College Survey on Student Engagement (CCSSE) $45,000 CCSSE Survey will be administered in Years Two, Four, and Five as part of the assessment plan; $15,000 each.

Career Assessment License – $30,000 Career assessment will be part of the College Readiness Certificate; $6,000 per year.

Consumable Materials and Supplies - $10,000 Two annual planning and assessment meetings will be held for all QEP staff. Other materials will support program development and delivery.

Co-curricular Tracking Software - $25,000 5-Star Students™ software will be used to record student progress towards the cocurricular certificate: 5 campuses total; 1 license per campus per year at $1,000 per license.

51


Valencia College •

Co-curricular Transcript Software - $48,000 OrgSync™ software will be integrated with Banner to document the co-curricular certificate on student transcripts; $12,000 per year.

Marketing Plan - $5,000 Work with Marketing and Strategic Communication and Organizational Communication and Development to create a marketing plan to rebrand the SLS course and NSE college-wide and print promotional materials.

Marketing and Promotional Materials for the NSE Course - $31,000 Development and printing of marketing and promotional Items such as brochures outlining the co-curricular certificates and the New Student Orientation workbook insert during Year One will cost $3,000. Printing of promotional materials as new co-curricular certificates are developed will cost $7,000 per year for Years Two through Five. Additional marketing dollars will come from the PRESS Grant to promote the NSE course.

52


Valencia College

QEP Budget

Project: Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) - Creating a New Student Experience Year Year One Year Two Three Year Four Year Five 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018

Total

Funding Source

A. PERSONNEL C-Level NSE Director

$75,000

$75,000

$75,000

$75,000

$75,000

$375,000

B-Level Assistant Director of Assessment

$61,500

$61,500

$61,500

$61,500

$61,500

$307,500

Staff Assistant II 12-month NSE Faculty - ($60,000 each - 9 new in year two and 9 new in year three) Instructional Designer - Part-time (20 hours per week @ $24 per hour) TOTAL PERSONNEL

$32,000

$32,000

$32,000

$32,000

$32,000

$160,000

$540,000

$1,080,000

$1,080,000

$1,080,000

$3,780,000

$24,960 $733,460

$24,960 $1,273,460

$24,960 $1,273,460

$24,960 $1,273,460

$24,960 $4,747,300

B. OTHER PERSONNEL Stipends for Faculty Leadership Team ($3,444 per 6 credit hours) Stipends/Release time for Faculty Development Fellows ($3,444 per 6 credit hours) Stipends/Release time for Faculty Development Fellows ($3,444 per 6 credit hours) Faculty work on New Lesson Plans and Strategies

$24,960 $193,460

$20,664

$20,664

$3,444

$3,444 $3,444

$3,444

$3,444

$3,444

$13,776

$15,000

$15,000

Faculty Development Course Development Compensation for Facilitating New Faculty Development Courses

$4,500

$4,500

$6,600

$6,600

Faculty Release Time for Course Development Stipends for Faculty Development to Teach Lifemap Certificate ($2,200 per section) Stipends for Staff Development to Teach Lifemap Certificate ($2,200 per section)

$5,166

$5,166 $4,400

$4,400

$4,400

$4,400

$17,600

$4,400

$4,400

$4,400

$4,400

$17,600

53 Â

QEP Budget QEP Budget QEP Budget QEP Budget QEP Budget

PRESS Grant PRESS Grant QEP Budget PRESS Grant PRESS Grant PRESS Grant PRESS Grant QEP Budget QEP Budget


Valencia College Stipends for Faculty to Create Meta-major for Business - ($400 per Meta-Major - 2 Faculty per Meta-Major) Stipends for Faculty to Create Meta-major for Nursing - ($400 per Meta-Major - 2 Faculty per Meta-Major) Stipends for Faculty to Create Meta-Major for STEM - ($400 per Meta-Major - 2 Faculty per Meta-Major) Stipends for Faculty to Create 5 remaining Metamajors of the NSE Course - ($400 per Meta-Major 2 Faculty per Meta-Major) Stipends for Faculty to Integrate the NSE Course to the 33 A.S. Programs ($400 per integration - 2 Faculty per Integration) Destinations Annual Program (Faculty Facilitators and Stipends) IT Consultant TOTAL OTHER PERSONNEL

$800

$800

Pathways Grant

$800

$800

Pathways Grant

$800

$800

LSAMP Grant QEP Budget

$1,600

$1,600

$800

$4,000

$7,200

$6,400

$6,400

$6,400

$26,400

$75,000

$75,000

$75,000

$75,000

$75,000

$375,000

$60,000 $190,374

$60,000 $156,844

$95,244

$95,244

$94,444

$120,000 $632,150

$23,798

$55,199

$84,860

$84,860

$84,811

$333,526

$5,566

$12,910

$19,847

$19,847

$19,835

$78,003

$26,754

$62,055

$95,399

$95,399

$95,343

$374,948

$2,802

$6,500

$9,992

$9,992

$9,986

$39,025

$22,836 $81,756

$91,344 $228,008

$91,344 $301,442

$22,836 $232,934

$22,836 $232,811

$251,196 $1,076,943

QEP Budget QEP Budget QEP Budget

C. FRINGE BENEFITS FICA 6.2% FICA Medicare 1.45% Retirement 6.97% Workers Compensation 0.73% Health Insurance ($7,612 per FTE; does not apply to PT staff under 25 hours) TOTAL FRINGE BENEFITS D. TRAVEL

54 Â

QEP Budget QEP Budget QEP Budget QEP Budget QEP Budget


Valencia College Conference attendance for First-Year Student Conferences (15 people @ $1,500 each)

$22,500

$22,500

$22,500

$22,500

$22,500

$112,500

TOTAL TRAVEL E. ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS Administration of Community College Student Survey of Engagement (CCSSE)

$22,500

$22,500

$22,500

$22,500

$22,500

$112,500

$15,000

$15,000

$45,000

Career Assessment License Consumable Materials and Supplies for Meetings and Training Co-curricular Tracking Software ($1,000 per license)

$15,000 $6,000

$6,000

$6,000

$6,000

$6,000

$30,000

$2,000

$2,000

$2,000

$2,000

$2,000

$10,000

$5,000

$5,000

$5,000

$5,000

$5,000

$25,000

$12,000

$12,000

$12,000

$12,000

$48,000

Co-curricular Transcript Software (Org Sync) Development of Marketing Plan Development and Printing of Marketing and Promotional Materials TOTAL ADMINISTRATIVE QEP Total Projected Costs

$5,000

$5,000

$3,000 $21,000

$7,000 $47,000

$7,000 $32,000

$7,000 $47,000

$7,000 $47,000

$31,000 $194,000

$501,339

$1,180,060

$1,716,895

$1,663,387

$1,662,464

$6,724,135

55 Â

SPD Funds/QEP Budget

QEP Budget QEP Budget QEP Budget QEP Budget QEP Budget PRESS Grant QEP Budget


Valencia College

X.

Assessment Building on the lessons learned about data collection and use from college-wide

program learning outcomes assessment activities, and from large-scale, student-success oriented initiatives over the past ten years, Valencia has developed a comprehensive assessment plan for the development and scaled implementation of a New Student Experience. The assessment plan distinguishes between institutional measures of student progression tracked over time, NSE Student Outcomes (that include student learning outcomes), and formative measures of implementation in support of continuous program improvement. The implementation of the QEP Assessment Plan will be a collaborative effort between the Director of the New Student Experience, the Assistant Vice President for Institutional Effectiveness and Planning (responsible for Institutional Research and Institutional Assessment), NSE faculty and staff, the Campus Deans of Learning Support, the Deans of Students, the Director of Institutional Assessment, the Director of Faculty and Instructional Development, and the Assistant Director of Institutional Assessment (to be hired in Fall 2013). The following plan describes the intended or desired outcomes (including student learning outcomes), a description of the data to be collected, the data collection procedure, frequency of data collection, a timeline for establishing baseline measures, the first anticipated collection point for data reflective of QEP interventions, and the position(s) or department(s) primarily responsible for data collection and reporting. The College Data Team will be responsible to support annual campus and college-wide reflection on the nature, meaning, and implications of the data collected. Co-chaired by the Director of New Student Experience and the Assistant Vice President for Institutional Effectiveness and Planning, the College Data Team will be comprised of the positions identified above and a representative group of faculty and staff members involved in the implementation of the curricular and co-curricular components of the new student experience. 56 Â


Valencia College The work of the Data Team at Valencia was initially developed to support the implementation of student success strategies during the College’s participation in AtD. The primary role of the Data Team currently is to lead an annual process that incorporates the reflection on data collected across the institution. This process requires the Data Team to collaborate closely with the faculty members, staff members and administrators who work closest to students. The Data Team will prepare an annual report on QEP implementation and the impact on students that will support annual campus and college-wide planning activities. Valencia has the human and technical resources necessary to collect, report, and analyze data associated with the implementation of the New Student Experience. The College has an Institutional Research (IR) department directed by Kurt Ewen, Assistant Vice President for Institutional Effectiveness and Planning, four research analysts, and a senior researcher to be hired in Fall 2013. The IR staff has extensive experience in the evaluation of major student success and learning projects including the AtD initiative and the College‘s other grant-related projects. The research analysts are skilled in developing data queries and conducting analyses. Work is currently underway between the IR department and OIT to expand the College’s data warehousing capabilities to include web-based, interactive visual analytics tools. These tools will allow end users to drill into disaggregated student success and progression data at the campus, department and course level. Valencia’s QEP will also be supported by the Office of Institutional Assessment. The director and assistant director will oversee the development, implementation, and documentation of annual plans for the assessment of student learning in all curricular and cocurricular programs. The department is responsible the collection and use of survey data from national surveys (e.g., the Community College Survey of Student Engagement) and supporting implementation of locally develop surveys (e.g., term-by-term student evaluation or feedback on instruction). Finally, Institutional Assessment coordinates qualitative data collection (e.g., 57


Valencia College student and faculty focus groups) and supports the integration of that data into our broader reflection on the student experience. Â

To assess the success of the QEP, we plan to consider institutional measures,

programmatic student outcomes, and implementation measures. Table 2 provides details on institutional measures, including the objective/measure, the data to be examined, the frequency of data collection, the baseline performance of Valencia students, and the timetable for the first measurement. Table 3 provides details on programmatic student outcomes, including: 1) the learning outcomes themselves; 2) their integration into curricular and/or co-curricular activities; 3) a description of the types of data to be collected; 4) the connection of the learning outcome to Valencia’s general education outcomes; 5) data collection procedures; 6) the frequency of data collection; 7) baseline measures; 8) timeline for first results; and, 9) parties responsible for data collection. Table 4 provides measures of implementation, including the objective/measure, a description of the data to be collected, the frequency of data collection, the timeline for fist results, and the parties responsible for data collection.

Note that Tables 2-4 complement Table 1, which presents the timeline for the implementation of the curricular and co-curricular work. With our extensive experience in assessment and evaluation, and the human and financial resources we have budgeted, we are confident the QEP can be realistically implemented and completed in five years.

58 Â


Valencia College Table 2. Institutional Measures Valencia College – QEP Assessment Plan Objective / Measure Increase New Student4 Persistence

Increase % Students Succeeding in Front Door

Data Description

Frequency

Base line Performance

Fall to Spring Persistence—Degreeseeking Students, First Time at Valencia (FTAV) Cohort Disaggregated by Enrollment Category

Yearly

Fall to Fall Persistence—Degreeseeking Students, First Time at Valencia (FTAV) Cohort Disaggregated by Enrollment Category

Yearly

Fall to Spring Persistence – Degreeseeking Students, First Time in College (FTIC) Cohort Disaggregated by Gender and Ethnicity

Yearly

Fall to Fall Persistence – Degreeseeking Students, First Time in College (FTIC) Cohort Disaggregated by Gender and Ethnicity

Yearly

Successful Completion5 of Front Door High Enrollment Courses Disaggregated by Campus of Course Enrollment

Fall, Spring and Summer Terms

All FTIC – 78.0% FTIC College Ready - 84.4% FTIC Dev Ed – 74.7% FTAV Transfer Col Ready – 76.8% FTAV Transfer Dev Ed – 73.3% All FTIC – 59.7% FTIC College Ready – 70.4% FTIC Dev Ed – 54.8% FTAV Transfer Col Ready – 48.3% FTAV Transfer Dev Ed – 53.4% African American Female – 73.6% African American Male – 65.7% Caucasian Female – 70.2% Caucasian Male – 79.4% Hispanic Female – 78.8% Hispanic Male – 76.7% African American Female – 87.8% African American Male – 80.9% Caucasian Female – 84.3% Caucasian Male – 84.8% Hispanic Female – 83.5% Hispanic Male – 89.6% See the Strategic Indicators Report on Student Progression (http://valenciacollege.edu/academic-affairs/institutional-

1st QEP Measures Spring (January) 2015

Fall (September) 2015

Spring (January) 2015

Fall (September) 2015

Spring (January) 2015

effectiveness-planning/institutionalresearch/Reporting/Strategic-Indicators/documents/00SIR-StudProgression-20130829.pdf

)

                                                                                                                      4

5

For the purposes of Valencia’s Quality Enhancement Plan, a “new Student” at Valencia is any student (native or transfer-in) who has completed fewer than 15 college-level credits at Valencia. For the purposes of Valencia’s Quality Enhancement Plan, the “successful completion” of Front Door High Enrollment Courses requires a grade of A, B, or C.

59


Valencia College Courses/ Decease the % of NonSuccess

Successful completion6 of Front Door High Enrollment Courses Disaggregated by Race/Ethnicity and Gender

Fall, Spring and Summer Terms

Increase New Student Progression to Key Academic Thresholds

Student Progression Tracked Over TimeFall Cohort FTIC Degree-seekers: 15 Credits in 2 years, 30 Credits in 3 years, 45 Credits in 4 years, Graduate in 5 years

Yearly

See the Strategic Indicators Report on Student Progression (http://valenciacollege.edu/academic-affairs/institutionaleffectiveness-planning/institutionalresearch/Reporting/Strategic-Indicators/documents/00SIR-StudProgression-20130829.pdf)

15 Credits in 2 Yrs – 65.1% 30 Credits in 3 Yrs – 51.2% 45 Credits in 4 Yrs – 43.3% Graduate in 5 Yrs – 35.2%

                                                                                                                      6

Spring (January) 2015

For the purposes of Valencia’s Quality Enhancement Plan, the “successful completion” of Front Door High Enrollment Courses requires a grade of A, B, or C.

60

Fall (September) 2015


Valencia College Student Progression Tracked Over TimeFall Cohort FTIC Degree-seekers: 15 Credits in 2 years, 30 Credits in 3 years, 45 Credits in 4 years, Graduate in 5 years. Disaggregated by Race/Ethnicity and Gender

Yearly

Increase Graduation Rates for Developmental New Education Students7 -Fall Cohort FTIC Student Degree-seekers over 5 Years by Cohort Time Race/Ethnicity and Gender to Degree Completion                                                                                                                      

Yearly

15 Credits in 2 Years African American Female – 53.9% African American Male – 50.0% Caucasian Female – 73.4% Caucasian Male – 62.9% Hispanic Female – 69.3% Hispanic Male – 62.7% 30 Credits in 3 Years African American Female – 41.7% African American Male –39.7% Caucasian Female – 60.6% Caucasian Male – 46.6% Hispanic Female – 53.4% Hispanic Male – 46.5% 45 Credits in 4 Years African American Female – 33.1% African American Male –31.2% Caucasian Female – 51.8% Caucasian Male – 40.0% Hispanic Female – 45.6% Hispanic Male – 37.8% Graduate in 5 Years African American Female – 25.8% African American Male –21.6% Caucasian Female – 41.1% Caucasian Male – 32.7% Hispanic Female – 37.6% Hispanic Male – 34.8% African American Female – 23.3% African American Male – 15.1% Caucasian Female – 28.6% Caucasian Male – 21.0% Hispanic Female – 28.0% Hispanic Male – 20.3%

7

Fall (September) 2015

Summer 2016

Given the recent changes to Developmental Education in the State of Florida, the definition of developmental education student will make it difficult to track their progression and graduation as has been done in the past. The College Data Team will develop appropriate data definitions to track the progression of student who would formerly have been identified as developmental education students.

61


Valencia College (5 year graduation horizon)

Graduation Rates for College Ready Students-Fall Cohort FTIC Degreeseekers over 5 Years by Race/Ethnicity and Gender

Yearly

Increase New Student Cohort Rates of Degree Completion

Cumulative Completion Rates for Fall FTIC Degree‐seeking Students with at Least One Developmental Education Course Required

Yearly

Cumulative Completion Rates for Fall FTIC Degree-seeking College Ready Students Across Cohort Term

Yearly

African American Female – 47.2% African American Male – 46.4% Caucasian Female – 53.6% Caucasian Male – 41.1% Hispanic Female – 51.4% Hispanic Male – 49.3% See the Strategic Indicators Report on Student Progression (http://valenciacollege.edu/academic-affairs/institutional-

Summer 2016

Summer 2016

effectiveness-planning/institutionalresearch/Reporting/Strategic-Indicators/documents/00SIR-StudProgression-20130829.pdf)

See the Strategic Indicators Report on Student Progression (http://valenciacollege.edu/academic-affairs/institutional-

Summer 2016

effectiveness-planning/institutionalresearch/Reporting/Strategic-Indicators/documents/00SIR-StudProgression-20130829.pdf)

Increase New Student Engagement

Community College Survey of Student Engagement – Academic Challenge (CCSSE benchmark data to be disaggregated by student self-reported credit hour accumulation and reflective of a college-wide oversample intended to reveal campus specific engagement data) Community College Survey of Student Engagement – Support for Learners (CCSSE benchmark data to be disaggregated by student self-reported credit hour accumulation and reflective of a college-wide oversample intended to reveal campus specific engagement data)

Spring of 2015, 2017, and 2018

Baseline measures for Academic Challenge established by participation in the survey in 2002, 2005, 2007, 2009, 20011 (campus-based over sample), and 2013 (campus-based over sample)

Fall (September) 2015

Spring of 2015, 2017, and 2018

Baseline measures for Support for Learners established by participation in the survey in 2002, 2005, 2007, 2009, 20011 (campus-based over sample), and 2013 (campus-based over sample)

Fall (September) 2015

62


Valencia College Table 4. Programmatic Student Outcomes Valencia College – QEP Assessment Plan

CoCurricular

(SLO or SL9)

Direct (D) or Indirect (ID) Measure

Data Description

Curricular

Programmatic Integration

Purpose Students will create a personal purpose statement that outlines and articulates their values, goals, interests, and strengths in relation to their educational and career aspirations.

X

X

SLO

D

Pathway Students will choose an academic program aligned

X

X

SO

ID

Student Outcomes

Connectio n to General Education Learning Outcomes

Data Collection Procedure

CT ER

Curricular NSE Course revision will create prescribed common assessments. Assessment procedures (the collection and the programmatic review of student artifacts) will be developed in accordance with Learning Assessment Committee standards. Co-Curricular NSE Career Readiness Certificate will include co-curricular measures of student learning.

N/A

9

Critical Thinking (CT); Ethical Responsibility (ER); Information Literacy (IL); Interpersonal Communication (IC)   SLO= Student Learning Outcome; SL=Student Outcome

63

Primary responsibility for data collection and reporting

Baseline

1 QEP Results

Fall, Spring and Summer terms

Baseline to be determin ed in the NSE Pilot in Spring 2014

Fall term 2014

Campus Deans of Learning Support, the Deans of Students, Director of Institutional Assessment

Fall, Spring and Summer terms

Baseline to be determin ed in the NSE

Fall term 2014

Campus Deans of Learning Support, the Deans of

Frequency

8

                                                                                                                      8

st


Valencia College with their educational/car eer goals, interests, strengths, and values. Plan - Students will design an education plan that include goals for learning and a financial plan.

Pilot in Spring 2014

X

X

SLO SO

D ID

CT ER

Curricular NSE Course revision will create prescribed common assessments. Assessment procedures (the collection and the programmatic review of student artifacts) will be developed in accordance with Learning Assessment Committee standards. Co-Curricular NSE Career Readiness Passport will include co-curricular measures of student learning. Indirect Measure

Students, Director of Institutional Assessment

Fall, Spring and Summer terms

Baseline to be determin ed in the NSE Pilot in Spring 2014

Fall term 2014

Campus Deans of Learning Support, the Deans of Students, Director of Institutional Assessment

Fall, Spring and Summer terms

Baseline to be determin ed in the

Fall term 2014

Campus Deans of Learning Support, the

- Student development of My Education Plan (MEP)

Preparation Students will apply college success skills.

X

X

SLO

D

IL ER

- Tracking of student course enrollment patterns in relationship to their most recent MEP Curricular NSE Course revision will create prescribed common assessments. 64 Â


Valencia College

Personal Connection As a result of the New Student Experience Students will demonstrate effective communication skills with diverse groups.

X

X

SLO

D

IC

Place Students will demonstrate awareness of college support systems.

X

X

SO

ID

N/A

Assessment procedures (the collection and the programmatic review of student artifacts) will be developed in accordance with Learning Assessment Committee standards. Co-Curricular NSE Career Readiness Passport will include co-curricular measures of student learning. Curricular NSE Course revision will create prescribed common assessments. Assessment procedures (the collection and the programmatic review of student artifacts) will be developed in accordance with Learning Assessment Committee standards. Co-Curricular NSE Career Readiness Passport will include co-curricular measures of student learning. - Tracking of Valencia new student use of campus-based Learning Support Services. - Self-reported student 65 Â

NSE Pilot in Spring 2014

Fall, Spring and Summer terms

Baseline to be determin ed in the NSE Pilot in Spring 2014

Fall, Spring and Summer terms

Baseline to be determin ed in the NSE Pilot in

Deans of Students, Director of Institutional Assessment

Fall term 2014

Fall term 2014

Campus Deans of Learning Support, the Deans of Students, Director of Institutional Assessment

Campus Deans of Learning Support, the Deans of Students,


Valencia College

Students will demonstrate Increased Student Engagement

X

X

SLO

ID

N/A

use of campus-based Learning Support Services – End of term Student Feedback on Instruction Term by Term comparison of data collected from the CCSSE Course Feedback Form (Link) administered in SLS 1122 and front door new student courses with the results of the CCSSE survey administered collegewide in 2002, 2005, 2007, 2009, 20011 (campus-based over sample), and 2013 (campus-based over sample). CCCSSE will be administered in the Spring of 2015, 2017, and 2018 – CCSSE data to be disaggregated by student self-reported credit hour accumulation and reflective of a collegewide oversample intended to reveal campus specific engagement data. 66

Spring 2014

Fall, Spring and Summer terms

Baseline to be determin ed in the NSE Pilot in Spring 2014

Director of Institutional Assessment Spring 2014

Campus Deans of Learning Support, the Deans of Students, Director of Institutional Assessment


Valencia College Table 4. Measures of Implementation Valencia College – QEP Assessment Plan Objective / Measure Improve the effectiveness of the implementation of the NSE (the student experience)

Data Description

Frequency

End of Term Student Feedback on Instruction survey results for pilot NSE course as compared to the existing Student Success course and other front door courses for new students. End of Term Student Feedback on Instruction survey results for pilot NSE course at scale as compared to other front door courses for new students. Student Feedback Surveys for co-curricular activities associated with the Co-curricular Certificates Focus groups focused on the student experience in the redesigned NSE course Focus groups focused on the student experience in co-curricular activities associated with the Co-curricular Certificates Faculty Feedback Surveys for pilot NSE course

Improve the effectiveness of the implementtation of the NSE (the faculty /staff experiFaculty and Staff Feedback Surveys concerning faculty and staff ence) development opportunities Focus groups focused on the faculty experience in the redesigned NSE course Focus groups focused on the faculty and experience with cocurricular student engagement activities

67 Â

Spring Fall, Spring and Summer

1st QEP Position(s) or Measures Department(s) Primarily responsible for data collection and reporting Spring Director of Institutional 2014 Assessment Fall 2014

Fall, Spring Summer Fall 2013 (Lake Nona Pilot) Once a year during Spring the duration of the 2014 QEP

Spring

Spring 2014

Once per courses / Spring certificate during the 2014 duration of the QEP Once a year during the duration of the QEP

Spring 2014

Director of Institutional Assessment Director of Institutional Assessment Director of Institutional Assessment Director of Institutional Assessment Director of Institutional Assessment, Director of Faculty and Instructional Development Director of Institutional Assessment, Director of Faculty and Instructional Development Director of Institutional Assessment Director of Institutional Assessment


Valencia College

XI.

References and Appendices

Adams, C. J. (2003). Soft skills: Seen as key elements for higher ed. Education Digest, 78(6),18-22. Alexander, J. S. & Gardner, J. N. (2009), Beyond retention: A comprehensive approach to the first college year. About Campus, 14, 18–26. American College Personnel Association (ACPA). (1994). The student learning imperative: Implications for student affairs. Washington, DC: Author. Astin, A. W., Vogelgesang, L. J., Ikeda, E. K., & Yee, J. A. (2000). How service learning affects students. Los Angeles, CA: Higher Education Research Institute, UCLA. Barefoot, B. O., Gardner, J., Cutright, M., Morris, L. V., Schroeder, C. C., Schwartz, S. W., & Swing, R. L. (2005). Achieving and sustaining institutional excellence for the first-year of college. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Chickering, A.W., & Gamson, Z.F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. AAHE Bulletin, 39(7), 3-7. Childress, Lisa K. (2006) Internationalization Plans for American Higher Education Institutions: The Development and Monitoring of Written Commitments to Internationalization. Online Submission, Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE) (Anaheim, CA, Nov 1-4, 2006) Cho, S. W., & Karp, M. M. (2013). Student success courses in the community college: Early enrollment and educational outcomes. Community College Review, 4(1), 86-103. Engstrom, C & Tinto V. (2008). Access without support is not opportunity. Change, 40(1), 46-50. Eyler, J., & Giles, Jr., D. E. (1999). Where's the learning in service learning? San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

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Valencia College Geleta, N. E., & Gilliam, J. (2003). An introduction to service-learning. In Teacher education consortium in service-learning, learning to serve, serving to learn: A view from higher education (pp. 10-13). Salisbury, MD: Salisbury University. Gonzalez, J. (2012) Aspen competition drives innovative ideas for community-college completion. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 58(19), 1. Habley, W. R., Robbins, S. B., & Bloom, J. L. (2012). Increasing persistence: Research-based strategies for college student success. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Howard, H. E., & Jones, W. P. (2000). Effectiveness of a freshman seminar in an urban university: Measurement of selected indicators. College Student Journal, 34(4), 509. Hunter, M. S., & Linder, C. W. (2005). First-year seminars. In Upcraft, Gardner, & Barefoot (Eds.). Challenging and supporting the first-year student: A handbook for improving the first-year of college (pp. 275-291). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. King, P. M. (1997). Character and civic education: What does it take? Educational Record, 78(3,4), 87-90. Kuh, G. D. (1996). Guiding principles for creating seamless learning environments for undergraduates. Journal of College Student Development, 37 (2), 135-48. Kuh, G. D., Kinzie, J., Schuh, J. H., Whitt, E. J., & Associates (2005). Student success in college: Creating conditions that matter. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Kuh, G. D. (2008). High-impact educational practices: What they are, who has access to them, and why they matter. Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities. Marriner, M. & Gebhard, N. (2006) Roadtrip nation: a guide for discovering your path in life. New York: Ballantine Books. Mars, M. M., & Ginter, M. (2012). Academic innovation and autonomy: An exploration of entrepreneurship education within American community colleges and the academic capitalist context. Community College Review, 40(1), 75-95. 69 Â


Valencia College Mars, M. M., Slaughter, S., & Rhoades, G. (2008). The state-sponsored student entrepreneur. Journal of Higher Education, 79(6), 638-670. Messineo, M. (2012). Sustainability and first-year programs. New Directions for Student Services, 137, 67-81. doi:10.1002/ss.20015 Moore, K. P., & Sandholtz, J. H. (1999). Designing successful service learning projects for urban schools. Urban Education, 34(4). 480-498. OECD (2012). United States, in OECD, Education at a glance 2012: OECD Indicators, OECD Publishing. doi: 10.1787/eag-2012-en. O'Neill, N. (2010). Internships as a high-impact practice: some reflections on quality. Peer Review, 12(4), 4-8. Pascarella, E. T., & Terenzini, P. T. (1991). How college affects students: Findings and insights from twenty years of research. San Francisco, CA; Jossey-Bass. Payne, R., DeVol, P., & Smith, T. Bridges out of poverty: strategies for professionals and communities. United States: aha! Process, Inc. Pennington, H. (2012). For student success, stop debating and start improving. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 58(32), 1. Ponder, J., Veldt, M. V., & Lewis-Ferrell, G. (2011). Citizenship, curriculum, and critical thinking beyond the four walls of the classroom: linking the academic content with servicelearning. Teacher Education Quarterly, 38(4), 45. Puyana, A., & Shugart, S. (2001). Strategic goal 2: Start right. (White Paper). Retrieved from Valencia College: http://valenciacollege.edu/lci/essays/Goal2Essay.htm Scott-Clayton, J. (2011). The shapeless river: Does a lack of structure inhibit students’ progress at community colleges? (CRCC Working Paper No. 25). Community College Research Center, Teachers College: Columbia University. Shugart, S., Phelps, J., Puyana, A., Romano, J., & Walter, K. (2011) Valencia's big ideas: Sustaining authentic organizational change through shared purpose and culture. 70 Â


Valencia College O’Banion, T. and Wilson, C.D., Eds. Focus on learning: A learning college reader. Phoenix, AZ: League for Innovation in Community Colleges, 123-125. Siegel, M. J. (2011). Reimagining the retention problem: Moving our thinking from end product to by-product. About Campus, 15(1), 8-18. Skidmore, D.,Marston, J & Olson, G. An Infusion Approach to Internationalization: Drake University as a Case Study, Frontiers: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Study Abroad, v11 p187-203 Aug 2005 Stenhouse, V. L., & Jarrett, O. S. (2012). In the service of learning and activism: service learning, critical pedagogy, and the problem solution project. Teacher Education Quarterly, 39(1), 51. Tinto, V. (2005). Taking student success seriously: Rethinking the first-year of college. (White Paper). 9th Annual Intersession Academic Affairs Forum, Purdue University. University of South Carolina (2009). First-year experience and students in transition: 2009 National Survey of First-Year Seminars. Retrieved from http://www.sc.edu/fye/research/surveys/survey_instruments/files/Executive_Summaries_ 2009_National_Survey_First-Year%20Seminar.pdf Upcraft, M. L., Gardner, J. N., & Barefoot, B. O. (2005). Challenging and supporting the firstyear student: A handbook for improving the first-year of college. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Valencia College (2009). Starting right: The story continues. Foundations of excellence final report and recommendations. Retrieved from Valencia College: http://valenciacollege.edu/academic-affairs/institutional-effectivenessplanning/institutional-assessment/documents/FoEFinalReport-ApprovedbyCLC5-709.pdf

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Valencia College Valencia College (2011). CCSSEresults. Retrieved from Valencia College: http://valenciacollege.edu/academic-affairs/institutional-effectivenessplanning/institutional-assessment/surveys/documents/ValenciaCCSE2011.pdf Vander Schee, B. A. (2011). Changing general education perceptions through perspectives and the interdisciplinary first-year seminar. International Journal Of Teaching & Learning In Higher Education, 23(3), 382-387. Yohalem, N., & Jensen, E. (2012). Raising the bar from ready by 21 to credentialed by 26 (Vol. 5). Washington, DC: The Forum for Youth Investment. Youniss, J., & Yates, M. (1997). Community service and social responsibility in youth Chicago, IL; University of Chicago Press.

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Valencia College

Appendix 1 QEP PARTICIPANT LIST First

Last

Campus

CLC / CPC

Reading Circle

Big Idea

Members

Leaders

Taskforce

Title

QEP Leadership Team Joyce

Romano

DTC

VP, Student Affairs

CLC/CPC

Kurt

Ewen

DTC

AVP, Institutional Effectiveness & Planning

CLC/CPC

Jamy

Chulak

West

Professor, Respiratory Therapy

Christina

Hardin

Osceola

Professor, English

Ed

Holmes

East

Counselor, Student Services

John

Niss

Winter Park

Professor, Math QEP Core Team

Susan

Ledlow

DTC

VP, Academic Affairs & Planning

Joan

Tiller

DTC

Interim VP, Academic Affairs

Landon

Shepherd

Osceola

Dean of Learning Support

Bass

East

Dean of Learning Support

Karen

Reilly

West

Dean of Learning Support

Macelle Karen

Cohon Cowden

East West

Jenny

Hu

Osceola

Beth

King

West

Professor, English Professor, Reading Professor, Computer Programing & Analysis Librarian

Sonya

Joseph

Lake Nona

AVP, Student Affairs

Leonard

73 Â

Common Curricular Experience

X

Progression to Degree Readiness Common Curricular Experience Co-Curricular Engagement Introduction to Valencia Progression to Degree Readiness Common Curricular Experience Common Curricular Experience Common Curricular Experience

Co-Curricular Engagement


Valencia College Progression to Degree Readiness Common Curricular Experience Common Curricular Experience Common Curricular Experience

Karen

Borglum

DTC

AVP, Curriculum & Articulation

Cathy

Penfold-Navarro

West

Project Director, Title III

Wendi

Dew

East

Director, Faculty & Instructional Development

Laura

Blasi

DTC

Director, Institutional Assessment

Daryl Amy

Davis Bosley

West CJI

Lucy

Boudet

West

Institutional Research Analyst Interim VP, Human Resources VP, Marketing & Strategic Communications Senior Team

Joyce

Romano

DTC

VP, Student Affairs

CLC /CPC

Carl

Creasman

East

Professor, History

CLC

Stacey

Johnson

East

Campus President

CLC / CPC

Susan

Ledlow

DTC

VP, Academic Affairs & Planning

CLC / CPC

Kathleen

Plinske

Osceola

Campus President

CLC / CPC

Bill

White

West

Chief Information Officer

CLC / CPC

Falecia

Williams

West

Campus President

CLC /CPC

Joe

Battista

West

Amy

Bosley

CJI

Lucy

Boudet

West

Geraldine Deidre

Gallagher Holmes DuBois

DTC Osceola

Chief Operating Officer AVP, Organizational Communication & Development VP, Marketing/Strategic Communications Foundation President & CEO Professor, Speech

CPC

Keith

Houck

DTC / West

VP, Operations & Finance

CPC

Bill Joan

Mullowney Tiller

DTC DTC

Matthew

Abalos

Osceola

VP, Policy/General Council Special Assistant to the President Big Meeting 2012 Participants Coordinator, Internships

74 Â

Introduction to Valencia Common Curricular Experience Introduction to Valencia Progression to Degree Readiness Progression to Degree Readiness Common Curricular Experience Common Curricular Experience Co-Curricular Engagement Introduction to Valencia

Common Curricular Experience


Valencia College Kristin

Abel

East

Kim

Adams

DTC

Ruby

Alvarez

West

Professor, Theater Technology Administrative Assistant, Curriculum Development & Articulation Professor, Nursing

Johnny

Aplin

East

Coordinator, ATLAS Access Lab

Alys

Arceneaux

West

Analyst, Institutional Research

Maryke

Asbury

Osceola

Julie

Balassa

East

Anne

Barreto

West

Coordinator, Disability Support Services Assistant Director, Disability Support Services Academic Advisor, Student Services

Nicholas

Bekas

West

Campus Dean, Academic Affairs

Laura

Blasi

DTC

Director, Institutional Assessment

Karen

Blondeau

West

Director, Learning Resource Center

Karen

Borglum

DTC

AVP, Curriculum Development & Articulation

Mike

Bosley

Lake Nona

Executive Dean

Joanna Betty

Branham Bright

East East

Fiscal Manager, Library Adjunct Professor, IT

Robyn

Brighton

East

Director, Curriculum Initiatives

Valerie Tullio Jenni

Burks Bushrui Campbell

West West Osceola

Catherine

Campbell

DTC

Director, Honors Counselor, Student Services Dean, Communications/Humanities Specialist, Career & Workforce Education

Jenny

Charriez

CJI

Director, Employee Development

Chris Kristeen Karen Penny

Christensen Christian Conners Conners

West East East West

Director, Financial Aid Services AVP, Resource Development Adjunct Dean, Allied Health

75 Â

CLC

Progression to Degree Readiness Common Curricular Experience

Introduction to Valencia

CLC

CLC

Progression to Degree Readiness Common Curricular Experience Common Curricular Experience Progression to Degree Readiness Common Curricular Experience

Common Curricular Experience

Progression to Degree Readiness Introduction to Valencia

Introduction to Valencia


Valencia College Carl Jodi

Creasman Criner

East West

Professor, History Administrative Assistant, Fine Arts

Marilyn

Curall

West

Professor, English

Diane

Dalrymple

East

Donna

Deitrick

West

Wendi

Dew

East

Aida

Diaz

West

Staff Assistant I, Educator Prep Institute (EPI) Director, Faculty & Instructional Development Professor, Spanish

Carmen

Diaz

West

Coordinator, Internships

Suzette Lynn Susan Daniel

Dohany Dorn Dunn Dutkofski

Winter Park East Winter Park Osceola

Lisa

Eli

Osceola

Michal

Ewing

West

Kimberly

Finley

West

Shelby

Fiorentino

West

Professor, Speech Dean, Science Manager, Credit Programs Dean, Fine Arts Managing Director, Continuing Education International Support Specialist, Institutional Research Academic Advisor, Dean of Students WEC Coordinator, ATLAS Access Lab

Linda

Firmani

Winter Park

Counselor, Student Services

Kimberly

Foster

Osceola

Manager, Learning Support Services

Michelle

Foster

East

Campus Dean, Academic Affairs

Charles

Fox

West

Mildred

Franceschi

West

Barbara

Frazier

DTC / West

Jean Marie

FĂźhrman

Winter Park

Becky

Gallop

West

Debbie

Garrison

East

CLC

Introduction to Valencia

Librarian

Assistant Director, Faculty & Instructional Development Dean, Business Director, Workplace Learning/Placement Professor, Reading Director, Conferencing & College Events Professor, Math

76 Â

CPC

X

Co-Curricular Engagement Common Curricular Experience Introduction to Valencia Co-Curricular Engagement Introduction to Valencia

CLC Introduction to Valencia

Common Curricular Experience Progression to Degree Readiness

Progression to Degree Readiness CPC

CLC


Valencia College Claudia

Genovese-Martinez Gonzalez Bonnewitz

West

Professor, Math

DTC

Professional Staff Representative

Damion

Hammock

Winter Park

Faculty Senate President, Winter Park

CLC /CPC

Stacey

Johnson

East

Campus President

CLC / CPC

Susan

Ledlow

DTC

VP, Academic Affairs & Planning

CLC / CPC

Maryke

Lee

East

Dean, Math

CLC

Kari

Makepeace

DTC

Executive Assistant, Academic Affairs & Planning

CLC

Michele

McArdle

Winter Park

Executive Dean

CLC

Rob

McCaffrey

East

Professor, Digital Media

CLC / CPC

John Diane

McFarland Orsini

Osceola West

Faculty Senate President, Osceola Faculty Senate President, West

CLC / CPC CLC

Kathleen

Plinske

Osceola

Campus President

CLC / CPC

Robin

Poole

West

Professor, Dental Hygiene

CLC

Cheryl

Robinson

Winter Park

Dean of Students

CLC

Irina Bill

Struganova White

West West

Professor, Physics Chief Information Officer

CLC CLC / CPC

Falecia

Williams

West

Campus President

CLC /CPC

Wendy

Givoglu

East

Dean, Arts/Entertainment

Leslie

Golden

DTC

Assistant General Counsel

Jeff

Goltz

CJI

Director, Criminal Justice Institute

Carin Al

Gordon Groccia

East Osceola

Barbara

Halstead

DTC

Kitty

Christensen

West

Dean, Business, IT & Public Services Professor, Math Executive Assistant, President's Office Professor, Dental Hygiene

Elisha

77 Â

CLC

Progression to Degree Readiness Progression to Degree Readiness Progression to Degree Readiness Introduction to Valencia Common Curricular Experience Progression to Degree Readiness

Common Curricular Experience Co-Curricular Engagement

Common Curricular Experience Common Curricular Experience Common Curricular Experience


Valencia College Kathy Nasser

Hauser Hedayat

West DTC

Manager, Campus Operations AVP, Career & Workforce Education

Larry

Herndon

West

Professor, Student Life Skills (SLS)

Jeff Debra Todd

Hogan Hollister Hunt

West Lake Nona West

Dale

Husbands

Osceola

Functional IS Support Specialist Professor, Psychology Director, College Bookstore Dean, Business & Information Technology

Nichole

Jackson

East

Professor, Humanities

Debi Ty Coleen

Jakubcin Johnson Jones

East West Osc

LeSena

Jones

DTC

Coordinator, Employee Development Deans of Students Professor, Office Systems Technology Manager, Career & Workforce Education

Sonya

Joseph

Lake Nona

AVP, Student Affairs

Elizabeth

Jusino

East

Coordinator, Career Program Advisor

Celine

Kavalec-Miller

East

Director, Teaching/Learning Academy (TLA)

Beth

King

West

Librarian

Jessica

King

DTC

Administrative Assistant, Institutional Assessment

Donna

Kosloski

West

Analyst, Institutional Research

Deborah Joe Helene

Larew Livingston Loiselle

EC CJI CJI

Tom

Lopez

West

Rachel Mabel Brian

Luce-Hitt Machin Macon

CJI Osceola Lake Nona

Lisa

Macon

West

Director, Â Students with Disabilities AVP, Human Resources AVP, Facilities & Sustainability AVP, Safety/Security Risk Management Coordinator, Diversity & Inclusion Professor Professor, Math Dean, Architecture, Engineering/Technology

78 Â

Common Curricular Experience

CPC Co-Curricular Engagement

X

Co-Curricular Engagement Progression to Degree Readiness Co Curricular Engagement Common Curricular Experience

Progression to Degree Readiness

Common Curricular Experience


Valencia College Common Curricular Experience

Jane

Maguire

East

Professor, Reading

Noelia

Maldonado

DTC

Support Specialist, Planning

Adrian

Manley

West

Counselor, Student Services

Donna Lee Susan

Marino Maryke Matthews

DTC East West

Coordinator, Donor Relations Dean, Math Professor, Biology

James

May

East

Professor, English

Marjorie

McKillop

West

Carolyn

McMorran

West

Edward Katherine

Moore Moore

Winter Park

Student Services Advisor, Dean of Students WEC Managing Director, Continuing Education Foundation Board Director Director, Learning Resource Center

Jocelyn

Morales

East

Counselor, Student Services

Joshua Linda Erin

Murdock Neal O'Brien

West East East

Jyoti

Pande

East

Della Cathy Paula Yasmeen

Paul Penfold Navarro Pritchard Qadri

East West West East

Instructional Designer, IT Dean, Communications Professor, English Assistant Director, Faculty & Instructional Development Dean, Communications Director, Pathways Title III Dean, Nursing Professor, Education

Terry

Rafter-Carles

East

Professor, Student Life Skills (SLS)

Andy

Ray

West

Professor, Building Construction Technology

Gerald

Reed

West

Programmer/Analyst, OIT

Beth

Renn

West

Jennifer

Robertson

DTC

Bianca

Rodriguez

West

Dean, Communications/Humanities Director, Study Abroad & Global Experience (SAGE) Professor

Common Curricular Experience

Common Curricular Experience

79 Â

Common Curricular Experience

Introduction to Valencia

CPC

Common Curricular Experience Common Curricular Experience Common Curricular Experience Introduction to Valencia


Valencia College Susan

Russo

Osceola

Barbara

Shell

East

Liza

Shellpfeffer

East

Technical Document Specialist Senior, Admissions & Records Assistant Director, Community Relations Professor, Speech

Landon

Shephard

Osceola

Campus Dean, Learning Support

Sandy

Shugart

DTC

College President

Renee

Simpson

West

AVP, Admissions & Records

Patti Undria

Smith Stalling

West West

Assistant Chief Information Officer Internal Auditor

Jackie

Starren

Osceola

Professor, Humanities

Stan David Jillian Russell Steven Carol Summer Erin

Stone Sutton Szentmiklosi Takashima Thiesse Traynor Trazzaera Tuttle

CJI East Osceola West East West East CJI

Jorge

Valladares

East

Linda Myrna Carla Dennis Jane Martha Bobbi

Vance Villanueva Walker Weeks Wiese Williams Willoughby

East DTC Lake Nona East East CJI CJI

Janice

Wood

DTC

Allie

Yadav

East

Chara

Young

CJI

VP, Human Resources Dean, Humanities/Foreign Language Dean of Students Dean, Math Manager, Student Services Senior Manager, Public Relations Professor, Reading Coordinator, Supervisor Development Coordinator, Disability Support Services Dean, Student Services Special Assistant to the President Professor, English Professor, Library Professor, Accounting AVP, Diversity & Inclusion Specialist, Human Resources Administrative Assistant, Institutional Effectiveness & Planning Grants Manager, Resource Development Director, Organizational Communication

80 Â

Common Curricular Experience Progression to Degree Readiness

Common Curricular Experience CPC Introduction to Valencia Introduction to Valencia

Introduction to Valencia

Introduction to Valencia

Progression to Degree Readiness


Valencia College

Appendix 2 Big Meeting 2012 Tuesday, June 12, 2012 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. West Campus, Special Events Center ANNOTATED AGENDA Goals for the Day: § Review the Progress of Goals & Objectives of the Strategic Plan 2008-2015 § Review Campus Plans and their Relationship to the Strategic Plan § Develop Broad Themes/Clusters for the Reflection of the Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) 8:00 a.m.

Registration, Continental Breakfast & Networking (30)

8:30 a.m.

Welcome & Introductions (15) o Joan to do welcome and introduce Jean Marie o Jean Marie to ask CPC members to stand, and thank them for their support and work all year o Jean Marie to ask everyone to introduce themselves at each table o Joan to discuss overview of the day

Joan Tiller Jean Marie Führman

8:45 a.m.

National Agenda (30) (Suggested) o Completion o Accelerated Learning o First-Year Experience, Progression, Second-Year Experience o Advising Models o Financing Cost of Higher Education

Joyce Romano Sandy Shugart

9:15 a.m.

Recognition – Champion Awards (15) (notes on separate page) o Karen Borglum will assist Dr. Shugart o We want everyone to stand who’s been involved, such as: Reach, Developmental Math, Bridges, SL, LinC. o Some of our leaders of Developmental Education Initiative (DEI) are: o Nicholas Bekas – Pen o 4 Faculty Leaders: Marilyn Curall, Al Groccia, Summer Trazzera, Mia Pierre – Bookends (info on separate page)

Sandy Shugart

9:30 a.m.

Strategic Plan 2008-2015 (30) • Report on Progress of Goals & Objectives o Kurt to present with 2011 Goal Team Representatives:

Kurt Ewen Joyce Romano John Niss

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Valencia College o o o o o o

Joyce Romano #1, John Niss #2, Amy Bosley #3, Lucy Boudet #4 Reference Handout of old and new/changed objectives Ask to respond to suggested changes on Form in packet Pause for any responses to new or changed objectives Collect Response form at 2 tables each - Assist: Barbara, Cathy, Janice, Jean Marie, Jessica, Joan, Karen, Kim, Kris, Laura, LeSena, Nasser, Noelia – Each one Summarize Responses

Amy Bosley Lucy Boudet

10:00 a.m.

Break (15) o Joan will give directions to regroup o Ask everyone to regroup – to the best of their ability – so there is a mix of representing Career, Faculty, Professional, and Administrative staff at each table o The table with the best mix will get a prize

10:15 a.m.

Campus Plans (60) • East/Winter Park Campuses (20) • Osceola/Lake Nona Campuses (20) • West Campus (20) o Power Point Slides “Overview of Underlying Themes,” and of 20 minutes, allow 5 minutes for Q&A for each campus.

Dave Sutton Michele McArdle Kathleen Plinske Falecia Williams

11:15 a.m.

Discussion – What are the Connections… (45) o Ask each table to discuss and write ideas on big diagram poster on tables; include themes that they heard in the discussion that morning

Joyce Romano

12:00 p.m.

Lunch & Networking (60) o Joan to announce lunch and that posters will be picked up o Give directions for accessing lunch o Staff to pick up posters and post on walls: Barbara, Jessica, Janice, Gisela, Cathy, Patty, Jessica, Kim, Noelia, Kurt, Joyce, Karen, Lesena, Kris, Nasser, Laura, Barbara, Joan, Jean Marie o Distribute One-sheet per table handout for “Top 3 Themes”

1:00 p.m.

Walkabout with Someone Else (30) o Ask everyone to pair up with another person to walk around the room and record themes they see on the posters Overview on Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) (45) o Kurt to present with 4 QEP Faculty Leaders: Christina Hardin, Ed Holmes, John Niss, Kitty Harkleroad o Handout in packet

1:30 p.m.

82

Joan Tiller

Kurt Ewen Christina Hardin Ed Holmes John Niss Kitty Harkleroad


Valencia College

2:15 p.m.

Next Big Idea (60 = 30+30) o 30 minutes to discuss at each table the themes that everyone had written down, and identify three top themes from each table o Place “Theme Form” on Tables (1 per table) (Noelia & Gisela) o 30 minutes to share with the room top three themes per table. When shared, type theme(s) to view on 4 screens o When one table shares, ask others in the room if they have the same theme – show of hands to record. Ask tables to share other themes not previously mentioned. o Campus Presidents to assist with microphones o Joyce and Kurt to work with Joan & Jean Marie to identify themes to be typed on screen o Count how many identified each of the same themes – type on the screen o 3:10 pm - Pick up pages of top three themes from each table o Direction & Connection (15) o How the themes connect with the progression of the day o Share what’s next: o Continued discussion with senior team and QEP team o Reminders about Reading Circles (Slide) o Remind of planning discussion in the fall o This is an example of how innovation emerges o Invite room to celebration and remind of accomplishments

Joan Tiller Jean Marie Führman

3:30 p.m.

Celebration Party (30) o Reference Noteworthy tent cards…”I’m sure you can think of many others…” o Enjoy ice cream and networking

Sandy Shugart

4:00 p.m.

Adjourn – Thank you for your participation!

3:15 p.m.

83

Sandy Shugart


Valencia College

Appendix 3 Big Idea Group (BIG) Questions The New Student Experience •

The Big Idea: To support learning, students need a holistic first-year experience that is academically and socially engaging while providing connection and direction.

Questions to consider:

1. What do the data tell us about the success of our New Students? 2. What would need to be different at Valencia for our students to have a coordinated new student experience? 3. What role might technology play in helping our students to have a coordinated new student experience? 4. What impact might limited resources have on a student’s ability to have a coordinated new student experience? Discussion points to consider: 1. How to create the right conditions (curricular and co-curricular) to ensure student learning success in the first-year. 2. Design of a systemic approach to integrating LifeMap College Success Skills into the first-year experience. 3. Design of a common student experience/ introduction to Valencia which is focused on student success. 4. Renewal/expansion of the commitment to “direction and connection” while exploring emerging big ideas of navigation and purpose.

Student Learning •

The emerging idea: More than any other time in history, student learning can happen anywhere and at any time. Changes in the conditions for student learning require that we think differently about how we engage students in the learning process.

Questions to consider: 1. What do the data tell us about student learning at Valencia? 2. How have the conditions for student learning changed? What do these changes suggest about adjustments we should make in the ways we engage students in the learning process? 3. What is Valencia currently doing to help students learn? Approximately how many are impacted on an annual basis? Do we have any evidence about the effectiveness of these efforts? 4. What would need to be different about the student experience at Valencia for all of our students to learn more? 5. What role might technology play in helping students learn? 6. What impact might limited resources have on a student’s ability to learn? 84


Valencia College Student Navigation •

The emerging idea: To be successful, Valencia students not only need an educational plan, but they also need clear and specific directions for navigating the demands of college.

Questions to consider: 1. What do the data tell us about the ability of our students to navigate college? 2. What is Valencia currently doing to help navigate the demands of college? Approximately how many are impacted on an annual basis? Do we have any evidence about the effectiveness of these efforts? 3. What would need to be different about the student experience at Valencia for students to get the navigation help they need? 4. What role might technology play in helping students find the navigation they need to be successful in college? 5. What impact might limited resources have on a student’s ability to navigate college?

Student Purpose •

The emerging idea: Students with some sense of their purpose in life and in college are more likely to be engaged, to learn and to succeed in college.

Questions to consider: 1. What do the data tell us about the relationship between student purpose and students’ success in college? 2. How does a student develop purpose in life and in college? 3. What is Valencia currently doing to help students discover their purpose in life? Do we have any evidence about the effectiveness of these efforts? 4. What would need to be different about the student experience at Valencia for more of our students to discover their purpose? 5. What role might technology play in helping students develop purpose? 6. What impact might limited resources have on a student’s ability to find purpose?

85


Valencia College

Appendix 4

86 Â


Valencia College

87 Â


Valencia College

88 Â


Valencia College

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Valencia College

90 Â


Valencia College

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Valencia College

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Valencia College

Appendix 5 QEP Student Forums: Emerging Big Ideas New Student Experience Focus Group Questions - Osceola Campus 1. Think about your experience as a brand new Valencia Student (whenever that may have been), in terms of interactions with Valencia. a. What were your biggest challenges? b. What were your biggest successes? 2. What were your biggest challenges during the year of being a Valencia student? 3. What resources at Valencia did you utilize to help you during your first semester and year at Valencia? 4. What kind of support from Valencia do you wish you had access to during your first semester and year at Valencia? 5. How could Valencia improve the year experience for students? Be specific. 6. Did you feel like part of the college community when you first started as a student at Valencia? If not, what would have made you feel like part of the college community? 7. What resources, skills, or information do you believe every student needs to be successful during his/her first semester and year of college? 8. If you could design a “Tools for New Studentsâ€? class for all new Valencia students to take, what would students learn in that class? Student Learning Focus Group Questions - Winter Park Campus 1. List the top 5 ways you have had learning experiences through Valencia not in the traditional face-to-face, in-class situation. List more if desired but prioritize the top 5. 2. List the top 5 things you have learned at Valencia other than traditional academic skills and information. List more if desired but prioritize the top 5. 3. What interactions have you had with Valencia where you did not learn as much as you could or should have learned? Be as specific as possible, particularly considering learning outside coursework. 4. Are there ways that technology could be used to improve the how students interact with the college and student learning in and out of class? Student Navigation Focus Group Questions - East Campus 1. What advice would you give a new student to Valencia to help him/her navigate the college? 2. How would you describe your experience with Atlas and the Valencia web site? 3. What would you do to find out about college programs, graduation requirements and other college information? 4. How has your experience been working with Student Affairs (e.g., Student Services, Answer Center, tutoring, Financial Aid, etc.)? 5. Do you feel Valencia professors listen to or understand your needs? 6. In what ways do you normally communicate with Valencia staff/professors? 93 Â


Valencia College 7. If you have used extra support outside of the classroom, tell us what has been your experience? (e.g. Tutoring, Supplemental Learning (Supplemental Learning, Math Center, SPA) 8. Do you believe Valencia has prepared you to move onto either a university or career? If yes or no why? Student Purpose Focus Group Questions - West Campus 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

What is your purpose for being at Valencia College? What is your purpose in life? Why is having a purpose in college and in life important? How does having a clear purpose for being at Valencia College make you more successful in life? What is Valencia College currently doing to help you discover or refine your purpose? What could Valencia College do differently to help you discover or refine your life and academic purposes? What role does technology play in helping you develop or refine your purpose? How do limited resources (financial, emotional, mental, physical, role models, knowledge of hidden rules, coping strategies) impact your ability to find or refine purpose?

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Valencia College

Appendix 6

STEM - LSAMP Education Social Sci/Hum Services Human/Commun Public Safety Manufact/Construct NSE Course AS Integrate Infor Tech - 2 Arts & Entertainment 5 CJ Tech/Paralegal/Fire -3 Eng Tech - 5 Business/Acctng/Office -5 Hosp & Culinary - 4 Nursing - 1 Allied Health - 8 Land & Hort -1

Spring 185 new sections

2013 Fall

2014 Spring

Design

Pilot

50% Scale

185 new sections

Design

Pilot

Scale

Design Design

Pilot Pilot Design

Scale Scale Pilot

NSE Course Basic NSE Course Meta Major Business - Pathways Health Sciences Nursing Pathways

Fall

Metamajor Flavors by Year 2015 Spring Summer Fall

Summer

Design

100% Scale

Scale Pilot Design

Design

Pilot

Scale

Design

Pilot

Scale

Design Design

Pilot Pilot

Scale Scale

Design

Pilot Design

95 Â

2016

Scale Pilot Design

Scale Pilot Design Design

Summer


Valencia College

Fall

Metamajor Flavors by Year 2017 2018 Spring Summer Fall Spring Summer

STEM - LSAMP Education Social Sci/Hum Services Human/Commun Public Safety Manufact/Construct

Scale Pilot Design

Scale Pilot

Scale

NSE Course AS Integrate Infor Tech - 2 Arts & Entertainment - 5 CJ Tech/Paralegal/Fire - 3 Eng Tech - 5 Business/Acctng/Office - 5 Hosp & Culinary - 4 Nursing - 1 Allied Health - 8 Land & Hort -1

Scale Pilot Pilot Design

Scale Scale Pilot

Scale

NSE Course Basic NSE Course Meta Major Business - Pathways Health Sciences - Nursing Pathways

96 Â


Valencia College

Appendix 7 Essential Competencies of a Valencia Educator Assessment Valencia educators will develop student growth through consistent, timely formative and summative measures, and promote students’ abilities to self-assess. Assessment practices will invite student feedback on the teaching and learning process as well as on student achievement. Inclusion & Diversity Valencia educators will design learning opportunities that acknowledge, draw upon and are enriched by student diversity. An atmosphere of inclusion and understanding will be promoted in all learning environments. Learning-centered Teaching Strategies Valencia educators will implement diverse teaching and learning strategies that accommodate the learning styles of students and that promote both acquisition and applications of knowledge and understanding. LifeMap Valencia educators will design learning opportunities that promote student life skills development while enhancing discipline learning. Through intentional inclusion of growth-promoting strategies, instructors, counselors and librarians will facilitate the students’ reflection, knowledge, and appreciation for self and others; gradual assumption of responsibility for making informed decisions; and formulation and execution of their educational, career, and life plans. As a result, students can transfer those life skills to continued learning and planning in their academic, personal, and professional endeavors. Outcomes-based Practice Valencia educators will design curriculum that aligns elements of student learning toward growth in the Student Core Competencies and progression through course sequences, by the demonstration of Program Learning Outcomes. The goal of outcomes-based practice is student learning. The two key questions posed are “What will the students be able to know or do?” and “How will you know they can do it?” Valencia has established “what students should know or do” upon their graduation through the Student Core Competencies (Think, Value, Communicate & Act) and Program Learning Outcomes (e.g., General Education Outcomes, AS, AA, Honors, Certificate Programs, etc.). Valencia educators will facilitate student growth in the Student Core Competencies to include thinking critically and creatively across different contexts and domains of human understanding; communicating effectively in different modes and across different settings; articulating and applying personal values, values of various disciplines, and values of others; and applying learning and understanding effectively and responsibly in their lives as students and educated adults. Valencia educators also will facilitate educational growth in and demonstration of essential knowledge, abilities, attitudes and/or dispositions as articulated in Program Learning Outcomes. Professional Commitment Valencia educators will stay current and continually improve their knowledge and understanding of their discipline. They will participate in activities that promote Valencia’s learning mission, including serving on campus and college-wide groups, attending professional conferences, and/or participating in other community organizations. Scholarship of Teaching & Learning Valencia educators will continuously examine the effectiveness of their teaching, counseling, librarianship and assessment methodologies in terms of student learning. They also will keep abreast of the current scholarship in the fields of teaching and learning.

 

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Quality Enhancement Plan  

Valencia College Quality Enhancement Plan - The New Student Experience