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August 10, 2018 | www.valcomnews.com

Arden-Carmichael News — Bringing you community news for 27 years —

Shooting Lasers and Solving Crime: Jesuit students look to grow competitive cybersecurity See page 4

The Opioid Epidemic...................................2 School News............................................4 Faces and Places..........................................8 What’s Happening.................................... 9 Home Improvement Guide........................10

Faces and Places: 11th Annual Fab 40’s 5k Run/Walk

King Cong Brewing open in Old North Sacramento

See page 8

See page 3

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Vol. XXVII • No. 15 1109 Markham Way Sacramento, CA 95818 t: (916) 429-9901 f: (916) 429-9906 Cover by: Courtesy Other photos by: Joe Perfecto Monica Stark

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“The Opioid Epidemic: Don’t Forget the Chronically Ill.”

Arden-Carmichael News • August 10, 2018 • www.valcomnews.com

(Editor’s Note: Terry McSweeney will host “The Forum on the Opioid Crisis” with the support of the Valley Community Newspapers on Saturday, Sept. 15 from 1:30-4:30 p.m. at the Pocket Library. September is Pain Awareness Month. This is part 3 in a series on various aspects of the opioid crisis.) A few months ago I went to another forum on the opioid epidemic. I listened to the panelists to hear their viewpoints on the crisis. It was all very interesting, but one thing was lacking. During the intermission, I began a conversation with one of the panelists. I mentioned to her what I thought was lacking. I told her, “ No one has mentioned those people who actually need the opioids to survive, the chronically ill.” She said, “You are right.” When the panelists reconvened each panelist reviewed their thoughts and that panelist added, “Let’s not forget the chronically ill.” An expert had to be reminded that the chronically ill are a very important part of the opioid epidemic that should not be forgotten. My mom is one of those chronically ill people that should be remembered. It was 6:00 am on a Tuesday morning when I got the call from the assisted living facility where my 90 year old mom lives. Her caregiver told me that she had been up all night writhing in back pain. Her regularly prescribed medicine, 1000mg of Tylenol was not relieving her severe pain. They had to send her to the emergency room for a stronger treatment. When I got to the hospital, the doctor had tried a small dose of stronger pills twice, still no relief. Mom finally got a little relief when 2 doses of morphine were administered via IV, but she still was in a great deal of pain. The doctor then said she could go home where she would have to go back to her regular meds and get no relief at all. Mom kept moaning in pain as she was helped into my car. Her questions: “Are you sure I should be going home? How will I get through the pain? I can’t move.” When we arrived at her place, it took 2 caregivers helping me to get her into her apartment, while she was still writhing

in pain. The doctor was limited in what he could do to help her by hospital policy. A doctor rose to make a comment at the previous forum. No name was given or where he practiced because of the fear of losing his job. He said he was against his hospital’s opioid policy. He wanted to be able to help those chronically ill people who came to him with guided opioid use, but he was no longer allowed to do so. It was important for him to keep his job so that he could help them in some small way even with the limitations. Maggie Fox (NBC) wrote, “Pain patients beg the FDA (Federal Drug Administration) for more options, easier access to opioids, people with chronic conditions cope with prescription restrictions and limited alternative therapies amid the opioid crackdown.” (Smith, E) She adds,” Many chronically ill patients deprived of the tools to manage their pain have felt so desperate. (Fox). Sadly many of them are making the choice to commit suicide.” Recently my friend said her doctor was going to cut her opioid use in half. She shook her head in desperation and said, “Without these meds I might as well kill myself.” Fortunately with love and support she did not, but we can no longer take the chance that millions of the chronically ill will follow through and commit suicide, we have to encourage legislators and other leaders and organizations to never forget the chronically ill. One of those leaders, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottleib, M.D. “ The FDA remains focused on striking the right balance between reducing the rate of new addiction by decreasing exposure to opioids and rationalizing prescribing, while still enabling appropriate access to those patients who have legitimate medical need for these medicines.” (7/9/18) We need to be the voices for the chronically ill and make sure they are not forgotten. If you know any doctors, legislators, nurses, caregivers, chronically ill patients, and others that have had experience with the opioid crisis including those addicted or their families, who might be interested in being a panelist, call or text Terry at 916204-7199. Also, if there are any medical marijuana experts who have experience with cannabis aiding in the elimination of opioid addiction, who might be interested in being a panelist, contact Terry or Monica (916-267-8992). Terry McSweeney is a Certified Fibromyalgia Advisor, Graduate of the International Fibromyalgia Coaching Institute, Founder of “Fibromyalgia Pathways.com,” Founder of the Sacramento Fibromyalgia Support Group, Member of Leaders Against Pain in conjunction with the National Fibromyalgia & Chronic Pain Association, and Chairperson of the Sacramento Together Walks for Fibromyalgia Awareness held each May. Valley Community Newspapers, Inc.


King Cong Brewing open in Old North Sacramento By Joe Perfecto

As microbreweries go, King Cong Brewing Co. on Del Paso Blvd. is the “800-pound gorilla” in Old North Sacramento. That’s partly because it’s the first and, so far, the only microbrewery in Old North Sacramento. Still, given that it’s broken a century-long dry spell north of the river, and all that it’s brought to the area’s nine member neighborhoods and beyond since its Dec. 2017 opening, it’s a safe bet that locals will regard this taproom/ eatery as the “king of beers” for some time to come. But far from the result of a grand vision or a master plan, or even the simple desire to cash in on the latest microbrewing bull market, the brewery is the product of serendipity and a few life-changing decisions that took founder/brewmaster Cong Nguyen on a wild ride along an uncharted and unexpected course. King Cong is, in a sense, a success that sprang from failure. The youngest of three sons, Nguyen came into the world three years after his parents’ 1981 arrival in California as part of the second wave of immigration from Vietnam. His father, a math teacher, went into landscaping, and his mother became a manicurist. They raised the boys with what Nguyen characterized as traditional val-

Valley Community Newspapers, Inc.

Photos by Joe Perfecto

Beer samplers abound in the outdoor patio.

ues. “It was important to my parents that [we] went to med school, dental school, law school—professional-type careers,” he said. One brother trained as a commercial baker and worked at Long Sandwich, the South Sacramento restaurant the family opened in 2004. The second became a successful dentist, and Cong spent years striving to follow his lead; he earned a bachelor’s at UOP but was not admitted to dental school, even after two more years of study to better his score on the Dental Admission Test. “After all the denial letters I realized I wasn’t going to get in,” he recalled. “At that point I felt like a failure; man,

what am I gonna do now?” He settled for the role of office manager for his brother’s two dental practices, and while he learned a great deal about business, and there was job security, his life had stagnated. It was a fateful day when his brother decided to open a third practice in a building owned by the family. “[When] in 2011 my brother wanted me to manage the office that was going to be in Old North Sacramento, I told him, you know, if you open this office I’m done—I don’t want to do this anymore.” It was then that the idea of attending the Master Brewers Program at UC Davis emerged. “I heard that the

craft beer scene [had] started growing—this was before the boom—and it intrigued me,” Nguyen said, despite the fact that he had little knowledge about craft brewing, his exposure to beer mostly limited to the traditional major labels such as Budweiser. “I just took a leap of faith that this is something that I can do and enjoy.” As the program is limited to 40 students, there’s a long waiting list; nearly three years would pass before he was finally admitted in 2014. During that long wait his parents suggested another try at professional school, but he was resolved to pursue what felt like a course correction. “At some point I realized that there’s more to life than being a dentist or a doctor,” he said. “So I said no, I tried to do that for you; I want to do something for myself, and I’m waiting for brewing school. This is something I think is going to be good for me and that I want to do.” Nguyen recalls that with his enrollment in the brewing program, family members saw an immediate transformation. “Not too long ago my brother [the dentist] told me, ‘the day that you joined the brewing program, I saw something different in you,’” he said. See Brewery, page 6

www.valcomnews.com • August 10, 2018 • Arden-Carmichael News

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Shooting Lasers and Solving Crime: Jesuit students look to grow competitive cybersecurity club By Laura I. Winn

On any given Saturday night at arcades across the country, you will find groups of gawky teens racking up points on the latest games, eating junk food and laughing with friends. On July 14 at Laser Tag of Carmichael, the young men from Jesuit High School were there to do all the above, while also sprinkling in discussion of a topic especially relevant to current events: cybersecurity. As members of Jesuit’s award-winning Cybersecurity Team, formally the CyberPatriot Club, the teens not only understand the gravity of cyber attacks threatening everything from emails to elections, but more importantly, how to use research skills and forensic tools to thwart them. In between games of laser tag, the teens hoped to recruit current and incoming Jesuit students to their (mock) cybercrime-fighting team. During the 2017-2018 school year, 18 Jesuit students participated in year-round Air

Force Association CyberPatriot competitions that simulate real-life cyber attacks. After finishing in the top 10 percent nationwide at the CyberPatriot Semifinal Round in February, the teens received an invitation to the California Mayors Cyber Cup, placing first in the Sacramento Region and advancing to the prestigious California Cyber Innovation Challenge. At the June 23 to 25 competition held at Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo, the teens worked together to stop a mock ransomware attack that threatened lives on a military hospital. Much to their surprise, they took second-place, finishing ahead of schools with more established cybersecurity programs. In comparison to some of the top Southern California schools, Jesuit’s program is small and young, only in its fourth year. To entice students already carrying a rigorous academic load to join the club, which meets during lunch and after school, math teacher and team coach, Mr. Justin Tsai, promises snacks and a good time.

Jesuit High School’s Justin Covairt, Donovan Jasper, Casey Honaker, Peter Sutarjo, Jovin Thomas and Joshua Chou with coach Justin Tsai win second place at the California Cyber Innovative Challenge held June 23 to 25 at Cal Poly.

“As an educator, I say Algebra 2 is important. But I say, Cybersecurity Team is really fun,” he said. Tsai said he stresses the team aspect of the cybersecurity challenges, which bring together students with different computer specialties. The Jesuit team has specialists in Windows, Linux and Cisco operating systems. The computer whizzes come to him with no background in cybersecurity, but through a drive to solve puzzles and win competitions, they push themselves to ac-

quire the skills needed to stop cyber attacks. This often means turning to Google and YouTube–research tools that are second-nature to a generation that has never known life before the Internet. “These kids, their eyes light up when you say computers and competition,” explained Tsai. Class of 2018 valedictorian, Peter Sutarjo, 18, said he first joined the cyber club for the extra credit in algebra, plus the free food and travel perks. But it was the challenges that really piqued his interest. “I

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like finding creative solutions for problems. I like the selfstudying and self-learning of it,” he said. Now headed to UCLA where he will continue his studies in computer science, Sutarjo said cybersecurity is an important for a host of reasons. “It’s politically relevant. Look at the (2016) election. It affects nations. We have to enforce security as a culture. As humans become more hands-off and artificial intelligence increases, you have to have protections. Threats are exponentially growing.” Sutarjo served as a cyber club team leader, along with fellow 2018 graduates, William Heisinger and Michael Honaker. Like Sutarjo, Honaker, 18, said the cyber club gave him an introduction to a growing field he would like to pursue professionally. Honaker, who specializes in Linux, will study computer science and engineering at the renowned Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in New York. In addition to See Cyber club, page 5 Valley Community Newspapers, Inc.


Mayor Darrell Steinberg hands off the first-place trophy to Jesuit students for the California Mayors Cyber Cup, Sacramento Region 2018 competition.

Cyber club: Continued from page 4

meeting other students who share a passion for cybersecurity, Honaker said his favorite part of the competitions was learning more at each one. At the California Cyber Innovation Challenge, Honaker was able to dive deeper into the forensic aspect of cybsersecurity. “It was a blast!” he said. That kind of enthusiastic response is exactly what the hosts of the competitions hope for. According to Cal Poly Communications Specialist, Cynthia Lambert, the goal of the Innovation

Challenge is to introduce students to cybersecurity as a career in an field with a global shortage of qualified professionals. More than 70 percent of cyber attacks target small businesses, and recovery costs can put the organizations out of business, cites the National Cyber Security Alliance, a nonprofit that works with the Department of Homeland Security. Despite the growing need for cybersecurity experts, “It hasn’t sunk into parents that

this is a career field for their children,” said Tsai. “Three years ago, you wouldn’t find a cybersecurity major, it would only be a specialty under computer science. Now it is more and more common as a major.”

Jesuit receives grants to cover the cost of competition registration fees. Mr. Tsai provides the snacks– but has not given into his students’ request for Red Bull–and all that interested students need to do is

show up to a club meeting and try their best. “You’ll make mistakes. It’s part of the fun the learning processes. The kids who put in the time, reap the reward of a successful year at competition,” said Tsai.

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Brewery:

Continued from page 3

“It’s one of the best decisions I ever made. It brought out in me something that I didn’t know that I had.” Highly demanding of both time and effort, the program essentially amounted to a second full-time job; each weekday Nguyen drove from Elk Grove to Davis, attended class from 8 to 4, then drove to Rancho Cordova to pull an evening shift in the dental office, finally returning to Elk Grove. And then, weeks into the program he realized that even all that wasn’t enough, when he discovered that little of the course curriculum involves actually making beer. To his surprise, the bulk of the UCD program comprises reading and lecture, with very little time dedicated to applied brewing practicum. “It didn’t revolve around hands-on as much as I thought it would,” he said. “It was basically learning everything biologically and chemically about the ingredients, the process, the equipment used, and engineering like water flow and heat exchange. When they went through the brewing process they showed us the steps…but there wasn’t a lot of brewing.” Nguyen needed to find a way to do some dry (-hopped) runs. The program does help students obtain brewing operations experience via placement in internships, but that opportunity can be difficult or impossible to manage for students like Nguyen who have full-time jobs. Although he might have juggled his job with a position at a local brewery, such were scarce, so an internship would probably have taken him outside the area, which wasn’t possible. Besides, he wanted the ability to daily apply the craft’s principles as soon as they were covered in class. So halfway through the program he bought a pilot system and small fermenters and installed them at the would-be dental office, using what little time was left outside of work and school to practice. (Had the Del Paso Blvd. space not been available, he would have set up the operation in his garage—which in fact is how many breweries start out.) “I felt really comfortable jumping in, and I wanted to make sure I got off to a good start,” he said. This investment, combined with tuition and other class-related costs, consumed a huge portion of the funds he had earmarked for a house purchase. After completing the program, Nguyen resumed his regular work schedule and continued to refine his brewing skills; a self-described perfectionist, he spent every available hour at the brew kettle tweaking his recipes. Yet starting a brewery was but one of several possible career paths, each with its own set of risks. “When I went into it, I didn’t know what [my] direction would be. I was just focused on doing something that I would enjoy doing for a living,” he said. “I wanted to start a business, 6

and the goal was to open a brewery, but you gotta think about the alternatives. So if it didn’t work out and the brewery wasn’t built, then I would have been able to at least enjoy doing something different from what I was already doing.” On the face of it, founding his own brewery might seem the financially riskiest of Nguyen’s options, but many who’ve taken that gamble in the current market climate have found that it really is “good to be the king”— plus, employment with an existing brewer has its own issues. “A lot of my classmates thought the same thing— they’re going to go to brewing school, they’re going to get a job at a brewery,” he said. “A lot of them don’t work at breweries anymore, because they weren’t getting paid enough.” Having the pilot system, the drive and the knowledge that working for someone else could prove a dead end, combined with his business savvy and people skills, made opening his own brewery the logical move. “I realized that with the assets I have, this was right for me—it really fits,” he explained. “My brother taught me a lot about business and management, [and] I learned from working the dental offices that I’m a big people person, that that’s one of my strengths—being able to relate to people, making them comfortable, having this personality that people gravitated towards. [W]ith the brewery, it complements it, because it’s natural for me to engage with people.” There followed the painstaking, timeconsuming process of perfecting the recipes for his inaugural beer lineup— which for Nguyen was truly a labor of love. “I’m a perfectionist—I spend a lot of time on details,” he said. “So brewing just came naturally to me. I’m obsessed with it; I practically live in the brewery.” It was during this repeated tweaking that he realized his venture had a real potential for success, and on a larger scale than he had imagined. “Before we opened, I would brew for endless hours; I had this drive to keep improving a recipe until I felt it was done, and then I’d move on to the next one,” he said. “I would have friends and family—and friends of friends—come in so I could get feedback. I was getting so many different types of people through the door—beer drinkers and non-beer drinkers. And people started believing in the product. The original idea was that I go work for someone else or start something as small as I could; I really wanted to be able to build my own brewery, but to start small—a little taproom, a little brewpub, make it simple. But because of the feedback I was getting and the quality of the beers, people saw that there was potential and they wanted to invest in what I was doing.” By that point, the glass shop that occupied half of the building closed down, enabling Nguyen to utilize the entire space, which after a two-year construction period now houses a 15-bbl, three-

Arden-Carmichael News • August 10, 2018 • www.valcomnews.com

The entryway is seen from the platform near a brewing tank.

vessel system from Premier Stainless: a mash lauter tun, kettle, whirlpool, 30bbl fermenters, 45-bbl hot liquor tank and 30-bbl cold liquor tank. Upon entry, patrons see the brewing area to the left of the entryway hall as they make their way to the cozy bar/eatery seating area and outdoor patio in the rear. The operation could just as easily have been located in one of his family’s other commercial real estate holdings, all of which are miles away. In fact, his brother only acquired the North Sacramento site to use as a satellite dental practice due to the area’s large number of residents enrolled in Denti-Cal, as such patients comprise the bulk of his practice. Any other use wasn’t on the radar. But Nguyen saw the site’s potential for his venture. “People ask me, why didn’t you open up in South Sacramento? That’s where our family’s restaurant is,” he said. “I could have built right next to the sandwich shop; we have that plaza. There’s 5000 square feet available that I could have easily used. But there’s something about this space that I just loved. [T] his area has character. I think this is a beautiful location, and a great retail location because [of all the traffic]. [It’s on Hwy. 160] and there’s downtown right there. This is a central location that people can easily drive to.” Although Del Paso Blvd. isn’t exactly top of mind for most beer-minded locals, Nguyen is confident that will change. “Think about where [many of ] the breweries are now. Bike Dog and Yolo Brewing are in the middle of nowhere,” he said. “Think about Device-[it’s] in an industrial area. [They’ve] become destination locations. Customers are willing to drive to those locations. This is a great location in that this is a developing area; the City is working toward gentrifying this place just like with Oak Park. Oak Park Brewing came in there during that time of change and it’s worked out for them. I wanted to be one of the pioneers in rejuvenating [the area]. I think there’s a lot of potential here. It’s also rewarding to hear a lot of people coming in

from the neighborhood say, ‘I can’t believe there’s finally somewhere that I can walk to, something near me that I can enjoy.’ And why not fill that void?” Despite the recent explosive growth of the microbrewing market, Nguyen asserts there’s still room for expansion. “There are a lot of beer drinkers, and as much as people believe it’s a saturated market, Budweiser and Coors still make up over 80% of the market with their lagers,” he said. Still, with new brewpubs appearing seemingly every day, gaining and maintaining a foothold in an increasingly crowded market is a daily challenge. One key to this problem is product innovation. While the major labels still account for the bulk of beer sales, Americans are much more sophisticated consumers than they were 30 years ago, which for microbrewers makes radical experimentation not only possible but necessary. “With the number of breweries that are opening, that makes it more of a push to innovate with new types of hops and malts and things like that,” he said. “Every year there’s a new strain of hops coming out that you can try, to bring something new to the table.” “People now are so open to innovations that [they previously wouldn’t appreciate],” he said. “I mean, before— sour beers, that was a no-no. But now [that style] has its own category. So it’s really revolutionized. Generally the main sellers are the staple beers that are very simple. But if you create something that really catches on.... You have to try to find things that are unique. Usually those are the one-offs. Things like the [Belching Beaver] peanut butter stout are a one-off, but everybody loved it, so it became a staple beer. So you might find that gem that takes you to a whole other level. The crazy thing about making beer is that every little thing that you change can change the entire profile of the beer—from the water to yeast to the malts, to the temperature and time that you cook the malts, [and] the different ratios of the malts.” See King Cong, page 7 Valley Community Newspapers, Inc.


King Cong: Continued from page 3

The product of Nguyen’s long process of experimentation was an initial lineup of three offerings— an inaugural pale ale, an experimental pale ale and a red ale; a milk stout shortly followed. Since the grand opening, the selection has expanded to include three IPAs—one filtered, one hazy and one that incorporates hot peppers—and a double IPA. While the taps are weighted toward IPAs, the style is probably the most popular on the west coast—so although this selection is arguably unbalanced, it’s clearly catering to market demand. One way King Cong bucks the current trend among microbrewpubs, though, is by featuring a kitchen. Most newer venues simply offer a food truck schedule for a number of reasons—fewer permits, less cost, less work, smaller staff. But for Nguyen, whose family has owned and operated Long Sandwich since 2004, offering an in-house food option was a foregone conclusion. Plus, there were other considerations, such as reliability and customer demand.“One of the most important things that I’d heard from everybody is,‘we get hungry, and we want to be able to eat something while we’re drinking,’” he said. “And with food trucks, you’re relying on a different business; what if they’re sick that day, or whatever? And it generates revenue; why not monopolize on that opportunity?” Initially the menu comprised just four thincrust pizzas, based on family recipes that Nguyen tweaked by adding beer and adjusting ingredients. “Long Sandwich used to have a wholesale [division]; for years my brother, Long, was doing all of the pastries and breads for places like the Marriott hotel and Fry’s Electronics,” he said. “He helped me develop the dough and sauce recipes.” Now there are six varieties; also available are the banh mi (a

classic Vietnamese sandwich), six calzones, four salads and cheese bread. Nguyen designed his taproom with a casual, low-key atmosphere, plainly appointed with simple furnishings; nothing fancy or flashy. Its most striking feature is an enormous pentaptych that occupies much of the back wall, bearing an image of the mighty King Kong himself, whose unblinking watchful gaze oversees all. Kong’s steely stare might give some people the willies, but it’s a simple matter to take refuge in the patio, where they can safely escape the surly simian’s notice. Nguyen hopes to soon offer 12 taps, and possibly 18 eventually, but the latter will require expanding the cold box into the staff parking area in the rear, potentially involving a refrigerated shipping container. For now, though, the available capacity seems sufficient to meet the demand. And there’s been plenty of that; the brewery’s weekly events draw healthy crowds. An especially popular happening is the Tue. evening “Paint & Pint Nite” Art Party by Mike Tate; for $25 participants get a pint of suds and all supplies needed to help channel their inner Picasso. Other regular events include Thu. Trivia Night, live music on Sat. and an afternoon cornhole tournament on Sun. The brewery also hosts special events such as the Apr. 15 “Pints, Pups and Pawdicures” fundraiser benefiting Recycled Pets NorCal. In the course of a few short months, King Cong has established itself as a neighborhood fixture, found a welcoming home. And Cong Nguyen, the man behind it all, seems to have found his destiny. “It doesn’t feel like a job; it feels like this is who I am,” he said. “There’s a lot of hard work…but I feel that I’ve found a calling.” Located at 1709 Del Paso Blvd. just above Arden Way, the brewery is easy to miss but worth the search. Well, except on Mon., because it’s closed. The doors open at 3 and close at 9 Tue.-Thu; Fri.

Brewery owner Cong Nguyen takes a seat at the bar as the brewery’s mascot, a giant gorilla, looks on.

hours are 3-10, Sat. hours are noon-10 and on Sun. they’re noon-9. For the latest info visit https:// www.facebook.com/kingcongbrewing/ or https:// kingcongbrewing.com or call 916-514-8041. Better still, just stop in and discover why everybody’s going ape over this little spot on the old Boulevard. But please—no monkey business. OK—maybe just a little…but keep it in the patio. Remember, Mighty Kong is watching.

Live Here. Bank Here. Grow Here. Strong communities are built on successful businesses. As part of the Suncrest Bank family, we’re here to support both by providing more of what your business needs to thrive. Custom loans and local decisions • Agribusiness expertise • Commitment to building strong local economies

(888) 844-1011 • CommunityBizBank.com © 2018 Suncrest Bank. All Rights Reserved.

Valley Community Newspapers, Inc.

www.valcomnews.com • August 10, 2018 • Arden-Carmichael News

7


Faces and Places:

11th Annual

Fab 40’s 5 k R u n / W a lk

Photos by Monica Stark

The 11th Annual Fab 40’s 5k Run/Walk and ¼ mile and ½ mile kids’ fun runs started and finished at the highest point in our City – in beautiful East Lawn Memorial Park in East Sacramento. Realizing there is a tremendous need in the local community to help caregivers and their families, the Fab 40’s committee donates all proceeds from this event to the Alzheimer’s Association www.alz.org.

8

Arden-Carmichael News • August 10, 2018 • www.valcomnews.com

Valley Community Newspapers, Inc.


What’s NOW THROUGH SUNDAY, AUG. 12 12TH BIANNUAL OPEN INT’L “PASTELS ON HIGH”: Sacramento Fine Arts Center (5330-B Gibbons Dr, Carmichael)

SATURDAY, AUG. 11 USEFUL PLANTS WITH BRIAN COLLETT: Friends of the Riverbanks invites you to this monthly event, which generally meets on the second Saturday of each month at 10 a.m. (note there are exceptions so check the calendar), at Sutter’s Landing Park at the VERY end of 28th Street in Sacramento. Bring water and sunblock, and a change of clothes for young ones who are sure to get sandy, muddy, and wet. Children under 13 must wear life jackets if they go into the water, per law. Leave your dogs at home and please bike, walk, or carpool if you can to keep our carbon footprint as small as possible. Directions: Head north on 28th Street, cross C Street and then the railroad tracks. Continue to the last parking lot where the park abuts the American River Parkway. DEER TOES AND COYOTE PAWS: 10:30 a.m. at Effie Yeaw Nature Center (California & Tarshes Dr, Carmichael) CONCERTS IN THE PARK - Alexander Nelson Band, Carmichael Park (5750 Grant Ave, Carmichael)

SUNDAY, AUG. 12 FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Carmichael Park (5750 Grant Ave, Carmichael) EUREKA! Noon to 1:30 p.m., Effie Yeaw Nature Center (California & Tarshes Dr, Carmichael)

THURSDAY, AUG. 23 BBQ, BEER & BOOGIE - A Walk to End Alzheimer’s Fundraiser, Oakmont of Carmichael (4717 Engle Road, Carmichael), 5:30 to 8 p.m.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 7 and SATURDAY, SEPT. 8 COMMUNITY BOOK SALE – FRIENDS OF THE ARDEN-DIMICK LIBRARY: The Friends of Arden-Dimick Library are holding a two-day Community Book Sale on Friday, September 7, 2018 from 1:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. AND on Saturday, September 8, 2018 from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. in the Community Room at the Arden-Dimick Library, 891 Watt Avenue. Funds from this sale will be used for local library programs. Autumn is a great time to curl up with a book. We’ve got lots of reading material for both adults and children, and this sale is an excellent opportunity to stock up at low prices. We also have DVDs and CDs if you prefer those. This is our last big sale of the year, so you might even want to do some early holiday shopping! Friends of the Library receive a 20% discount (except during the bag sale). Membership information will be available at the sale for those who are not members of the Friends of the Library. The Friends of the Arden-Dimick Library is a volunteer community-based organization. Its dual mission is to advocate for the Library and to provide funding for books, materials, programs and library activities primarily through selling donated books.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 8 DRAGONS AND DAMSELS, GREG KAREOFELAS: Friends of the Riverbanks invites you to this monthly event, Valley Community Newspapers, Inc.

happening

which generally meets on the second Saturday of each month at 10 a.m. (note there are exceptions so check the calendar), at Sutter’s Landing Park at the VERY end of 28th Street in Sacramento. Bring water and sunblock, and a change of clothes for young ones who are sure to get sandy, muddy, and wet. Children under 13 must wear life jackets if they go into the water, per law. Leave your dogs at home and please bike, walk, or carpool if you can to keep our carbon footprint as small as possible. Directions: Head north on 28th Street, cross C Street and then the railroad tracks. Continue to the last parking lot where the park abuts the American River Parkway.

THURSDAY, OCT. 25 COMMUNITY MEETING WITH SUPERVISOR SUSAN PETERS AT MISSION OAKS COMMUNITY CENTER The meeting, starting at 6 p.m., provideS an opportunity for residents to hear a brief update on what is going on in Sacramento County and to ask questions. The meeting will also have a guest speaker from a variety of county departments. 6 to 7 p.m. at Mission Oaks Community Center, 4701 Gibbons Drive, Carmichael.

SATURDAY, OCT. 13 WELCOME BACK, SALMON: Friends of the Riverbanks invites you to this monthly event, which generally meets on the second Saturday of each month at 10 a.m. (note there are exceptions so check the calendar), at Sutter’s Landing Park at the VERY end of 28th Street in Sacramento. Bring water and sunblock, and a change of clothes for young ones who are sure to get sandy, muddy, and wet. Children under 13 must wear life jackets if they go into the water, per law. Leave your dogs at home and please bike, walk, or carpool if you can to keep our carbon footprint as small as possible. Directions: Head north on 28th Street, cross C Street and then the railroad tracks. Continue to the last parking lot where the park abuts the American River Parkway.

THURSDAY, OCT. 25 COMMUNITY MEETING WITH SUPERVISOR SUSAN PETERS AT MISSION OAKS COMMUNITY CENTER The meeting, starting at 6 p.m., provideS an opportunity for residents to hear a brief update on what is going on in Sacramento County and to ask questions. The meeting will also have a guest speaker from a variety of county departments. 6 to 7 p.m. at Mission Oaks Community Center, 4701 Gibbons Drive, Carmichael.

SATURDAY, NOV. 10 SURPRISE! Enjoy beautiful fall day outdoors independently. Friends of the Riverbanks invites you to this monthly event, which generally meets on the second Saturday of each month at 10 a.m. (note there are exceptions so check the calendar), at Sutter’s Landing Park at the VERY end of 28th Street in Sacramento. Bring water and sunblock, and a change of clothes for young ones who are sure to get sandy, muddy, and wet. Children under 13 must wear life jackets if they go into the water, per law. Leave your dogs at home and please bike, walk, or carpool if you can to keep our carbon footprint as small as possible. Directions: Head north on 28th Street, cross C Street and then the railroad tracks. Continue to the last parking lot where the park abuts the American River Parkway.

Arden-Carmichael?

SATURDAY, DEC. 1 PARTICIPATE IN 34RD ARNHA ANNUAL WILDLIFE COUNT: Friends of the Riverbanks invites you to this monthly event, which generally meets on the second Saturday of each month at 10 a.m. (note there are exceptions so check the calendar), at Sutter’s Landing Park at the VERY end of 28th Street in Sacramento. Bring water and sunblock, and a change of clothes for young ones who are sure to get sandy, muddy, and wet. Children under 13 must wear life jackets if they go into the water, per law. Leave your dogs at home and please bike, walk, or carpool if you can to keep our carbon footprint as small as possible. Directions: Head north on 28th Street, cross C Street and then the railroad tracks. Continue to the last parking lot where the park abuts the American River Parkway.

JAN. 1, 2019 NEW YEARS GATHERING: Friends of the Riverbanks invites you to this monthly event, which generally meets on the second Saturday of each month at 10 a.m. (note there are exceptions so check the calendar), at Sutter’s Landing Park at the VERY end of 28th Street in Sacramento. Bring water and sunblock, and a change of clothes for young ones who are sure to get sandy, muddy, and wet. Children under 13 must wear life jackets if they go into the water, per law. Leave your dogs at home and please bike, walk, or carpool if you can to keep our carbon footprint as small as possible. Directions: Head north on 28th Street, cross C Street and then the railroad tracks. Continue to the last parking lot where the park abuts the American River Parkway.

ONGOING LITERACY LITTLE LEAGUE IN NEED OF READING TUTORS: Reading tutors are needed for 40 minutes per week on either Mondays, Tuesdays, or Wednesdays from 1:55 to 2:35 p.m. starting in mid-September, continuing through May, 2019 (with the same child for the entire academic year, if you wish ). Training/ scheduling coffee occurs in late August. Literacy Little League, an award winning tutoring program, lets you get to know a third grade student in need of help with reading

performances at pioneer LIVING SOUNDS WOODWIND QUINTET

AUGUST 19 - 3PM - FREE

BEETHOVEN & FRIENDS

CHAMBER ENSEMBLE

SEPT 23 - 3PM - FREE

SACRAMENTO VIDEO GAME MUSIC ENSEMBLE

OCT 21 - 3PM - FREE

historic pioneer church

2700 L St, Sacramento

Across from Sutter’s Fort

916-443-3727

www.pioneerucc.org

comprehension. Tutors work together in the Resource Room with a credentialed teacher present and all materials provided. Substitutes are available if you can’t make it, or you can sign up as a substitute. Tutoring takes place at the Edison Language Institute (at the site of the former Jonas Salk Middle School) at 2950 Hurley Way near Morse Avenue. Contact Dorothy Marshall, retired psychologist, San Juan Unified School District, at 916-488-2578., dorothymarshall@comcast.net for date/time of training session. FRIENDS AND FAMILY OF SURVIVORS SUPPORT GROUP: Every first Monday of the month from 6 to 7 p.m. Location: Sacramento. Call 916-428-3271 for exact location. Description: Is your friend or family member in a domestic violence, sexual assault, or human trafficking situation? This free, drop-in group is for you. Learn how to support your loved one, and receive some support yourself among people who are in the same situation. Feel free to call My Sister’s House for more information: 916-428-3271. #METOO SUPPORT GROUP: Every third Monday of the month from 6 to 7 p.m. Location: Sacramento. Call 916-4283271 for exact location. Description: This drop-in support group is free, confidential, open to all genders, and available to sexual assault survivors at any point in their healing. Feel free to call My Sister’s House for more information: 916-428-3271. FAMILIES LEARN ENGLISH – ESL students and their children are welcome at this weekly program. Designed for beginning learners. Tuesdays from 9 a.m. 11 a.m. at Arcade Library, 2443 Marconi Ave., Sacramento. CAMP POLLOCK VOLUNTEER DAY: From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays help im-

prove Camp Pollock! Join the Sacramento Valley Nature Conservancy at the 11acre, former Boy Scout Camp, located on the American River in the American River Parkway. Every Saturday volunteers team up with SVC staff to accomplish tasks including: painting, planting, weed eradication, construction, fence building, outreach, native plant garden maintenance and more. Volunteer days are held every Saturday from 9am-1pm at Camp Pollock. Please wear sturdy, closed toe shoes, hat, dress in layers and bring a water bottle, snack and liability form. All youth must be accompanied by their guardian. Please register below, so we can plan our volunteer projects accordingly. Volunteers will be notified by email if the event is canceled. Rainy conditions will also cancel Service Project. Important Documents: Directions to Camp Pollock Liability form - please print and bring (http://www.sacramentovalleyconservancy. org/admin/upload/Adult%20Release%20 of%20Liability.pdf ) Additional information about SVC’s events, outings and volunteer opportunities. If you would like to coordinate a group service day or have questions, please contact us at camppollock@sacramentovalleyconservancy.org FARMERS MARKET: Carmichael Recreation and Park District hosts a weekly farmers market where you can buy farm fresh goods to take to your table. The market is operated by, Living Smart Foundation, a local nonprofit training organization specializing in financial and business education for youth in our community. Each week the market features certified Farmers locally grown seasonal fruits and vegetables, specialty gourmet foods, spices, sauces, nuts, dried fruits and honey. Local entertainment is provided for your enjoyment! 9 a.m to 2 p.m. at 5330 Gibbons Drive.

The Viewing Room A comedy by Mark Smith

Directed by Leo McElroy

‘Coming September 14 – 30

th’

Stern patriarch Chester Dumbrosky has decided to make amends. Unfortunately he waited for the day of his ‘wake’ to do so.

Howe Avenue Theater @ Howe Avenue Park Reserve tickets @ msmith2661@comcast.net or call 916-206-3183

www.valcomnews.com • August 10, 2018 • Arden-Carmichael News

9


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Arden-Carmichael News • August 10, 2018 • www.valcomnews.com

Valley Community Newspapers, Inc.


Preservation Roundtable set for Tuesday By Joe Perfecto

The face of Sacramento is being reshaped day by day, hour by hour. During the past few years the city has experienced a rate of transformation unparalleled in recent history. Throughout the central city and its immediate environs old structures are being repurposed or replaced, and numerous empty lots are seeing ambitions development projects or are targeted for same. Notable examples are the new arena on L Street, the renovations underway on the 700 block of K Street and the mixeduse towers in progress at 19th and J. With such change comes many challenges, such as balancing progress with preservation. One local advocacy organization striving for equilibrium between tradition and transformation is Preservation Sacramento. Founded in 1972 as the Sacramento Old City Association, the 501(c)(4) non-profit has

worked to educate government and the populace about the economic and social benefits of historic preservation, and has fought many battles to protect the area’s architectural heritage against the threats of neglect, ignorance, and monetary expediency. The association meets quarterly at a Preservation Roundtable to discuss the area’s architectural activity as it relates to historical preservation as well as provide information about training of interest to owners of—and parties otherwise invested in—historic properties, ranging from how to apply for protected structure status to restoration of vintage windows. The Fall Roundtable will take place Tue., Aug. 14 from 6-8 PM at Urban Roots Brewing & Smokehouse, 1322 V Street. (Housed at the former site of Brownie’s Blueprints, Urban Roots is itself an example of structural repurposing.) The agenda includes updates

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from the City’s preservation director, a presentation by Sacramento Heritage Inc. on upcoming educational sessions and an appearance by SKK Development to discuss planned and current projects at 16th & F Streets, 16th & H Streets, 21st & Q Streets and the fourstory, 59-unit structure slated for 3rd & Broadway. Renowned local author, activist and Preservation Sacramento president William Burg, who will chair the event, noted that in addition to being the organization’s official membership meeting, the Roundtable also serves as a community forum for neighborhood groups, community leaders, historic preservation professionals, real estate developers and local history groups. A professional historian, Burg has documented the people, places and events that shaped Sacramento, through a series of books that focus on neighborhoods such as Southside Park and Mid-

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town, the heyday of K Street and the legacy of the city’s artistic community. Although the range of local elements of interest to the preservation community is already wide and varied, Burg stated that an untold number have yet to be identified, especially outside the Grid. “While most of Sacramento’s listed historic resources are in [the] central city, most of the city has never been surveyed, and there are many potentially eligible historic buildings and neighborhoods citywide—including important places in Land Park,” he said. At the meeting, the association will provide meat and side dish sampler platters free of charge, and beer is of course available for purchase. (For those so inclined, the brewery’s menu offers vegetarian fare.) The meeting will transition to a happy hour event once proceedings have concluded. Admission is free, but a $5 donation is requested to help offset costs. See https://www.facebook.com/ events/669598370054548 for event info or http://www.preservationsacramento.org for info about the group.

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RESERVE YOUR SPACE IN THE CLASSIFIEDS! CALL 429-9901 www.valcomnews.com • August 10, 2018 • Arden-Carmichael News

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Arden-Carmichael News - Aug. 10, 2018  

Arden-Carmichael News - Aug. 10, 2018