Page 1

July 13, 2018 | www.valcomnews.com

Arden-Carmichael News — Bringing you community news for 27 years —

is now open

17-day event to offer rides, music, entertainment, more See page 4

Lance Armstrong feature. ...........................3 Farm and Flavor.......................................7 Faces and Places..........................................8 Life in the Village...................................... 10 What’s Happening.................................. 14

Carmichael resident honored by Sacramento Historical Society See page 3

Fulton Avenue Association 4th of July Celebration See page 8

Michelle Gallagher

Carmichael

Carmichael

5447 Hesper Way $ 375,000 3 Beds | 2 Baths | 1,691 Sq.Ft.

5961 Casa Alegre $179,900 2 Beds | 1.5 Baths | 972 Sq.Ft.

Orangevale

Picturesque Grass Valley

6429 Walnut Ave $369,000 15017 Greenhorn Road • $515,000 3 Beds | 2.5 Baths | Pool 3 Beds | 3 Baths | 5 Acres

916.541.0540

michellegallagher Homes.com mgallagher@golyon.com

CalBRE# 01382218


A r den- C armich ael News w w w. va l c o m n e w s . c o m

Opioid Epidemic forum set for September 15 By Terry McSweeney

E-mail stories & photos to: editor@valcomnews.com Editorial questions: (916) 267-8992 Arden-Carmichael News is published on the second and fourth Fridays of the month. Newspapers are available in stands throughout the area. Publisher...................................................................David Herburger Editor............................................................................... Monica Stark Art Director.......................................................................John Ochoa Graphic Designer..................................................Annin Greenhalgh

Vol. XXVII • No. 13 1109 Markham Way Sacramento, CA 95818 t: (916) 429-9901 f: (916) 429-9906 Cover by: Courtesy

Advertising Director................................................... Jim O’Donnell Advertising Executives................ Linda Pohl, Melissa Andrews Copyright 2018 by Valley Community Newspapers Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited.

Other photos by: Lance Armstrong Monica Stark

Make yourself at home with an Experienced Realtor

Nancy Arndorfer Serving the Sacramento Area for over 30 Years OUTSTANDING LIFE MEMBER SAR MASTERS CLUB CalDRE# 00443547

(916) 838-1763 • narndorfer@GoLyon.com

Must present coupon. Cannot be combined with other offers. Expires 7/31/18

3133 Arden Way, Sacramento 916-246-7498 www.snowlinehospice.org

2

Arden-Carmichael News • July 13, 2018 • www.valcomnews.com

Terry will host ‘The Forum on the Opioid Crisis” with the support of the Valley Community Newspapers on Saturday, Sept. 15 from 1:30-4:30pm at the Pocket Library. September is Pain Awareness Month. This is part 2 in a series on various aspects of the opioid crisis.

“The Opioid Epidemic: A Mother’s Story” In 2016 116 people died in the U.S. every day from opioid-related drug overdoses meaning more than 42,000 people died in that year alone. (www.hhs.gov/opioid/ about-the-epidemic) One of those people was my cousin’s 29 year old son. He was 12 years old when his best friend died in a river accident and he was witness to it. He felt so guilty, blaming himself. Perhaps he felt he should have done more to save him. His guilt overwhelmed him which led to the beginning of his opioid journey by getting oxycodone on the streets. As parents when you realize that your child is in trouble with drugs, you do whatever you can to get him the help they need and hope that it works, but unfortunately sometimes everything you do just does not work. Twice my cousin checked her son into a hospital rehab facility for detox and twice he checked himself out. She found him a support group, but he dropped out. Acupuncture didn’t work either. Then two weeks after his high school graduation, another good friend committed suicide. His guilt returned with a vengeance. During this time my cousin and her husband joined a group called Nar-Anon, a 12-step program for addicts and their families. She realized while listening to other parents that besides the addiction their kids had something in common. Each of them described their child as “a sweet kid,” or “such a good human being.” They also sent him to a therapist, which was difficult because he was such a private person who found it difficult to share his feelings. It was also odd that the therapist prescribed xanax to help him through his depression and anxiety. The question is why? Time went by and 2 years prior to his death he went to the emergency room where it was found that he had a pulmonary embolism, a condition in which one or more arteries in the lung becomes blocked by a clot. To their surprise the doctor prescribed percocet, which is a combination drug consisting of oxycodone and acetaminophen used for pain management. (RxList) There seemed to be hope because he refused it by telling the doctor,” I can’t take that. I am addicted.” The question is, why would a doctor knowingly prescribe percoset to an addict? It was March 30, 2016, her husband’s birthday. Their oldest son was at work and she took her husband to lunch to celebrate

“There isn’t an addict that wants to be an addict.” his birthday. When they came home their lives changed forever. Her husband went to check on their son and then screamed for her to bring the Narcan, a drug used to reverse a drug overdose. They had done this 7 times before and it worked. This time they were too late. He had died from an overdose of xanax and heroin combined. Families are left to deal with the pain. My cousin said she will never be totally happy again, her husband doesn’t talk about it, but he was rocked to his core, and their other son believes he could have done more to save his brother, his best friend. Her advice to other parents of the addicted, “Don’t be afraid to talk to your child, no matter what show them all of the love you can, and don’t turn your back on them.” Most importantly remember, “ There isn’t an addict that wants to be an addict.” In the state of California there are 19 bills in the current legislative, each geared to curb opioid abuse. (https://www.cda. org/news-events/cda-supported bills, 6/7/18) Assemblyman Arambula said, “ California is faced with a serious health care dilemma: how to prescribe controlled substances safely and effectively to relieve pain, while simultaneously reducing the risk of prescription medication misuse, addiction, and overdose.” (https:// www.cmanet.org/news/detail/) We must find this balance remembering those addicted and the 137 million chronically ill Americans. Terry McSweeney is a Certified Fibromyalgia Advisor, Graduate of the International Fibromyalgia Coaching Institute, Founder of Fibromyalgia Pathways.com, Founder of the Sacramento Fibromyalgia Support Group, Member of Leaders Against Pain in conjunction with the National Fibromyalgia & Chronic Pain Association and Chairperson of the Sacramento Together Walks for Fibromyalgia Awareness held each May. Valley Community Newspapers, Inc.


Carmichael resident honored by Sacramento Historical Society By LANCE ARMSTRONG

Carmichael resident Steve Beck on June 26 was one of the recipients of the Sacramento Historical Society’s 2018 Enlightenment Awards. The award celebrates regional organizations and individuals who strive to enshrine Sacramento on the global map. Beck, a 1970 graduate of Rio Americano High School, has dedicated the past 20 years to delivering California history to the community at large through various media. Since 2006, Beck has worked as the history program lead at Sutter’s Fort, developing programs that deliver history to the community. Those programs include the overnight educational program, living history programs, with costumed docents at the fort, and outreach programs to schools, service clubs, historical societies and other organizations. Beck said he assisted many people through his work in the Sutter’s Fort archives. “I did that work from 2000 to 2006,” he said. “I became familiar with the archives, but my research skills as a college debater allowed me to easily access information in

the archives that would help authors and other interested parties (gain knowledge) that would be otherwise very difficult to obtain.” While attending American River College in the 1970s, Beck became a state champion debater on a twoperson debate team. With his debate partner, Beck won 16 of 18 tournaments that he entered during his sophomore year in the spring of 1973. Through his excellence as a debater, Beck received a full-ride scholarship to attend West Georgia State University, where he would ultimately earn a bachelor’s degree in rhetoric. At the time that Beck attended that university, it was one of the nation’s top debate colleges. Beck was a member of a national circuit, in which he flew throughout the United States to compete in weekly debate events at different schools such as Georgetown University, the University of Washington and the University of Southern California. On two occasions, Beck and his debate partner received an at-large bid to participate in the national collegiate debate tournament. In both years, they participated in the finals.

Angela Heinzer

|

Photo by Lance Armstrong

Carmichael resident Steve Beck, left, receives an Enlightenment Award from the Sacramento Historical Society on June 26. Presenting the award to Beck is the society’s president, Greg Voelm.

Beck was also voted as the top Beck’s life adventures also include speaker at tournaments at Florida managing the Taber Furniture Co., State University, the University of a new and used furniture business at California, Santa Barbara, and various other schools. See Award, page 6

916.212.1881

|

angelaheinzer.cbintouch.com CalBRE #01004189

Prime Del Dayo Estates Location! This is an outstanding property featuring a wonderful open floor plan w/ 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, formal dining room, living room w/ wet bar, kitchen, 3 car garage and an expansive great room that enjoys the views of the yard. The lush backyard is perfect for entertaining with a covered patio, sparkling pool and plenty of gardening and grass area. This is a great opportunity to live in this beautiful neighborhood. 4940 Keane Drive - $925,000 Valley Community Newspapers, Inc.

www.valcomnews.com • July 13, 2018 • Arden-Carmichael News

3


State Fair is now open 17-day event to offer rides, music, entertainment, more By Lance Armstrong

day, from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Tuesdays, and from 11 With July finally here, one a.m. to midnight from Friof the most anticipated sum- days through Sundays. mer events of the year – the California State Fair – will Live music begin next week. Opening on July 13 and Among the other popular running for 17 days, the fair attractions at the fair are its will once again bring a wide live music shows. variety of attractions deThose shows include signed to offer something concerts on various stagfor everyone. es, including the Golden 1 Stage. Among the artists who will Midway rides perform at this year’s fair on Drawing many people to that stage include War ( July the fair every year are the 13), Berlin, featuring Termidway rides. ri Nunn ( July 14), Kool and Butler Amusements con- the Gang ( July 16), Night tinues its longtime tradition Ranger ( July 21), Sugar Ray of offering various rides at the ( July 23) and The Spinners State Fair. Along with famil- ( July 28). iar rides, this company also A new feature this year will plans to offer two new rides be free admission to the fair this year. with the purchase of tickThe midway will be open ets to either the Kidz Bop from 2 to 11 p.m. on Mon- Live ( July 26) or ZZ Top/ days, Wednesdays and Thurs- George Thorogood ( July

Photos courtesy of the California State Fair

Midway rides are among the fair’s most popular attractions.

26) concerts at Papa Murphy’s Park at Cal Expo. A Republic FC soccer game will also be played at Papa Murphy’s Park during the fair. The game will be played against the Oklahoma City Energy on July 21 at 8 p.m., and tickets to that contest will also include free admission to the fair. For information about these Papa Murphy’s Park events, visit www.papamurphyspark.com. Also new to the fair this year will be the

Youth Mariachi Competition, which will be held on July 22 at 5 p.m. The participants will compete for cash prizes. Mariachi Vargas de Tecalitian will perform that night on the Golden 1 Stage.

Silent Disco Another new, music related event at this year’s fair will be Silent Disco, a daily, free activity, in which participants will dance to the kid-friendly music of their choice through their own special set of headphones. After 5 p.m., DJs will battle to get the most number of people listening to their station.

Animals Animals play a significant role in the fair throughout the fairgrounds.

4

Arden-Carmichael News • July 13, 2018 • www.valcomnews.com

As usual, the Sale of Champions will be held at the State Fair. This prestigious event presents the opportunity for Future Farmers of America and 4-H members and adults to represent their counties with the livestock animals they have raised. The event, in which the most valuable livestock are named, will be held in the Tractor Supply Co. Big Barn on July 15 at 6 p.m. The sale will be preceded by a social gathering at 5 p.m. and a dinner at 5:30 p.m. Animals such as pigs, horses, cows, sheep and goats can also be visited by the public in the barn during the fair, and barn animal owners can gain tips about their animals at the Livestock Animal Education Center. See State Fair, page 5

Valley Community Newspapers, Inc.


Animals play a significant role in the fair.

State Fair:

as vendors will have supplies of merchandise such Continued from page 4 as clothing, gadgets and A petting zoo will also items for the home. be available to fair guests, There will also be various as well as a Fur and Feath- demonstrations. ers section, with state champion rabbits, chickens and Other attractions turkeys. For 11 days, the fair will Among the other fair atbe present live, Kentucky tractions will be freestyle Derby-style horse racing. motocross, wiener dog racThere will also be es, the California counties horse shows held in exhibit, the California Authe horse arena on the thors section and a classic fairgrounds. car show.

Food and beverage concessions

As usual, the fair will feature many vendors offering a wide variety of food, ranging from hot dogs, ice cream and funnel cakes to turkey legs, many deep fried items, and healthy alternatives such as fruits and vegetables. On Wednesday and Thursday, fairgoers can purchase certain food items at a reduced price, as the fair will feature its $2 Taste of the Fair days. On those days, each food vendor will offer a normally higher priced food item for $2. Those seeking adult beverages can visit the Save Mart Wine Garden and the Craft Brew Pub, which will be open daily.

Many merchandise vendors

Fair hours, admission

Fair hours at the main gate are 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Mondays through Thursdays and 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. Admission to the fair is $14/general, $12/seniors, 62 and older, $10/children, 5 to 12, and free/ages 4 and younger. Pre-sale tickets, purchased before July 13, will include a $2 per ticket discount. Fairgoers bringing three non-perishable food items to the fair will receive free admission on Mondays before 3 p.m. Diapers will also be accepted. These items will be donated to the Elk Grove Food Bank. The State Fair runs through July 29.

For additional details about The fair will offer plenty this year’s fair, visit the website of shopping opportunities, www.castatefair.org. Valley Community Newspapers, Inc.

Performances at Pioneer

BILL DAMIAN

HARP & FLUTE JULY 15 - 3PM - FREE

WOODWIND QUINTET CHAMBER ENSEMBLE AUGUST 19 - 3PM - FREE

BEETHOVEN & FRIENDS

CHAMBER ENSEMBLE SEPT 23 - 3PM - FREE

HISTORIC PIONEER CHURCH 2700 L St, Sacramento Across from Sutter’s Fort 916-443-3727

www.valcomnews.com • July 13, 2018 • Arden-Carmichael News

5


Award:

Continued from page 3

1815-1817 Del Paso Blvd., from 1978 to 1993. During those years, Beck was married and became a father to his children, Emily and Sam. Following his divorce, Beck became particularly interested in California natural and human history. Beck would attend field trips with friends and study plants and rocks. He said that he became somewhat of a naturalist. Beck, who was basically retired at the time, kept some odd hours, as he drove his truck around neighborhoods, delivered copies of The Sacramento Bee before sunrise. Another part of Beck’s past includes teaching classes at American River College. The first of those classes were persuasive speaking and argumentation and debate. On the encouragement of his colleagues at the college, Beck began to pursue another university degree. In 1995, Beck graduated from American River College with an associate’s degree in science, with emphasis on anthropology and geology. As a transfer student at California State Universi-

ty, Sacramento, Beck earned bachelor’s degrees in geology and anthropology, with minors in geography and botany. Beck said that he returned to American River College and Sacramento State, where he taught laboratory classes. He also taught a lecture class at Cosumnes River College. “I was one of those freeway flyers, doing a little bit of teaching, but not making any money,” he said. “At the same time, I was raising two kids.” Beck added that his life changed dramatically after he discovered an advertisement for interpreters that was posted on a wall in the anthropology lounge at Sacramento State. “They kind of interviewed me (at Sutter’s Fort) and they (asked), ‘What do you know about public speaking?’” he said. “They didn’t know that I had a degree in rhetoric, and had been a debater and all this stuff.” With his background, it did not take long for Beck to be offered a position as a seasonal employee at Sutter’s Fort. Beck has since gained much experience through his work for this historic state park. That experience also includes his contributions

Photo by Lance Armstrong

Steve Beck, the history program lead at Sutter’s Fort, was honored by the Sacramento Historical Society last month.

to the annual, two-week long Sutter’s Fort Mobile Living History program, which involves setting up camps that exemplify California pioneer life in the 1840s. About 3,000 students from about 70 upper Sacramento Valley schools visit the encampments at Red Bluff and Colusa. Beck has also appeared on the History and Discovery channels, speaking about

such topics as John C. Fremont and the conquest of California, and the travails of the Donner Party. He is also knowledgeable on topics such as Sutter’s Fort and the Bear Flag Revolt, and has received the Wave (Western Access Video Excellence) Award for documentaries on the Bear Flag Revolt and the Donner Party. Beck has also spoken about California history

916-267-8992

1109 Markham Way, Sacramento 95818

CalDRE#00457955

916-212-4808 2277 Fair Oaks Blvd. Ste.440, Sacramento, CA 95825

Beaver73@JPS.Net LBeaverSellsHomes.cbintouch.com

Lic# 344700003

6

Arden-Carmichael News • July 13, 2018 • www.valcomnews.com

Sellers · First Time Buyers Move-Up Buyers · 1031 Exchanges Investors Who Need To Buy Or Sell Trusts and Probates.

on KVIE Channel 6, and he has regularly appeared on the Access Sacramento public access cable television channel program, “Living in the West.” Beck was also one of the lead speakers for the Oregon-California Trails Association’s national convention in 2015, and was the keynote speaker for the grand opening of the California Trail Interpretive Center in Elko, Nev. Also a part of Beck’s résumé is his work as the archivist of the Sacramento Historic Sites Association, and coaching the American River College debate team to state and national titles. His experience as an educator includes his participation on a select panel of authors and historians for a seminar about John Sutter at the University of the Pacific. Beck, who married his current wife, Deborah, at Sutter’s Fort on May 5, 2012, has also written monographs on the history and anthropology of the Sacramento region, and has contributed to many books. In regard to receiving an Enlightenment Award from the Sacramento Historical Society, Beck mentioned that he was surprised. “I was surprised, but extremely honored and gratified by the recognition and experience,” he said. Valley Community Newspapers, Inc.


FarmpFlavor Rebellious, resistant roots By Kerin Gould

When my new hoop house was being assembled, the soil to be covered was tilled, evened out with a rotary harrow and then, once the structure was assembled, fluffed again. In spite of this, and without any water, a lone, rebel squash plant has popped up, been trampled flat as we moved rafters and cross-beams into place, and popped back up to thrive, bigger and better than any of the squashes I planted properly — which is a little embarrassing. Weeds in that area must go, but this plant has my full respect and admiration, and it has earned its place through sheer determination. Turns out it’s a round zucchini, already producing tasty food for me to share. I almost feel that eating its squashes will make me fierce and resistant too. I will save seeds from this hardy plant at the end of summer, since a tough, heat and drought-resistant plant is truly valuable in our changing climate. It makes me think of my fierce friends who have resisted things that could have flattened and extinguished them: one friend is still overcoming a flesh-eating mystery illness and lost both her mom and her dear old dog in the same year, but held a community open-mic on her porch amid fire-flies this weekend; another friend with stage 4 cancer lost her husband to a police shooting, but has the strength to keep her family together and lead protests against such excess violence; a wonderful woman, who is post-mastectomy and comes to my cooking class for folks facing cancer, joked about shouting at her husband to help her find her “boobs”, the good ones, making the other cancer-resisters at the table laugh out loud. That fierce resistance also reminds me of the families of color who are encouraging their kids to go forward and dream big in spite of the recent resurgence of violence and discrimination, teaching them how to safely respond, how to thrive in spite of it. And the LGBTQ families, steadfast in their right to be who they are and love who they love. While the schoolkids who are currently growing up may take acceptance and inclusion for granted now, they may be called in the future to stand and defend their friends and families. I also admire the folks who have cleared incredible obstacles to come to this country, often escaping terrible situations of repression, corruption, violence, domestic abuse, and extreme poverty. Some of my own family came here that way, fleeing violence against Armenians or the poverty of Ireland or religious oppression against Quakers. Not only do such determined people add more to this country than they get back and commit fewer crimes than the general population (as demonstrated in the Washington Post article “Two charts demolish the notion that immigrants here ilValley Community Newspapers, Inc.

legally commit more crime,” by Christopher Ingraham), their resolve to work and raise their families safely and decently deserves our support and compassion. Of course, the Indigenous peoples of the continent have demonstrated the most incredible resistance and tenacity right here on their own lands. So, I salute the rebels, the resisters, the ones who make goodness out of the harshest conditions, the folks who take root, blossom beautifully and then are fruitful and giving. You are tough. You are inspiring. You are truly valuable in our changing climate. In honor of the resilient and prodigious zucchini, I offer this kid-friendly recipe, full of garlic and tomatoes, but without pasta or dough:

SAT ATURDAY AY & SUNDAY AY | 5AM - NOON AUGUST 11-12, 2018 oada | Galt McFarland d Living Histt o ry Ranch | 8899 Orr Ro

Pizza Canoes Ingredients 8 zucchinis cut in half lengthwise Garlic - at least one clove, more if you like 1 Onion 3 full size tomatoes or 10 oz tomato puree Oregano and Basil Salt and Pepper Pinch of brown sugar Olive oil Shredded mozzarella cheese or cheese substitute Directions • Mince garlic and onion and sauté in olive oil on medium heat. Flavor to taste with basil, oregano, pinch of sugar (takes the acid/bitter taste off the tomato for kids’ palates), salt and pepper. If using fresh herbs, chop finely. • Chop tomatoes and add to sauté. • Using a grapefruit spoon, hollow out the zucchini to make a “dugout canoe”, leaving a solid 1/4” wall to hold the filling. Add the scooped out zucchini to the sauté mix and let simmer. • On a lightly oiled baking sheet, arrange the “canoes”. • When the filling is cooked, scoop neatly into the canoes. Top with shredded cheese or vegan cheez. • Bake at 375 degrees until the cheese melts and the zucchini is tender, 20-30 minutes (depending on the size of the canoes). • Remove from the baking sheet with a spatula and serve hot.

GALT BALLOON FESTIVAL HOT AIR BALLOONS Ball loo l ns Launch h a t sunrise (appr prr ox. 6 a.m.) Weathe e r Permitting g

TETHERED BALLOON RIDES Tethered Rid d es: $10 Per Perr s on Weather Perr mitting Pilot’s Discc retion

Art/ Ar t// Cr C aft, C omm m e rcial & Food od d Vend d o rs do

Advance Tickets: $5 Per Person Ch h i ldren 5 a nd Und d er Free e Tickett s a t the Gate (d d ay of eve e nt): $1 1 0 Per Pe e rson Parki kin ing g at a t M cFa cFarla rlan n d Ranch h is $10 per veh h icle a nd mu u st s be pur p chased d in ad d vance. F e sate Fre e llite pa a rking a nd shutt tle bu u ses are e located d at the G alt Ma a rket, 6 10 Chabolla Avenue e , Galt.

ARRIVE EARLY TO WATCH THE BALLOONS LAUNCH! GATE OPENS AT 5 AM

T IC KET TICK K ET TS A AVA VAILL AB VAI B LE AT THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS GALT TIC Ch Cha h mbe b rO Offi ffi ffice f ce e/G Galt a lt He alt Heral r d,, 604 N. Lincoln Way ral

G

D I S T R I C T

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

E xpresss Type Type & Gra Graphi phics phi hi cs, 740 74 0 S Spaa p aa ns Dri paa D rive Dr ve #2 #2 The C Co ff ffe e Shop S hop Baker Ba kery, y, 411 C Str Street St eet Barsetti Vineyards Tasting Room, 400 4t h S Stre treet et River Rock Brewery, 807 C Street L’Chayim, 400 4th Street State Farm Insurance, 10330 Twin Cities Road #2 #20 20

BALLOO OON N FE E ST STIV T IV VAL A S PO P O NS N S OR ORS S

FFerr e rr el ell l lgas l g as • R Ros ose e LaVi L a Vine ne Far arme mer’ me r s In Inss urance e Ag Age e ncy E xpres esss Ty Type pe & G Gra raph phii cs • Ga Galt l E le e me ment ntary School District Galt Family Dentistry • Softcom • Banner Bank • EA Family Services Best Western Galt Inn • Raley’s • Paul Sandhu • River Rock Brewery

SMUD • Barsetti Vineyards • Carson’s Coatings • J&J Heating & Air, Inc. • Velvet Grill & Creamery Galt Smog & Registration • Doxey Chiropractic • Cal Waste Recovery Systems • Comfort Inn Farmers & Merchants Bank • Parker Realty • BMD • Mark Crews • Buchanan Auto Glass Galt Family Optometric Center • Mike Guttridge Realty • Central Valley Physical Therapy Ron Hilder DDS • Les Schwab Tires • Alpha Omega Integrated Pest Management The Coffee Shop Bakery • Steven S. Sanford DDS • The Galt Herald Giddens Brothers, Inc. • Ben Salas Funeral Home • Ralph Cortez

www.GaltBalloonFestival.com

GaltBalloonFestival

www.valcomnews.com • July 13, 2018 • Arden-Carmichael News

7


Fulton Avenue Association

4th of July Celebration Photos by Monica Stark editor@valcomnews.com

The 17th annual Arden Arcade 4th of July Parade at Fulton Avenue brought hundreds of neighbors together for the big community event. The annual parade started at 2700 Fulton Avenue and ended at Howe Park for fun, food and red, white and blue! The Fulton Avenue Association thanks the Fulton El Camino Recreation and Park District, to Joshua Paul, Chick-Fil-A Arden Fair, BJs, Barber City on Fulton Avenue, and to Trader Joe’s at Town & Country Village for food and beverage donations.

8

Arden-Carmichael News • July 13, 2018 • www.valcomnews.com

Valley Community Newspapers, Inc.


Valley Community Newspapers, Inc.

www.valcomnews.com • July 13, 2018 • Arden-Carmichael News

9


LIFE

in theByVillage Jan Dalske Arden-Carmichael News

We were all very excited that springtime was just around the corner. The last few months of the year had been a very difficult time for our parents. Our dad had been late for work a few days because he had to take time off to visit our mom and our little sister, Sandra Kay, at the hospital. And after our mom and little sister had come home, I know that he worried about them. When we found out about Sandra’s birth defect, it was especially difficult. He had asked us to be good kids and help our mother whenever we could. I already did that, and I

hoped that my brothers and sisters would be more helpful. But, the boys did not really know how to help, and they thought that housework was just for girls. And, Linda and Rita were really too young to do too many things. I was just seven, but I had always been my mother’s little helper. I told my mom that I would try to find ways that all of my brothers and sisters could help around the house every day. I asked them to try to make their beds when they woke up every morning. I showed them how easy it was to pull up the covers

and plump up the pillow, and then cover the bed with the bedspread. They could pick up their toys when they were finished playing with them. They could put their dishes on the counter when they were finished eating. If everyone in our family did their share of the work, then our mother could spend more time with little Sandra Kay. Rita was going to turn three in March. My mom told me that she wanted to give her a rag doll and her own set of blocks so she would not want to play with the ones Wayne had in his playpen. That was a good idea. I guess that our dad would have to go shopping for those toys as our mother did not drive and we only had the car my dad used to go to work every day. Maybe, if my mom had any extra time she would sew Rita a new dress like she did for my birthday. That would be a nice present for Rita be-

� ���������������

�������������������������������

cause she usually wore the clothes that Linda and I had outgrown. Easter Day was on Sunday, April 1st this year. That was just a week after Rita’s birthday. Dad always brought home candy for our celebration. He boiled eggs and colored them for us. He let Rodney and I help him that year. I guess he thought we were finally old enough to do that without breaking the eggs or spilling the coloring mixture. The older kids had their own Easter Baskets with chocolate eggs, colorful jelly beans, and some marshmallow chicks. Usually our parents did not let us have candy. It was a treat on Easter, Halloween and Christmas. So, we took advantage of it when we could. Our backyard already had new fences that our dad had put up, and a strong gate. And, dad had planted grass, but it was covered with water during that horrible rain storm in December. Dad worked hard to get the grass to come back to life once all of the water had started to dry up in the backyard. He wanted to surprise our

mother with a flower garden. He knew what her favorite flowers were and he wanted to plant them all in her garden. She liked roses, so he planted a rose bush with bright red petals. It climbed the trellis by the patio. She also loved lilies and how tall and stately they looked. She loved geraniums with their brightly colored flowers. My dad had met some men in his construction job that were from Mexico. They all had cactus plants in their yards, and they gave him some cuttings that he could plant so that our mom could have cactus plants in her garden. Having a garden was a great present for our mom. Because our parents both grew up in the cold state of Wisconsin, many flowers would not grow in that state. But sunny California was the perfect place for growing all of the flowers that made our yard come alive. And, when mom cut them and put them in vases and placed them on display in our house, the rooms were bright with color and the air was filled with the scents of the flowers.

4.50% Initial APR*

���������� ���������� ����������

������������������������ ������������������������������ ��������������������������������������������� ������������� ��������������� ���������������������������������� ���������������� ������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������� ���������������������������������

Serving our local communities since 1958 www.eldoradosavingsbank.com CARMICHAEL • 4701 Manzanita Ave. • 481-0664 Se Habla Espanol • 800-874-9779 *

4.50 the loan which is called the draw period. After the initial 5 year period, the APR can change once based on the value of an Index and Margin. The Index is the weekly average yield on U.S. Treasury Securities adjusted to a constant maturity of 10 years and the margin is 3.50%. The current APR for the repayment period is 6.375%. The maximum APR that can apply any time during your HELOC is 10%. A qualifying transaction consists of the following conditions: (1) the initial APR assumes a maximum HELOC of $150,000, and a total maximum Loan-to-Value (LTV) of 70% including the new HELOC and any existing 1st Deed of Trust loan on your residence; (2) your residence securing the HELOC must be a single-family home that you occupy as your primary residence; (3) if the 1st Deed of Trust loan is with a lender other than El Dorado Savings Bank, that loan may not exceed $200,000 and may not be a revolving line of credit. Additional property restrictions and requirements apply. All loans

subject to change without notice. Other conditions apply. A $475 early closure fee will be assessed if the line of credit is closed within three years period. Ask for a copy of our “Fixed Rate Home Equity Line of Credit Disclosure Notice” for additional important information. Other HELOC loans are available under different terms. 14-1

10

Arden-Carmichael News • July 13, 2018 • www.valcomnews.com

Valley Community Newspapers, Inc.


with Pat Lynch

Banana Fanna Bo Banna Names (and slogans) mean a lot. A new baby, Theo, came to our block. Theo will fit right in with his generation of kids. His name is in the top fifty preferred boy names of 2018. The top ten boys names are Jackson, Liam, Noah, Aiden, Lucas, Casen, Grayson and Mason. (Yep, Casen, Grayson and Mason—they could grow up to be a law firm, or a rap group). The top ten names for baby girls are, Sophia, Olivia, Emma, Ava, Isabella, Mia, Aria, Riley, Zoe and Amelia. Name preferences sweep through the Zeitgeist every few years or so and it’s hard to keep up. It seemed only yesterday that everyone was called Montana, Kane, Dakota and Cade. But now there’s a new surge. These name swings are national. Disney has inspired some, notably, River, Willow and Storm (No, not Stormy). But speaking of Stormy, the name, Donald, appears to have plunged. “ The popularity of baby name “Donald” is falling dramatically,” says the Salon website. This seems strange because you’d think that Trump’s base would fervidly reproduce batches of little Donnies, or Don-Dons, creating a Trump Bump in the birth rate. But it hasn’t happened. Maybe they realized he wants to eradicate their maternity coverage.

Anyway, chosen names and designations say more about the choosers than the named. When a city has a nickname or slogan it’s not like naming a baby. It, A: arises from the people’s observations of the city’s quality, or, B: it’s part of a deliberate re-branding that strives to associate people and places with products. Sacramennto used to be identified as the City of Trees. This accounted for much of its allure. Now some promoters want us to call it the Farm to Fork Capitol. Farm to Fork. That’s a giant step backward. Into a cow pie. We’ve struggled for recognition as a culturally hip urban center (trees are hip, and show ecological awareness) and they want Farm to Fork, a phrase that evokes a rustic, small town sensibility. At least “City of Trees” is a City. There’s an online petition where fraught Sacramentans may protest the fork-to-face rural slogan and stand up for our City of Trees. I’m going to sign it because I’ve been to farm towns. I don’t mean picturesque foothill towns like Sutter Creek, I mean treeless, scraggly drivethroughs baking under the sun. This is not the Sacramento aesthetic. We are a diverse mix of people and in our long summers we thrive in the shade of our beauti-

ful trees. Finally, “Farm to Fork” has no poetry (it has alliteration but that alone is not poetry). City of Trees, like the City of Light, or the City that Never Sleeps, or the City of Angels, evokes a poetic image that arises naturally from the city’s core identity. It’s not a slogan superimposed by marketers. Don’t you wish we could all vote on these things before signs go up showing us grinning and waving forks? In England there’s a “Names, Not Numbers” symposium that claims to stand up for “individuality in a mass age.” This is a good illustration of the renaming excitement. Some people with ordinary names feel their sparkling uniqueness is submerged in a swamp of Johns and Janes. But you can change your name to Eucalyptus Snowdrop and still have nothing fascinating to say. You can change your name and wear startling outfits and still be dull as toast when you opine. The trick is to be authentic. If Eucalyptus is funny or inquisitive, she’ll do fine. But if she’s spent too much time thinking up her new name, she’ll be as flat and empty as she thought her old name was. Now to nicknames. Princess Di’s nickname was Dutch. Uppercrust eastcoast nicknames are Buffy and Skipper. And Scooter. A famous Scooter, Lewis “Scooter” Libby, was recently pardoned by Trump. Scooter worked for former Vice President Dick Cheney and leaked the name of CIA under-cover agent Valerie Plane, thus imperiling her life and mission. A federal grand jury convicted Scooter of “perjury, obstruction of justice” and “making false statements.” No one

knows yet what lofty position he will hold in the present administration. Once nicknames arose organically from a person’s traits, like, Blondie, or, Brainiac. But now you can order up nicknames from multiple nickname websites. Maybe Eucalyptus Snowdrop could shop for a nickname just as she spent hours researching a new birth name. Here’s a few of the purportedly cool girl’s nicknames found online: Shadow, Moonshine, Sphinx, Claws, Bon-Bon, Subzero, Wind, and Statue. Here’s boys nicknames from the same site: Boomer, Mammoth, Saber-tooth, Crusher, Bomber, Rocket, Cannon and Trigger. Readymade nicknames for all. Take your pick. It probably shouldn’t escape us that the boy’s list is a tad more explosive than the girl’s. Finally--last names. I was surprised to learn that my own last name, Lynch, has become controversial. A school board in Portland, Oregon, recently voted to remove the name, Lynch, from three elementary schools named after a local Lynch family that donated generously to them. The name is also, of course, commonly associated with lynchings and crazed, grizzled cowboys in movies shouting, “Git a rope.” Now some ardent Oregoneons are actually urging Lynches to change their last names altogether. When I first heard about this, I volunteered to change my name to Pat Noose. My brother, Danny, said he’d change his to Danny Lethal Injection. We were merely trying to be flip, a proclivity amongst the more nervous Lynches. And we do take seriously the horrific racist legacy of the

word. We take it seriously, but not personally. Should people named White change their names? Because whites were the lynchers and currently the racist villains in the USA are white. But not necessarily Whites. Not all white Whites are white racists. And so it is with Lynch. There is a John Lynch, born into slavery, who got himself elected a U.S. Congressman. I hope he is part of my Lynch heritage because he lived till 92 and kept his edge the whole ride. If we Lynches changed our last names we’d create horrendous legal confusion with our identification, licenses, wills, passports, contracts—all the tonnage of paperwork that marks one’s passage through life. So I thought maybe I could change my first name instead. I’d change it to, Don’t. Then I’d be, Don’t Lynch, a nice instruction upholding due process. But, Don’t, is a problematic first name. What if I got married again? “I, Don’t, take thee for my lawful, wedded spouse,” simply doesn’t sound enthusiastic. So this Lynch name controversy remains a knotty problem. I can’t repeat here the new first name my brother chose for himself.

Call Melissa at (916) 429-9901 www.valcomnews.com

>Whho7$DWkcWdIed FD366

4041 Freeport Blvd Sacramento, CA 95822 (916) 452-6157

Serving Sacramento Families since 1903. Pre-arrangement packages available.

East Lawn Memorial Parks,

Mortuaries & Crematory

(916) 732-2000 EastLawn.com

4 Sacramento locations serving families since 1904

Valley Community Newspapers, Inc.

www.valcomnews.com • July 13, 2018 • Arden-Carmichael News

11


CONSTRUCTION/HAULING

4 papers, 1 low price!

CREATURE CATCHERS/REMOVAL

FLOORING SPECIALIST

Summer Yard Clean-up Specials!

in this section, today!

Call 429-9901 ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR

HANDYMAN • HAULING & YARD CLEAN-UP Call LESTER • RAIN GUTTER CLEANING • CONCRETE REMOVAL (916) 838-1247 • HEDGE TRIMMING /SHRUB REMOVAL Lic#128758/Ref • PRESSURE WASHING Pressure wash your driveways clean! your decks, too! Clean out your garage! Replace that old lawn! Hard work—not a problem! SPECIALS FOR SENIORS/*SERVING THE AREA FOR OVER 20 YRS*

Advertise your service

HANDYMAN

HAULING

CAPITOL ELECTRIC Reasonable Residential & Commercial Work since 1960 Repairs, Trouble Shooting Custom Lighting/FREE Est. Excellent ref from Angie’s List

(916) 451-2300 Cell: 213-3740

Neil McIntire –– C.S.L.# 394307

PAINTING

12

CLEANING

CLEANING

ADDITION SPECIALIST

Arden-Carmichael News • July 13, 2018 • www.valcomnews.com

Get - R - Done Hauling Tear Downs Fence Removal Trees & Shrubs Backyard Cleanup Handyman Services Debris Removal Small Jobs Moving & much more!

PAINTING

Licensed & insured

Price: $75 & up Whatever It Takes CALL ANYTIME!

Greg (916) 370-0565 PAINTING

Valley Community Newspapers, Inc.


D & H Service Office: 916-428-5907 Cell: 916-206-8909 Interior and exterior painting Fence Installation Tile Installation 25 years of experience Dry Rot Repair

ROOFING/SIDING

ROOF/GUTTER CLEANING

PLUMBING

HANDYMAN

ROONEY’S PLUMBING

FULL SERVICE PLUMBING

456-7777

Stan The Man est 2007

* ROOF / GUTTER CLEANING * WINDOW CLEANING * SENIOR DISCOUNTS * PRESSURE WASHING

916.601.1030

rooneysplumbing.com

Cleaning and Repair Sacramento, CA

License #683668

4 papers, 1 low price!

TILE WORK

TILE WORK

BAXTER TILE 3675 R Street Sacramento, California 95816

Roofing Specialists 454-3667

zimroof.com License #763169 Dave Zimmerman

EXPERT INSTALLATION REMODELING & REPAIR

Advertise your service

Ceramic • Marble • Granite Floors • Counters • Walls

in this section, today!

33 Years Experience • FREE Estimates

Call 429-9901

916-213-4669 License #668100

TREE & GARDENING SERVICE

TAX PREPARER #1 CONCIERGE TAX PREPARER

35 yrs. exp. We specialize in Business Tax returns including Corp & Partnerships. FREE Pick-up & Delivery to those who qualify. We prepare expertly all past tax returns including all State returns. Get the most deductions allowed to you by law. CTEC + IRS Registered & Bonded. Please call for your appt. today. Irene Senst (916) 640-3820 CA, (775) 410-3422 NV. Same low 1990 rates. www.taxirene.info • taxireneinfo@gmail.com

FOR SALE CLEAR LAKE LOTS

Owner can sell a 5000 sq.ft. lot (utilities available) as little as $500.00 down and $236.00 per month. 1 mile from the lake. Call Bob @ 707-998-1785 or 702-523-5239

Valley Community Newspapers, Inc.

HANDYMAN

SPECIAL ALZHEIMER’S LIVING

HANDYMAN SERVICES

No job too small. Make your “to-do” list and give me a call. Electrical, Plumbing, Tile, Sheetrock,Plaster, Stucco, Repairs and Remodeling, you name it! Lic# 908942. Call Steven at 230-2114.

HANDYMAN

CLEAN-UP SPECIALS!

Summer yard cleaning – Yard clean-up. Rain gutter cleaning, pressure washing/power spray, hauling, yard work, painting, tree & shrub removal, clean-up, fence repairs, light tree trimming, & more. Ref avail. Call Les at 8381247. 18 yrs. exp.Specials for seniors. Licensed

BOOKKEEPING #1 CONCIERGE BOOKKEEPER

Lic. #347001338/342

Day Club, Respite, Residential, Support Groups & Educational Classes casey.s@chancellorhealthcare.com www.reverecourt.com

(916) 392-3510

7707 Rush River Dr. Sacto, CA 95831

35 years exp. in industries like Auto, Mechanics, Restaurants, Caterers, Massage, Doctors, Chiropractors, Non-Profits, Retail, Marshal Arts, Barber, Construction, Wholesale, Investment Clubs, Corp, Partnerships, Small Business. We are experts in General Ledger, Payroll, Profit & Loss & Quarterlies. Call for your concierge appt. Same low 1990 rates. Ask for Irene Senst (916) 640-3820, Nevada (775) 410-3422. www.taxirene.info • taxireneinfo@gmail.com

BUSINESS SERVICES #1 CONCIERGE BUSINESS SERVICES

Put our 35 years in Concierge Business Support Service to work for your business. We provide support in: Licensing, Business & Corp Startups or Closures, Basic web design, Set-up social media. Business Concierge Shopping, Marketing and much more. Please contact Irene Senst (916) 640-3820 CA, (775) 410-3422 NV. www.taxirene.info • taxireneinfo@gmail.com

www.valcom news.com

RESERVE YOUR SPACE IN THE CLASSIFIEDS! CALL 429-9901

www.valcomnews.com • July 13, 2018 • Arden-Carmichael News

13


What’s

happening

Arden-Carmichael?

FRIDAY, JULY 13 K-POP FANS UNITE! – Like K-Pop or K-Dramas? Join us make back-to-school supplies and room decorations featuring your favorite stars while we listen to (and obsess over) K-Pop. Open to teens in 6th through 12th grades. Friday, July 13 from 4 to 5:30 p.m. at ArdenDimick Library, 891 Watt Ave., Sacramento.

LITERACY LITTLE LEAGUE IN NEED OF READING TUTORS: Reading tutors are needed for 40 minutes per week on either Mondays, Tuesdays, or Wednesdays from 1:55 to 2:35 p.m. starting in mid-September, continuing through May, 2019 (with the same child for the entire academic year, if you wish ). Training/scheduling coffee occurs in late August. Literacy Little League, an award winning tutoring program, lets you get to know a third grade student in need of help with reading comprehension. Tutors work together in the Resource Room with a credentialed teacher present and all materials provided. Substitutes are available if you can’t make it, or you can sign up as a substitute. Tutoring takes place at the Edison Language Institute (at the site of the former Jonas Salk Middle School) at 2950 Hurley Way near Morse Avenue. Contact Dorothy Marshall, retired psychologist, San Juan Unified School District, at 916-488-2578., dorothymarshall@comcast.net for date/time of training session.

SATURDAY, JULY 14 BUGS BUGS BUGS WITH NITA DAVIDSON: Friends of the Riverbanks invites you to this monthly event, which generally meets on the second Saturday of each month at 10 a.m. (note there are exceptions so check the calendar), at Sutter’s Landing Park at the VERY end of 28th Street in Sacramento. Bring water and sunblock, and a change of clothes for young ones who are sure to get sandy, muddy, and wet. Children under 13 must wear life jackets if they go into the water, per law. Leave your dogs at home and please bike, walk, or carpool if you can to keep our carbon footprint as small as possible. Directions: Head north on 28th Street, cross C Street and then the railroad tracks. Continue to the last parking lot where the park abuts the American River Parkway. POND PAINT: At Effie Yeaw Nature Center (California Ave and Tarshes Dr, Carmichael) at 10:30 a.m. ARCADE BOOK CLUB – Join fellow book lovers for discussion and socializing. This month’s book is Travels with Charley by John Steinbeck. July 14 at 11 a.m. at Arcade Library, 2443 Marconi Ave., Sacramento. YOGA CLASS – Come to the library for a free yoga lesson and experience its grounding, calming effects, while increasing your strength, flexibility and balance. Please wear loose clothing and bring a yoga mat. Instructor Joan Howell has been teaching yoga for 20 years. Adults of all skill levels are welcome. Saturday, July 14 and 28 from 1 to 2 p.m. at Arden-Dimick Library, 891 Watt Ave., Sacramento. CONCERTS IN THE PARK - Iola Rose Band: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Carmichael Park (5750 Grant Ave, Carmichael)

SUNDAY, JULY 15 FARMERS MARKET: From 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Carmichael Park (5750 Grant Ave, Carmichael) LEAPIN’ LIZARD: Starting at 1:30 p.m. at Effie Yeaw Nature Center (California Ave and Tarshes Dr, Carmichael)

WEDNESDAY, JULY 18 PUPPET ART THEATER PRESENTS: Tommy’s Space Adventure! – Tommy loves books about outer space and space aliens. His greatest wish is to someday meet a real live space alien. Little did Tommy know his wish was about to come true. Open to kids and their adults. Wednesday, July 18 from 4 to 5 p.m. at ArdenDimick Library, 891 Watt Ave., Sacramento.

seated while enjoying the movie. There will also be lots of fidget toys! Saturday, July 21 from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at Arden-Dimick Library, 891 Watt Ave., Sacramento. MAIDU SUMMER VILLAGE TOUR: At 10:30 a.m. at Effie Yeaw Nature Center (California Ave and Tarshes Dr, Carmichael)

SATURDAY, JULY 21 CONCERTS IN THE PARK - Latin Touch from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Carmichael Park (5750 Grant Ave, Carmichael)

SUNDAY, JULY 22 FARMERS MARKET: From 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Carmichael Park (5750 Grant Ave, Carmichael)

FRIDAY, JULY 25 TREVOR WYATT MAGIC – Join us for a familyfriendly Summer Reading performance. Magician Trevor Wyatt will put forth a high-energy magic show that features lots of audience participation. Open to kids and their adults. Wednesday, July 25 from 4 to 5 p.m. at Arden-Dimick Library, 891 Watt Ave., Sacramento.

SATURDAY, JULY 26 DIY BALLOON TWISTING – Have you admired the balloon animals at carnivals and fairs? Learn to make them yourself! Materials and instruction provided. All ages welcome. July 26 at 3 p.m. at Arcade Library, 2443 Marconi Ave., Sacramento.

TUESDAY, JULY 31

BIZARRE BAZAAR: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at American Cancer Society Discovery Shop (2708 Marconi Ave, Sacramento)

BACK TO HOGWARTS – Celebrate Harry Potter and JK Rowling’s birthdays while getting ready to go back to everyone’s favorite wizarding school! All ages welcome, and cosplay encouraged. Donations for a school supply drive will be accepted during the event. July 31 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Arcade Library, 2443 Marconi Ave., Sacramento.

SATURDAY, JULY 21

SATURDAY, AUG. 11

THE KING OF KARAOKE & OTHER STORIES – Meet Sacramento Bee columnist Bob Sylva as he shares his debut collection of stories. Bob brings a reporter’s eye for detail, a keen sense of irony, and a touch of magical realism to the short stories in his first book of fiction. Saturday, July 21 from 2 to 3 p.m. at Arden-Dimick Library, 891 Watt Ave., Sacramento.

USEFUL PLANTS WITH BRIAN COLLETT: Friends of the Riverbanks invites you to this monthly event, which generally meets on the second Saturday of each month at 10 a.m. (note there are exceptions so check the calendar), at Sutter’s Landing Park at the VERY end of 28th Street in Sacramento. Bring water and sunblock, and a change of clothes for young ones who are sure to get sandy, muddy, and wet. Children under 13 must wear life jackets if they go into the water, per law. Leave your dogs at home and please bike, walk, or carpool if you can to keep our carbon footprint as small as possible. Directions: Head north on 28th Street, cross C Street and then the railroad tracks. Continue to the last parking lot where the park abuts the American River Parkway.

FRIDAY, JULY 20

AUTISM-FRIENDLY FAMILY MOVIE: “A WRINKLE IN TIME” – A special family movie event for kids with autism and/or sensory disorders. This month: “A Wrinkle in Time” (PG, 2018). “Typical” toddlers and preschoolers are welcome too! We’ll have healthy snacks, the lights will be slightly up, the sound will be slightly down, and kids don’t need to remain

14

Arden-Carmichael News • July 13, 2018 • www.valcomnews.com

SATURDAY, SEPT. 8

SATURDAY, NOV. 10

DRAGONS AND DAMSELS, GREG KAREOFELAS: Friends of the Riverbanks invites you to this monthly event, which generally meets on the second Saturday of each month at 10 a.m. (note there are exceptions so check the calendar), at Sutter’s Landing Park at the VERY end of 28th Street in Sacramento. Bring water and sunblock, and a change of clothes for young ones who are sure to get sandy, muddy, and wet. Children under 13 must wear life jackets if they go into the water, per law. Leave your dogs at home and please bike, walk, or carpool if you can to keep our carbon footprint as small as possible. Directions: Head north on 28th Street, cross C Street and then the railroad tracks. Continue to the last parking lot where the park abuts the American River Parkway.

SURPRISE! Enjoy beautiful fall day outdoors independently. Friends of the Riverbanks invites you to this monthly event, which generally meets on the second Saturday of each month at 10 a.m. (note there are exceptions so check the calendar), at Sutter’s Landing Park at the VERY end of 28th Street in Sacramento. Bring water and sunblock, and a change of clothes for young ones who are sure to get sandy, muddy, and wet. Children under 13 must wear life jackets if they go into the water, per law. Leave your dogs at home and please bike, walk, or carpool if you can to keep our carbon footprint as small as possible. Directions: Head north on 28th Street, cross C Street and then the railroad tracks. Continue to the last parking lot where the park abuts the American River Parkway.

THURSDAY, OCT. 25 COMMUNITY MEETING WITH SUPERVISOR SUSAN PETERS AT MISSION OAKS COMMUNITY CENTER The meeting, starting at 6 p.m., provideS an opportunity for residents to hear a brief update on what is going on in Sacramento County and to ask questions. The meeting will also have a guest speaker from a variety of county departments. 6 to 7 p.m. at Mission Oaks Community Center, 4701 Gibbons Drive Carmichael.

SATURDAY, OCT. 13 WELCOME BACK, SALMON: Friends of the Riverbanks invites you to this monthly event, which generally meets on the second Saturday of each month at 10 a.m. (note there are exceptions so check the calendar), at Sutter’s Landing Park at the VERY end of 28th Street in Sacramento. Bring water and sunblock, and a change of clothes for young ones who are sure to get sandy, muddy, and wet. Children under 13 must wear life jackets if they go into the water, per law. Leave your dogs at home and please bike, walk, or carpool if you can to keep our carbon footprint as small as possible. Directions: Head north on 28th Street, cross C Street and then the railroad tracks. Continue to the last parking lot where the park abuts the American River Parkway.

THURSDAY, OCT. 25 COMMUNITY MEETING WITH SUPERVISOR SUSAN PETERS AT MISSION OAKS COMMUNITY CENTER The meeting, starting at 6 p.m., provideS an opportunity for residents to hear a brief update on what is going on in Sacramento County and to ask questions. The meeting will also have a guest speaker from a variety of county departments. 6 to 7 p.m. at Mission Oaks Community Center, 4701 Gibbons Drive Carmichael.

SATURDAY, DEC. 1 PARTICIPATE IN 34RD ARNHA ANNUAL WILDLIFE COUNT: Friends of the Riverbanks invites you to this monthly event, which generally meets on the second Saturday of each month at 10 a.m. (note there are exceptions so check the calendar), at Sutter’s Landing Park at the VERY end of 28th Street in Sacramento. Bring water and sunblock, and a change of clothes for young ones who are sure to get sandy, muddy, and wet. Children under 13 must wear life jackets if they go into the water, per law. Leave your dogs at home and please bike, walk, or carpool if you can to keep our carbon footprint as small as possible. Directions: Head north on 28th Street, cross C Street and then the railroad tracks. Continue to the last parking lot where the park abuts the American River Parkway.

JAN. 1, 2019 NEW YEARS GATHERING: Friends of the Riverbanks invites you to this monthly event, which generally meets on the second Saturday of each month at 10 a.m. (note there are exceptions so check the calendar), at Sutter’s Landing Park at the VERY end of 28th Street in Sacramento. Bring water and sunblock, and a change of clothes for young ones who are sure to get sandy, muddy, and wet. Children under 13 must wear life jackets if they go into the water, per law. Leave your dogs at home and please bike, walk, or carpool if you can to keep our carbon footprint as small as possible. Directions: Head north on 28th Street, cross C Street and then the railroad tracks. Continue to the last parking lot where the park abuts the American River Parkway.

ONGOING LITERACY LITTLE LEAGUE IN NEED OF READING TUTORS: Reading tutors are needed for 40 minutes per week on either Mondays, Tuesdays, or Wednesdays from 1:55 to 2:35 p.m. starting in midSeptember, continuing through May, 2019 (with the Continued on page 15 Valley Community Newspapers, Inc.


What’s

happening

Continued from page 14 same child for the entire academic year, if you wish ). Training/scheduling coffee occurs in late August. Literacy Little League, an award winning tutoring program, lets you get to know a third grade student in need of help with reading comprehension. Tutors work together in the Resource Room with a credentialed teacher present and all materials provided. Substitutes are available if you can’t make it, or you can sign up as a substitute. Tutoring takes place at the Edison Language Institute (at the site of the former Jonas Salk Middle School) at 2950 Hurley Way near Morse Avenue. Contact Dorothy Marshall, retired psychologist, San Juan Unified School District, at 916-488-2578., dorothymarshall@ comcast.net for date/time of training session. FRIENDS AND FAMILY OF SURVIVORS SUPPORT GROUP: Every first Monday of the month from 6 to 7 p.m. Location: Sacramento. Call 916-428-3271 for exact location. Description: Is your friend or family member in a domestic violence, sexual assault, or human trafficking situation? This free, drop-in group is for you. Learn how to support your loved one, and receive some support yourself among people who are in the same situation. Feel free to call My Sister’s House for more information: 916-428-3271. #METOO SUPPORT GROUP: Every third Monday of the month from 6 to 7 p.m. Location: Sacramento. Call 916-428-3271 for exact location. Description: This drop-in support group is free, confidential, open to all

Arden-Carmichael?

genders, and available to sexual assault survivors at any point in their healing. Feel free to call My Sister’s House for more information: 916-428-3271. FAMILIES LEARN ENGLISH – ESL students and their children are welcome at this weekly program. Designed for beginning learners. Tuesdays from 9 a.m. 11 a.m. at Arcade Library, 2443 Marconi Ave., Sacramento. CAMP POLLOCK VOLUNTEER DAY: From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays help improve Camp Pollock! Join the Sacramento Valley Nature Conservancy at the 11-acre, former Boy Scout Camp, located on the American River in the American River Parkway. Every Saturday volunteers team up with SVC staff to accomplish tasks including: painting, planting, weed eradication, construction, fence building, outreach, native plant garden maintenance and more. Volunteer days are held every Saturday from 9am-1pm at Camp Pollock. Please wear sturdy, closed toe shoes, hat, dress in layers and bring a water bottle, snack and liability form. All youth must be accompanied by their guardian. Please register below, so we can plan our volunteer projects accordingly. Volunteers will be notified by email if the event is canceled. Rainy conditions will also cancel Service Project. Important Documents: Directions to Camp Pollock Liability form - please print and bring (http://www. sacramentovalleyconservancy.org/admin/upload/ Adult%20Release%20of%20Liability.pdf )

Additional information about SVC’s events, outings and volunteer opportunities. If you would like to coordinate a group service day or have questions, please contact us at camppollock@sacramentovalleyconservancy.org FARMERS MARKET: Carmichael Recreation and Park District hosts a weekly farmers market where you can buy farm fresh goods to take to your table. The market is operated by, Living Smart Foundation, a local nonprofit training organization specializing in financial and business education for youth in our community. Each week the market features certified Farmers locally grown seasonal fruits and vegetables, specialty gourmet foods, spices, sauces, nuts, dried fruits and honey. Local entertainment is provided for your enjoyment! 9 a.m to 2 p.m. at 5330 Gibbons Drive. SACRAMENTO CAPITOLAIRES BARBERSHOP CHAPTER meets Tuesdays at 7 p.m. in Christ Community Church, 5025 Manzanita Ave., Carmichael, CA 95608. Men who like to sing are always welcome; www.capitolaires.org; 888-877-9806. The group is members of the Barbershop Harmony Society. AFTER SCHOOL RETRO GAMING – Retro video games after school. Hang out, make friends, and have fun. Recommended for 3rd through 6th grade. Crafts will be available for younger children. 2 p.m., ev-

ery Thursday at the Arcade Library, 2443 Marconi Ave., Sacramento. READ TO A DOG – Specially trained therapy dogs are waiting for children to come read to them. This program is for school age children that can read. We supply the books or you may bring your own book to read to the dogs. The books should be able to be read in 5 10 minutes. After 10 sessions, the reader is awarded a free book. Every Tuesday from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Carmichael Library, 5605 Marconi Avenue, Carmichael. PRESCHOOL STORYTIME – Join Ms. Kathy for storytime! We will share books, songs, make a simple craft and have loads of fun! All children must be accompanied by an adult. Every Thursday from 10:15 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. at Carmichael Library, 5605 Marconi Avenue, Carmichael. TODDLER STORYTIME – Come and hear stories and sing songs with Ms. Kathy! All children must be accompanied by an adult. Every Thursday from 11:15 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. at Carmichael Library, 5605 Marconi Avenue, Carmichael. KNITWITS – Do you knit? Crochet? Do needlework? Want to learn? Are you an expert in knitting or crocheting who can help others? Bring a project to work on and a snack to share as we learn together! This adult program is every Friday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at Carmichael Library, 5605 Marconi Avenue, Carmichael.

Faces and Places:

Dedication for commemorative World Peace Garden at Pioneer Church Photos by Stephen Crowley

A Commemorative World Peace Garden was dedicated Sunday, June 24, at Pioneer Congregational Church, 2700 L St. Twenty peace doves were released as the peace pole was unveiled by Vice-Mayor Steve Hansen and Pastor Phil Konz. A World Peace Pole is centered in the commemorative brick area open to Valley Community Newspapers, Inc.

the Sacramento community. It symbolizes the oneness of humanity and a common wish for a world at peace. Eight languages on the World Peace Pole say “May Peace Prevail On Earth” in Spanish, Japanese, Hebrew, Miwok, Arabic, Hindu, Russian, English and English in Braille. Speakers in all languages interpreted what peace means to their cultures.

www.valcomnews.com • July 13, 2018 • Arden-Carmichael News

15


Take part in Fix a Leak Week, March 19 - 25 and hunt down the leaks in your home.

The average home leaks more than 10,000 GALLONS of water per year – almost enough water to do a year’s worth of laundry.

FIX A LEAK WEEK CHECKLIST � Check all your faucets and showerheads for drips ��Do the dye test. Add some dye tablets or food

coloring to your toilet’s tank. If colored water appears in the bowl within 15 minutes, there’s a leak in the flap ��Set up a free SSWD Water-Wise House Call to

get expert advice and help finding leaks. Call (916) 972-7171 or visit SSWD.org to schedule your house call today.

And remember to check and fix leaks throughout the year!

sswd.org

Arden-Carmichael News - July 13, 2018  
Arden-Carmichael News - July 13, 2018