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COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS

RACE EQUITY & INCLUSION In Racine County

2018 REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY


LEARNING BY LISTENING TO OTHERS T

he report you hold in your hands is the result of two years of listening to our community, providing details regarding what we heard and what we plan to do to address the challenges identified by Racine County residents. In 2016, United Way chose to focus its Community Conversations on race, equity, and inclusion in Racine County. This was part of a larger effort by United Way Worldwide to help communities engage in productive conversations around challenging issues like race in the wake of violent incidents around the country. These kitchen table-style discussions—based on a model developed by the Harwood Institute—are designed to provide a safe environment to share and collect feedback from community members of various ages, backgrounds, ethnicities, and experiences. United Way of Racine County began holding Community Conversations in 2013 as a way to authentically engage our community. We know that conversations about race can be difficult for a community to have. However, they’re vitally important if we’re to move forward together. That’s why we decided to continue our Community Conversations on race, equity, and inclusion for a second year in a row. Here’s why we believe that was necessary: What the data clearly demonstrates—and what we have heard during the course of both rounds of Community Conversations—is that more often than not, blacks and Hispanics in our community experience some of our biggest economic and social challenges. Not only do the statistics

bear this out, but this is how black and Hispanic residents feel about their place in our community. We chose to devote two years to the topic of race, equity, and inclusion because it is imperative to our work as a community impact organization that we have a deep and thorough understanding of the issues and challenges we face as a community. These inequities ultimately carry a cost and hold us back as a community. We cannot create long-term systemic change without considering racial inequity and its impact on the health, education, and financial stability of residents of color and our community as a whole. Once again, we hope you find this year’s report informative and enlightening. While some of what you read might challenge your assumptions about our community, we hope it is eye-opening. And in order to move forward, we invite you to stay engaged with us as we work to provide opportunities to create a better community for everyone. By understanding the aspirations and challenges identified by participants regarding race, equity, and inclusion, we can develop long-lasting solutions with community partners. Together, we can create positive change in our community. Together, we will build an educated workforce in Racine County. Rodney Prunty President & Chief Professional Officer

“Since 2013, (United Way of Racine County) has been engaging in community conversations. They’ve talked to hundreds of people in their community year round about the things that mattered most to those people. In 2016, they focused on racism and policing at a time when our communities across the U.S. needed that conversation. People wanted those conversations. Police wanted the conversations. Citizens wanted the conversations. White people wanted the conversations. Black people wanted the conversations. They needed a place and an organization they could trust to bring them together.”

BRIAN GALLAGHER ­— President and CEO, United Way Worldwide 2

2018 Community Conversations Report


OUR COMMUNITY AT A GLANCE O

ver the past 40 years, Racine County has undergone significant change. The county’s largest community, the city of Racine, has seen its population decrease while neighboring villages like Mount Pleasant and Caledonia have evolved from rural into now largely suburban communities. While the population of Racine County has decreased slightly since the 2010 census to an estimated 194,873, the city’s population has continued to drop from a high of more than 94,000 in 1970 to an estimated 77,931 today, according to U.S. Census Bureau data. During this same time period, the city of Racine has become one of the state’s most diverse communities. In 1970, the city’s population was almost 90 percent white. According to most recent estimates, 23 percent of the city’s residents are Hispanic/Latino and 22 percent are black. Racine has a history of being more diverse than the rest of Wisconsin and the nation as a whole. It’s also struggled with segregation and the ensuing issues this causes. However, despite its diversity, people of color in both the city and the county continue to lag behind their white counterparts according to all available measures. While this report focuses on specific disparities like health outcomes, suspension rates, and unemployment, people of color also lag behind their white counterparts in areas such as educational attainment and homeownership. Though these obstacles have held Racine back for some time, through the collaboration of 2018 Community Conversations Report

Population by Race

80.1%

Racine County

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

White

11.0%

50%

Black

60%

70%

80%

8.9%

90%

100%

Other

Population by Race

City of Racine

0%

63.7%

10%

20%

30%

22.2%

40%

White

50%

Black

60%

14.1%

70%

80%

90%

100%

70%

80%

90%

100%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Other

Population by Ethnicity

12.5%

Racine County

0%

10%

87.5%

20%

30%

40%

Hispanic or Latino

50%

60%

Non-Hispanic or Latino

Population by Ethnicity

City of Racine

0%

22.7%

10%

77.3%

20%

30%

40%

Hispanic or Latino

50%

60%

Non-Hispanic or Latino

Source: American Community Survey 5-year estimates, 2012-16

many dedicated community partners—city government, county government, the Racine Unified School District, and the business community—change is on the horizon. This report is not meant

to lessen the community’s enthusiasm, but to serve as a flashlight to help illuminate some of the obstacles that continue to hold us back, so that we can work together to overcome them. 3


WHY DISPARITIES MATTER W

hether we realize it or not, there is a high cost to ignoring racial and ethnic disparities that persist throughout our society. Countless studies over the past decade have pointed to the challenges faced by black and Hispanic residents, both nationally and here in Wisconsin. In fact, when it comes to racial equity, Wisconsin ranks very low. The picture here in Racine County is not much different. The disparities that have created our current situation didn’t occur overnight. They developed over decades. From healthcare, to education, to employment, the racial divide is massive, as the data clearly demonstrates. In the following pages, you’ll get just a glimpse of what is happening here in Racine County and the city of Racine.

RACE A socially constructed system of categorizing humans largely based on observable physical features (phenotypes), such as skin color, and on ancestry. There is no scientific basis for, or discernible distinction between, racial categories. The ideology of race has become embedded in our identities, institutions and culture and is used as a basis for discrimination and domination.*

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While the nation continues to become increasingly diverse, efforts to address the persistent racial and ethnic disparities have faltered, and economists have argued that this can stifle growth and competitiveness and that racial inequities threaten economic growth and prosperity as people of color become the majority. By 2050, more than half of U.S. workers and consumers will be people of color. As America confronts human capital constraints on our workforce, we must look to the potential of all and take deliberate, realistic, and proven measures to enable the full participation of all.* *Source: The Business Case for Racial Equity: A Strategy for Growth (W.K. Kellogg Foundation)

EQUITY “The state, quality or ideal of being just, impartial and fair.” The concept of equity is synonymous with fairness and justice. It is helpful to think of equity as not simply a desired state of affairs or a lofty value. To be achieved and sustained, equity needs to be thought of as a structural and systemic concept.*

INCLUSION The action or state of including or of being included within a group or structure. More than simply diversity and numerical representation, inclusion involves authentic and empowered participation and a true sense of belonging.*

*Source: Race Equity and Inclusion Action Guide (The Annie E. Casey Foundation)

2018 Community Conversations Report


DISPARITIES IN HEALTH

14.5%

Birth weight is the weight of the newborn measured immediately after birth. A birth weight of less than 5.5 lbs, or 2500 grams, is considered a low birth weight. Compared to infants of normal weight, low birth weight infants may be more at risk for many health problems.

Black infants in Racine County are two times more likely to be a low birth weight than white babies.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Source: Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Office of Health Informatics

In 2016, 1 out of 7 infants in Racine County born to black mothers were born underweight.

Healthy People 2020 defines a health disparity as “a particular type of health difference that is closely linked with social, economic, and/or environmental disadvantage.” Health disparities adversely affect groups of people who have systematically experienced greater obstacles

to health based on their racial or ethnic group; religion; socioeconomic status; gender; age; mental health; cognitive, sensory, or physical disability; sexual orientation or gender identity; geographic location; or other characteristics historically linked to discrimination or exclusion.

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

Acknowledge that saying you are ‘color blind’ disregards the history and culture of others.

2018 Community Conversations Report

Community Conversation Participant 5


DISPARITIES IN EDUCATION Black students are suspended at higher rates than their Hispanic or white classmates; 25 percent of black Racine Unified students were suspended during the 2015-16 school year, more than twice the average (12.1 percent) of all student suspensions combined. Source: WISE DASH, Wisconsin DPI, SDPR

25% Suspension rate for black Racine Unified students.

1 out of 4 black Racine Unified students were suspended during the 2015-16 school year.

Racine Unified using Circles of Support to address inequity Circles of Support is an assetsbased and flexible approach to addressing racial and other disparities that draws out and builds on the strengths and aspirations of African-American and other students of color, and builds on their existing supportive relationships. Students meet with a facilitator once a week. The meetings create a nurturing place for mutual support, and students are able to participate in ways that affirm their everyday lives and identities. Participants

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develop positive and supportive peer relationships. The circles support socialemotional development through reflective practices and collective problem solving and promote intellectual curiosity and growth. Facilitators provide informal coaching and support to the participants’ classroom teachers, empowering students to connect what they learned in the circle to what happens in the classroom, and helping teachers understand how to support their students’ growth.

Just because we’re a different race doesn’t mean we’re not as smart as you. Community Conversation Participant 2018 Community Conversations Report


DISPARITIES IN FINANCIAL STABILITY

18%

The unemployment rate is negatively correlated with educational attainment: The more educated the workforce, the lower the unemployment rate.

Black unemployment rate in the city of Racine.

Source: Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Source: American Community Survey 5-year estimates, 2012-16

20

15

18%

10 12%

5

0

9%

White/Caucasian

Hispanic/Latino

Black/African-American

Racine County unemployment rates vary only slightly from the city’s: black, 17%; Hispanic/Latino, 10%; white, 6%.

In 2016, the median black worker earned 75 percent of what the median white worker earned in an hour; the median black household earned 61 percent of the income the

median white household earned in a year; and the value of net worth for the median black family was just 10 percent of the value for the median white family.

Source: Economic Policy Institute

2018 Community Conversations Report

There’s a long history of discrimination that has kept us separated, both regionally and economically. Community Conversation Participant 7


WHO DID WE HEAR FROM? 2017-18 COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS Between October 2017 and May 2018, United Way of Racine County held 16 conversations with 159 participants representing the following community groups: n John XXIII Education Center n African American Roundtable n Wisconsin Women’s Business Initiative Corp. n United Way of Racine County Board n 16th Street C.O.P. House n Dr. John Bryant Community Center (Youth) n Dr. John Bryant Community Center (Adults) n Racine Family YMCA: Focus on Fathers n Gateway Technical College n Greening Greater Racine n University of Wisconsin-Parkside n Racine Interfaith Coalition n Racine Vocational Ministry n J.I. Case High School n Transitional Living Center Burlington n Veterans Outreach of Wisconsin

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1%

no answer

men women

51% women

48% men

2018 Community Conversations Report


PARTICIPATION BY AGE

PARTICIPATION BY RACE/ETHNICITY

PARTICIPATION BY RESIDENCY

2018 Community Conversations Report

31%

Baby Boomer (1946 - 1964)

9%

Silent Generation (1925 - 1945)

21%

Generation X (1965 - 1980)

31%

Millennial (1981 - 1996)

6%

Generation Z (1997 and after)

2%

No Answer

39%

White/Caucasian

35%

Black/African American

15%

Hispanic/Latino

1%

American Indian/Native Alaskan

2%

Asian

6%

Other

1%

No Answer

69%

City of Racine

24%

Racine County

6%

Other

1%

No Answer

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WHAT DID WE HEAR? CHALLENGES

n Understanding racism and the effects of stereotyping n Addressing systemic inequities n Lack of resources to create positive change within

neighborhoods and communities of people of color n Racially segregated neighborhoods*

n A business community that reflects the demographics of its

ASPIRATIONS

community members n Understanding and acceptance of racial differences* n An equitable, inclusive, and safe community n Diverse leadership throughout all sectors in Racine County

n Provide opportunities to educate the community about the history of race

SOLUTIONS

and its implications in today’s society n Commitment to taking personal action by engaging in work within our own spheres of influence to address personal biases n Encourage community leaders to take action to address the challenges around racial inequities n A community-wide event to learn about and celebrate cultural differences* * Identified during both rounds of Community Conversations

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2018 Community Conversations Report


TURN OUTWARD TALKS AGE

I

n addition to hosting Community Conversations, United Way of Racine County solicited responses from Racine County residents through an anonymous online survey. A total of 63 individuals responded to the survey. Turn Outward Talks, based on Rich Harwood’s “ask exercise,” gave United Way a chance to hear from a diverse group of community members who did not participate in a Community Conversation. As in 2017, we asked the following questions: n When thinking about race and equity, what kind of community do you want? n How is that different from how you see the community in which you live? n Is racism and discrimination a problem in Racine County and why? n In your opinion, what are some ways we can confront racism and discrimination in Racine County? Themes n A diverse, inclusive, and equitable community, a

Silent Generation (Before 1945)

3%

24%

Millennial (1981 to 1996)

49%

Baby Boomer (1946 to 1964)

24%

Generation X (1965 to 1980)

RACE 6%

6%

Other

Hispanic/ Latino

17%

Black/ African-American

71%

White/Caucasian

community that celebrates diversity and supports those in need.* n Address systemic racism in our education,

healthcare, and judicial systems that negatively affects marginalized races. n Equality resulting in fair treatment for all.

RESIDENCY

Participants indicated the need for accountability that would ensure our businesses, employees, schools, and parents are promoting equality.*

19%

n Opportunities to learn more about racism and its

Other

implications–professional learning.

n Opportunities to engage and learn about other

cultures–continued conversations, community events.*

54%

City of Racine

27%

Racine County

* Identified during both rounds of Turn Outward Talk surveys

2018 Community Conversations Report

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CONVERSATION SNAPSHOT CASE HIGH SCHOOL In May 2018, United Way of Racine County held a Community Conversation with a group of 10 students from Case High School to learn their thoughts, concerns, and aspirations about race, equity, and inclusion in Racine County from teenagers’ perspectives.

CHALLENGES

n Participants indicated there are more microaggressions than

blatant racism n High-level classes are largely white with staff that act with a sense of superiority n Fear of being judged among friend groups and sports teams keeps us segregated n People refuse to admit racism is a problem

ASPIRATIONS

n An open-minded community that sees people as equals n Personal communication instead of using social media n Empathy for youth who are growing up in difficult situations

and giving them a sense of hope n No fear of violence

SOLUTIONS

n Bring seemingly different groups together to embrace their

differences n Equal opportunities for students of color n Required classes to educate all people on Latino and African American history n Start with parents and their children n Accountability and real consequences for race-driven actions

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PARTICIPANTS

10 Case High School Students

Gender

6 Female 4 Male Age 10 Generation Z (1997 and after)

Race/Ethnicity

1 Black 3 White/Caucasian 1 Black/Caucasian 2 Hispanic/Latino 3 Hispanic/Latino/Caucasian

Education Level 10 High School

Residency/Work

7 Live in the city of Racine 4 Work in the city of Racine 3 Live in Racine County 6 Work in Racine County

It’s hard to watch your friends not be able to experience the same things as you in an equal way. Case High School student

2018 Community Conversations Report


FINAL THOUGHTS O

ur credo is: We fight for the health, education, and financial stability of every person in our community. We know the foundation of any community’s long-term success starts with understanding inequities. That is why we devoted two years to listening and understanding our community’s perceptions, experiences, and recommendations around race, equity, and inclusion. We want you to know we are listening and will apply an equity lens when it comes to our daily work, to help sharpen our focus on outcomes. Our response started after last year’s Community Conversations Report Out event. We listened to attendees’ suggestions and over the last year we have focused on implementing those recommendations. This included: expanding our CORE Team by inviting community members to participate; ensuring Community Conversations better represented our diverse community, including age, race, education level, and gender; and most importantly, focusing on training our staff about race, equity, and inclusion. Eliminating racism and inequity will take time and resources. We will continue to engage partners in business, government, education, and nonprofits in dialogue and work around this subject matter. But we cannot do this alone. That is why we invite you to participate in the change. All registered attendees of the 2018 Community Conversations Report Out event will receive an email. We encourage you to take the survey and follow the links provided to learn more about what we have shared in this report and how you can get involved in the coming months and years as we continue to work together to make Racine County a community where everyone prospers. We all win when we LIVE UNITED.

2018 Community Conversations Report

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NEXT STEPS I

n July 2017, United Way of Racine County’s Community Conversations CORE Team knew that the following year’s Community Conversations would again focus on the issue of race, equity, and inclusion in Racine County. Clearly, one year was not enough to dedicate to such an important topic and there were more individuals who needed to be heard from. With the encouragement and support of United Way Worldwide, United Way of Racine County spent the past year engaging even more community members in this important conversation with the ultimate goal of creating positive next steps that could help move our community forward. One of the main purposes of Community Conversations is to help inform our work as a community impact organization. The past two years of conversations—26 conversations and 263 participants—have helped us better understand the challenges our community faces when it comes to racial inequities. These inequities contribute to the disparities we see in the areas of health, education, and financial stability and will continue to hold us back unless we address them. On the following page, you’ll read what tactics the CORE Team developed to bring our community together, better understand each other, and move us forward. We are grateful to all the participants who

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United Way of Racine County

Community Conversations CORE Team United Way of Racine County Staff Julie Anderson Executive Assistant Alexa Haigh Vice President of Investor Relations Alberto Huerta Investor Relations Manager MaryBeth Kallio Community Investment Director Community Members Steven Mussenden Executive Director, Racine Literacy Council Genie Webb Outreach Specialist, WWBIC

dedicated their time and their voices over the past two years of Community Conversations. We would also like to thank Steven Mussenden, executive director of the Racine Literacy Council, and Genie Webb, outreach specialist at the Wisconsin Women’s Business Initiative Corporation for joining the CORE Team.

2018 Community Conversations Report


NEXT STEPS Community Pledge: Declaration of Inclusion

United Way of Racine County is asking the community to be part of the movement of inclusion—the active, intentional, and ongoing engagement with diversity—by signing a “Declaration of Inclusion” pledge. This pledge asks individuals to respect and appreciate all aspects of any person, including race, religion, skin color, nationality, sexual orientation, gender identity, physical abilities, age, parental status, work and behavioral styles, and the perspectives of each individual as shaped by their nation, culture, and experiences. In addition to taking the personal pledge, United Way of Racine County will help individuals build their “equity muscle” through a quarterly newsletter with various resources, events, and ways to stay involved.

Diversity Council

United Way of Racine County is creating a community-wide Diversity Council. The council is designed to engage business partners around the focus areas of race, equity, and inclusion. Research indicates organizations that tie diversity and inclusion to their business strategies increase performance, productivity and customer satisfaction. Through the support of United Way, members will have the opportunity to participate in quarterly meetings focused on five essential components of diversity in the workplace: situation, strategy, structure, skills and knowledge, and sustainability. The goal of the council is to provide business representatives with the training and support to create diversity and inclusion strategies in their own workplace, resulting in more diverse, inclusive workplaces aligned with organizational goals.

Community Event

United Way of Racine County has joined together with Racine County, Higher Expectations for Racine County, and Visioning a Greater Racine to host the first community-wide diversity celebration to be held in Racine County. “OneRacine” is the result of one of the top solutions identified by participants in our past two years of Community Conversations on race, equity, and inclusion. Participants expressed their desire for an event in which all members of the community could come together to learn about and celebrate cultural differences. “OneRacine” will be held Saturday, October 6 at Festival Hall. Admission to this event is free and will offer community resources, live performances, and many multicultural foods and items for purchase.

2018 Community Conversations Report

OneRacine celebrating culture, diversity, & community

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United Way of Racine County

2018 Community Conversations Report  
2018 Community Conversations Report  
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