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Helped to change teens’ negative perceptions of police

Played role in U.S. Supreme Court case on due process and incarceration

2010/11 Helen Bader School of Social Welfare Championed a socially just food system

Guided Madison PD through protests at state capitol

Named Hartford Geriatric Social Work Faculty Scholar

Improving lives. Strengthening communities. AR_2011_final.indd 1

Annual Report

Provided field training for the next generation

Helped improve fatherchild relationships

Named to federal study on behavior and social consequences of HIV/AIDS

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2010/ 2011 Annual Report From Dean Stan Stojkovic ............................................ 3

Child Welfare Partnership Moves to New Community Base

Research .................................................................. 5 - 22

Modern Debtors Prisons? UWM Professor Plays Role in U.S. Supreme Court Case

Shifting Inner City Juveniles’ Perceptions of Police Talking About Your End-of-Life Wishes

CABHR Director Michael Fendrich Named Wisconsin Distinguished Professor

Caregiver Agencies Nationwide Partner with TCARE® Artists Collaborate on Aging Issues

HBSSW Supports Milwaukee Time Bank Ex-Offenders Tell of Life In and Out of Prison

Researchers Aim to Help Foster Parents Manage Children’s Problem Behaviors

Awards, Alumni, Donors, Memoriums ..............39 - 62

Cutting Through the Bull of High-Energy and High-Alcohol Drinks

Move Grass. Grow Food. Alumna Makes Fresh Food a Social

Removing Barriers to Organizational Change

Alumni of the Year Awards

Two HBSSW Faculty Appointed to National Review Boards

Graduate of the Last Decade (GOLD) Award

Teen Parenting Program Strengthens Father-Child Relationships

New: Crime Analysis Specialization

Postpartum Sleep Loss, Male Depression and Alcohol Biomarkers Studied by CABHR Multidisciplinary Teams

Professional Development and Outreach Expands Offerings

Teaching and Engagement ............................. 23 - 38 Study Abroad Programs UWinteriM in New Orleans

Improving lives and strengthening communities through AR_2011_final.indd 2-3

Helen Bader School of Social Welfare

CJ Grad Helps Thwart Largest Terrorist Attack Since 9/11 Justice Issue

HBSSW Awards Night HBSSW Grads Improve Lives, Strengthen Communities Who Was Helen Bader? In Recognition of Generosity In Memory of . . .

research, education and community partnerships 4/19/2012 2:25:14 PM


From Dean Stan Stojkovic . . . Annual Report 2010/11

W

hat, exactly, do social welfare graduates do? These pages only hint at the myriad of ways our criminal justice and social work alumni improved individual lives and the quality of community life this year. Eric Jergenson (MS CJ ’95), an FBI special agent, was instrumental in preventing a monumental terrorist attack in New York. Nobel Wray (BS CJ ’93), chief of police with the Madison Police Department, led his force through national newsmaking protests at the Wisconsin State Capitol. Gretchen Mead (MSW ’04,) founder of Victory Garden Initiative, lead extremely timely efforts to make fresh produce available to everyone, regardless of socioeconomic status—a revolution that is not solely about food, but about social justice. And Allison Draheim (MSW ’99), Green Bay School District’s family, community and homeless resource coordinator, was named Person of the Year in Green Bay. These are but a few of our individual graduates who are working hard in the areas of social work and criminal justice. As a group, our graduates in these two disciplines make a difference by improving policies, addressing the vital social issues of our time, and acting as a strong voice for thoughtful social change in our society. For 45 years, UWM’s Helen Bader School of Social Welfare has educated and prepared thousands of students for entry-level and advanced careers. Students are supported by our highly-respected faculty who are dedicated to better understanding and addressing societal issues that affect so many of us: aging, child welfare, conflict resolution, our corrections system, crime, cultural diversity, death and dying, disabilities, economic and social policy, homelessness, poverty, marriage and family, mental health, substance abuse, welfare reform and more. Students also have the benefit of being able to complete field work at one or more of our 200 partner agencies who help bring classroom lessons to life. We are making a difference and invite you to join us in coming years as supporters, partners, students, faculty and staff.

Helen Bader School of Social Welfare 2400 E. Hartford Avenue P.O. Box 786 Milwaukee, WI 53201 414 229-4851 www.hbssw.uwm.edu Editor Carolyn Bucior Writers Carolyn Bucior Sharon Keigher Beth Stafford Design Ellen Lafouge Photography Troy C. Fox Peter Jakubowski Sharon Keigher Alan Magayne-Roshak Susan Rose Chris Schneider Wendy Volz-Daniels Proofreading Carol Kozminski

Stan Stojkovic, Ph.D. Dean and Professor 3

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Shifting Inner City Juveniles’ Perceptions of Police The results were extremely encouraging. Participants in the STOP and UWM groups increased their general knowledge of the police and specific knowledge regarding conduct during police encounters, but only the STOP group positively changed their perceptions of the police.

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would it take to start an exponential shift of What juveniles’ negative perceptions of the police? Police harass us. They stop us for no reason. Juveniles living in vulnerable neighborhoods commonly hold such perceptions about the police officers who patrol their communities, says Kimberly Hassell, associate professor and Tina Freiburger, assistant professor, both in the HBSSW Criminal Justice Department. “Relationships between police and inner-city juveniles are in a state of national crisis. Many police officers do not understand juveniles’ perspectives and most juveniles do not understand why the police do the things that they do,” Hassell says. This year, the Milwaukee Police Department (MPD) launched a far-reaching program called Students Talking it Over with Police, or STOP, in collaboration with the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare and the Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee. The program aims at changing perceptions and was developed by the MPD’s District 5 Community Prosecution Unit (CPU) officers, who had been challenged by Chief Edward Flynn to find a way to engage and educate youth identified as future leaders in inner-city areas. Hassell and Freiburger were charged with developing an evaluation to uncover and

document STOP’s impact and to assist in replication efforts. Youths in the program learned about the nature of urban police work, the nature of neighborhood crimes, the reasons police stop and question people, and how to conduct themselves with police during a field or traffic encounter. More than 600 youths between ages 8 and 18 participated in the pilot program offered through several after-school programs at Boys and Girls clubs. Youths were divided into three groups: one group received the STOP program information from District 5 CPU officers; one group received the same information from Hassell and Freiburger; the third group received no information. The results were extremely encouraging. Participants in the STOP and UWM groups increased their general knowledge of the police and specific knowledge regarding conduct during police encounters, but only the STOP group positively changed their perceptions of the police. These findings document two key points: it is important that juveniles interact directly with officers and that police personally facilitate programs such as STOP. Participants reported that they spread the word about their positive police interactions, suggesting STOP’s messages could be passed on exponentially. Because of the carefully documented processes and research methodology, STOP is poised to become a national model that can be easily replicated by other agencies.

The HBSSW awarded the Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee its Research Partner of the Year Award, in recognition of the strengths and potential of this particular collaboration. “Doctors Hassell and Freiburger were a pleasure to work with,” says Sam Williams, executive vice president of Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee. “Their professional expertise added instant credibility to the STOP program.”

In October 2011, the International Association of Chiefs of Police, which has 20,000 members in 100 countries, recognized the importance of this research by awarding MPD their Excellence in Law Enforcement Research Award at their annual convention.

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Talking About Your End-of-Life Wishes

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he Helen Bader School of Social Welfare is home to interdisciplinary studies in aging that help us as individuals and as a society. This year, our researchers contributed to our knowledge on end-of-life conflicts and wishes, decreasing caregiver stress, and improving the lives of those with dementia.

“We each need to consider putting the subject of dying, and our wishes about our own end-of-life care, on the table for discussion,” says Jung Kwak, assistant professor, social work. “It’s a difficult topic to initiate. But these conversations are valuable.“

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you discussed your end-of-life wishes with your Have family or friends? Do you know the many benefits of doing so—for you, your spouse and your children? “We each need to consider putting the subject of dying, and our wishes about our own end-of-life care, on the table for discussion,” says Jung Kwak, assistant professor, social work. “It’s a difficult topic to initiate. But these conversations are valuable. They can decrease the burden and stress on our eventual caregiver and ensure someone else will advocate for us to receive care consistent with our values.” If you’re the listening party, she adds, you’ll gain a deeper understanding of the other person. “It can surprise you,” she says. Kwak studies decisional conflicts surrounding death and the need to have surrogates for persons with dementia. Because of her promising research in this area, she was named in 2010 as one of six Hartford Geriatric Social Work Faculty Scholars. Her research is funded by the Parkinson’s Research Institute and the Hartford Foundation.

Kwak researches factors that impede and those that help a caregiver make such decisions. Spouses, she says, feel more confident to make decisions; children less confident and more conflicted. In addition, the state and quality of relationships play a role. “Generally, the more family conflict, the less able people are to make end-oflife decisions,” she says. “At some point, we might become the caregiver of someone we love and care about. It comes with a lot of responsibility but most people are not prepared,” Kwak says. A caregiver’s job can be made easier by three factors, she says: understanding health and medical information, knowing the dying person’s values, and being supported by friends and family. This year, Kwak collaborated on the documentary Consider the Conversation, A Documentary on a Taboo Subject, which spotlights how ill-prepared Americans are in making end-of-life decisions. The Huffington Post called it a “must see” documentary. The medical director of Mayo Clinic Health System Home Health & Hospice called it “remarkable and thought provoking.” And the New York Times wrote that it “provides moving narratives and important perspectives.” The documentary, which began airing on PBS in June 2011, was co-produced by UWM Letters & Science alumnus Mike Bernhagen (MA Communication ’91), director of Rainbow Hospice Care in Jefferson, Wisconsin. Are there rights and wrongs in making end-of-life decisions? Kwak thinks not. “We’re talking about life and death,” she say. “I’m not sure there is a right way to live or to die.”

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Caregiver Agencies Nationwide Partner with TCARE® Caregivers are at higher than average risk of anxiety and stress that interferes with their relationships, including their relationship with the care receiver. “Sometimes those of us who do it simply cannot continue without physical and emotional support,” Montgomery says.

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aregiving for a relative with dementia is often stressful and can lead to depression,” says Professor of Social Work Rhonda Montgomery, the Helen Bader Endowed Chair in Applied Gerontology. Caregivers are at higher than average risk of anxiety and stress that interferes with their relationships, including their relationship with the care receiver. “Sometimes those of us who do it simply cannot continue without physical and emotional support,” Montgomery says. Working with the UWM Research Foundation, Montgomery designed and licensed TCARE® (Tailored Caregiver Assessment and Referral), a program used by partner agencies nationwide that helps professional care managers design individualized care plans for caregivers and their families. TCARE®—now in its fourth year and in increasing demand nationwide—assesses caregivers’ needs and strengths and guides caregivers to the specific support services that can help ease their workload and reduce

stress. “These services are tailored to an individual’s needs, circumstances and preferences,” Montgomery says. In 2009-10, Montgomery’s team began a pilot project funded through Texas AgriLife Extension at Texas A&M University to adapt and evaluate TCARE® for use with military service members, veterans and their families. “Family caregivers provide 80 percent of the personal and medical care, or $375 billion worth,” says Montgomery. “They help shorten hospital stays and are a major factor in delaying institutional care. They, and their families, deserve the most effective support.” In 2010, Montgomery received a significant honor in the world of caregiving—the Rosalynn Carter Leadership in Caregiving Award, presented personally by the former first lady. The award recognizes UWM’s partnership with the Washington Association of Area Agencies on Aging to implement TCARE® in Washington state. TCARE® has been funded by the Helen Bader Foundation, the National Alzheimer’s Association, the Jacob & Valeria Langeloth Foundation, the Alzheimer’s Disease Demonstration Grants to States, and contracts with the states of Georgia, Michigan, Minnesota and Washington.

In 2010, Montgomery received a significant honor in the world of caregiving—the Rosalynn Carter Leadership in Caregiving Award, presented personally by the former first lady. The award recognizes UWM’s partnership with the Washington Association of Area Agencies on Aging to implement TCARE® in Washington state.

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Artists Collaborate on Aging Issues “We aim to create enduring and meaningful projects in which staff, residents, families, students and artists can learn and grow through collaboration,” Basting says.

The collaborators on The Penelope Project will teach a four-day program called “CREATE/ CHANGE: Transforming Care for Elders Through Creative Engagement” in June 2012. The program will bring together artists, students, and long-term care professionals to inspire others to radically revise long-term care programming.

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roots in the arts, Anne Basting, associate Withprofessor and director of the Center on Age & Community (CAC) in UWM’s Helen Bader School of Social Welfare, does groundbreaking research into improving the lives of those with Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia. Basting has found that even people who begin losing their ability to recall still retain the ability to imagine and tell improvisational stories. Helping them do that can help empower them. With a joint appointment in the Theatre Department of the Peck School of the Arts, Basting has made the arts an integral part of the CAC’s work. “We aim to create enduring and meaningful projects in which staff, residents, families, students and artists can learn and grow through collaboration,” Basting says. From 2008-10, she developed The Penelope Project in collaboration with the UWM Theatre Department, Sojourn Theatre, Luther Manor senior living community and the American Association of Homes and Services for the Aging. The goal was to improve the quality of life for people who live, work and visit in long-term care settings. The project culminated with the presentation of “Finding Penelope,” a full-length play written by Basting and staged in a “roaming” format throughout Luther Manor. Discussion about Penelope’s story inspired poems, songs, dances, drawings and stories (both fiction and nonfiction) from the Luther Manor residents and day participants. “While keeping people safe, providing good health care and serving warm meals is vital, we’re also focused on building connections with the people we might have just walked by in the past,” says Beth Meyer-Arnold, director of adult day services at Luther Manor.

The Penelope Project is funded by supporters of the arts and of social services, including the Wisconsin Humanities Council, Wisconsin Arts Board, Helen Bader Foundation, Brookdale Foundation, MAP Fund, Forest County Potawatomi Community Fund, Faye McBeath Foundation, UWM Theatre Department and Wisconsin Representatives of Activity Professionals.

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Researchers Aim to Help Foster Parents Manage Children’s Problem Behaviors “Foster parents often find themselves in situations in which instinctive parenting skills are not enough to meet the needs of these children,” Mersky says.

Foster parents undergo extensive training, says Topitzes, but it is typically didactic in nature, which may not be as effective as the experiential and interactive training that PCIT offers. “The ultimate goal is to improve childparent relations, prevent multiple foster care placements and improve foster children’s long-term outcomes.” at the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare Faculty and the Center for Addiction and Behavioral

Health Research have secured a two-year, $300,000 grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. They will test whether an evidence-based clinical intervention, Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), can be translated into a community setting to help foster parents effectively manage the problem behaviors of their foster children. 13

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Project Connect: Adapting PCIT to Foster Care is being led by Josh Mersky (PI) and Dimitri Topitzes (co-PI), assistant professors, social work. Other coinvestigators are: Michael Brondino, associate professor, social work; and Steve McMurtry, professor, social work. Cheryl McNeil, a professor at West Virginia University and PCIT expert, will serve as clinical trainer and consultant. The randomized trial will include 132 foster families in the Milwaukee area and is being undertaken in partnership with St. Aemilian-Lakeside, Inc. and the Milwaukee Child Welfare Partnership for Professional Development. Children in foster care often exhibit externalizing behaviors that caregivers may not be able to manage well, says Mersky. “Foster parents often find themselves in situations in which instinctive parenting skills are not enough to meet the needs of these children,” he says. Foster parents undergo extensive training, says Topitzes, but it is typically didactic in nature, which may not be as effective as the experiential and interactive training that PCIT offers. “The ultimate goal is to improve child-parent relations, prevent multiple foster care placements and improve foster children’s long-term outcomes,” he says. PCIT has been shown to reduce problem behaviors in young children, but it is cost-prohibitive. Mersky’s and Topitzes’ study will modify the traditional model—a therapist working with a single family in an outpatient setting. Instead, they will use group-based training coupled with follow-up telephone consultations. The intervention builds on existing child welfare service structures, increasing the likelihood that, if successful, it could easily be integrated into current practices. “We wanted to test a model that could ultimately impact the matter in which services are delivered to foster families,” says Topitzes. “We wanted it to have a shelf life beyond the grant cycle.”

2011, Josh Mersky and InDimitri Topitzes, assistant

professors, social work, received $300,000 in funding that will help them evaluate and support home visiting programs for disadvantaged parents. The two-year grant came from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and is administered through Wisconsin’s Department of Children and Families. In Wisconsin, hundreds of disadvantaged, expectant parents annually receive home visiting services from nurses, social workers and paraprofessionals to help enhance the well-being of parent and child. “The network of home visiting programs in Wisconsin is still in development. The grant will help programs expand in ways that best ensure positive program effects,” says Topitzes. “These programs are known to improve birth outcomes, promote maternal and child health, prevent child maltreatment, and enrich overall child development,” says Topitzes. “Strengthening the network of home visiting programs ultimately has implications for improving overall human capital in this state.” 14

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Cutting Through the Bull . . . Energy drinks, the fastest growing segment of the U.S. beverage industry, continue to bring calls to poison control centers. A can packs the equivalent caffeine of three cups of coffee or ten 12-ounce Cokes. Side effects include a racing heart, headache, anxiety, insomnia and an upset stomach.

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2010, noting serious health incidents InatNovember university campuses, the FDA banned caffeinated-

alcoholic beverages (CABs) from the U.S. market. However, current manufacturers (Four Loko, Moonshot, Joose and others) continue to tap into a primarily young-adult-male market with two separate drinks: one that is high in caffeine (aka energy drinks) and one that is high in alcohol. Serious concerns remain with each drink and with mixing the two, says Lisa Berger, associate professor, social work, and scientist with the school’s Center for Addiction and Behavioral Health Research. High-alcohol beverages contain dangerously high levels of alcohol (up to 12 percent). A single 23.5-ounce can delivers the alcohol content of a bottle of wine, or 4.7 drinks. A night of heavy drinking is considered more than three drinks for a woman, four for a man. Energy drinks, the fastest growing segment of the U.S. beverage industry, continue to bring calls to poison control centers. A can packs the equivalent caffeine of three cups of coffee or ten 12-ounce Cokes. Side effects include a racing heart, headache, anxiety, insomnia and an upset stomach. According to a January 31, 2011 New York Times article, there have been four documented cases of caffeine-associated deaths reported, and five cases of seizures associated with consumption of energy/power drinks. Mixing is dangerous. Research shows that mixing these two drinks may increase a person’s likelihood of being taken advantage of sexually, taking advantage of another person sexually, and driving while drunk. “The caffeine can make people think they’re not as drunk,” Berger says. Berger’s research on energy drinks and their consumption in Milwaukee markets appeared in the May 2011 issue of Addictive Behaviors. She and her colleagues found that in Milwaukee and its suburbs, young Caucasians consumed the most homemade CABs and non-black minorities consumed the most energy drinks. (Coauthors on the paper were: Michael Fendrich, Han-Yang Chen, Amelia M. Arria, and Ron A. Cisler.)

. . . of High-Energy and High-Alcohol Drinks “In Milwaukee, you can see the advertising at work—Red Bull cars, Monster delivery trucks and T-shirts,” Berger says. “The market for energy drinks is clearly young people.” What can concerned individuals do to fight back? Plenty, says Berger. • Work with school districts to ban energy drinks from K-12 campuses. • Help children of all ages cut through the advertising hype. False: energy drinks increase energy, alertness, nutrition, mental and athletic performance. True: they are essentially cans of sugar and caffeine, which is where the “energy boost” derives. • Talk with young adults about the dangers of mixing caffeine and alcohol. • Support current legislation that seeks further limitations. An alcohol-industry watchdog group, the Marin Institute, has released model legislation for individual states.

High-alcohol beverages contain dangerously high levels of alcohol (up to 12 percent). A single 23.5-ounce can delivers the alcohol content of a bottle of wine, or 4.7 drinks. A night of heavy drinking is considered more than three drinks for a woman, four for a man.

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Removing Barriers to Organizational Change of mental health and substance Theuseco-occurrence disorders is prevalent. So are consequences

In 2010, Berger undertook a study to evaluate the readiness of three large Milwaukee non-profit agencies that were planning to collaborate in order to improve delivery of AODA to their clients.

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that include poor psychosocial functioning and lack of adherence to treatment. So doesn’t it make sense for an organization to coordinate services for mental health and alcohol and other drug abuse (AODA)? Not so fast. While a coordinated service model is ideal, providers must be ready to make such a change. “Not addressing organizational and personal barriers to this type of change can backfire,” says Lisa Berger, associate professor, social work, and scientist with HBSSW’s Center for Addiction and Behavioral Health Research. In 2010, Berger undertook a study to evaluate the readiness of three large Milwaukee non-profit agencies that planned to collaborate in order to improve AODA services. Those agencies—Jewish Family Services, Pathfinders, and Aurora Family Services—provide the lion’s share of mental health services to Milwaukee’s low-income residents. The problem? A structure that supported two uncoordinated systems—one for mental health, one for AODA services. “The overall system is not working to serve clients with dual diagnoses,” Berger says. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, research shows that clients with co-occurring disorders need integrated and simultaneous treatment. Furthermore, according to the Journal of the American Medical Association, comorbidity is common: 29 percent of people diagnosed as mentally ill abuse either drugs or alcohol; 37 percent of alcohol abusers and 53 percent of drug abusers also have at least one serious mental illness. Berger’s evaluation revealed that the agencies were ready to change and that staff would need additional AODA training and experience. “It’s unique for organizations to come together to address systemwide problems,” Berger says. “It takes courage to look for areas that may be in need of improvement.”

Two HBSSW Faculty Appointed to National Review Boards Otto-Salaj, associate professor, social work, Laura accepted an invitation in December 2010 from the

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to serve as a member of their Behavioral and Social Consequences of HIV/AIDS Study Section, Center for Scientific Review. Her term began July 2011 and will last until June 2015. In this role, Otto-Salaj is contributing to the national biomedical research effort, in particular by reviewing and making recommendations on grant applications to the National Institutes of Health. The appointment letter describes how members are selected “on the basis of their demonstrated competence and achievement in their scientific discipline as evidenced by the quality of research accomplishments, publications in scientific journals and other significant scientific activities.” ******** LeBel, associate professor, criminal justice, served Tom as a member of the National Institute of Justice’s

Scientific Review Board (December 2010-11). The board’s purpose is to develop a prisoner reentry model to be tested in NIJ’s Demonstration Field Experiment. According to the National Reentry Resource Center, 708,677 state and federal prisoners returned to their communities in 2010. The complexities of reentry can be challenging for the offenders, their families and communities. LeBel’s primary research focus is prisoner reentry. He is the author or co-author of numerous articles and book chapters on prisoner reentry, desistance from crime, stigma, and drug treatment. In particular, his research incorporates a “strengths-based” perspective in regard to incarcerated and formerly incarcerated people.

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Teen Parenting Program Strengthens Father-Child Relationships “We have an obligation not just to prevent teen pregnancy but to help teens and their children to have better lives,” Florsheim says.

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couples struggle to stay connected after “M any having a baby,” says Paul Florsheim, associate

professor in the HBSSW and the Joseph Zilber School of Public Health. “But if you’re a teen with an unplanned pregnancy, the difficulties are greater,” he says. While Milwaukee’s notoriously high teen birth rate declined in 2011, about 1,000 babies are born annually in the city to teen mothers. Florsheim reaches out to these young women and the baby’s father and helps them work together as co-parents in order to stabilize their child’s home environment. The program specifically aims to help young fathers become, and stay, positively involved. “A teen father often disappears because he feels like a failure,” Florsheim says. “If we reach him while he’s hopeful, we can try to turn that hope into a long-term investment in his child.”

In 2010, Florsheim received in a five-year, $3 million grant from the Office of Adolescent Pregnancy Programs to support a study entitled: “The Milwaukee Young Parenthood Study; Co-Parenting Counseling for Pregnant Adolescents and their Partners.” The study is based on a co-parenting program Florsheim developed at the University of Utah that helped teen fathers build strong co-parenting relationships. “A father’s level of functioning as a father is strongly tied to the quality of his relationship with the birth mother, regardless of whether they remain together as a couple,” Florsheim explains. “We help young parents become positively engaged with each other by strengthening their communication skills. A child does better in a stable environment, where there are low levels of conflict between father and mother,” Florsheim adds. Research shows that children who are both born to young mothers and grow up without fathers are at increased risk for becoming teen parents. The Milwaukee Young Parenthood Study also steers teen parents from “rapid repeat” pregnancies by helping them carefully think about family planning. “We have an obligation not just to prevent teen pregnancy but to help teens and their children to have better lives,” Florsheim says. According to Florsheim, some people have the misperception that most young fathers are not motivated to become good parents. “A lot of them are invested in their children,” he says. “But they need help learning how to manage the complications of parenthood.” The federal government likely will eliminate the funding agency that supports Florsheim’s research. “If we lose this grant, it will be a blow to the research and to the services we provide,” Florsheim says. “We will try to find a way to continue our work, because we are having positive results.”

The program specifically aims to help young fathers become, and stay, positively involved.

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Postpartum Sleep Loss, Male Depression and Alcohol Biomarkers Studied by CABHR Multidisciplinary Teams CABHR scientists maintain collaborative partnerships in the Milwaukee metropolitan area, across the nation and around the world.

Michael Fendrich has been director of CABHR since 2005.

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at the HBSSW, the Center for Addiction Housed and Behavioral Health Research (CABHR) is an interdisciplinary research center. CABHR scientists focus on a wide range of applied behavioral health issues and in doing so, inform public policy and build science. Our interdisciplinary team currently holds $7.8 million in research grants and conducts cutting edge epidemiological, intervention, and clinical research, and provides treatment resources to Milwaukee residents in the process. CABHR scientists maintain collaborative partnerships in the Milwaukee metropolitan area, across the nation and around the world. Below are examples of the multidisciplinary research that CABHR supports. Sleep and Indigent Mothers Jennifer Doering, CABHR scientist and assistant professor, nursing, studies the connection between sleep and health in poor, urban women. She is testing an intervention to promote sleep and reduce fatigue in new mothers. Doering believes the topic of sleep is an important addition to CABHR’s research agenda and that it deserves more attention in general. “When you don’t get good sleep, it affects all areas of your life, just as alcohol and drug addiction and psychological illness do,” she says. “Postpartum sleep loss has incredible implications for health, infant development, and the economic security of the mother.” Depression Among Latino and African American Men Jonathan Kanter’s research seeks to improve treatment for depressed individuals who have not been studied in previous depression research, including ethnic minorities and people who do poorly in treatment, such as those with personality disorders. Kanter is a CABHR scientist, associate professor in psychology, director of the UWM’s Depression Treatment Specialty Clinic, and coordinator of UWM’s Psychology Clinic.

Recently, he worked with Milwaukee’s 16th Street Clinic—located in the heart of Milwaukee’s strong Latino community—to create a more effective mental health treatment model for depressed Latino men. “In Milwaukee and nationwide, the Latino population is growing,” Kanter says. “But few studies have compared the effectiveness of different mental health treatment models for this group.” Search for New Alcohol Biomarker The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism awarded CABHR Director Michael Fendrich and CABHR Scientist Lisa Berger a grant to study hair ethyl glucuronide, a new biomarker for alcohol abuse. Working with the United States Drug Testing Laboratories in Des Plaines, Illinois, they are studying the self-reported drinking behaviors and related biomarker test results in a sample of college students. Other collaborators include the University of Wisconsin Survey Center in Madison.

CABHR’s interdisciplinary team currently holds $7.8 million in research grants and conducts cutting edge epidemiological, intervention, and clinical research, and provides treatment resources to Milwaukee residents in the process.

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Study Abroad Programs: Bristol, England

summer, HBSSW offers social work and criminal Each justice students the opportunity to study abroad

One student wrote, “The Bristol trip was hands down the greatest thing I’ve done in my college career, maybe even my life.”

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for two weeks in historic Bristol, England. Additionally, two social work students can complete a one-semester internship in Plymouth, England. “Students benefit from exposure to different cultures, social policies and treatment models,” says accompanying faculty member Tom LeBel, associate professor, criminal justice. Students have had very positive experiences. One student wrote, “The Bristol trip was hands down the greatest thing I’ve done in my college career, maybe even my life.” Prior to the trip, each student selects a topic of study within criminal justice or social work for the focus of a final comparative policy written assignment. Once in England, they attend lectures and site visits, where they learn about British models of service. Site visits often include children and family welfare agencies, police headquarters and prisons, and agencies that address health, mental health, substance abuse and aging.

Criminal justice students, for example, made site visits this year to the child abuse investigation team at Lockleaze Police Station and to Her Majesty’s Prison Channing Woods; social work site visits included those to Support Against Racial Incidents and Abbeyfield Health Promotion. Side trips are always a highlight with students, LeBel says, and this year’s trip found students exploring a medieval castle in Wales, the old-world beauty of Bath, touring Parliament in London, and visiting the Mayflower Steps in Plymouth (where the Pilgrims are said to have boarded the Mayflower). “Many students used free time to travel to other UK towns and European countries in small or large groups, which enhanced their study abroad experience,” says accompanying faculty member Susan Rose, associate professor, social work. Other students completed their field practicum in a drug treatment center. At the Plymouth Drug and Alcohol Project, they studied the UK harm reduction model of AODA treatment, explains Rose. “The field practicum has proven to be a life changing and memorable experience for many of our students,” she says.

Prior to the trip, each student selects a topic of study within criminal justice or social work for the focus of a final comparative policy written assignment. Once in England, they attend lectures and site visits, where they learn about British models of service.

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Study Abroad Programs: Linz, Austria

experience is one that I will look back on and “This be proud that I got to experience all that I did.”

Through this international course, students spend two weeks in Linz, Austria, at the Upper Austria University of Applied Science. There, they study the country’s social welfare responses to issues of substance abuse, family violence and dislocation, international immigration, crime, and child welfare.

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“This has been one of the most amazing experiences of my life and I am thankful that so much time and effort was put forth to ensure amazing site visits, interesting lectures and fabulous meals.” “I have learned more in my two weeks here than in my first year of grad school.” These are just some of the comments made by undergraduate and graduate criminal justice and social work students who immersed themselves in the Comparative Public Policy Summer Study Abroad Program in Austria over the last three years. Through this international course, students spend two weeks in Linz, Austria, at the Upper Austria University of Applied Science. There, they study the country’s social welfare responses to issues of substance abuse, family violence and dislocation, international immigration, crime, and child welfare. This year, accompanying faculty members were Susan Rose, associate professor, social work, and Stan Stojkovic, dean and professor of criminal justice.

“In today’s global society it is imperative that social welfare students are exposed to a variety of international approaches that address social justice, diversity, poverty, and crime,” says Rose. “Students learn of some unique approaches in Austria that can inform policy and practice in the United States.” Students made site visits to the Garsten Prison, the Linz Police Department, a therapy center for substance misuse and more. Additionally, social work students visited several agencies including the Linz Integration Department, a men’s counseling center and the state child welfare office. Both criminal justice and social work students visited the Mauthausen concentration camp—a Nazi slave labor camp—which proved to be the most powerful excursion for many. “It changed my life,” wrote one student. For many students, one of the positive highlights was a trip to historic Salzburg, where students had several hours to tour the city.

Both criminal justice and social work students visited the Mauthausen concentration camp—a Nazi slave labor camp— which proved to be the most powerful excursion for many. “It changed my life,” wrote one student.

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Study Abroad Programs: Grecia, Costa Rica

A highlight was working with children in Bajo de Tejares, a migrant settlement of impoverished Nicaraguan families. “Students agreed that their favorite part of the experience was the warm bonds they established with the children and their host families.”

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HBSSW social work students went to Costa Rica with

decent Spanish language abilities. They returned with much stronger ones. “I gained so much confidence in my speaking abilities,” says upperclassman Korie Stehlik. “I laughed with people at jokes told in Spanish, navigated cities, and calculated the exchange rate in my head, and that felt soooo good!” Stehlik was one of six students in 2011 who signed up for HBSSW’s course Spanish Immersion for Social Workers, a jam-packed, three-week learning adventure that included experience with the country’s social work system, and study of the culture and history. “Students developed their Spanish speaking and listening skills through intensive language classes, conversing with host families, and through everyday excursions, such as to local markets,” says accompanying faculty member Sharon Keigher, professor, social work. A highlight was working with children in Bajo de Tejares, a migrant settlement of impoverished Nicaraguan families. “The fathers do itinerant farm work throughout Costa Rica, while the mothers and children stay in

the settlement,” Keigher says. Students worked with the children after school at the Comunidad Centro Christiano, doing arts and crafts, games, and face painting. “Students agreed that their favorite part of the experience was the warm bonds they established with the children and their host families,” Keigher says. Students also visited a women’s empowerment agency and a small shelter that provided temporary care for young children. On weekend excursions, students zip-lined through jungle canopy, rafted the white water of the Sarapiquí River, trekked by bus, ferry, and pickup truck to Montezuma Playa and more. On the last day, following a torrential evening rainstorm, students heard a familiar Rrrr, Rrrrr, Rrrrrr outside their casita. Four students walked outside to find a taxi, stuck in deep mud. They changed their clothes, then returned to push the taxi free, as if it were Wisconsin in January. Social workers: always ready to help!

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UWinteriM: New Orleans

“The students learned ethnographic research methods and used this method in taking field notes and conducting interviews of Ninth Ward residents. These interviews will be archived so that generations from now, descendents of the interviewees can watch and listen to their family member describe their recovery from Katrina in their own voices.”

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the second year, HBSSW social work students Forparticipated in a UWinteriM service learning

course held in New Orleans. The 17-day course examines the devastating consequences of Hurricane Katrina (including 3,000 deaths and the evacuation of tens of thousands of city residents) that continues to expose racial and socioeconomic disparities. The course introduced students to the historical, political, racial and economic aspects of Katrina, says accompanying faculty member Wendy Volz Daniels, clinical associate professor, social work. While they were in New Orleans, students resided in a bed and breakfast, an environment that created a livinglearning community and allowed for all experiences to become “teachable moments,” says Volz Daniels. Students prepared for the trip by watching a documentary of one family’s experience with the storm. Reading assignments emphasized the history and culture of New Orleans and the consequences of natural disasters on children, older adults, those with mental health issues, and those with alcohol or other drug abuse issues.

“Every morning, the students were immersed in service learning at social service and educational agencies that serve residents of the Ninth Ward,” Volz Daniels says. “The students learned ethnographic research methods and used this method in taking field notes and conducting interviews of Ninth Ward residents. These interviews will be archived so that generations from now, descendents of the interviewees can watch and listen to their family member describe their recovery from Katrina in their own voices.” In educational excursions, students toured city cemeteries and the Backstreet Cultural Museum, which is dedicated to preserving New Orleans’ African American cultural traditions. A resident scholar led students in retracing the route of the 1811 slave revolt called the German Coast Uprising, an important event in New Orleans’ history that is largely omitted from history books. In the end, the components of the service learning course came together in a powerful way. “Students reported that the experience was transformative,” says Volz Daniels. “For the first time, they came to truly understand the various factors that play into recovery efforts such as the one in New Orleans.”

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he Student Social Work Association hosted a campus event to participate in a project called “Dress a Girl Around the World,” which strives to give every girl in the world a dress. Using donated pillowcases, students and volunteers sewed 50 dresses. SSWA board member Diana Vang traveled to Costa Rica and dropped half of them off with an agency serving Nicaraguan women and children refugees. The remaining dresses were sent to a Hmong village in Chiang Rai, Thailand.

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Child Welfare Partnership Moves to New Community Base rooms, labs with two-way mirrors and a childcare area. Located in an architectural gem built in 1929 to house the American Paper Lace Company, the center is used to train child welfare staff and foster parents associated with the Bureau of Milwaukee Child Welfare, hold stakeholder meetings and conduct research projects, including some directed by HBSSW faculty and staff. The Wisconsin Department of Children and Families contracts with the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare to provide this training, which supports workers as they strive to be family centered, child focused, and culturally responsive.

The new space was created in partnership with the Bureau of Milwaukee Child Welfare, the Wisconsin Child Welfare Professional Development System and the Department of Children and Families.

(Top left photo, left to right)) HBSSW Associate Dean Gwat-Yong Lie; Chancellor Michael Lovell; Arlene Happach, Director, Bureau of Milwaukee Child Welfare; Julie Brown, MCWPPD Director; and HBSSW Dean Stan Stojkovic.

Located on campus since its creation in 2001 by Gwat-Yong Lie, associate professor, social work, the center needed to become more accessible and community-based, says Director Julie Brown. “We wanted a place for learning and collaborative research for state and local partners who are dedicated to serving children and families in Milwaukee and throughout Wisconsin.”

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Glendale’s magnificently redesigned East

(Bottom right photo) Hardworking MCWPPD staff helped make the open house a huge success.

Lake Towers Corporate Center, 4425 N. Port Washington Road, is the new home of the Milwaukee Child Welfare Partnership for Professional Development. The partnership, a focus area of UWM’s Helen Bader School of Social Welfare, held a ribbon-cutting ceremony and open house on August 31, 2010. Located on campus since its creation in 2001 by GwatYong Lie, associate professor, social work, the center needed to become more accessible and community-based, says Director Julie Brown. “We wanted a place for learning and collaborative research for state and local partners who are dedicated to serving children and families in Milwaukee and throughout Wisconsin,” she says. The new space was created in partnership with the Bureau of Milwaukee Child Welfare, the Wisconsin Child Welfare Professional Development System and the Department of Children and Families. The result is a multi-use space that includes multiple classrooms that seat up to 35 participants, conference 32

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Modern Debtors Prisons? UWM Professor Plays Role in U.S. Supreme Court Case Pate is a former social worker whose academic research focuses on how social welfare policies impact black men. His fields of special interest are welfare reform policy; child support enforcement policy; fatherhood; domestic violence; and the intersection of race, gender, and poverty.

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for non-payment of child support vary Penalties across the nation. Driver’s licenses are revoked. Hunting and fishing licenses are suspended. Payments are automatically deducted from wages and income-tax returns. Thousands of people are imprisoned. But if the person in arrears is poor, does he have a constitutional right to counsel in a civil case that could result in his imprisonment? Does lack of counsel deprive him of his liberty? In June 2011, the U.S. Supreme Court heard a civil case (Turner v. Rogers) involving a man incarcerated for child support debt and the court weighed in on these questions. Yes, the court decided, states must provide safeguards to reduce the risk of erroneous deprivation of liberty in civil contempt cases such as child support cases. But no, the state does not have to provide counsel in such cases.

Aiding the petitioners was David Pate, assistant professor, social work. Pate helped prepare the legal briefs for the case, assisting principal writer Tonya Brito, professor, University of Wisconsin Law School and a board member for the Center for Family Policy and Practice. Pate is a former social worker whose academic research focuses on how social welfare policies impact black men. His fields of special interest are welfare reform policy; child support enforcement policy; fatherhood; domestic violence; and the intersection of race, gender, and poverty. The case involved an indigent South Carolina man, Michael Turner, who was jailed for one year for not paying more than $5,700 in child support for his daughter. He was not provided with a lawyer during his contempt hearings; South Carolina does not provide indigent parents with lawyers in such cases. Pate is one of only a few people nationwide who researches how national and state policies such as these affect poor men. His practice, knowledge and research in this area made him uniquely qualified to assist in the preparation of the briefs that were submitted to the U.S. Supreme Court. It’s not a crime to owe money and technically, in the case of child support, parents are jailed for failing to comply with a court order. “Imprisonment is used as an incentive for the defendant to cooperate,” Pate explains. “But in my research, I’ve found that the defendant’s extended family, in many cases, ultimately pays the additional financial costs if they have the money available. Imprisonment makes it impossible for the person to earn money and puts the financial burden on the family and the state.” The U.S. Supreme Court receives roughly 10,000 requests annually for cases to be reviewed. Of these, they choose about 100 that typically address issues of considerable national importance.

Pate is one of only a few people nationwide who researches how national and state policies such as these affect poor men. His practice, knowledge and research in this area made him uniquely qualified to assist in the preparation of the briefs that were submitted to the U.S. Supreme Court.

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CABHR Director Michael Fendrich Named Wisconsin Distinguished Professor

Fendrich’s research has focused on the epidemiology of drug and alcohol abuse (using biomarkers to compare actual substance use with reported use), the association between substance use and highrisk behavior in college students and other young adults, and the impact of interventions that address substance abuse in criminal justice and other high-risk settings. 35

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Fendrich, director of the Center for Michael Addiction and Behavioral Health Research

(CABHR) and a professor of social work in the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare, has been named the university’s latest Wisconsin Distinguished Professor. The award will support Fendrich’s search for solutions to Wisconsin’s persistent and costly problem with diversion of prescription medications. Established in 1988, the Wisconsin Distinguished Professorship program supports 20 researchers in the UW System whose scholarship demonstrates a potential impact on Wisconsin’s economy, and who are nationally recognized experts in their fields. Wisconsin Distinguished Professors are required to attract at least $25,000 in extramural support annually for at least five years. This donation is matched by $25,000 in

state funds. Appointments are highly competitive, and the private money must be unrestricted. Private funding for Fendrich’s Wisconsin Distinguished Professorship comes from Concordia University Wisconsin (CUW). Fendrich will lead a partnership with CUW’s School of Pharmacy; the goal is to dramatically improve doctoral student training in the epidemiology, health consequences and economic impact of addiction and substance misuse in Wisconsin. Fendrich cites U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration statistics that reveal Wisconsin has a persistent problem with diversion of prescription medications, which has considerable economic consequences and potentially lasting adverse consequences for the pharmaceutical industry. According to the DEA, diversions include “physicians who sell prescriptions to drug dealers or abusers; pharmacists who falsify records and subsequently sell the drugs; employees who steal from inventory and falsify orders to cover illicit sales; prescription forgers; and individuals who commit armed robbery of pharmacies and drug distributors.” The distinguished professorship will help Fendrich expand his program of research in this area and explore effective pharmacist-based prevention strategies that could reduce the scope of this problem, including training new pharmacists in detection and prevention. Fendrich’s research has focused on the epidemiology of drug and alcohol abuse (using biomarkers to compare actual substance use with reported use), the association between substance use and high-risk behavior in college students and other young adults, and the impact of interventions that address substance abuse in criminal justice and other high-risk settings. His work has been supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and the National Institute of Justice. 36

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HBSSW Supports Milwaukee Time Bank

Ex-Offenders Tell of Life In and Out of Prison

of faculty members at the HBSSW have joined A number the advisory board of a growing and successful grassroots

project: a local time bank. “The Time Bank provides alternative supports to vulnerable populations with whom we often work as social workers,’ says Dimitri Topitzes, assistant professor, social work. Time banks thrive in times of high unemployment. Currently, there are 300 time banks in 23 countries, including the Milwaukee Area Time Exchange, located in Milwaukee’s Riverwest neighborhood. The successful exchange was started in 2009 by Riverwest resident Debbie Davis. Not familiar with a time bank? A time bank is a local organization in which people exchange skills instead of currency; for example, you deposit two hours of driving neighbors to medical appointments and withdraw two hours of carpentry work. All hours of work are valued equally, whether they are spent on web design, child care, sewing, cooking, or painting. The social connections, community building, and personal feelings of goodwill have proven to be significant secondary benefits. The following joined the board of the Milwaukee Area Time Exchange: Stan Stojkovic, dean and professor, criminal justice; Roberta Hanus, clinical associate professor and field liaison, social work; Sharon Keigher, professor, social work; and Topitzes.

they served 70 years in prison on charges Collectively, ranging from drugs to murder. When they spoke to

us in person, they asked us to reconsider how we set social welfare policies and how we treat former offenders. In April 2011, HBSSW and the Peck School of the Arts brought the off-Broadway play “The Castle” to UWM’s Zelazo Center for the Performing Arts. In the play, called “fascinating” by the New York Times and “profoundly eloquent” by Variety, four ex-offenders shared true, firsthand accounts of their crimes, imprisonments, and hurdles to reintegration upon release. Is there hope for redemption? “The Castle” challenges anyone who was sure the answer was “No.”

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“Fascinating production... gives voice to a growing segment of the public, urging that we reconsider how we treat former offenders.” New York Times

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CJ Grad Helps Thwart Largest Terrorist Attack Since 9/11

Jergenson, who works international counterterrorism in the FBI’s Denver office, played a significant role in thwarting a 2009 al Qaeda suicide bombing attempt that U.S. Attorney General Erik Holder referred to as “one of the most serious terrorist threats to our nation since September 11, 2001.” For his work preserving the safety of the nation and its citizens, Jergenson received a 2010 Attorney General’s Award for Exceptional Service from the U.S. 39 Department of Justice.

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Agent Eric Jergenson (MS CJ ’95) F BISpecial credits the professors and staff in the

HBSSW Criminal Justice Department for his extraordinary achievements in international counter-terrorism. “What they passed along to me was invaluable in terms of future success,” says the Oshkosh, Wisconsin, native. Jergenson, who works international counter-terrorism in the FBI’s Denver office, played a significant role in thwarting a 2009 al Qaeda suicide bombing attempt that U.S. Attorney General Erik Holder referred to as “one of the most serious terrorist threats to our nation since September 11, 2001.” The case continues to generate interest, as it was the first known instance of core al Qaeda operators plotting within the United States since 9/11. It is often cited in the current debate over domestic intelligence gathering. For his work preserving the safety of the nation and its citizens, Jergenson received a 2010 Attorney General’s

Award for Exceptional Service from the U.S. Department of Justice. According to the FBI, Najibulla Zazi, 24, admitted that he came to New York in 2009 near the eighth anniversary of September 11 to kill himself and others on the subway using a homemade bomb. He characterized the plot as a martyrdom operation. Shortly after arriving in New York, Zazi realized he was being investigated by law authorities and returned to Denver, where he lived and worked as an airport shuttle driver. The FBI arrested Zazi in Denver on September 19, 2009. Back at the FBI’s Denver headquarters, Jergenson came to know Zazi better than anyone else on the bureau, as he interviewed the Afghanistan native for 20 hours, extracting information that the FBI deemed highly valuable. Zazi turned out to be a central figure in what’s become an ongoing investigation and intelligence operation that so far has led to several related arrests. He pleaded guilty to terrorism charges, saying he wanted to avenge U.S. aggression in the Arab world, and faces a sentence of life in prison without parole. “Everyone should know that al Qaeda operatives are here in the U.S. and they blend in,” Jergenson says. “Without the very, very hard work by many people, the attack would have occurred and it would have been devastating.” In addition to deaths and injuries, the attack would have delivered a severe blow to the U.S. economy, an outcome which al Qaeda has historically sought, he adds. “I wouldn’t be here today had it not been for Stan Stojkovic, Rick Lovell and the criminal justice program,” Jergenson says. “With a career in the FBI or any local, state or federal law-enforcement position, you can truly make a difference.” (Photo) FBI special agent Eric Jergenson (MS CJ ’95) (right) at the arrest of Najibulla Zazi. (Photo by Chris Schneider.) 40

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Move Grass. Grow Food.

Standing near her front-yard crops and wooden sign that reads “Move grass, grow food,” Gretchen Mead

A fresh and sustainable food source is a social justice issue according to Mead, who founded VGI in 2008 in order to empower individuals and communities to grow perennial crops, from squash to nuts. Her goal is nothing short of a sociallyand environmentally-just food system that, at the same time, helps restore the ecosystem of blighted urban areas.

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(MSW ’04) has proclaimed a revolution. “Gardening is the passive resistance of our time,” says the founder of Victory Garden Initiative (VGI). A fresh and sustainable food source is a social justice issue according to Mead, who founded VGI in 2008 in order to empower individuals and communities to grow perennial crops, from squash to nuts. Her goal is nothing short of a socially and environmentally just food system that, at the same time, helps restore the ecosystem of blighted urban areas. “The industrialization of agriculture has distanced us from what we eat and where that food comes from,” she says. “But even in urban areas, we can boost our health with a garden that provides fresh fruits and vegetables.” Mead planted VGI’s first garden in her front yard in Shorewood, Wisconsin. Three years later, VGI-installed gardens numbering in the hundreds. Volunteers installed more than 100 gardens in a single day during the third annual Victory Garden Blitz. The 4’ x 8’ raised beds, filled with organic soil, were erected throughout the metro area. Gardeners paid $125 for one bed, $200 for two beds; local businesses aided the blitz through in-kind support. Other donors sponsored beds located on land leased from the City of Milwaukee in central city neighborhoods. The movement caught on at UWM, where 50 raised beds were constructed near the Physics Building last spring, an initiative supported by the Office of Sustainability. The beds are tended to by individual gardeners or are used as part of a new sustainability and permaculture course. Mead’s transition from direct practice to community practice was a natural trajectory, says Deborah Padgett, associate professor and chair of the Social Work Department. “Our master’s degree students can choose direct practice, community practice, or an option that

Alumna Makes Fresh Food a Social Justice Issue combines the two. Nontraditional students are often interested in this third option.” Because they have more life experience, these students often start with direct-practice social work, then slide into organizational and policymaking roles. “Historically, social work has been involved in community practice,” Padgett says. “What Gretchen Mead is doing is very much in the tradition of Jane Addams and Hull House.” Mead’s work is an excellent contemporary example of the importance of community practice in our lives, says Stan Stojkovic, dean of the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare. “By applying her social work education to a living and real-world context – i.e., developing sustainable food for urban residents – she’s empowering citizens to improve themselves and their communities.”

Mead’s work is an excellent contemporary example of the importance of community practice in our lives, says Stan Stojkovic, dean of the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare. “By applying her social work education to a living and real-world context – i.e., developing sustainable food for urban residents – she’s empowering citizens to improve themselves and their communities.”

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HBSSW Alumni of the Year

HBSSW Alumna of the Year

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he Alumni of the Year award recognizes outstanding graduates who distinguished themselves through career accomplishments or civic involvement. This year, two individuals received this award.

Criminal Justice Alumni of the Year

Social Work Alumna of the Year

Noble Wray is currently the chief of police with the Madison Police Department. Wray rose to this position seven years ago, after serving in the department for more than 20 years as a patrol officer, the department’s first neighborhood officer, and assistant chief, where he managed operations and support divisions. In the world of policing, Wray, who grew up on Milwaukee’s north side in a family of ten in a condemned home, is a nationally recognized consultant. He consults with other departments in the two areas that form the foundation of Madison’s department: the philosophy of community policing and problem solving in ways that address the root cause of the problem. Wray is active with the United Neighborhood Centers, Red Cross, Project Hugs, Girl Scouts of Dane County and Dane County Chiefs.

The Green Bay Press-Gazette named Alison Draheim as its 2010 Person of the Year. In that award, she was called “One of those unsung heroes” that the broader community does not know about. Draheim has an energetic approach and commitment to helping people, combined with a positive leadership style. She serves on the boards of Greater Green Bay Habitat for Humanity, Brown County Human Services, and Brown County Domestic Violence Inter-Agency Council and is the outgoing president of the Brown County Homeless and Housing Coalition. In addition to her active volunteerism, Draheim is employed by the Green Bay School District as the family, community and homeless resource coordinator.

Noble Wray, BS CJ ‘93 Chief of Police, Madison Police Department

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Alison Draheim, MSW ’99 Family, Homeless and Resource Coordinator, Green Bay School District

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Coming in 2013, from Wisconsin’s Largest Criminal Justice Program: Specialization in Crime Analysis you to the steering Thank committee members for

their ongoing collaboration to guide the creation of our school’s crime analysis specialization.

Graduate of the Last Decade (GOLD)

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he Graduate of the Last Decade (GOLD) award recognizes graduates who have achieved a measure of success in their field and brought credit to themselves and the university.

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Rachele M. Klassy (MSW ’07) received a Graduate of the Last Decade (GOLD) Award from UWM in 2011. Klassy’s primary interest in acquiring her MSW was to provide services to persons in the criminal justice system. Following graduation, she pursued employment in the Milwaukee correctional system. Working as a psychiatric social worker and psychiatric worker coordinator in the Milwaukee County Office of the Sheriff, Klassy’s duties include: performing mental health, suicide, psychosocial and AODA assessments; crisis intervention; de-escalating dangerous and volatile inmates; and crisis counseling. Though dealing with potentially traumatic scenarios, Klassy has remained passionate and dedicated to addressing this population’s mental health needs. “I never thought I’d work in mental health,” she says. “I do and I love it. I get the opportunity to help individuals during the most difficult times of their lives.”

Wanted: Crime analysts. Local, state and federal criminal justice agencies have many openings for crime analysts. Starting in spring 2013, HBSSW will offer a Specialization in Crime Analysis to criminal justice students who want to specialize in this growing area of crime fighting. Job overview. Crime analysts use geospatial and other technologies to analyze crime patterns, trends and problems. They participate in administrative, strategic, and tactical planning for resource deployment and operations for crime reduction and crime prevention. Our steering committee partners. To develop this specialization, HBSSW’s Department of Criminal Justice worked with a steering committee of federal and local law enforcement officials, including supervisory crime analysts. This committee will continue to work to expand connections with agencies across the region and nation and to develop a network of field placements and career opportunities for our students. To learn more: Beginning summer 2012, please check the HBSSW website for more information. Information will not be available prior to that time.

• James Bohn, Director, Wisconsin DEA • Brian Barkow, Captain, Milwaukee County Sheriff’s Department, Law Enforcement Analytics Division • Nicole DeMotto, Crime and Intelligence Specialist, Milwaukee Police Department, Intelligence Fusion Center • Patrick O’Dea, Assistant Director, Wisconsin DEA • Nancy Olson, Public Information Officer, City of Milwaukee • Richard Thomas, Chief, Port Washington Police Department • Kimberly Hassell, Associate Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, HBSSW • Rick Lovell, Chair, Department of Criminal Justice, HBSSW • Stan Stojkovic, Dean, HBSSW

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Award Recipients, 2010-2011 Academic Year

HBSSW Awards Night Shines Light on Excellence school’s third annual awards night brought Thetogether 200 people to acknowledge some of the

researchers, community partners, teachers, students and donors that have left their mark this academic year. “The banquet highlights a small number of the many excellent people we have in the school,” says Dean Stan Stojkovic. The evening’s highlights included two Alumni of the Year awards that recognize outstanding graduates who distinguished themselves through career accomplishments or civic involvement. This year’s awards ceremony drew the largest crowd yet. “We will continue to hold this event every year to honor and celebrate our faculty, staff, and students,” says Stojkovic. “I’m amazed at how many outstanding people we have who allow us to achieve our mission and move us toward our vision of being one of the best schools of social welfare in the country.” 47

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• Alumni Award, Criminal Justice: Noble Wray (BS CJ ’93) • Alumni Award, Social Work: Alison Draheim (MSW ’99) Donor of the Year Award: Judy Kramer (BS ‘93), (MSW ‘99) FACULTY/STAFF AWARDS School Awards • Service Award, Social Work: Dr. Michael Brondino • Service Award, Criminal Justice: Dr. Thomas LeBel • Research Award, Criminal Justice: Dr. Kimberly Hassell • Research Award, Social Work: Dr. Laura Otto-Salaj • Teaching Award, Social Work: Dr. David Pate • Teaching Award, Criminal Justice: Dr. William Pelfrey • Adjunct Faculty Teaching Award: Mary Briggs • Adjunct Faculty Teaching Award: Melissa Quistorf • Service Award, Non-teaching Staff: Ellen Lafouge National Awards • Rosalyn Carter Leadership in Caregiving Award: Dr. Rhonda Montgomery • Alzheimer’s Association New Investigator Researcher Award: Dr. Marie Savundranayagam University Awards • UWM Research Foundation Senior Faculty Award: Dr. Michael Fendrich • UWM Distinguished Public Service Award: Dr. Anne Basting • UWM Faculty Distinguished University Service Award: Dr. GwatYong Lie • Ernest Spaights Plaza Honoree: Dr. Elam Nunnally • Graduate of the Last Decade: Rachele Klassy Length of Service Awards • Diane Miller, 35 years • Dr. Rick Lovell, 25 years • Dr. Deborah Padgett, 20 years • Dr. Steve McMurtry, 15 years • Lori Woodburn, 15 years • Dr. Gwat-Yong Lie, 15 years Random Act of Kindness Awards • Dr. Laura Otto-Salaj, Social Work • Dr. Kimberly Hassell, Criminal Justice • Josh Lang, Project Assistant, Social Work • Kelsey Skrobi, Student, Social Work 48

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COMMUNITY AWARDS Agency Research Collaboration Awards • The Housing Authority for the City of Milwaukee • Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee Community Agency of the Year • Field Place Component, Milwaukee County Office of the Sheriff Community Member of the Year • Robert Phelps

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Social Work Field Instructors of the Year: • Sue Eckhart, Justice 2000 Municipal Court Alternatives Program • Grace Green, Clement J. Zablocki VA Medical Center • Susan Lex, MPS, Brown Street Academy • Lisa Magnus, Aurora St. Luke’s South Shore In-Patient Behavioral Health • William Mullooly, St. Ben’s Clinic • Joe Viste, MPS, Public Stay

Social Work Field Agencies of the Year • Rogers Memorial Hospital • Washington County Human Services Department STUDENT AWARDS Student Scholarship Awards These academic scholarships were made possible through the generosity of our donors. • HBSSW Alumni/Yolanda Vega-Will Scholarship: Henrietta Johnson; Lymel Bivens • Lucetta O. Bissell Graduate Scholarship: Carolyn Schweitzer; Diona Johnson • Don & Helen Banta Scholarship: Joanne Anderson • Helen C. Carey Trust Scholarship: Tammy Ricke; Ke-Andra Hagens • Catherine S. Chilman Family Studies Scholarship: Heather Saunders • Dean’s Freshman Scholarship: Danielle Hoeppner • Greater Milwaukee Area Realtors Youth Foundation Scholarship: Marzita Ugarte • Harry & Esther Kovenock Scholarship: Brian Flynn • Chancellor’s Fellowship Award: Tami Anschutz; Kimberly 49

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Bartlein; Carmen Mojica; Leah Sinn Iversen; Mitchell Wolf; Sara Tomjanovich; Laura Warichak Kathleen Scheller Memorial Scholarship: Christine Buck Social Welfare Community Organization Scholarship: Hannah Wendel Laura Tice Memorial Scholarship: Timothy Ziffer General Scholarship-UWinteriM in New Orleans: Sara Helminger Dean’s International Scholarship: Jessica Batcher; Sandra Thielke Marianne and Joseph Nothum Scholarship for International Studies: Aaron Skobel; Britney Morrow Helen Bader Center on Age and Community Scholarship: Melissa Brown; Christopher Dondzila; Kelly Gaglione; Jeanette Miranda; Natosha Nisporic; Ellen Nocun; Susannah Rotter Robert L. Stonek Memorial Scholarship: Stephanie Sikinger; Megan Rosa

Student Awards These promising undergraduate and graduate students excelled in the classroom and showed a commitment to service and social justice. • Undergraduate Award in Criminal Justice: Joseph Hallett • Graduate Student Award in Criminal Justice: Kiel Zillmer • Graduate Project Assistant Award in Criminal Justice: Stephanie Sikinger • Undergraduate Award in Social Work: Jonathan Nolte • Graduate Student Award in Social Work: Christopher Hernandez • Graduate Project Assistant Award in Social Work: Lindsay Mae Dusold; Kayla Montgomery The 2011 HBSSW Awards Committee included the following faculty and staff members: Linda Czernicki and Jerry Rousseau, (co-chairs), Sue Braden, Julie Brown, Carol Carlson, Michelle Espino, Kimberly Hassell, Jennifer Hernandez-Meier, Sharon Keigher, Carol Kozminski, Lydia LaGue, Katie Mangan, Stephanie Sikinger, Barbara Teske-Young, Dimitri Topitzes, and Wendy Volz Daniels.

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Professional Development Expands Offerings, Location • Grief Workshop Part I and the Alchemy of Grief Part II (taught by Adjunct Instructor Tom Kopka). In addition, the Professional Development & Outreach Program was on the road, bringing customized training to worksites. • For the second consecutive year, we customized the course Boundaries and Ethics for Social Workers at WillowGlen and Bell Therapy. • A four-part series on Case Management, Mental Illness, Motivational Interviewing and Addiction was taught to between 50 and 75 financial employment managers from Workforce Development, United Migrant Opportunity Service, SSIA and the Social Development Commission. These staffers all work with severely disabled clients with developmental disabilities. • We partnered with Rogers Memorial Hospital to offer a one-day workshop titled Bullying: Creating a Peaceful School Learning Environment. More than 160 social workers, student counselors, and teachers attended.

ocation, location, location! The school’s professional development offerings are now held in Glendale at the redesigned East Lake Towers Corporate Center, 4425 N. Port Washington Road.

L

academic year, our school’s Professional This Development & Outreach Program attracted

more than 1,000 participants throughout Wisconsin and Illinois. Workshops were offered at UWM and at worksites, where they often were customized for employees. Social work professionals attended more than 25 trainings on a variety of topics ranging from addiction to spirituality. Our three most popular courses were: • Sex, Drugs and Rock & Roll. Addiction, Compulsion and Craving; The Biology of the Pursuit of Happiness (taught by David Mays). • Contemporary Professional Boundaries and Ethics, a basic course mandated by the state of Wisconsin (taught by Adjunct Instructor Bobbi Prichard).

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• We partnered with the NAACP and the Black Child Development Institute to offer a Color of Child Welfare Summit titled Reducing Racial Disproportionality and Disparities While Improving Outcomes for Children and Families of Color.

Interested in attending one of our workshops? All offerings are listed at www. hbsswceh.uwm.edu.For more information, please contact Linda Czernicki, program manager, professional development: 414-229-6329 or czernick@uwm.edu.

• At the request of Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare Hospice and the Circle of Life Foundation, we cosponsored a conference on hospice care titled Palliative Care: A Novel Solution to the Healthcare Crisis. Dr. R. Sean Morrison from Mt. Sinai School of Medicine was the keynote speaker. Three hundred social workers, nurses, pastoral care professionals and physicians attended this workshop. Finally, we geared up to introduce our first on-line continuing education workshop Supervisory Training: Tools and Strategies in fall 2011.

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HBSSW Grads Improve Lives, Strengthen Communities they majored Whether in criminal justice or

social work, our recent graduates have found positions improving lives and strengthening communities in Wisconsin and beyond. Here is a sample of where you might find some of our recent alumni working.

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Social Work Graduates School Social Worker Milwaukee Public Schools School Social Worker Wisconsin Career Academy School Social Worker Stevens Point Area Public School District Health Unit Coordinator Columbia St. Mary’s Hospital Case Manager Bellin Hospital Case Specialist Rogers Memorial Hospital Social Worker Oshkosh Medical and Rehabilitation Center Social Worker Linden Grove Social Worker Zablocki VA Medical Center Social Worker Curative Care Network Psychiatric Social Worker Aurora Health Care Medical Social Worker Odyssey Healthcare Medical Social Worker Cedar Community Subacute Social Worker St. Elizabeth Hospital Residential Clinical Supervisor Transitional Living Services Community Resource Specialist Impact Foreign Expert Shangqiu Normal University Adoption Case Manager Children’s Service Society of Wisconsin Licensing Specialist Children’s Service Society of Wisconsin Treatment Foster Care Social Worker Children’s Service Society of Wisconsin Bilingual Special Needs Adoption Worker Children’s Service Society of Wisconsin Bilingual Initial Licensing Specialist Lutheran Social Services Foster Care Licensing Specialist Lutheran Social Services Child Protection Social Worker Itasca County Health and Human Services Employment Specialist Goodwill Industries Therapist Redeemed Counseling Therapist Rawhide Boys Ranch AODA Counselor Fox Lake Correctional Institution Volunteer Coordinator AmeriCorps Disability Benefit Specialist Waukesha County Family Advocate SDC Head Start Care Coordinator St. Charles Youth and Family Services Care Coordinator Lutheran Social Services Case Manager Hebron House of Hospitality Case Manager Wisconsin Community Service Case Manager United Methodist Children’s Services

Alternative to Prison Employment Coordinator Wisconsin Dept. of Corrections Treatment Social Worker Wisconsin Dept. of Corrections Admissions Coordinator Council for the Jewish Elderly Group Programs Coordinator Betty Brinn Children’s Museum Diversion Specialist Justice 2000 Release Planning/Intake Case Manager Justice 2000 Youth Worker Professional Services Group - Kenosha Youth and Family Advocate The Counseling Center of Milwaukee Youth Development Specialist Boys & Girls Clubs of Sheboygan County Match Support Specialist Big Brothers Big Sisters Coordinator of the Alcohol Diversion Program UWM Police Department Staff Member Homes for Independent Living Case Manager La Casa de Esperanza

Criminal Justice Graduates Intelligence Analyst Federal Bureau of Investigation U.S. Border Patrol Agent Department of Homeland Security Intelligence Analyst Milwaukee High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Case Manager Justice 2000 Deputy Sheriff Milwaukee County Sheriff’s Office Correctional Officer Milwaukee County Sheriff’s Office Probation and Parole Agent State of Wisconsin Loss Prevention Investigator Mills Fleet Farm Police Officer Milwaukee Police Department Police Sergeant, Associate Director Milwaukee Police Department Police Officer Atlanta Police Department Police Officer West Allis Police Department Police Dispatcher Brown Deer Police Department Police Recruit Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department Emergency Service Dispatcher Greenfield Police Department Felony Drug Offender Alternative to Prison Employment Coordinator Wisconsin Dept. of Corrections Security Officer Securitas Security Services USA Loss Prevention Manager Barton Protective Services Loss Prevention Manager Kmart Loss Prevention Manager Lowe’s Protection Specialist Target Loss Prevention Supervisor Shopko

HBSSW Alumni Board,

2010/2011: • Angie Brunhart • Sandra Chavez, President • Tobey Libber • Marty Ordinans • Maxine Spears Winston • Daniel Tushaus • Barbara Weber Advisory: • John Bartel • Jennifer Clearwater • Stan Stojkovic

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_

Who Was Helen Bader? her life, Throughout Helen Bader sought

After finishing her master of social work degree at UWM in 1981, she worked at the Milwaukee Jewish Home, where working with older adults brought home the many issues of aging. At a time when Alzheimer’s disease was almost a complete mystery, she helped open the residents’ minds and hearts through dance and music.

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to help others. She played many roles—student, mother, businesswoman, and social worker—believing that everyone should have the opportunity to reach their fullest potential. Growing up in the railroad town of Aberdeen, South Dakota, Helen learned the value of hard work and self-reliance. Living through the depths of the Great Depression and the sacrifices of World War II, she also learned the importance of reaching out to those in need. Helen attended Downer College in Milwaukee, following in the footsteps of her mother and sister. After earning a degree in botany, she stayed in Milwaukee and soon met Alfred Bader, a chemist from Austria. They married, started a family, and created a business called the Aldrich Chemical Company. The Baders’ eventual divorce led Helen to again become self-reliant. Helen dedicated herself to finishing her master of social work degree at UWM, which she earned in 1981. Her field work at the Legal Aid Society of Milwaukee led her to help many people in need, including single mothers and adults with mental illnesses. In the process, she gained a deeper appreciation for their everyday struggles. After graduation, she worked at the Milwaukee Jewish Home, where working with older adults brought home the many issues of aging. At a time when Alzheimer’s disease was almost a complete mystery, she helped open the residents’ minds and hearts through dance and music. Helen felt the residents’ quality of life depended upon the small details, so she was happy to run errands or escort them to the symphony. Helen soon faced cancer. As the illness began to sap her physical strength, she shared a wish with her family: to continue to aid those in need. She died in 1989.

After her death, patterns of Helen’s quiet style of philanthropy became more apparent. When she had come across an organization that impressed her, she would just pull out her checkbook without fanfare. Helen felt an obligation to do her part. In 2003, the Helen Bader Foundation made a historic gift of $5 million to the UWM Foundation for the benefit of Helen’s alma mater in her name. The Helen Bader Foundation had a vision to continue Helen’s legacy as a social worker who specialized in care for the aging. The endowments this gift created support scholarships for UWM students specializing in gerontology studies and the creation of a faculty research position in applied gerontology, allowing the school to gain international prominence as a leader in this field. As a tribute to Helen’s social work and philanthropic legacy, and to show appreciation for this generous gift, the school formally changed its name to the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare. No matter if you graduated before or after this name change, you can be proud to be part of the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare family and the legacy of a remarkably kind and generous alumna.

In 2003, the Helen Bader Foundation made a historic gift of $5 million to the UWM Foundation for the benefit of Helen’s alma mater in her name. The Helen Bader Foundation had a vision to continue Helen’s legacy as a social worker who specialized in care for the aging.

Helen Bader at the Milwaukee Jewish Home.

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In Recognition of Generosity Chapman Society Members of the UWM Alice G. Chapman Society have informed us that they intend to leave a gift to the UWM Foundation in their estate plans. Our deepest thanks to you for your partnership and future investments. We are humbled to be the keepers of your UWM legacy. Anonymous Paul Kovenock Judith Kramer ‘94, ‘97 Karen Morauski ‘83 Aileen Rockjordan* ‘61 Stan Stojkovic*

Chancellor’s Society

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Members of the Chancellor’s Society made gifts or pledges of $1,000 or more to HBSSW during the 2010-11 fiscal year. Don ‘69 & Helen Banta John Boudry Concordia University Wisconsin Ernestine E. O’Bee Revocable Living Trust Faye McBeath Foundation Georgia Southwestern State University Helen Bader Foundation, Inc. Anne Basting* & Ivan Lichtenstein Julia Malooly ‘67 Steven McMurtry* & Gwat-Yong Lie* Karen Morauski ‘83 National Adult Day Services Association Deborah Pfuntner Susan* & Robert Rose Mark & Sandra Scheller Stan Stojkovic* Peggy Tschetter

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Wisconsin state taxpayer support of Because UWM is at only 17 percent and dropping, your

donations to the UWM Foundation on behalf of the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare help us more than ever to advance our mission: to improve lives and strengthen communities through research, education and community partnerships. Our deepest thanks to all of you.

2010 - 2011 Donors J. Adler ‘83 Pamela Alvarez ‘92 Anonymous Donations Margaret Anunson* Kurt ‘77 & Joyce Baker Mary Kay ‘78, ‘80 & Donald Balchunas Bridget Bannon ‘70, ‘74 Don ‘69 & Helen Banta Mary Barrett Anne Basting* & Ivan Lichtenstein Joseph Bauer ‘87 Lida Bayne ‘76 Georgia Becker ‘76 & David Lorenz Darrell Becker ‘87 Carol Beckerleg ‘86 Fred Berman* Willie Bethune ‘79 Roberta Bieger-Mayrl ‘73 & William Mayrl Barbara ‘82, ‘96 & John Bigler Jay ‘87 & Ellen Blankenship Robert Blazich ‘71, ‘73 Diana Bolmes ‘97, ‘98 Mary ‘01 & John Boudry Bruce Boyd ‘74 Suzanne* & Kenneth Braden

Edmund Braun ‘80 Stephen Brazell ‘90 Mary Brill ‘90 Julie Brown* Pamela Budda ‘77 Linda Burris ‘83, ‘87 Thomas Callan ‘81 Terry Carter ‘72, ‘74 Linda ‘99 & James Carter Michael Chmielewski ‘76 Steve Cincotta ‘89 Eileen ‘63 & Art Clark Cynthia Clausen ‘85 Sharon Clausz ‘99 Jennifer Clearwater* John Cole ‘90 Linda Combes ‘69 Concordia University Wisconsin Daniel Conta ‘70 Margaret ‘89, ‘93 & David Cory Mary Coulson ‘47, ‘65 Joan & Louie Crisostomo Joseph Crumrine ‘99 & Mary Bednarik Linda* & Gerald Czernicki Terry ‘77 & Mary Dallmann Joanne Damico-Grajczyk ‘81 & Gary Grajczyk Kristine Davidson ‘75 Lynn Debilzen ‘07

2010/2011 Donors - Alumni & Friends of HBSSW Philip Demski ‘72 Diane DePanfilis ‘82 Lynn Detrie ‘75 Ramona Dicks-Williams ‘84 & John Williams Mary Dillmann ‘07 Jed Dolnick ‘78 William Dosemagen ‘76 & Robin Ahrens ‘75 Valencia Drew-Westmoreland ‘83, ‘87 Katherine Durben ‘92 James Durnil ‘87 & Kathleen Gale Alexander ‘73 & Sharon Durtka Richard Eaton ‘76 Steven Eigen ‘68 Saleem ‘74 & Olivia El-Amin ‘74 Christopher Ellerd ‘70 Elliot M. Lubar Revocable Trust Melissa Emberts ‘89 Wendy Erickson ‘86 Ernestine E. O’Bee Revocable Living Trust Dale ‘71 & Judy Faesi Mary Jane Farley ‘84, ‘87 Faye McBeath Foundation Carmen Felix Daniel Felten ‘68 Michael Fendrich* David Fenner ‘89 Irene Fiacchino-Symes ‘94 JoAnn Fishbein Janet Flood ‘96 Donna Foote ‘04 Sarah Ford ‘73 & Randall Klumb Todd Franke ‘79, ‘84 Daniel Fuhrmann* Teresa Full ‘92 Lindsay Garcia ‘01 Susan Garny ‘89 Georgia Southwestern State

University Patricia Gilbertson ‘77 Kurt Goeckermann ‘95 Fiona Gordon MacLeod ‘78, ‘82 Karen Gorske ‘76, ‘77 Ronald Grace ‘79 Terry Gray ‘78 M. Green ‘90 Doris Griffin ‘75 Wolfgang ‘72 & Irmgard Grundner Roxanne Guenther ‘98, ‘00 Darlene ‘55 & Frank Guernsey Edward ‘65 & Marie Gumz Washington Guyton ‘67 Barbara Haag ‘76 Debra Hagen ‘77, ‘85 William Hanel Jennifer Hanson ‘03 David Harper ‘67 Sally Hartman ‘87 & Thomas Barnes Helen Bader Foundation, Inc. Ernest Herre ‘63 Edward & Heidi Hida Ruth Hopgood ‘83 John Horngren ‘62 Millicent Houston ‘91 Barbara Hufschmidt ‘79 Mary Hunter ‘92, ‘95 Margaret Hyson ‘67 Jacqueline Jackson ‘77 Karen Jackson ‘87 Deborah Jacobs ‘77 Jacqueline Jansen ‘99 Horace Johnson ‘75 Rebecca Johnson ‘08 Mark ‘82 & Laurie Kadunc Goldie Kadushin* & Steven Morrison

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In Recognition of Generosity Carla Kaminski ‘89 Elizabeth Katz ‘08 Sharon Keigher* Guadalupe ‘73 & Daniel King Therese King Hall ‘02 Joseph Kleiber ‘72 Rachel Kleibor ‘02 Thomas Klein ‘62 Catherine Klein ‘95 Bonnie Knippel ‘91 Dione Knop ‘90, ‘97 Edward ‘76 & Jeanette Knuth Richard Kohloff ‘95 James Koleas ‘82 Phillip Koss ‘78 Thea ‘75 & Peter Kovac Debra Koval ‘79 Susan Krebs ‘67 Mary Kressin ‘95 Ellyn ‘76, ‘79 & Maurice Laessig Lydia LaGue* Marcia Larson ‘71 Erika Lauson Kirk Lausterer ‘99 Daniel Lawton ‘69 Cynthia Le Clair ‘81 Dominic ‘76, ‘88 & Donna Leone Robert Lewein ‘60, ‘61 Joseph Liberto ‘52 Gwat-Yong Lie* ‘80 & Steven McMurtry* Tricia Linde ‘09 Mary Linton ‘67 Eva ‘77, ‘78 & Elliot Lipchik Susan Loeher* ‘65 Beverly ‘71 & James Lustig Moreau ‘60 & Marilyn MacCaughey Jane Mackey* ‘08 Mary Madden ‘88 59

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Douglas Mahy ‘69 Lyniece Maiden Patricia Makens ‘69 Julia ‘67 & William Malooly Carolyn Mangan-Casey ‘88 Lauren Manthey ‘79 Allan ‘68, ‘69 & Marti Marino James ‘75, ‘77 & Joan Maro Susan Marsolek ‘68 Francisco ‘76 & Elizabeth Martorell Michael Marzion* M. Masch ‘78 Wade Mather ‘09 Charlotte Mayfield ‘03, ‘05 Margaret McCarthy ‘71 Norm ‘75 & Nancy McLure Kenneth Menting ‘68 Heather Mertens ‘98 Jonathan Metz ‘02, ‘06 James Metz ‘76 Craig Modahl ‘99 Robert Mohr ‘67 Mary Monahan ‘75 Rhonda* & Michael Montgomery Karen Morauski ‘83 Roosevelt Morgan ‘80 Teresa Mueller ‘68 Joan Naegeli ‘80 Jeanne Nagorski ‘94 National Adult Day Services Association Helen Navarre ‘60, ‘62 James Neuser ‘66 Daniel Nolan ‘78 Jerome Nowak ‘88 Christine ‘75, ‘80 & Daniel ‘67, ‘73 O’Donnell Lee Ogrizovich ‘88 Christopher Olinger ‘89

Michele Olshanski ‘95 Martin ‘78 & Karen Ordinans Karianne Osowski Laura Otto-Salaj* Susan Pauls ‘00 Susan Perry ‘79 Deborah Peterman ‘91 Greg Peterson ‘80, ‘92 Deborah Pfuntner Annette Pitterle Linda Plagman Anna Pleas ‘93, ‘97 Margaret Pofahl ‘79, ‘84 Helen ‘83, ‘85 & Kenneth Ponec Jennifer Popovich ‘01 Laura Price ‘78, ‘82 Alan Quosig ‘91 Dena ‘91 & Robert Radtke Susan Raines ‘06 Timothy Ralston ‘86 Charon Reed ‘07 Nancy Reuter ‘95 Dorothy Roberson ‘97 James Roepke ‘57 Mary Rohr ‘69 Susan* & Robert Rose Chris Rosland ‘72 Debra Rouse ‘87 Vilma ‘00 & Gary Rummler Rena Safer ‘64 Joann Sallmann ‘91 Calley Savage ‘89 Diane Savides ‘91 Christopher ‘76 & Susan Schaefer Debra Schampers ‘93 Kristin Scheel ‘07 Mark & Sandra Scheller Armin Schenk ‘68 Christine Schneider ‘93 Peter ‘74 & Suzanne Schuler

Claudia Schur Michael Serio ‘77 Mike & Judy Sherer James Sherwood ‘95 Janis Shogren Claire Siebold ‘75, ‘77 Fredrick Siggelkow ‘80 Stephanie Sikinger ‘09, ‘11 Nancy Sinclair ‘73 John Sliga ‘76 Jessica Snow ‘02 Marion Sobieski ‘77 Kathleen Stack ‘04 Ann Steffen ‘10 Barbara Stohl ‘80 Stan Stojkovic* Milan Stojkovic ‘90, ‘00 Franklin ‘66 & Suzanne Stoneburner Victoria Streich ‘96 Sally Tarvid ‘01 Janet Tenge ‘69, ‘70 Judith ‘69 & Stanley Teplin Ann Terwilliger ‘81 Julie Theisz ‘91 Laura ‘95 & Jon Thorsen Michele Tietyen ‘88 Jose Torres* ‘72 & Miriam Oliensis-Torres ‘81 Peggy Tschetter Gerald Urbik ‘89 Sheryl Van Haren ‘85 Corinthia Van Orsdol David Vandermale ‘74 Vantage Point Debra Vash ‘89 Arlene ‘69, ‘70 & Mark ‘70 Voelz Carol Wacker ‘72, ‘76 Jeanne Wagner Newton* Michael ‘80 & Ingrid Wallace

Latonya Walls Mark Walters ‘78 Mary Ward ‘73 Curtis Washington ‘71 Marilyn ‘78 & Donald Weber Jo Weigandt ‘91 Marlene Widen ‘76 Leann Wielebski ‘75, ‘84 Maxine Winston ‘85 Mindy Wirth ‘78 Julienne Woodward ‘92 Mary Wright ‘01 Susan Wundrow ‘84, ‘87 Melissa Zarczynski ‘00 Donna Zientek ‘78 Linda Zik ‘87 Karen ‘90 & Robert Zimmerman Karl ‘75 & Melanie ‘93 Zurheide * Indicates the donor is a current or retired member of the HBSSW faculty or staff. The accuracy of this list is very important to us. If we have listed your information incorrectly, please inform Patrick Kessenich, Office for Development and Alumni Relations at (414) 229--3016, or via email at kessenic@uwm.edu.

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In Memory of . . .

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Max Kurz

Catherine Chilman

Max Kurz, professor emeritus, social work, died November 27, 2010 at the age of 93. Max was known as a fierce champion of social justice and served the school from 19551992. He was a charter member of National Association of Social Workers. Those of us who had the pleasure of working with him will dearly miss him. Max was studying medicine in Vienna at the time of the Nazi occupation. (Both of his parents died in the Holocaust.) He left Austria and moved to Holland, eventually making his way to New York City and later to Milwaukee. He served in the U.S. Army as part of a ski patrol. In 2006, UWM honored Max as an Ernest Spaights Plaza honoree, a significant honor given to UWM employees who have made significant, enduring and institution-wide contributions to the growth, development and mission of the university. Memorial gifts can be made to the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare, Retzer Nature Center, or Lad Lake.

Catherine Street Chilman died of natural causes on January 27, 2011. She was 96 years old. Chilman’s last professional post was as a professor of social work in our school from 1973 to 1986. It was here and at Syracuse University that she most enjoyed teaching. Her professional positions, memberships and activities were numerous. The one she was most committed to was the National Groves Conference on the Family, where she served as chair and president for 21 years. In 1985 she received the Lifetime Honored Member Award from that organization. In addition to numerous professional articles, she wrote publications directed at a popular audience, including Your Child: 6-12 and Moving into Adolescence. She was listed in American Men and Women of Science, Who’s Who of American Women, and Who’s Who in America. Chilman’s hobbies outside of work were reading, writing, hiking, travel, poetry, plants and swimming. Donations in her memory may be made to: The Employees’ Appreciation Fund, C/O Collington Residents Association, Collington Episcopal Life Care Community, 10450 Lottsford Rd, Mitchelleville, MD, 20721-2745.

To make a donation in memory of Max Kurz or Catherine Chilman: By check • Write check to the UWM Foundation. Specify to whom your gift should honor. • Mail to: UWM HBSSW P.O. Box 786 Milwaukee, WI 53201 Online • www.hbssw.uwm.edu. • Click on Alumni and Friends

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Studied dangers of alcohol and energy drinks

Served on National Institute of Justice Board for Prisoner Re-entry.

Championed a socially food manage system Helped fosterjust parents problem behaviors

Improved the lives of 1000’s of caregivers nationwide

Named Graduate of the Last Decade (GOLD)

Named Wisconsin Distinguished Professor

Helen Bader School of Social Welfare P.O. Box 786 Milwaukee, WI 53201 www.hbssw.uwm.edu Led student drive to sew dresses for poor girls around the world

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