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LIVING INFRASTRUCTURE FOR THE CAPITOL HILL ECODISTRICT ANALYSES, PLANS AND VISIONS DEVELOPED BY Xinzhuo An Rao Fu Tianshi Guo Yuhan Yang Liyang Chen Mahshid Gharibi Fangyuan Hong Shaoxuan Zhou Shih-Chia Chiu Guanyi Gao Youngsuk Jun Ying Zhou Xiaoyang Zhu Led by Associate Professor Nancy Rottle

Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

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FOREWORD In this culminating studio for the UW’s Masters of Landscape Architecture (MLA) cohort we have used informed design as a means to explore questions related to green infrastructure and public space in the context of the densest neighborhood in the state, one that continues to rapidly intensify. The 13 MLA candidates in the studio have applied a research-based approach to planning and design solutions for the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict – recently officially recognized by Seattle City Council – to develop possible answers to the overarching questions: • How can green infrastructure in a dense neighborhood create a high performing district that leads to a more environmentally healthy and culturally responsive city? • What kinds of networks and places will contribute, how should they be configured and located, and what innovative types of design features can be imagined and applied? Managing the studio process themselves, the group has worked between scales, using collaborative overlay processes to conduct analyses and case studies, chart goals, develop metrics and coalesce networks for the District. Students subsequently relied upon their group analyses and visions to identify priority sites for in-depth design explorations. The ten design proposals contained in this document chart new territory in how we might create a public realm infilled with exciting, multi-functional and poetic spaces, addressing both process as well as ecological and social outcomes. The students’ detailed design explorations further informed and re-shaped the final plan, resulting in key concepts for habitat networks and matrices, community parks and gardens, vibrant pedestrian streets, water conservation and treatment, cultural and historic resonance, and district connectivity. In addition to specific design proposals, their typologies for public spaces and streets provide prototypes for flexible application of these concepts. Finally, students applied various tools to their individual design proposals to measure the benefits the projects would collectively yield, related to mobility, habitat, community space, soil and water. We have many people to thank for helping to fuel the success of the Capstone Studio, a new model in our program. First and foremost, our thanks go to Joel Sisolak of Capitol Hill Housing for recognizing the opportunity for our students, and for inspiring and thoughtfully responding to their design work over the course of two terms. We also benefitted from lectures by Lynne Barker of the national EcoDistricts organization and by Christian Runge from Mithun, and from an inspiring tour of the Bullitt Center. The students’ work was informed by their interactions with a corps of civic professionals from local firms, the City and the EcoDistrict in our design reviews, and in our final presentation to the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict Board. Many thanks go to them all for contributing to the growth of our students, and to the students themselves for their inspired and diligent work in developing this Living Infrastructure for the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict. Nancy Rottle, FASLA Associate Professor UW Department of Landscape Architecture May 2015

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CONTENTS + Foreword PHASE 1 RESEARCH AND PROCESS Part 1 Basic Conditions +What is an EcoDistrict? +Research Framework and Design Process +Geophysical Conditions: Fluvial & Geologic Context +Geophysical Conditions: Topographic Context +Ecological Conditions: Water, Plant & Animal Communities

Part 2 Site Analyses Aesthetics + Climate + Food System + Habitat + History + Land Use Mobility + Open Space + Water + Social and Cultural Condition

Part 3. EcoDistrict Precedent Studies PHASE 2 DISTRICT PLANNING AND DESIGN +Three Opportunity Analyses +SWOT Analysis +Principles +Master Plan +Major Concepts and Projects +Space + Street Typologies +Metrics

PHASE 3 SCHEMATIC DESIGNS Pair Projects

+Water & Habitat / Rao+Shaoxuan +Pixel Gardens / Xiaoyang + Mahshid +Vibrant Street / Shih-chia + Liyang

Individual Projects

+Retrospect and Prospect / Annie +Olive way Ultra Urban Drosscape / Young +Eco Resilient Campus / Yoyo +The Living Spine / Guanyi +Eco Arterial / Ying +Stitching Capitol Hill EcoDistrict / Tianshi +District Core Remix / Fangyuan

Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

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What’s an EcoDistrict? In 2009, EcoDistricts was launched to help cities initiate innovative strategies to accelerate neighborhood sustainable development. The scale of the neighborhood is believed to be small enough to innovate quickly and big enough to make a significant impact to the community. EcoDistricts are established to increase efficiencies, restore ecosystems, and improve local communities. The overall performance of EcoDistricts will be measured over time by adding new designs and infrastructure to the neighborhood. Capitol Hill is a truly diverse neighborhood that doesn’t easily fit stereotypes. The community is a small town in itself which contains a variety of business, people, and culture. It is filled with artists, restaurants, cafes and a thriving gay and a lesbian community. The highlights include the Broadway Farmers Market, seasonal food festivals, Cal Anderson Park, and the Pike/Pine Corridor. The Capitol Hill EcoDistrict is located in the most densely populated neighborhood in Seattle. It is led by Capitol Hill Housing, a community development corporation and public development authority with nearly four decades of experience to improve community health and affordability. The EcoDistrict is working in partnership with the local community to test innovative solutions that address Capitol Hill’s most pressing and challenging sustainability goals. Capitol Hill is looking to different cities around the globe for inventive approaches to achieve a long-term, healthy community for the people of the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict.

Credit: EcoDistrict | Greentopia

Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

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Research and Process We developed a framework for analyzing the conditions and forces in the EcoDistrict. Our analyses ranged from the region to the district and addressed ten categories. We also referred to the targets and metrics offered by the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict. We then used these analyses and our design studies to propose a Master Plan for the EcoDistrict.

Using GIS data, our studio was able to make a CNC model to capture the topography of Capitol Hill. From that process, we acquired a general understanding about the parcels and water flow, not only in the EcoDistrict, but also in the larger area of Capitol Hill.

Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

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Research Framework

STAGE I: System Analysis

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Habitat

Water

Climate

Food System

Mobility

Aesthetics

History

Open Space

Social

Land Use


Design Process

STAGE II: Opportunity Analysis History Art Open Space

Habitat Water Food

Mobility Energy Streetscape

Master Concept Plan

Proposed Typology

Metrics Index In 2030

STAGE III: Croup Concept

Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

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Geophysical Conditions: Fluvial & Geologic Context Geology of the Seattle area, Washington The city of Seattle, Washington State, lies within the Puget Sound Lowland, an elongate structural and topographic basin between the Cascade Range and Olympic Mountains. The area has been impacted by repeated glaciation in the past 2.4 m.y. and crustal deformation related to the Cascadia subduction zone. The present landscape largely results from those repeated cycles of glacial scouring and deposition and tectonic activity, subsequently modified by landsliding, stream erosion and deposition, and human activity. The last glacier to override the area, the Vashon-age glacier of the Fraser glaciation, reached the Seattle area ca. 14,500 14C yr B.P. and had retreated from the area by ca. 13,650 14C yr B.P.. The Seattle area sits atop a complex and incomplete succession of glacial and nonglacial deposits that extends below sea level and overlies an irregular bedrock surface. These subsurface materials show spatial lithologic variability, are truncated by many inconformities, and are deformed by gentle folds and faults. Sediments that predate the last glacial–interglacial cycle are exposed where erosion has sliced into the upland, notably along the shorelines of Puget Sound and Lake Washington, along the Duwamish River valley, and along Holocene streams. Seattle straddles the Seattle uplift, the Seattle fault zone, and the Seattle basin, three major bedrock structures that reflect north-south crustal shortening in the Puget Lowland. Tertiary bedrock is exposed in isolated locations in south Seattle on the Seattle uplift, and then it drops to 550 m below ground under the north half of the city in the Seattle basin. The 6-km-wide Seattle fault zone runs west to east across the south part of the city. Seattle has also been shaken by subduction-zone earthquakes on the Cascadia subduction zone and deep earthquakes within the subducting plate. Certain postglacial deposits in Seattle are prone to liquefaction from earthquakes of sufficient size and duration.

Credits: Kathy Goetz Troost* and Derek B Booth

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Geophysical Conditions: Topographic Context Topography of Seattle

1894 Map

Seattle is located between the saltwater Puget Sound (an arm of the Pacific Ocean) to the west and Lake Washington to the east. To the west, beyond Puget Sound, are the Kitsap Peninsula and Olympic Mountains on the Olympic Peninsula; to the east, beyond Lake Washington and the eastside suburbs, are Lake Sammamish and the Cascade Range. Lake Washington’s waters flow to Puget Sound through the Lake Washington Ship Canal (consisting of two manmade canals, Lake Union, and the Hiram M. Chittenden Locks at Salmon Bay, ending in Shilshole Bay on Puget Sound).

1904 Map

Terrain of Street 01

Terrain of Street 02

Terrain of Street 03

Topographic Map of Seattle Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

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Ecological Conditions: Water, Plant & Animal Communities Puget Sound Watershed

Sustainable street design 4/24/2015

Puget Sound extends approximately 100 miles (160 km) from Deception Pass in the north to Olympia, Washington in the south. The sound connects with the Strait of Juan de Fuca and ultimately the Pacific Ocean. Water levels here fluctuate with the tides and winds can produce dramatic waves seasonally. water.weather.gov/ahps/print.php?print=obs

AHPS Observed Gauge Map Seattle’s Puget Sound shoreline is used in many ways. Elliott Bay supports a

+ Occasional Flooding –

deepwater shipping port and tourist and commercial businesses. Some areas of the shoreline are used for housing and residential neighborhoods. Universally the shoreline is used for recreation where public access exists. Similarly universal are fish and wildlife species that use this saltwater area for breeding, Switch Basemap rearing, and feeding. Reset View

Name

Hydrological category Map

12Hydrograph Available

Probability

Esri, DeLorme, FAO, USGS, NOAA, EPA, NPS


King County Biodiversity Report King County is 5,977 km² in size (5,443 km² land and 534 km² marine waters), and the population in the 2000 census was 1,737,034 (density of 315/km²). The diversity of geography combined with the county’s history of land use has shaped the biodiversity of the past, present, and will continue affecting it into the future.

Pacific ninebark

Labrador tea

Landscape Diversity Map SNOHOMISH COUNTY

BOTHELL

WOODINVILLE

KING COUNTY

S am

SHORELINE

ma

m

DUVALL

h

is

m ish River

522

99

Sk yk o

Ri

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2

MERCER ISLAND

900

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NORTH BEND

RENTON

TUKWILA

M id d

g Pu 405

509

BURIEN

NG

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da

r

Birds

R iv

90

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S. F

MAPLE VALLEY

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S n o q u alm

Peregrine Falcon

Chester Morse Lake

Northern Goshawk

Amphibians/Reptiles

18

509

Western Pond Turtle

99

AUBURN

Gre en

Ri ve

Plant Species

Salmonids Bull Trout Chinook

Larch Mountain Salamander

Steelhead

Insects

r

Beller’s Ground Beetle

Howard Hanson Reservoir

KING COUNTY

Level IV Ecoregions

PIERCE COUNTY 169

ite Wh

KITTIT A KING

S

ENUMCLAW

Y UN T CO TY UN CO

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The information included on this map has been compiled from a variety of sources and is subject to change without notice. King County makes no representations or warranties, express or implied, as to accuracy, completeness, timeliness, or rights to the use of such information. King County shall not be liable for any general, special, indirect, incidental, or consequential damages including, but not limited to, lost revenues or lost profits resulting from the use or misuse of the information contained on this map. Any sale of this map or information on this map is prohibited except by written permission of King County.

Orca (Killer Whale)

Plants

Tailed Frog

BLACK DIAMOND

164

Data Sources: Ecoregions from U.S. EPA; Rare plant data from Washington Natural Heritage Program; Terrestrial mammal habitat data from Washington Gap Analysis Program; Bird, Amphibian, and Reptile data from Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Priority Habitats and Species (PHS) program; Beller’s Ground Beetle data combined PHS data and King County Bog Inventory data; Chinook Salmon and Bull Trout distributions compiled from King County salmon recovery efforts.

Wolverines

Common Loon

5

FEDERAL WAY

Fisher

Spotted Owl

ie R ive r

410

WASHINGTON STATE

Western toad

Grizzly Bear

Marbled Murrelet

18 515

516

Mammals Bald Eagle

Maury Island

COVINGTON

TY

Rare, Threatened, and Endangered Plant and Animal Species

SEATAC

KENT

UN

KING COUNTY, WASHINGTON

169

167

A

KI

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Ce

Vashon Island

CO

er

SNOQUALMIE

ISSAQUAH

99

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CARNATION

SAMMAMISH

5

SEATTLE

UN

North Fork Snoqualmie

90

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Y

BELLEVUE

Riv

202

520

Lake

UN T P CO

COUNTY

SEATTLE

203

CO

CH EL

hi W as

KI N G

KITSA

520

Elliott Bay

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REDMOND

405

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Sn

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KIRKLAND

To lt

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5

SEATTLE

Mapped distribution indicates salmonid species is present and is documented by a primary source. Sightings by secondary sources are not included on this map.

Central Puget Lowland Eastern Puget Riverine Lowlands Eastern Puget Uplands North Cascades Highland Forests North Cascades Lowland Forests North Cascades Subalpine/Alpine Western Cascades Lowlands and Valleys Western Cascades Montane Highlands Cascade Subalpine/Alpine

N

KING COUNTY Map produced by King County DNRP GIS and WLR Visual Communication and Web Unit. File name: 0802kcBiodivRegions.ai wgab, sk, lpre

0

3

6 Miles

Februaryy 2008

Rare, Threatened, and Endangered Plant and Animal Species Map

Open Water Major State and Federal Highways Major Streams and Rivers

Mountain goats Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

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Site Analysis: Aesthetic 2 1

3

4

5 6

14

1

2

3

4

5

6


Site Analysis: Climate, Energy & Emissions Climate Change

Sea Level Rise

More Extreme Precipitation

Reduced Mountain Snowpack

Capitol Hill EcoDistrict and Seattle 2030 District Goals

The goals of Capitol EcoDistrict are aligned with Seattle 2030 Goals. The strategies include clean electricity, green building, complete neighborhoods, and waste reduction programs to support Seattle being carbon neutral by 2050.

GHG Emission

Greenhouse Gas emissions come from four main sectors: vehicle, building energy use, waste generation and industry.

Reduced Mountain Snowpack

Energy Consumption

Sea Level Rise

Building Area

Waste Management

Baseline Energy Budget

Waste management is also a key way to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions. The vehicles and equipment needed to take garbage from the site to landfill which is called waste transport may produce significant emissions. Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

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Site Analysis: Food System Food Resources for Urban Wildlife The natural food resources in Capitol Hill include a variety of fruiting trees and shrubs that provide food throughout the summer. Depending on the fruiting pattern of the plant, these food sources can last into winter. Other natural sources of food for urban wildlife include other wildlife species. Predatory species feed on other wildlife species (prey). Artificial sources of food for urban wildlife include garbage and any other human propagated food source.

Food Resources for Humans In addition to fruit trees, there are also several P-Patches or community gardens, that provide urban farming opportunities for the residents to grow their own food. One goal of the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict is to double the number of P-Patches by 2035. However, there are not many spaces available for P-Patches in this highdensity urban area. The challenge for the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict will be to discover new urban farming possibilities.

Food Resources Map

Urban Wildlife Food Web

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Site Analysis: Habitat There are over 60 kinds of street trees on Capitol Hill. The total number is more than 11000. Capitol Hill is Seattle’s best neighborhood for trees.This is due to: 1.Timing. Capitol Hill was not a pioneer neighborhood of the sort that was planted largely with only fruit and nut trees. Instead, it was planted right around the time Seattle had a boom, and financial largess. 2. Money. The neighborhood has always been relatively well-off financially so could afford to plant and maintain trees. 3. Location. Capitol Hill is not as westward and thus dry as Queen Anne, Beacon and First Hills (or the former Denny Hill). It gets more rainfall. 4. Soil. The soil is, for a hill in Seattle, less sandy and more waterretentive than that of say, Phinney Ridge, Magnolia, West Seattle, etc. This, plus the slightly more rainfall, helps trees grow larger. 5. Room. The lot sizes and planting strips tend to be generous, enabling ample room for trees. 6. All Stars. Capitol Hill has a stellar collection of planted trees in Volunteer Park and Lake View Cemetery, plus a wonderful blend of planted and wild trees in Boren and Interlaken Parks. Capitol Hill Area 423 acre 100% Canopy Cover Area 2002 46 acre 10.80% 2007 54 acre 12.70% 2040 127 acre 30.00%

Street Trees

Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

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Site Analysis: Historic Preservation & Olmsted Plan The Pike-Pine Conservation District was first designated to create design guidelines for the district to support conversation efforts for older buildings and also to establish a Transfer of Development Potential(TDP) program that created additional incentives to preserve the character of Pike-Pine. These guidelines accommodate growth in the area and will allow for a more balanced mix of uses. The Olmsted Brothers plan in Seattle played a significant role of linking a 20-mile landscaped boulevard with planned parks and greenbelts within the city. The primary goal of the Olmsted plan was to locate a park or a playground within one half mile of every home in Seattle.

Pike-Pine Conservation District

John C. Olmsted

Change of Cal Anderson Park

John C. Olmsted and his company’s influences in Seattle and Capitol Hill

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Volunteer Park


Site Analysis: Land Use & Housing

Legend

Legend

Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

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Site Analysis: Mobility N

0

200

400

800feet

N 0

200

400

800feet

Credtis: Seattle Department of Transportation - City of Seattle

Traffic Flow(2013) & Surface Parking

BMP Implementation Plan 2019

7600

E Aloha St

15200

E John St 28600

7900

13500 10200

E Pine St

12th Ave E

ay

ew

liv

EO

Broadway E

E Denny Way

12000

E Pike St

t nS iso ad 600 E M 23

Crossing the roadway map

The “Crossing the Roadway” map groups different types of roadway characteristics together in order to compare intersections throughout the city and assigns points to characteristics that negatively impact crossing conditions.

20

Walking along the roadway map

The “Walking Along the Roadway” map groups different types of roadway characteristics together to compare roads throughout the city. It provides a measure of how comfortable it is for a person to walk along different roads by giving points to characteristics that negatively impact walking.


MON T LA K

N Passage Point Park

NE

S Passage Point Park

ST

PA CI FI

Fairview Park

BO Y

Grand Army Cemetery

AV Bellevue Place

Hing Hay Park

12TH AV

Firehouse Mini Park

12th Ave E JEFFERSON

Yesler Terrace CC

E JOHN ST

Garfield PF

23rd & UnionJackson

S AV

Flo Ware Park

Judkins Park & Playfield

6TH AV S

Beacon Hill PG

Map date: March 31, 2011 Source: Port of Seattle, Army Corps of Engineers, and City of Seattle GIS data.

E Portal Viewpoint

Downtown, Major Institutions

2,000

90 " $ # !

Service Area Criteria for Usable Open Space (UOS) 1/8 Mile Service Area of Usable Open Space over 10,000 SF

Residential Urban Villages Urban Center Villages & Hub Urban Villages

MC CLELLAN Single S Family Multi-Family, Residential/Commercial, Neighborhood/Commercial Manufacturing/Industrial

0 Feet

Non-City Park/Open Space

Zoning

S AV

No warranties of any sort, including accuracy, fitness or merchantability accompany this product.

IER

Twelfth Ave. S

©2011, CITY OF SEATTLEViewpoint All rights reserved

2,000

City of Seattle Parks

IN RA

S LANDER ST

®

Leschi Park Frink Park

LEGEND North Rainier

North Beacon Hill

Lake Washington

Powell Barnett Park

Sam Smith Park

S HOLGATE ST

Howell Park

Madrona Park

Noras Woods

31ST AV S

ER

INI Daejon Park

Dr. Rizal Park

A Larkins Park

Madrona PG

E CHERRY ST

ST

E DENNY WY

W.Grose Park

E UNION ST

L Hughes Cultural Arts Pratt E YESLER WY Dr. Blanche Park Lavizzo Park

RA

International Children's Park

4TH AV S

ST

Lakeview Park

Homer Harris Park Plum Tree Park

S JACKSON ST

Int'l District

P-Patch

N

LAKESIDE AV S

BROADWAY

Spring St. Mini Park

Horiuchi Park Kobe Terrace

ST

A EM

First Hill Park

S ME JA

MadisonMiller

Cal Anderson Park

Pike/Pine DISON

First HillST

City Hall Park

M

O IS AD

Prentis Frazier Park Pendleton Miller PF

20TH AV S

ST

Madison Park

E

23RD AV S

ON

Washington Park & Arboretum

DR

V

RI

E

A ON DR MA

Freeway Park

AV

15TH AV E

BROADWAY

Capitol Hill

Art Installations

520

E ALOHA ST

Tashkent Park Thomas Cascade Street PG Mini Park E JOHN ST Summit Slope E DENNY WY Park

Plymouth Pillars Park

ER

þ Æ

19TH AV E

St Marks GB Volunteer Park

IE W FA IR V

" $5 # !

Foster Island

Madison Park North Beach

Interlaken Park

I-5 Colonnade

N

Open Green Space

Gaps in Usable Open Space in the East Sector

Montlake PF

23RD AV

Terry Pettus Park

ST

24TH AV E

10TH AV E

Eastlake

Union Bay

Montlake Cut East West Montlake Montlake Park Park

Roanoke Park

Rogers PG

C

Belvoir Place

MC GILVRA BV E

Site Analysis: Open Space

E BV

15TH A

N 40TH ST

Burke-Gilman Trail

ST

- UOS of 10,000 SF or more for Urban Centers and Hub Urban Villages accessible within 1/8 mile

1/4 Mile Service Area of Usable Open Space over 10,000 SF - UOS of 10,000 SF or more for Residential Urban Villages, depending on population density, accessible within 1/8 to 1/4 mile

1/2 Mile Service Area of Usable Open Space over 1/2 Acre - UOS of 1/2 Acre or more for Single Family areas accessible within 1/2 mile

Parklet

In Capitol Hill, there is limited opportunity for open space. Currently there is only one big park in the central area. It is said that less than 40% of the residents of the urban village are served by open space. According to the comprehensive plan for Capitol Hill, by 2014, open space should include 6 P-Patches, one village commons and multiple small parks. The plan aims to add to at least 13.33 acres open space by 2014 for serving 13,334 households.

Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

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Site Analysis: Water Resource and System Stormwater and CSO system Rainfall is mainly concentrated in the winter and is less than 2 inches per month in the summer. Therefore, in the winter, it is important to deal with stormwater and drainage, while in the summer, it is important to irrigate and maintain the landscape. The EcoDistrict area is mostly a partially separated CSO system. Except the north, stormwater on the street is collected and treated through the Swale on Yale which located west of the site. Stormwater from Capitol Hill drains directly to Lake Union. Sanitary wastewater is conveyed to West Point; Combined wastewater is conveyed to West Point or Elliott West CSO Facility. In Seattle, 30% of the drinking water is from Tolt Watershed, while 70% is from Cedar Watershed. Only 22% of the potable water supply is used as drinking water.

Partially Separated System

Source: U.S. Climate

Water Resource and System Map

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Site Analysis: Social and Cultural Condition General Information Population density: Capitol Hill: 11,722 people per square mile Median age:(Male/Female) Capitol Hill: 37.3 years/ 35.5 years Median household income in 2011: Capitol Hill: $74,989

Average household size: Capitol Hill: 1.7 people Percentage of family households: Capitol Hill: 26.0%

Capitol Hill EcoDistrict Median Income Range

Capitol Hill EcoDistrict Population Range

Legend

Legend

Legend

arterial

arterial

arterial

population Value

Capitol Hill EcoDistrict Household Number Range

Family Households

Median Income

High

Value

Low

Value

High

Low High

Low

[

0

0.375

0.75

1.5

[

Miles 2.25

Population Range

0

0.375

0.75

[

Miles 2.25

1.5

Median Income Range

Capitol Hill EcoDistrict Dominant Landuse Types

0

0.375

0.75

1.5

Miles 2.25

Household Number Range

Capitol Hill EcoDistrict Dominant Residential Types

Capitol Hill EcoDistrict Dominant Culture/Art Types

Legend

arterial

parcel residential Type <all other values>

PRES_USE_D Legend

Apartment

arterial

Apartment(Co-op)

parcel dominant

Apartment(Mixed Use)

<all other values>

Legend

Government Service

Condominium(Mixed Use)

Industrial

Condominium(Residential)

Mixed Use

Duplex

Multi-Family

Residence Hall/Dorm

Office

Single Family(C/I Use)

Other Housing

Single Family(C/I Zone)

Public Facility

Single Family(Res Use/Zone)

Retail/Service

Townhouse Plat

Single Family

Triplex

[

0

0.275

0.55

1.1

Dominant Landuse Types

arterial

parce cultural Type <all other values>

PRES_USE_D Art Gallery/Museum/Soc Srvc Auditorium//Assembly Bldg Church/Welfare/Relig Srvc Movie Theater School(Private) School(Public)

Vacant(Multi-family)

arterial

Miles 1.65

Legend

Apartment(Subsidized)

PU_CAT_DES

[

Vacant(Single-family)

0

0.275

0.55

1.1

Miles 1.65

Dominant Residential Types

Skating Rink(Ice/Roller)

[

Sport Facility 0

0.275

0.55

1.1

Miles 1.65

Dominant Culture/Art Types

Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

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EcoDistrict Precedent Studies Due to the rising awareness of environmental challenges, many cities in the U.S. are planning for a more sustainable living environment. Our studio tried to study and learn from these projects to become inspired for our design solutions for the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict. The projects we found focus on different aspects, but all precedents we reviewed are located in high-density urban areas. The Capitol Hill EcoDistrict report proposed by GGLO, the Lloyd EcoDistrict in Portland proposed by Mithun, and the Central Corridor EcoDistrict in San Francisco proposed by San Francisco Planning Department are illustrated below. From these visions we learned how to set up the goals for the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict and to apply sustainable living concepts on neighborhood and community scales.

Capitol Hill EcoDistrict, Seattle Proposed by GGLO, 2009 The Capitol Hill EcoDistrict asses sustainability through the lens of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Performance Areasâ&#x20AC;&#x153;, equity, habitat, health, energy, water, transportation, materials and social and provides a template that guides and supports implementation of innovative projects in Capital Hill EcoDistrict.

Image Credit: GGLO

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Lloyd EcoDistrict, Portland Proposed by Mithun Architects and Urban Design, 2004 The Lloyd EcoDistrict focus on how to increase building efficiency which connects business and property owners with the tools they need to operate more efficiently. The program helps businesses lower utility costs, save energy, and perform better.

Image Credit: Mithun Architects and Urban Design

Central Corridor EcoDistrict, San Francisco Proposed by San Francisco Planning Department, 2012 The planing area for Central Corridor EcoDistrict is the subject of a significant re-zoning effort that encourages sustainable growth. The areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposed public realm and transportation improvements may create opportunities to align energy, water, and waste infrastructure systems.

Image Credit: San Francisco Planning Department Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

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Opportunity Analysis: Group Visioning Following the previous small team research categories, we divided those content areas into three bigger categories to envision the future of the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict based on selected values. Group 1: History / Art/ Open Space Group 2: Habitat / Water / Food Group 3: Mobility / Energy / Streetscape We wanted to maximize each categoryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s value, and we combined these results together to see how to optimize the most value for the EcoDistrict. Through this research and visioning, we formulated our goals and objectives that identified different needs of each group in order to guide the design of the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s green infrastructure.

Opportunity Analysis: History / Art / Open Space

Opportunity Analysis: Habitat / Water / Food

Opportunity Analysis: Mobility / Energy / Streetscape

Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

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Opportunity Analysis: History / Art / Open Space

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Opportunity Analysis: Habitat / Water / Food

Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

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Opportunity Analysis: Mobility / Energy / Streetscape

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Capitol Hill Hill Eco-district Capitol EcoDistrict SWOT Analysis SWOT analysis Capitol Hill Eco-district SWOT analysis

The most walkable neihborhood Leadership in vibrant and engaged The most walkable neighborhood community Leadership in vibrant and engaged Leader of “Living Building Challenge” community

Low quality public realm

TOD planning strategies Street car & cycle track on Broadway Low update Street car &Impact cycle Development track on Broadway

Th Thr re eat at

POSITIVE Capitol Hill light rail station

Capitol Hill rail strategies station TODlight planning

NEGATIVE

St

Eco-habitat decreasing

Stormwater runoff and pollution low quality of the publuc realm Eco-habitat decreasing

NEGATIVE

O

ty ni ty rtu ni po rtu Op po p

POSITIVE

Stromwater runoff Highly dense urban heat and islandpollution

s esss knne ea ak WWe

St ren re g ng th th

Leader of “Living Building Challenge”

Highly dense urban heat island

Gentrification High rent rate in housing Gentrification Urban soilin houisng HighCompact rent rate Historical building preservation

Urban Compact soil

Rainwater utilizaiton

Historical building preservation

Low Impact Development update Urban wildlife habitat diversify

Rainwater utilizaiton

Urban wildlife habitat diversify

Capitol Hill Eco-district future development

iv

Capitol Hill EcoDistrict

Capitol Hill Eco-district future development

20

Capitol Hill EcoDistrict

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Principles

Living Infrastructure for the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict emphasizes the performance integration of culture, equity, habitat, health, energy, water, transportation, materials and social and provides a template that guides and supports implementation of innovative projects in the Capital Hill EcoDistrict. The Living Infrastructure for Capitol Hill EcoDistrict is a comprehensive strategy to accelerate sustainable development at the city, district and neighborhood scales by integrating built environment and infrastructure projects with City and individual actions. They are at different scales to accelerate sustainability â&#x20AC;&#x201D; small enough to innovate quickly and big enough to have a meaningful impact.

Process:

1.Identification of public issues, management concerns, opportunities, and threats through collaborative stakeholder involvement. 2.Establishment of design criteria for evaluating and selecting the preferred alternative. 3.Inventory of resources, the current situation. 4.Formulation of alternatives which address the significant issues and concerns. 5.Evaluation of the consequences, benefits, and effects of each proposed alternative. 6.Selection of a preferred alternative based upon a full and reasoned analysis.

Design Considerations: An adequate design must address all of the significant public issues, management concerns, opportunities, and threats that are identified in the early stages of the design process. Design Inputs:

Existing resource design requires the consideration of many inputs such as an inventory of existing plans and policies, current type and amount of resource use, development trends, public issues, management concerns, regional supply of opportunities, best available space, environmental conditions, and available information from government and individual.

Rigorous Analysis: The analytical stage in the design process is the evaluation of alternatives whereby the alternatives should be sharply contrasted, and the pros and cons are rigorously evaluated so the reasons for and against each alternative become clear. Collaboration:

The meaningful engagement and exchange with the public and team members is essential throughout the design process. Collaboration results in a clearer definition of public values, more creative alternatives, more reasoned and reasonable decisions, and a diversity that becomes better informed and committed to the overall design and its implementation.

Integration: Design should consider other significant natural and cultural resources, uses, demands, and values in an integrated and comprehensive fashion. Clear Management Alternatives: All alternatives must be clear, comprehensive, and provide a reasonable range of choices for public consideration. Each alternative can be contrasted by its proposed objectives, desired future conditions, desired performance experiences.

Credits: EcoDistricts | Revitalizing cities from the neighborhood up

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Master Plan

Credit: GGLO-Capitol_Hill_EcoDistrict

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Opportunities for the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict Habitat Zone Community/Open Space Zone Cultural/Commercial Zone The three Zones represent key opportunities of the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict. The color gradient shows evaluation of the importance: the darker, the higher.

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Proposal__Living Infrastructure for the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict Habitat Zone

Community/Open Space

Major green spaces Green corridors Greenways Pollinator pathways Stormwater management

Open spaces Pedestrian experience Community center Food system

Cultural/Commercial Active social network Cultural experience History experience Commercial corridors

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MAJOR CONCEPTS & INDIVIDUAL Major Concepts & Individual WorksWORKS

living Hill EcoDistrict LivingInfrastructure Infrastructurefor forCapitol the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict

Habitat Corridor Community Corridor

9

10

3

Blue Strategies Community Food System

6

5

Creative Cultural Streets Neighborhood Stitching

4 36

8

7

2

1 4


1

RETROSPECT & PROSPECT

History as Linguistics, Design as Speaker

6

OLIVE WAY ULTRA URBAN DROSSCAPE

Design for Eco-Literacy: The Story of Flowing Water

Youngsuk Jun

Xinzhuo An (Annie)

2

VIBRANT STREET

Shared Spaces for Improving Green Lifestyle

7

ECO RESILIENT CAMPUS

Redefine Urban Eco Value and Social Connection

Shih Chia Qiu

Yuhan Yang (Yoyo)

Liyang Chen

3

THE LIVING-SPINE

Catalyze Spaces with Adaptive Strategy

8

ECO-ARTERIAL

Street Typologies and Surrounding Residual Space

Guanyi Gao

4

STITCHING CAPITOL HILL ECODISTRICT Reclaim Urban Residual Space

Ying Zhou

9

URBAN CREEK SYSTEM

Water Catalyst Habitat Improvement

Rao Fu Shaoxuan Zhou

Tianshi Guo (Skye)

5

DISTRICT CORE REMIX

Integrate Open Space in District Core Area

Fangyuan Hong (Fiona)

10

PIXEL GARDENS

Pollinators in Urban Contiguous Habitat

Mahshid Gharibimarzancola Xiaoyang Zhu

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Space Typologies For our analysis of the District, we developed six open space typologies which could be applied. We tried to maximize the available spaces and opportunities given in each situation.

1. Madison/ Olive/ Bellevue PL E

Proposed green wall on building facade Complete street tree canopy

Landscape garden & Gathering space

OP E

NU

P!

Landscape garden Community ourdoor library Outdoor cafe Adult playground

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1. Madison/Olive/Bellevue PL E

2. East Capitol Hill

3. Pollinator Corridor

4. Broadway

5. Pike-Pine

6. West Capitol Hill


Street Typologies We developed nine street typologies which could be implemented in different parts of the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict for various purposes. Shared-use Street Eco-pedestrian Street Shared-use Street

1. Water Street

Habitat Corridor Habitat Corridor

4. Habitat Corridor Tranit Corridor Tranit Corridor

7. Transit Corridor

Eco-pedestrian Street

2. Shared-use Street

3. Eco-pedestrian Street

5. Alley Water Space

6. Historical Share-used Street

Alley water space Alley water space

Ramble Street Ramble Street

8. Rumble Street

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Metrics

EXISTING BUILDINGS AND INFRASTRUCTURE OPERATIONS: • Energy Use: A minimum 10% reduction below the National average by 2015 with incremental targets, reaching a 50% reduction by 2030. • Water Use: A minimum 10% reduction below the District average by 2015, with incremental targets, reaching a 50% reduction by 2030. • CO2 of Auto and Freight: A minimum 10% reduction below the current District average by 2015 with incremental targets, reaching a 50% reduction by 2030.

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Parking

Metrics from SEATTLE 2030 NEW BUILDINGS, MAJOR RENOVATIONS, AND NEW INFRASTRUCTURE: • Energy Use: an immediate 60% reduction below the National average, with incremental targets, reaching carbon neutral by 2030. • Water Use: An immediate 50% reduction below the current District average. • CO2 e of Auto and Freight: An immediate 50% reduction below the current District average.

Provided

< 30 % > 20 %

Pedestrian

We based our metrics on select Seattle 2030 District targets, and used these metrics to evaluate our collective work. We added the metric of soil area to the set of targets. The collective potential benefits are presented here with the original targets.

Alley

Commute Mode

Provided

6 Acres

of alleys are used for parking of alleys could be occupied with various activities

reduced parking lot area, encourage public transportation, and walking

Provided

60 miles pedestrian-oriented streets

in the neighborhoods, to increase more walkable and comfortable streets for pedestrians


Canopy

30,000 SF 6 P-Patch

Provided

16 %

Open space

13%

Provided

2X

60,000 SF 43 P-Patch

achieved tree canopy cover

Potable water

area of new added P-Patch

Stormwater

2X

Provided

new infrastructure to save more potable water

no treatment system

Provided

1,899,590

16%

area of open space, with a park or a playground located within 1/8 mile of every home

1,800,000 gallon saved

gallons of stormwater are managed through the new system 7,295,000 gallons of stormwater are managed through the Swale on Yale

Provided

Grey water

Provided

Water & Soil

1110

Soil

P-Patch

Habitat & Open Space

Provided

householdsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; grey water is treated by new added infrastructure

Enhance habitat

+3 Acres open space > 750,000 SF Provided

4 Acres

area of enhanced wildlife habitat in urban lands

23

species are considered in the designs

+6.3 Acres

of soil area to support a wide variety of habitats and surface infiltration performance

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Schematic Designs After the research and initial Master Plan development, individual members and small groups of our studio chose different sites within the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict boundary to come up with innovative and inspiring schematic designs which could aid visionaries for potential realization in the EcoDistrict. The ten proposed schematic designs are placed in different parts of the EcoDistrict, and have various themes: ecology, mobility, streetscape, and history. The combination of the ten individual designs helped to complete our overall Living Infrastructure Master Plan vision for the EcoDistrict.

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WATER & HABITAT Utilizing water resources for sustainable urban habitat _ Shaoxuan Zhou & Rao Fu

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Puget Sound Habitat Area

Natural land Light urban Heavy urban

Pacific NW Migration Area

Living area Flying route

Utilizing water resources for sustainable urban habitat

+

Seattle is an important breeding area for year round species, and also for migrating species. Urban habitat is essential for birds, providing nesting area, diverse shelter and food source.


PROBLEM FIELD Our project is focused on the multi-family residential area in the west portion of the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict. Imminent new development, empty allies, roof opportunities and stormwater facilities are considered as important potential elements in the design.

GREEN/BLUE CORRIDOR As integrated systems, green, blue and grey water infrastructure can reduce runoff, increase biodiversity and offer cultural/health benefits through public access to valued natural resources. Water, as a limited resource in urban areas, is a key resource to preserve and recycle. Water quality is a decisive factor in urban environmental quality.

CAPITOL HILL URBAN HABITAT Seattle songbirds are the most common year-round residents in the Pacific Northwest present in urban areas. Songbirds need diverse food sources, nesting places and shelter. The Capitol Hill district sits between the Arboretum, Interlake Park and Lake Union, all with bird nesting areas. Our design is to provide continuity of these wildlife habitats, and diversify shelter, food source and nesting places.

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REGION The site is near to Lake Union and also close to diverse habitat areas, such as Volunteer Park, Union Bay, and the Arboretum. In addition, the site is on the highest topographic point in the area. This residential subdistrict is in economic and demographic transition.

Site Analysis

Layer Analysis - Urban Eco-unit

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WATER + HABITAT _ Shaoxuan Zhou & Rao Fu


BIRD HABITAT

Selected species in the Puget Sound region.

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CONCEPT

In our habitat study, we came up with four different natural environmental prototypes. The designs combine the consideration of these prototypes with types of green infrastructure that can be used in the urban setting.

Grassland

Monocultural planting

Bio-swale

+ street tree +lower structure

Tall tree

Single habitat structure

Vertical continuity

Green roof+ green wall+ canopy

Shallow water

Mixed planting opportunity

Rain garden

Rainwater catalyzing diversity

Pond

Edge effect with diversity

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WATER + HABITAT _ Shaoxuan Zhou & Rao Fu


THE PLAN

The West Capitol hill neighborhood can be catalyzed using new green infrastructure (GI) in the alleys and in opportunities provided by the new development.

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THE SYSTEM

Connecting disparate urban habitat patches and corridors, a large-scale bio-diverse water infrastructure stitches the neighborhoods together.

Creating more green habitat -Utilizing GI to catalyze habitat space

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WATER + HABITAT _ Shaoxuan Zhou & Rao Fu

Creating more green public space -Active programming space as public space


THE VISION

Alleys, parking lots, roofs, and housing units are the four important potential opportunities both in terms of water systems and habitat enhancement. The whole system design aims to provide habitat and more green space for living and playing, as well as recycling water and treating grey and storm water in order to improve the environment.

Alley + Street

-reduce and rearrange parking through alley design and building setback -utilize alleys by green infrastructure and activated open space -transform parking lanes on street to bioswales

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MID-RISE RESIDENTIAL HOUSING DEVELOPMENT

- negotiate with properties - new apartment development plan in order to provide more public space

Betula papyrifera Prunus / Pyrus

Cornus nuttallii Acer rubrum

Mahonia nervosa

Myrica californica Carex obnupta Juncus effusus Scirpus acutus

Rubus parviflorus Erica carnea Rosa woodsii Amelanchier arborea

Our new development proposal suggests having one tall apartment instead of several single family houses, based on the need for more housing. Then more land can be used as important water and habitat areas. This plan is located in the north part of the neighborhood, at the end of the stormwater system and at a transition point to Lake Union.

11

11

11

1

8

6

4

1

WATER + HABITAT _ Shaoxuan Zhou & Rao Fu

7

3

2

52

10

9

5

1

Retention pond

2

Relaxing areas

3

Planting strip

4

Annual planter

5

Dry-water playground

6

Planter

7

Rain garden

8

Wood sitting

9

Community gathering

10

Courtyard

11

New residential building


Housing Unit Redevelopment

multi family housing

pervious paving

rainwater play plaza

urban wet habitat

Rain garden

community open space

pond open habitat

green wall

- set up new infrastructure system - create open space and specific habitat environment

GREEN ROOF GREEN CATNOPY PEDESTRIAN FRTIENDLY AREA URBAN CREEK_CATALYZING HABITAT

FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS ALONG THE ROUTE

When the system has matured it will be able to treat more water from the neighborhood, and possibly even the entirety of the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict, to create connected habitat and provide cleaner water to Lake Union.

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PIXEL GARDENS

Pollinators in Urban Contiguous Habitat_ Mahshid Gharibimarzancola & Xiaoyang Zhu Thanks to the wonderful work of pollinators, much of the food we eat and flowers and plants we enjoy are possible. Yet, opportunity to create habitat for pollinators in a densely populated urban environment is limited. Contiguous habitat can consist of thousands of pixel gardens that are working together in a network. This network would not only support pollinators, but also improve built environments for people.

Contiguous Habitat

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POLLINATORS

PIXEL GARDEN_Mahshid Gharibimarzancola & Xiaoyang Zhu

Urban Life


Pixel to Corridor to Network

Green roof Green wall Green street back/front yard

Pixels

Corridor

Network

Phase1:The pixel gardens could work in different levels individually, with specific design toolkits assigned based on their locations and characteristics. Phase2: Separated pixels could work together as a corridor. Phase3: Interactive corridors communicate with each other to build an eco-network for wildlife and people.

Pacific Lowland Mixed Forests POLLINATORS PACIFIC LOWLANDS MIXED FORESTS Seattle

POLLINATORS BEES

BUTTERFLIES

BIRDS

MOTHS

BEETLES

FLIES absent BATS fetid WIND

PLANT TRAIT

COLOR

putrid

NECTAR GUIDES

ODOR musty faint

present

pleasant

sweet

NECTAR usually absent deeply hidden somewhat hidden sometimes present usually present POLLEN limited

modest

ample

FLOWER SHAPE shallow

regular

large

abundant

abundant

small and stigmas narrow tube tubular-like funnel-like without landing pad

bowl-like

with landing pad

Seattle is located at the Pacific Lowlands Mixed Forests area. The diagram expresses common pollinators in that zone and their plant preferences. Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

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Interconnected Network of Habitats

Volunteer Park

Green Belt

E Republican St

Miller Playfield Playground

Pollinator Pathway 2.0

Cal Anderson Park

Pollinator Pathway 1.0

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PIXEL GARDEN_Mahshid Gharibimarzancola & Xiaoyang Zhu


Corridor Analysis and opportunities HABITAT CLUES

community spaces street space green wall / green roof back / front yard

ACTIVITIES

Commercial street

Commercial street

beyond district community gathering neighborhood lives

Single-family

Multi-family

Multi-family

Green belt

Community Center Service zone

Service zone

Main green spaces Proposed green spaces Mixed use Buildings Multi-family Buildings Single-family

The design process is developed through multiple scales, from network to corridor to pixels. The network scale covers the whole Capitol Hill EcoDistrict. We explore opportunities for habitat based on exsiting conditions, such as green space, community garden accessibility, tree coverage, fruit trees, vacant land, parking lots and roofs. The Republican corridor is a very dense and mixed use urban area, connecting two big green patches, Miller Playfield and the I-5 Green Belt along. The habitat clues and activities vary based on different zones, which provide more possibility and flexibitily for pixel gardens. So we focused on this area as our corridor of pixel gardens.

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Key Pollinators

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PIXEL GARDEN_Mahshid Gharibimarzancola & Xiaoyang Zhu


Design Toolkit for Key Pollinators

Half-Cuts! Quick Cover for Wildlife

Drilled Log of Firewood

Natural Log

Rocks with Cavities and Crannies

Birds Feeder

Drilled Log of Firewood Dipping Pool

Bird Nest Habitat Features around a Pond

Different species have their own behaviors, habitat preferences and distribution areas. Research about key species displayed in a comprehensive diagram provides a design toolkit for pixel gardens. The distribution map shows migration routes and distribution of three species, including Rufous Hummingbird, Monarch Butterfly and Bumble Bee. The maps show three scales, from North America to Washington State to Seattle.

What is a Pixel Garden?

The key species matrix provides multiple aspects about our focused species, which have great importance for pollination process, which have been sharply threatenedare in limited recentto decades. In a densley developed neighbourhood, opportunities create large green areas. Pixel garden is an idea to design a network of small gardens, which are working together to shape a huge urban infrastructures. Small gardens are pixels of a toolkit big picture, Ecodistrict forcycle pollinators. The design circlean shows the life of four key species, how they change, and what they need in each period of their lives. The diagram is a design toolkit, with simple instructures for people to create their own small garEachSimplicity pixel of a and picture has specific and then pixels specificto order, that theytheir can own work gardens together and colo dens. accesibility of color, the design ideas areshould helpfulbe forinpeople enjoysocreating and to make the whole image. Pixel Garden toolkit provides people with the opportunity to make informed decisions, work with make livable places for pollinators. their neighbors as a team, and cocreate an EcoDistrict for pollinators.

Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

This diagram shows the life cycle of four key species, how they change, and what they need in each period of their lives. The diagram is a design toolkit, with simple instructures for people to create their own small gardens. Simplicity and accesibility of the design ideas are helpful for people to enjoy creating their own garden and make a livable place for pollinators aswell.

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Pixel Gardens

What is a Pixel Garden? Pixel Gardens are not identical, just like pixels of a picture. Each pixel of a picture has a specific color, and then pixels should be in specific order, so that they can work together and make the whole image. The Pixel Garden toolkit provides people with the opportunity to make informed decisions, work with their neighbors as a team, and co-create an EcoDistrict for pollinators. A mobile app can facilitate the process, collect data and observations, give information to create a small garden, and even give points as an incentive which can be counted to buy gardening materials, organic food, etc.

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PIXEL GARDEN_Mahshid Gharibimarzancola & Xiaoyang Zhu


Pixel Communication

Pixel Garden App Input location species plants behavior

Output distribution population design toolkit protection methods

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Habitat Pixel Typologies

In a densley developed neighbourhood, opportunities are limited to create large green areas. The Pixel Garden is an idea to design a network of small gardens, which are working together to shape a large urban infrastructure. Small gardens are pixels of a big picture, an Ecodistrict for pollinators. There are six typologies of the pixel gardens and each can provide pollinators and people with different opportunities. When we have a combination of pixel types, the spot is a favorable place for a variety of pollinators.

Green Roof

Back/front Yard

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PIXEL GARDEN_Mahshid Gharibimarzancola & Xiaoyang Zhu


Community Garden

Green Wall/Structure

Parklet

Planting Stripe

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Plants Relative to Pollinators

Height

Groundcover Veins Evergreen shrub Deciduous shrub Tree

Blooming time

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PIXEL GARDEN_Mahshid Gharibimarzancola & Xiaoyang Zhu


Wildlife Next Door

The plant diagram on the previous page can be used in the design toolkit, to inform the gardenters about plants, their height, look, and water/sun requirements in different seasons. The mage above shows how people can make their own small pollinator gardens, using the instruction of the design toolkit, to enjoy a green life while supporting pollinators and other wildlife habitat. Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

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VIBRANT STREET PLAN Street Life Plan For Capitol Hill EcoDistrict Liyang Chen + Shih Chia Chiu

ECODISTRICT

Capitol Hill EcoDistrict is a comprehensive plan initiated to advance neighborhood sustainability through increasing efficiencies, reducing pollution, restoring habitat, and improving community.

MOBILITY

The openings of the Capitol Hill Trolley and Light Rail station will more closely connect the EcoDistrict with other city districts. This significant addition of public transit provides significant opportunities to activate the community.

CULTURAL IDENTITY

Capitol Hill has long been Seattleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cultural attractor in terms of its music culture and varied lifestyles. Today, the Pike/Pine corridor is a thriving hive of restaurants, nightclubs, creative offices, and local retailers.

DEMOGRAPHICS

With this vibrant life and substantial real estate investment into new multi-family housing, the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s population is increasing significantly, especially with young adults. However, the price of housing is also high, and climbing.

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SITE CONSIDERATIONS

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STREET FRAMEWORK

STRATEGY TOOLKIT

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VIBRANT STREET_Liyang Chen & Shih Chia Chiu


STREET TYPOLOGY

Each typology aims to enhance streets and urban space performance in different ways. With low traffic volume on these streets, all three typologies are using a curbless shared-use street strategy with one lane of traffic, to improve the pedestrian experience, support local businesses, and activate public space.

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Key Map

Nagle PI (Connect to Light Rail Station)

SITE PLAN

Carl Anderson Park

Pine St 10

1

2

6

3

4

10th Ave

7

9

PHASE 1- CREATIVITY CORRIDOR

5

N

0

11

PHASE 2- REDEFINE CORE AREA

12

PHASE 3-

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ECOLOGICAL CORRIDOR

VIBRANT STREET_Liyang Chen & Shih Chia Chiu

25

50

100 ft

1. Vertical Lighting Structure 2. Terraced Platform / Stage for Street Concert 3. Dry Plaza / Fountain 4. Outdoor Sitting Area 5. Green Wall / Screen for Amphitheater 6. Bike Station 7. Rain Garden 8. Pollinator Vertical Structure 9. Plug-N-Play Furniture 10. Food Truck Parking 11. Parking Lot / Space for Temporary Event 12. Outdoor Cafe

Pike St

E Union St

8

11th Ave

N


REDEFINE CORE AREA

N

0

25

50 ft

MULTI-FUNCTIONAL PLAZA

URBAN PLAY PLAZA WEEKDAY 3:00PM

FARMERS MARKET WEEKEND 10:00 AM

CAPITOL HILL BLOCK PARTY 12:00 PM

OUTDOOR CONCERT WEEKDAY 9:00PM

AMPHITHEATER WEEKEND 7:00 PM

CAPITOL HILL PRIDE FESTIVAL 7:00 PM

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CLOSED LOOP WATER SYSTEM - HISTORICAL BUILDING RENOVATION Seismic and green retrofits to historic buildings will provide long-term benefit. The plan integrates street design with adjacent historic buildings and development, using green infrastructure to accept stormwater runoff from building rooftops and streets.

PUBLIC SPACE IMPROVEMENT

72

VIBRANT STREET_Liyang Chen & Shih Chia Chiu


CLOSED LOOP WATER SYSTEM - NEW DEVELOPMENT

The Vertical Green Structures are attached to the buildings at 11th Ave, connecting habitats of Volunteer Park, Cal Anderson Park, and Seattle University. New development will be equipped with high-efficiency water treatment facilities. Reused water can be used for multi-purposes, including toilet flushing, irrigation, kitchen, and street recreation.

WATER TREATMENT STRATEGY

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CREATIVITY CORRIDOR-10TH AVE DAY TIME

Plug-N-Play Furniture

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VIBRANT STREET_Liyang Chen & Shih Chia Chiu


CREATIVITY CORRIDOR-10TH AVE NIGHT TIME

+

=

VERTICAL LIGHTING STRUCTURE

The Vertical Lighting Structure enhances public space by providing pedestrian-friendly amenities including special lighting, seasonal heating and cooling, Wifi hotspots, and information stations. With these components, 10th Ave can function as a flexible event venue.

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ECOLOGICAL CORRIDOR-11TH AVE

VERTICAL POLLINATOR STRUCTURE

The Vertical Pollinator Structure is designed to connect and support the habitat of Volunteer Park, Cal Anderson Park, and Seattle University. The 11th Ave sidewalk is fitted with this habitat structure, which would also provide daytime shade and nighttime lighting.

76 VIBRANT STREET_Liyang Chen & Shih Chia Chiu


GREEN LIFE STREET-BOYLSTON AVE

VIBRANT STREET DESIGN FOR MULTIPLE USERS

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RETROSPECT & PROSPECT: FROM WHEELS TO FEET

Design for Pike & Pine in Capitol Hill_Xinzhuo(Annie) AN

This design is about creating street prototypes and open spaces with historical meanings for community activities. Based on the study of history of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Auto Rowâ&#x20AC;?, the design is inspired by the fabric and materials from the streets and buildings. The proposal tries to create more incentives for pedestrians to walk, ramble or linger. With different inspirations from autos and features of historical buildings, the proposed street and open spaces will be build upon flexible and the identity of Capitol Hill.

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Retrospect & Prospect_ Xinzhuo(Annie) An


Future

Walking Experience on Site

Bus Route Renovation

Bike Pronto in 0.2 Mile Intact

Slightly

Lightrail & Streetcar in 0.2 Mile Bike Lane Extensive

CONSERVATION CONDITION

Art Venues

Facade Alignment

Surface Parking

1900

1930 Depression

Post World War II

1980s

Now

2015

Year Diagram of “ Auto Row”

Moderate

New Construction

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COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

Breaking the Motion

Concept

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Retrospect & Prospect_ Xinzhuo(Annie) An

The design includes three parts which are the street design and two open spaces. For the street design, the concept is about breaking the flowing motion of walking by adding incentives for people to stop, linger and recall the memory of the former “Auto Row”. The concept advances the idea of “from wheels to feet”. Through the design of small scale street furniture and prototypes, the street will become more welcoming, friendly, and walkable, and the rhythm of walking will be more interesting and attractive. The design of furniture and paving is inspired by the materials on site and from history, recalling the memory of “Auto Row” to embed its identity in Capitol Hill.


STREET DESIGN

Brick

Permeable paving

Prototype Design

Bump Design

Bike Lane Divsion Design

Paving decoration with Tire Track

Foldable & Movable

Brick

Permeable paving

Plants

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OPEN SPACE I

Prototype Design

Using tires for seating and bicycle rack elements to recall the memory of auto row. Raingarden Materials

82

Retrospect & Prospect_ Xinzhuo(Annie) An


OPEN SPACE II

Prototype Design

Art Acivities

Movable

Resting Space

Lighting Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

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OLIVE WAY ULTRA URBAN DROSSCAPE

Design for Eco-literacy: The Story of Flowing Water_Youngsuk Jun Activating leftover urban space and using the existing natural slope of Olive Way will create a new design for eco-literacy. This design revealing water and ecological art will encourage eco-literacy by generating new active public space for learning and active involvement of the community.

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Olive Way

OliveWay

Eco-Literacy

Denny Way Broadway

Broadway

Denny Way

Generate and Activate Public Open space

Open Space Access for the Dense Neighborhood

Ultra Urban Drosscapes

EcoDistrict Boundary

Park / Open Space

1/8 Mile Radius

Ultra Urban Drosscapes

Dense Residential Zone

Collection of Drosscapes

EcoDistrict Boundary

Existing Parks

Open Space

Pedestrian Connection Collaboration and Exchange of Art & Culture

Stormwater Functional Features

ARTS that cultivate ECO-LITERACY tells the story of WATER

Seperated Stormwater

on Olive Way, EcoDistrict.

Secondary Buffer for Street Water

Olive Way

Close Access to Social-Cultural Center of Capitol Hill

Ultra Urban Drosscape

Retail/Social/Historic Zone

Collection of Drosscapes

EcoDistrict Boundary

Cistern: 30,400 Gal/Yr x 10

= 304,000 Gal/Yr

Bio-retention: 10,500 SF

= 2,098,000 Gal/Yr

Trees: 80 new trees

= 56,000 Gal/Yr

Permeable pavement: 120 SF

= 2,000 Gal/Yr

Denny Way

Total amount of stormwater managed = 2,460,000 Gal/Yr (Total amount of rainfall in the area

Olive Way

= 6,750,000 Gal/Yr)

Broadway

Broadway

Denny Way

36.4% of overall stormwater

Ultra Urban Drosscapes

Stormwater Conveyance Flow Diagram

Collection of Drosscapes

(3.3% before the new design)

Swale on Yale

Streetwater Flow

Cultural Access

Source: EcoDistrict Capitol Hill GGLO Report

Storefront Seattle: Calling for Cistern Design

+

The Storefront Seattle: Cistern Design Program will encourage local artists to design cisterns so the cisterns are not only functional but also have artistic value to them. Sponsors will provide stipends to the artists and the artists will be given the theme of water or ecology to design their cistern art.

Programs and Stakeholders Cistern

Local Artists

Eco-Literacy Cistern

Parklet

Open Space Local Artists

Businesses

Tree Canopies & Green Area EcoDistrict Neighbors

Unique Artist-designed Cisterns

Tourists

Water

Bio-retention

Pedestrian Street

Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

85


Site Analysis Summit Ave E

Pedestrian Street

Overall Site Plan

E John St

it

m

m Su

le

i Tr

g an

Water Flow:

Less

More

Natural flow of water: Nothing has to be forces

Wa y

live

St ree t

E Denny Way

EO

De

nn

yT ria

ng

le

Slope: 7.5%

ian

Traffic:

Slow

Fast

we

ll T ria

ng

E Howell St

Green Space & Canopy:

Ho

Bellevue Ave

Melrose Ave

I-5

le

Pe

de

str

Less Traffic Section: Weekend Pedestiran Street

Tree Canopies

Green Space

3.9 Times Increase

E Olive Pl

Ultra Urban Drosscape Intervention:

Combining of different design elements with new public open spaces and pedestrian streets will create unique spaces for eco-literacy + street water management. These elements will generate reasons for people to linger and return to the site.

Water & Green

Cistern

1

2

Site Design Elements 3

Water Flow Bio-retention

Water Flow:

86

Cisterns:

Bio-retention Cells:

Olive Way Ultra Urban Drosscape_Youngsuk Jun

4

5

1: Bio-retention 2: Parklet 3: Water Channel 4: Artist-designed Cistern 5: Public Open Space


Howell Triangle Activating a formerly underused street by creating public water plaza with a solar-powered, artist-designed cistern along with green walls. This new site will not only benefit pedestrians but also help nearby businesses by providing nice seating areas for their customers.

Before

Howell Triangle Section Bio-retention filtered water will eventually flow into the water plaza, then will end up in the street drain. Revealing the street water will help promote ecoliteracy.

Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

A

Howell Triangle Plan 1 2 3 4 5

Solar-powered Cistern

Artist-designed Cistern Parklet Water Feature Connected Water Channel Weekend Pedestrian Street

A

1 3

Use solar power to pump up the water to the building for toilet and shower. This will save more water than regular cisterns by reusing storm and grey water.

2

4

Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 5

Name

Rooftop water collection Greywater goes back into the cistern after filtering process Solar-powered pump

Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

87


Denny Triangle This triangular leftover space will be transformed into an outdoor bicycle rest area. The existing Pronto bike station will be improved with designated new bike lanes and artist designed cisterns. Bio-retention devices and permeable pavements will also help treat street water.

ntion Bio-rete

Artist-designed Cistern Bike Lanes Outdoor Seatings & Bio-retention Raised Trenched Crosswalk Bio-retention Planters

1

5 3 4

88

Permeable Surface Amended soil mix 3/4â&#x20AC;? gravel base Perforated underdrain

Aggregate bedding Open graded base Open graded sub-base Native soil

Raised Trenched Sidewalk

Denny Triangle Plan 1 2 3 4 5

Before

Olive Way Ultra Urban Drosscape_Youngsuk Jun

2

For Multi-purposed raised sidewalk takes street water from both the side and the top. People can see the water flowing through the drain and can follow the water. This will allow the water to have continuous flow when crossing the big intersection.


Olive Weekend Pedestrian Street

Before

Ongoing exposure to ecoliteracy design will eventually incerase the overall awareness of EcoDistrict. Olive Way will become a popular weekend hangout space. Pedestiran street could turn into event venue and social gathering place as well.

Summit Triangle Section Bio-retention filtered water will eventually flow into the water plaza, then will end up in the street drain. This process will reveal the water to the public and will become an effective educational eco-literacy tool.

Water feeding into the nearby buildings and p-patch

B’

B

Water flows along the terraced bio-retention cells

Summit Triangle Plan 1 2 3 4 5

Artist-designed Cistern Terraced Bio-retention Water FeatureB 3 Green Parking Lot ADA Accessible Ramp

Mobile Application for Eco-literacy

2

B’ 5

1

4

To encourage and promote eco-literacy, “E-Oliveway” application will be developed, especially for the younger generation’s involvement and emotional attachment to the site. Open Space

E-OLIVEWAY

Cistern & Water Pedestrian Street Features: - Locations and information of amenities - Data of water usage, saving and cisterns - Booking for events and activities - History of Oliveway

Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

89


ECO RESILIENT CAMPUS Re-define Ecological Value and Social Connection _Yuhan Yang

90


Fountain plaza plan view

Optimizing the existing parking space

Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

91


This project recognizes left over space and parking lots in the dense urban campus setting. Through various types of ecological landscape design, it combines social activities with water design. The site is composed of heavy traffic streets, alleys, and public open space.There are places where the city and the college overlap. So the goal is to create an interactive place for both public and school use, while strengthening the sense of belonging for the campus. A clear path and pavement pattern that connects in a similar manner will indicate to people where to go, where they will experience a safe and playful urban life under the elaborated lighting design. Water collected in belowground cisterns can be used for the water features and to irrigate the park.

92

Eco Resilient Campus_Yuhan Yang


Water Canal Alley

Daily water collection and filtration

Water flow followed by paving pattern

Optimizing parking lots and left over alley space by re-creating ecological network Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

93


THE LIVING-SPINE

catalyze spaces with adaptive strategies in multi-contexts along 11th Ave_Guanyi Gao concept

1 identify opportunities find potential space for adapting existing different character zones along 11th Ave 2 build the spine enhanced linear space to provide continuity on 11th Ave responding the heavy commercial Broadway corridor 3 adapt public space create adaptive strategy on street edges and open space

1 Identify Opportunities Lowell School Outdoor Space

from

Volunteer PARK

residential district to

from

Lowell school

E Roy St

to

E Repu

blican

from to E Den

along Cal Anderson park

ney W ay

Cal Anderson PARK

E Pin

e St

from to

from

from

to to EP

ike

from

St

to

copy shop/ parking lot EU

nio

nS

t

from

E Madison St SEATTLE UNIVERSITY

94

The Living Spine _ Guanyi Gao

to

St


2 Build The Spine Performance

transportation

33546.64 ft2 8980.5 ft2 enhance habitat open space social

water

environmental health

58 new trees

201400 gallon managed stormwater

Program

Rain Garden Rain garden is planted depressions designed to infiltrate stormwater runoff.

Car2Go

Pollinator Garden

Native plants will use less water and require less maintenance once established. They also can provide habitat for attracting pollinator

Educational Interaction

SPINE based on school context

functional stormwater collection rain garden pollinator garden wider sidewalk porous pavement street tree Temporal Variation SPINE based on residential context

tactical urbanism festival street pollinator garden street tree pervious pavement Edge Softening

SPINE based on urban green space/sports field context

rain garden wider sidewalk parklet bike station pollinator garden street tree pervious pavement Artistic Eco-function

SPINE based on cultural/commercial context

artistic outdoor play space rain garden pollinator garden Car2Go complete street bicycle parking parklet protected bike lane recycled lighting green roof

Car2Go means less pollution, less traffic, and more parking spaces. These free parking spaces can be utilized for more â&#x20AC;&#x153;green areasâ&#x20AC;? in Capital Hill Eco-district

Green Wall/Roof

Green wall/roof can reclaim disregarded space by providing aesthetic stimulation and reduce of the Urban Heat Island Effect and improve exterior air quality

Complete Street

Create non-traffic social functions within the right-of-way to support a new eco-concentration within a mix-use living street

Tree Canopy

The canopy layer provides protection from strong winds and storms, while also intercepting sunlight and precipitation

Pervious Paving

Pervious paving allows water to vertically flow through hard surfaces. As substitute for impervious paving, they support both pedestrian ans vehicular traffic

Curb

Curb cuts can vary in length, allowing for greater rain flow control. A flush curb take distribution of rainwater from street to the treatment facility Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

95


3 Adapt Public Space

adaptive strategy-Artistic Eco-function

SPINE based on cultural | commercial | art context

N

plan

AFTER|11th Ave at E Union St looking south

coffee shop/ copy shop Seattle University

green roof graffiti wall

bike box

rain garden

trampoline

recycled water

recycled lighting

pervious paving

11t

bike parking

hA

0

Car2Go

50 feet

BEFORE

ve

adaptive strategy-Edge Softening

SPINE based on urban green space | sports field context AFTER|11th Ave at E Denney Way looking south

plan

landscape canopy

green space bike+car

11th Ave

street parking

art board

flush curb

landscape sitting

0

recreation

rain garden

96

The Living Spine _ Guanyi Gao

40 feet

BEFORE

N


adaptive strategy-Temporal Variation SPINE based on residential context

AFTER|11th Ave at E Thomas St looking north

N

plan

new tree canopy

pollinator garden

rain garden

0

40 feet

e

th

11

Av

BEFORE

porous paving

tactical urbanism

street painting

temporal variation

adaptive strategy-Educational Interaction SPINE based on educational context

N

plan

AFTER|11th Ave at E Roy St looking east collect rain water from roof

ornamental tree

rain cover

rain window

new tree canopy

0

40 feet

structure detail school pollinator garden

rain garden

11th Ave

BEFORE

outdoor learning space

sand play space

rain garden(collect rain water)

Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

97


ECO ARTERIAL Exploring Residual Spaces to Innovate the Nexus of Capitol Hill_Ying Zhou Based on different street typologies of the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict, stormwater management, pollinator pathway and new streetscape designs are applied to E Olive Way, Broadway and Pike St. These streets can be a nexus of the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict according to their landuse, topographic and drainage conditions. Specific site design to the residual spaces of E Olive Way and E Pike St. are proposed according to their site conditions and potentials. As a mixed-use secondary street, E Olive Street focuses on reusing existing vacant spaces, parking lots and rooftops. Broadway is a primary traffic corridor in the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict, enhancing different activities and combining with their ecological functions are the design goals. Increasing sidewalk space of E Pike Street will improve the pedestrian environment of this historical corridor. The goal of applying multiple programs, including small parklets, P-Patches and gathering spaces, is to reactivate the street for the local community.

98


Street Section Diagram Pedestrian Zone

Vegetated Swale

Pollinator Corridor

Bike Trail

10’

5’

10’

5’

3’

3’

Drive Lane

10’

10’

10’

10’

10’

9’

10’

10’

9’

26’

7’

5’

5’

Pike St. Plaza

Olive Art Corner

10’

Pike St. P-Patch

350 feet 300 feet 250 feet 200 feet 150 feet 100 feet 50 feet 0 feet

Purposed Water Cleanliness Chart

Lake Union

Concept Diagram

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Color

Swale on Yale

Ca

O

Shape

Greenroof Pathway

Water Quality

Water Flow

E Pike St.

Broadway

E Olive Way

Swale on Yale

Eco Arterial

Fresh Mild pleasant

Height

Faint but fresh

Strong sweet (emitted at night)

Early Height Section of Pollinator Pathway Late

None to strongly fruity or fetid

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Water Requirement

Pollinator Diagram

Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

99


N 0’ E Olive Art Corner Plan

E Olive Art Corner Section

100

Eco Arterial _ Ying Zhou

40’

80’

Resource Possibility Diagram


Olive Art Corner

Olive Art Pavilion

Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

101


E Pike St. Plan

Fruit Tree

P-Patch Cell Stormwater Landscape Furniture Stormwater Landscape Furniture

E

Pik e

E Mad

102

Eco Arterial _ Ying Zhou

St

.

ison S

t.

Gird Pattern Enhance the Connectivity between E Madison St. with E Pike St.


N 0’

E Pike Plaza

E Pike P-Patch

40’

80’

E Pike Plaza is located at the second block of E Pike St. The design idea is to reprogram a parking lot space between two commercial buildings to create an urban plaza with an outdoor performing area, to enhance the cultural environment of E Pike St.

On the last block of E Pike St, the design idea is to use the triangular space to create a place for the local community. The program includes a P-Patch and community gathering space. Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

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STITCHING CAPITOL HILL ECODISTRICT

Reclaim Urban Residual Space_Tianshi Guo Madison Street creates a dynamic city grid, but it also a barrier between Seattle University and the central Capitol Hill EcoDistrict. How can the pedestrian experience crossing and along the streets be improved?

d

y wa

a Bro

&

n

-Pi

e Pik

me

m

o eC

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Uni

vers

ict

D

istr

Un

ive

Po

ten

Madison Street

tia

No

lP

rth

ed

Capitol Hill Art Distr

ict Boundary

104

rsit

-S

es

yE

ntr

tria

ou

th

ity B

an

nC

ce

on

Co

nn

oun

ec

ne

tio

cti

n

on

dar

y


Pedestrian Barrier Pike-Pine&Broadway Commercial District Capitol Hill Art Organizations

on

is ad

M

.

Str

Broadway / Harvard / Madison

10th / Madison / University entrance intersection

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I head south on 12th, turning east on Union every day, and I see students, bicyclists and other pedestrians in dangerous situations in this very high density neighborhood.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; -- SDOT survey Interviewee

Seattle University

Art Organizations & Neighborhood Stitching

Seneca & 12th / Union / Madison intersection

Seattle Walking Score Map

http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/pedestrian_masterplan/ pmp_system_analysis.htm

Vacating Street & Land use

Better Pedestrian Connection

Changing residual space into positive urban open space by vacating the street and connecting with Seattle University.

Crossing the road score Walk along the road score

Rumble Strips as an Art?

Stitching Pattern-->Triangular space with stitching pattern-->Flow & activities with stitching pattern

Sound & Activities with Passing Singing Roads with Rumble Strips Natural Habitat People Interaction Paving Material Changing

Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

105


E. Broadway

13th Ave.

12th Ave.

E. Union Str.

11th Ave.

10th Ave.

Site Plan

tr.

nS

o dis

Ma

E. Union Str.

E. Seneca Str.

Japanese American Remembrance Garden

Seattle University Entrance

E. Spring Str.

The Union Green

Program & Interaction

SU walk way

The Union Green

50 0

300 ft. 100

Urban Orchard Natural<-->People

10th Ave Pedestrian Street People<-->People

Moveable Art Showcase

Sections along Madison Street

(Entrance of an Art District) ‘Introduction to Capitol Hill Art & Culture’

12th&Union Str.&Madison St. 10th Ave&Madison St. Broadway&Madison St.

106

Stitching Capitol EcoDistrict _ Tianshi Guo


Open up University Boundary The new site design creates a better connection between the Seattle University and the Capitol Hill Central area.

Little Change - Big Improvement.

To improve the pedestrian experience crossing Madison Street at the university entrance, some small changes like cross walks, traffic lights and rumble strips could make a big difference. Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

107


DISTRICT CORE REMIX Open Space Integration_Fangyuan Hong

The goal of this project is to integrate separated open spaces to create a new district core. That is able to accommodate various activities and possesses high eco-value.

108


N 0

200

400

800feet

Existing Conditions The site is near the intersection of Broadway and E Pine St, which is in the central part of the Capitol Hill district, with large open spaces, institutions, busy retail streets and surrounded by multifamily residents. The up-coming light rail station and street-car stations are within walking distance.

Broad way

Light rail

Green Open Space

Sports Court

Rooftop

Streetcar

E Pine St

Bus stop

Street

Site Location

Space Typology

Green Space

Street Energy

Public Transit

Problems & Potentials

Underused Open Space

Public Transit

Negative Edge

High Retaining Wall

Unfriendly Entrance

Same Height Level

Various Sidewalk Edge

Design Strategy Occupy The Rooftop

Create A Centre

Thicken The Edge Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

109


1. Rooftop P-patch 2. Collective Kitchen 3. Staircase 4. Pedestrian Bridge 5. Raingarden 6. Sculpture Plaza 7. Green Amphitheatre 8. Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Playground 9. Pingpong Table 10. Sports Court

5

6

2

4

1

3

110

District Core Remix_Fangyuan Hong

7


The site design can be separated into four parts. The first one is transforming the green amphitheatre south of the central community college into a community plaza, which could be accessed from each edge. The second one is turning the rooftop of the parking garage to a P-patch, and connecting it to the plaza with a pedestrian bridge. The third part is to reorganize the sports court south of the Carl Anderson park in order to open the edge to the street and create a play ground adjoining the existing sport fields. The last part is widening the sidewalk of E Pine St, and installing street furniture, raingardens, and play infrastructure.

10

8 9

N

0’

50’

100’

250’

Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

111


Thicken the Edge

Street Furniture

Occupy the Rooftop

112

District Core Remix_Fangyuan Hong

Raingarden

Play Installation


Create the Center

Permeable Surface

Raingarden

Canopy

Entrance on the edge

Circulation

Gathering space

Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

113


114


Capitol Hill Eco District Capstone Studio

115



Living Infrastructure for the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict