Strength in Connection: GHI Director's Report October 2017

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STRENGTH IN CONNECTION

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON GLOBAL HEALTH INSTITUTE DIRECTOR’S REPORT OCTOBER 2017


UW-Madison Global Health Institute

UW–MADISON GLOBAL HEALTH INSTITUTE

IMPACT ~500

>1,200

185

Students enrolled in

Undergraduate Certificates in

Graduate | Professional |

Undergraduate Certificate in

Global Health awarded

Capstone Certificates in

Global Health

2012-2017

Global Health awarded

2017-2018

2007-2017

35

1,082

23

Majors in 8 schools and

Graduate/professional

UW-Madison classes worked

colleges represented in 2017

students participated in field

on 30 Monona, Wisconsin,

undergraduate certificate

experiences

city projects in the first

graduates

2005-2017

UniverCity Year program

172

34

72

Rural Wisconsin students

Advisory Committee

Grants to faculty, staff,

and teachers from 28 schools

members represent 14 of

graduate students, and

participated in the annual high

UW-Madison’s schools and

visiting scholars, representing

school global health day

colleges

medicine, economics,

2014-2017

2

engineering, and more

675

140

300

Participants attended the 4W

Participants from 22 countries

Participants and guests

Summit in April 2017, co-

attended the Quality

attended the 13th annual

sponsored by 4W and the UW

Improvement Leadership

Global Health Symposium in

Women’s and Gender Studies

Institute

March 2017

Consortium

2011-2017


UW-Madison Global Health Institute

Letter from the Director Dear friends and colleagues, We all know the challenges facing our world: Unprecedented natural disasters, increasing economic and social disparities, and a marked rise in the need for health systems that can provide care for all. In these uncertain times, the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Global Health Institute (GHI) and its work at the intersection of health, equity, and sustainability, is ever more relevant. Here you will find some of the ways our GHI community is advancing health for all and educating tomorrow’s health leaders. I am especially happy to report that GHI continues to make substantial contributions to education across campus. From managing international rotations for medical students to inviting high school students to campus to learn about global health to co-leading the increasingly popular Undergraduate Certificate in Global Health, the educational programs we sponsor and co-sponsor are opening doors and shaping young lives. In this report, you will also see how GHI Associate Director Tony Goldberg, a virus sleuth, is looking for the pathogens that could cause the next epidemic. GHI Advisory Committee members Lyric Bartholomay and Susan Paskewitz are leading the new $10 million Upper Midwestern Center of Excellence in Vector Borne Diseases to thwart insect-borne illness. GHI’s Quality Improvement Leadership Institute, led by GHI Associate Director Lori DiPrete Brown, fostered a project to stop TB that has garnered the Dalai Lama’s support. Our latest grant recipients will tackle antimicrobial resistance, school milk programs, domestic violence, emerging viruses, and more. They showcase the breadth of disciplines needed to ensure health for all and the complexity of the challenges facing us. We also report on February’s Climate & Health meeting, organized by the American Public Health Association, along with former U.S. Vice President Al Gore and co-hosted by GHI. I was honored to lead the opening panel. This year, we also wish Professor Cindy Haq, the founding director of the Center for Global Health that became GHI, the best in her next adventure. She has inspired students and encouraged all of us to strive for equitable health across communities. We will miss her when she moves to California. GHI’s vision calls upon us to advance equitable and sustainable health across the world. Our mission is to discover the underlying determinants of health and disease and to find lasting solutions to these complex challenges. Our strength is in collaborations that bring together the wisdom of the UW-Madison’s 21 schools and colleges with that of colleagues and communities in Wisconsin and, indeed, across the planet. Our hope lies with our students, as they take lessons learned from UW’s global health programs into the world. Many thanks to all of you who have been part of our work and our community. Together, we can continue to make a difference. On, Wisconsin, Jonathan Patz, M.D., MPH, Director, Global Health Institute John P. Holton Chair in Health and the Environment

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UW-Madison Global Health Institute

INSPIRING STUDENTS EDUCATION IS THE HEART OF THE GLOBAL HEALTH INSTITUTE. INTRODUCING STUDENTS TO RESILIENT COMMUNITIES. SHOWING THEM HOW TO LISTEN AND COLLABORATE. CHALLENGING STEREOTYPES. SHAPING TOMORROW’S GLOBAL CITIZENS AND GLOBAL HEALTH LEADERS. OUR STUDENTS ARE UNDERGRADUATES AND HEALTH PRACTITIONERS. THEY PURSUE GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL DEGREES. THEY ARE BADGERS BUILDING BRIDGES ACROSS CAMPUS AND COMMUNITIES. LEARNING THE COMPLEXITY OF HEALTH AND DISEASE. ENGAGING COMMUNITIES LARGE AND SMALL.

Educating global health leaders

From high school students to working professionals, learners across the spectrum discover that global health provides a rich framework through which to approach challenges in an increasingly connected and complex world. More than ever, students from all disciplines turn to global health certificate programs, international clinical rotations, and independent study opportunities that deepen their knowledge of health and the determinants of disease. Since 2011, more than 1,200 undergraduates have completed the Undergraduate Certificate in Global Health, offered in partnership with the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. Since 2007, 185 learners have earned the Graduate | Professional | Capstone Certificate, offered in partnership with the Department of Population Health Sciences. Here’s how global health programs have touched hundreds of student lives:

ll 310 graduate and health professional students, including 115 from Medicine and Public Health and 94 from Nursing completed faculty-led global health field courses, organized by GHI from 2005 to 2007. The courses bring together faculty and students from human and veterinary medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and other disciplines to explore health and disease.

ll 278 medical students experienced international clerkships and clinical rotations from 2005-2017. GHI manages the programs, and Associate Director Jim Conway is the advisor.

ll More than 300 students graduated in 2017 with the Undergraduate Certificate in Global Health. They represented 35 majors from eight schools and colleges.

ll 28 rural Wisconsin high schools have sent 172 students and their teachers to the annual High School Global Health Day, 2014-2017, co-sponsored by GHI and the South Central Region Area Health Education Center. GHI Assistant Director for Education Sweta Shrestha co-leads the program. Read more>>

ll 494 professional students, including 419 from clinical health sciences, participated in self-directed field experiences from 2005-2017. The program is managed by GHI Programs Coordinator Betsy Teigland.

ll 140 participants from 22 countries and Wisconsin have attended GHI’s annual Quality Improvement Leadership Institute, directed by Associate Director Lori DiPrete Brown. Read more>>

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UW-Madison Global Health Institute

Photo by Julien Rashid.

Our future is in good hands

GHI honored successful Global Health Certificate students at the Global Health Graduation Celebration in May. More than 350 undergraduates and graduate, professional, and capstone students earned certificates this year.

As a lifelong traveler, I was drawn to global health because of this personal interest in learning about other cultures and because of the gross disparities in health care I have seen both in our country and around the world. I hope to continue my work in global health as a pediatrician and to help fulfill every child’s right to health, regardless of sex, income, language, or citizenship”— Erin Chung, M.D. ‘17 and Professional Certificate in Global Health 2017 graduate.

Global health is at the core of what I do. ... A changing climate has consequences that everyone on the planet must endure. I feel it is my responsibility to help mitigate the negative effects and plan for what is coming.” — Johnny Uelmen, Nelson Institute and Graduate Certificate in Global Health 2017 graduate.

I am passionate about educating students to meet the health challenges that we face around the world today. In this position, I will work to make it possible for more students from all across the campus to be able to complete the certificate.”—Christopher Olsen, professor emeritus in the School of Veterinary Medicine who was named director of the Graduate | Professional | Capstone Certificate program. Read more>>

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UW-Madison Global Health Institute

PURSUING HEALTH ON ALL FRONTS EMERGING DISEASES. BIODIVERSITY LOSS. ENOUGH FOOD, SAFE WATER, AND CLEAN ENERGY. THESE MAJOR HEALTH CHALLENGES SHOW US THAT THE HEALTH OF ALL PEOPLE, ALL LIFE, EVEN THE PLANET ITSELF ARE DEEPLY INTERCONNECTED. THE UW-MADISON GLOBAL HEALTH INSTITUTE REACHES ACROSS DISCIPLINES, CONNECTING COLLEAGUES AND COMMUNITIES, PURSUING HEALTH ON ALL FRONTS.

MOSQUITOES, TICKS, DISEASE, AND YOU

New diseases are emerging. New species are invading, and new pathogens come with them. All have consequences for human health. As leaders of the new Upper Midwestern Center of Excellence in Vector Borne Diseases, UW medical entomologists Lyric Bartholomay, School of Veterinary Medicine, and Susan Paskewitz, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, both members of the GHI Advisory

Committee, have new tools to thwart insectborne diseases. The new center, funded with a $10 million grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, fosters collaboration among university experts and local, state, and federal public health practitioners in Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa, and Michigan. They will monitor insect populations with an eye to preventing and responding to new and old diseases, including Zika and West Nile.

Read more>>

We are trying to impress on all our UW students and collaborators across the globe that health should be considered in all policies: to shape conversations where everybody talks about the same thing— wellness.”—James Conway, GHI associate director for health sciences, during a One Health session for Washington Mandela Fellows. GHI helped organize a week of global health programs for the 25 young leaders from 20 African countries. Read more>>

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UW-Madison Global Health Institute

The big picture relevance of the research is that if we’re going to understand the diversity of viruses in the world, we need to look in unusual places. We have a lot to learn about the basic distribution of species on the planet.”—Tony Goldberg, GHI associate director of research and professor of epidemiology in the School of Veterinary Medicine. He’s hunting viruses in monkeys, fish, and bats. Read more>>

7 Photo by Bruce Richter, UW-Madison.


UW-Madison Global Health Institute

IMPROVING QUALITY AND ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE ARE CENTRAL TO THE UWMADISON GLOBAL HEALTH INSTITUTE. TOGETHER, CLINICIANS, RESEARCHERS,

STRENGTHENING HEALTH SYSTEMS

AND TEACHERS ADVISE, COLLABORATE, AND CONSULT. ENSURING EQUITABLE, SUSTAINABLE HEALTH FOR ALL COMMUNITIES. TODAY AND TOMORROW.

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We have a module developed by surgeons who have worked in lowresource settings. It looks at pregnancy complications, when a C-section is needed and how it’s done. We have some hands-on courses on fractures and broken bones, on burns and skin grafts.”— Girma Tefera, professor of surgery and GHI Advisory Committee member, about Operation Giving Back on NPR’s Goats and Soda. Read more>>

I felt healthier definitely, and happier that I was doing something. Plus I didn’t have to allot a certain time for exercise, it was just a part of my day, and that just made it so much better.” — Participant in the study to determine whether a social prescription for healthy eating and increased exercise would improve the health of overweight and obese college students. It was headed by Maggie Grabow, a fellow in family medicine and community health and GHI. Read more>>

All of the core tenants of medicine are incredibly well-outlined in those (global) experiences, from broadened medical knowledge to understanding the determinants of health.” — Janis Tupesis, emergency physician and GHI-Graduate Medical Education liaison, on the value of global education for medical residents. Read more>>

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UW-Madison Global Health Institute

GHI grants fuel projects across campus Drawing on expertise from schools and colleges across campus, the 2017 Global Health Institute grant recipients showcase the breadth of disciplines needed to ensure health for all—from infectious diseases to economics and dairy science to biochemistry and medicine. This year’s grantees address topics from antimicrobial resistance to domestic violence to food security. They will bring visitors to UW-Madison to explore how fungi spread, establish collaborations for women’s well-being, and connect cities to their surroundings. “The global health community must remain vigilant,” said Seed Grant recipient and virus expert Yoshihiro Kawaoka, right, who will catalog viruses in West Africa. “The increase in global travel, overlap of human and animal habitats, climate changes, and bushmeat trafficking may facilitate the emergence and reemergence of viruses in the human population, potentially resulting in a devastating outbreak.”

Read more>>

Photo courtesty of Kawaoka lab.

Stop TB for Tibetan Kids GHI’s Quality Improvement (QI) Leadership Institute helped Delek Hospital in Dharamshala, India, develop a program to stop tuberculosis in Tibetan children that’s been endorsed by the Dalai Lama. As tuberculosis moved from adults to the children in Dharamshala, hospital administrators needed to find a way to wipe out the disease in schools and monasteries. In this Tibetan community, the TB infection rate is six times higher than the global average. The project began at the 2015 QI Institute, when Zorba Paster, a

Madison, Wisconsin, physician and UW clinical adjunct professor, and Tibetan health leaders participated in the QI Institute. Delek Hospital’s highly skilled team worked with UW-Madison and Johns Hopkins University to create a project endorsed by the Dalai Lama. “QI has played a huge role in organization, particularly in narrowing down and measuring progress,” Paster said. “QI provided the concept of the infrastructure, so you can see you can actually perform a project and finish it successfully.” Read more>> Photo courtesty of Delek Hospital.

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UW-Madison Global Health Institute

With chronic diseases on the rise globally, how painful would it be to save millions of lives, and billions of dollars in avoided mortality and hospital costs, from carbon policies that clear the air and also promote physical fitness through active transport?”— Jonathan Patz, director, GHI

Photo by Bryce Richter, UW-Madison

Climate Changes Health The public health and climate communities came together for February’s Climate & Health Meeting, hosted by former U.S. Vice President Al Gore, the American Public Health Association, GHI, and others. The meeting was organized as climate change became more evident: 2016 was the third consecutive heat record-breaking year, and 16 of the 17 hottest summers had occurred since 2001.The forum recognized that 97 percent of the world’s climate scientists agree that climate change is linked to human activity, including the burning of fossil fuels and emission of greenhouse gases. “Global climate change is one of the most pressing health crises of our time,” said GHI Director Jonathan Patz, who chaired the panel on “Connecting Climate Change and Public Health: State of the Science.” “And

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it threatens to undermine many substantial health gains across the world.” Gore, the founder and chair of the Climate Reality Project, was a prime mover in organizing the meeting at the nonprofit Carter Center in Atlanta. “Health professionals urgently need the very best science in order to protect the public, and climate science has increasingly critical implications for their day to day work,” he said. Read more>> Patz brought his climate and health message across the world, including keynote addresses at the annual meetings of the American Academy of Pediatrics in Chicago and the International Society of Environmental Epidemiology in Australia, plus opening comments at the inaugural Planetary Health conference in Boston.


UW-Madison Global Health Institute

LED BY CLIMATE AND HEALTH PIONEER JONATHAN PATZ, THE GLOBAL HEALTH INSTITUTE SHOWS HOW HEALTHY CHOICES BENEFIT NOT ONLY OUR HEALTH BUT ALSO THE HEALTH OF THE PLANET. THIS WORK ENGAGES ENGINEERS, URBAN PLANNERS,

CONNECTING CLIMATE TO HEALTH

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENTISTS, AND MORE. THEY COLLABORATE WITH CITIES. ADDRESS POLICY. FIND NEW SOLUTIONS FOR A SUSTAINABLE, EQUITABLE WORLD.

Model for change   

We are a nation that caters to our cars. We build cities with 18-lane highways to accommodate them and take for granted the convenience of jumping into the car—or SUV or mini-van—to go to the grocery store or drive to work. We rarely consider an alternative, if one exists. We plan our cities to make sure everyone arrives on time without the headaches of a traffic jam. Transportation planning has big impacts on population health, yet health is rarely considered in transportation decisions. In the face of climate change and evidence of increasing ill health from ailments such as obesity, heart disease, and diabetes, a trio of researchers at the Global Health Institute —associate scientist Jason Vargo, assistant scientist Samuel Younkin, and public

health research fellow Maggie Grabow— are adding health into the equation. They’re refining and expanding the Integrated Tranportation and Health Impact Model (ITHIM), an open-source software that specifically quantifies how much planning for bicycling and walking will improve health and save millions of lives and dollars. They’re collaborating with planners, including Eric Sundquist from the State Smart Transportation Initiative, to add big data into the mix, allowing them to bring an unprecedented level of pecision to estimates of how different transportation scenarios will affect the health outcomes of populations in individual metro areas. They’re also working with Portland, Oregon, planners to quantify health benefits of transportation policies. Read more>>

We tackled projects the city of Monona had dreamed about and drew up

plans for better housing, transportation, communications, and for restoring and renewing some of Monona’s most precious resources.”—UW-Madison Vice Chancellor Charles Hoslet, about the successful UniverCity Year project that saw 23 UW classes working on 30 projects. The initiative, co-convened by GHI, moves next to Dane County. Read more>>

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UW-Madison Global Health Institute

GLOBAL HEALTH RELIES ON HEALTHY COMMUNITIES.

BUILDING INCLUSIVE COMMUNITIES

WHERE THE WELL-BEING OF WOMEN CONTRIBUTES TO THE WELL-BEING OF ALL. WHERE STUDENTS LEARN THAT ALL HEALTH IS CONNECTED. WITH THE 4W (WOMEN AND WELL-BEING IN WISCONSIN AND THE WORLD) INITIATIVE AND EDUCATION PROGRAMS THAT SPAN THE LEARNING SPECTRUM, GHI HELPS NURTURE EQUITABLE, SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES IN WISCONSIN AND ACROSS THE WORLD.

A champion for women and science

Tracey Holloway is a champion for women in science, and a woman scientist who is sharing satellite data that helps us understand how pollution affects our atmosphere. She’s a professor in the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies and a member of GHI’s Advisory Committee and 4W’s Leadership Circle, Holloway founded the Earth Science Women’s Network in 2002, and it’s grown to include 3,000 women in 60 countries with members at every major university around the world. The network helps women address work-life balance issues and encourages them to pursue science, she told Brava magazine in May 2017. She’s also leading NASA’s Health and Air Quality Applied Sciences Team to make environmental satellite data more accessible. “The United States spends hundreds of millions of dollars to have these great systems in place,” Holloway said. “The idea is to help users get a sense of what is in the air and how it is changing, and inform decision-making around the best quality data.” GHI Director Jonathan Patz and weather satellite expert Steve Ackerman are collaborating on the multi-university project.

Read more>> Photo courtesy of Brava magazine.

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In an economy of greed, the political currency is becoming hate because if we don’t do that, people will rise and find options. But we have to rise and find options anyway.” — Vandana Shiva, scientist and humanitarian, during her keynote address for the 4W Summit that brought together 675 participants for three days of workshops. Read more>>


UW-Madison Global Health Institute

Cindy Haq is the reason GHI

A global health pioneer, for Wisconsin and the world

exists today. More than just these administrative structures, she laid the groundwork for the cross-disciplinary global health education programs that exist at UW-Madison.”— Christopher Olsen, director of the Graduate | Professional | Capstone Certificate in Global Health

Cindy Haq led GHI with

wisdom, humility, and a spirit of abundance. ... She personifies the best of what global health can be— promoting family medicine and primary care in rural, urban, and global settings.” —Lori DiPrete Brown, GHI associate director for education and engagement

Photo courtesy of Cindy Haq.

Cindy Haq, the founding director of the Center for Global Health that became GHI and professor of Family Medicine and Population Health Sciences, has been a global health champion for decades. Beginning in 1986, as medical director for a rural Ugandan health center, she trained village health workers to improve child survival. She went on to establish family medicine training programs in Pakistan and Ethiopia, help expand education and health programs for Afghan refugees, and found and serve as inaugural director of the Training in Urban Medicine and Public Health (TRIUMPH) program to bring physicians to urban, medically underserved communities. She has been a role model, mentor, and friend to hundreds of medical students and many faculty members. Next semester, Haq moves to the University of California-Irvine to beome chair of the Department of Family Medicine. Please join us in thanking her and wishing her the best in the next chapter of her life.

Our professors excel Advisory Committee member Karen Solheim, a clinical professor in nursing, received the Chancellor’s Hilldale Award for Excellence in Teaching. Read more>> Advisory Committee member Greg Nemet, a professor in public affairs and environmental studies, is a 2017 Andrew Carnegie Fellow. He is joined by former Advisory Committee member Gregg Mitman. Read more>>

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CONTACT US

LEADERSHIP

Email: globalhealth@ghi.wisc.edu

Jonathan Patz, M.D., MPH Director John P. Holton Chair in Health and the Environment

East Campus Office 1050 Medical Sciences Center 1300 University Avenue Madison, WI 53706 608-265-9299 West Campus Office 4270B Health Sciences Learning Center 750 Highland Avenue Madison, WI 53705-2221 608-262-3862 Connect with us on Social Media Facebook: UW-Madison Global Health Institute Twitter: @UWGlobalHealth

GIVING Help ensure health for all, today and tomorrow, with a gift to the University of Wisconsin-Madison Global Health Institute. To discuss gift opportunities, contact Kim Santiago at 608-265-9608 or

kimberlysantiago@wisc.edu

patz@wisc.edu

Lori DiPrete Brown, MSPH, MTS Associate Director for Education and Engagement Director, 4W

dipretebrown@wisc.edu

Jim Conway, M.D. Associate Director for Health Sciences jhconway@pediatrics.wisc.edu Tony Goldberg, DVM, Ph.D., M.S. Associate Director for Research

tgoldberg@svm.vetmed.wisc.edu Christopher Olsen, DVM, Ph.D. Director, Graduate | Professional | Capstone Certificate

chris.olsen@wisc.edu

Janis Tupesis, M.D. GHI-Graduate Medical Education Liaison

jtupesis@medicine.wisc.edu

ghi.wisc.edu

You may also make a gift online at supportuw.org/giveto/ghi

OUR VISION EQUITABLE AND SUSTAINABLE HEALTH FOR PEOPLE, ANIMALS, AND ECOSYSTEMS— ACROSS WISCONSIN AND THE WORLD.

Photo by Sweta Shrestha.


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