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FacultY oF Behavioural sciences

Programme guide master’s degree Programme 2012/2013 educational science & technologY

msc

T + 31 (0) 53 489 1017 I www.utwente.nl/est

vErSION NUmbEr 1

STUDENT SErvICES

EDUCATIONAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMME GuidE MAstER’s dEGREE PROGRAMME 2012/2013


Programme Guide 2012-2013 Master of Science (MSc) programme Educational Science and Technology (Including Pre-Master’s programme)

Information for students and staff www.graduate.utwente.nl/est

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As the information and data in this programme guide had to be supplied at a very early stage, it is based on information then available and takes into account what is expected for the coming academic year. The programme guide has been compiled with utmost care, but the authors are not responsible for any omissions or inaccuracies. The formal rules as stipulated in the Education and Examination Regulation shall prevail. The reader can thus not derive any rights from the contents of this programme guide.

Copyright: Copies:

Faculty of Behavioural Sciences, University of Twente June 2012 200

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Contents Preface ................................................................................................................. 6 Part A: Educational Science as a Discipline .................................................... 8 1. Educational Science .................................................................................... 9 1.1 What is Educational Science? ............................................................................. 9 1.2 Importance of educational science .................................................................... 10 1.3 What isn’t educational science? ........................................................................ 11 2. Educational Science and Technology (EST) at the UT ........................... 12 2.1 EST’s characteristics......................................................................................... 12 2.2 EST’s goals ....................................................................................................... 13 2.3 EST’s philosophy .............................................................................................. 14 2.4 EST’s programme outline ................................................................................. 15 2.5 Educational Design and Effectiveness (EDE) .................................................. 16 2.6 Human Resource Development (HRD) ............................................................ 17 2.7 EST in a part-time mode ................................................................................... 18 2.8 Doctorate programmes ...................................................................................... 19 2.9 University of Twente characteristics ................................................................ 19 Part B: Admission and Enrolment to the Master’s degree programme EST22 3. Admission criteria and application procedures ...................................... 23 3.1 Admission criteria ............................................................................................. 23 3.2 Evaluation of the admission criteria ................................................................. 24 3.3 Application procedures ..................................................................................... 26 4. Pre-Master’s programme .......................................................................... 29 4.1 Programme Outline ........................................................................................... 29 4.2 Pre-Master’s programme in a part-time mode .................................................. 30 5. Costs ........................................................................................................... 32 Part C: General information ............................................................................. 33 6. Practical issues.......................................................................................... 35 6.1 Student Charter ................................................................................................. 35 6.2 Faculty introduction .......................................................................................... 35 6.3 Communication and information ...................................................................... 35 6.4 Student Card...................................................................................................... 36 6.5 Annual rosters ................................................................................................... 37 6.6 Lectures ............................................................................................................. 37 6.7 Attending courses.............................................................................................. 38 6.8 Finding your way at the University of Twente ................................................. 39 6.9 Teaching facilities ............................................................................................. 40 6.10 Purchasing study materials ............................................................................... 41 6.11 Purchasing a laptop ........................................................................................... 41 6.12 Examinations..................................................................................................... 42 6.13 Student activism ................................................................................................ 45 2012.139 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2012-2013

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6.14 Alumni association ToPoS................................................................................ 46 6.15 Sports and cultural facilities on campus ........................................................... 46 6.16 ICT Service ....................................................................................................... 46 6.17 Children’s day-care centre ‘De Vlinder’........................................................... 46 7. Student support and counselling services.............................................. 48 7.1 Study guidance .................................................................................................. 48 7.2 Additional UT student support.......................................................................... 49 8. Quality assurance ...................................................................................... 51 8.1 Internal quality assurance ................................................................................. 51 8.2 Consultative committees ................................................................................... 52 8.3 External quality instruments ............................................................................. 53 9. Faculty of Behavioural Sciences .............................................................. 54 9.1 Faculty organisational chart .............................................................................. 54 9.2 Programmes ...................................................................................................... 55 9.3 Recruitment and Public Relations..................................................................... 55 10. Special regulations for students ........................................................... 56 10.1 Transitional regulations .................................................................................... 56 10.2 Individual regulations ....................................................................................... 56 10.3 Studying abroad ................................................................................................ 57 10.4 Copyright .......................................................................................................... 57 10.5 Student activism regulation............................................................................... 58 10.6 Support with entrepreneurship .......................................................................... 58 Part D: Course descriptions ............................................................................ 59 Appendix D1: Pre-Master’s courses (alphabetically)..................................... 60 Appendix D2: Master’s degree courses (alphabetically) ............................... 66

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Preface Dear students, You have chosen the Master’s (MSc) degree programme Educational Science and Technology (EST) at the University of Twente’s Faculty of Behavioural Sciences, probably because you are inquisitive about how people learn and how you can offer them support or research this. Welcome! In the degree programme Educational Science and Technology, this intrinsic coherence is realised within the programme’s specific focal area: • Educational Design and Effectiveness (EDE) and • Human Resource Development (HRD). The contents of the various subjects within these domains are strongly linked to the research profiles of the lecturers. This programme guide outlines the set-up and substance of the programme. The guide also informs on adjacent topics, such as student supervision, and methods and procedures for testing and quality assurance. By national and international standards, the programmes offered by the Faculty of Behavioural Sciences are of sound quality and developed in close collaboration with researchers from all over the world. It is our aspiration to offer courses that are not only intellectually challenging and which stimulate reflection on the domain, but that are also intrinsically relevant to the field of study, complete with a style of working and concurring literature that fit within the learning objectives of the subject. However, a good programme is more than just a collection of separate courses. It comprises subjects that are intrinsically coherent and that reinforce one another. We constantly strive to offer you an interesting curriculum with sufficient challenges and depth. We hope that this programme rouses your curiosity and is gratifying. I wish you a pleasant time here!

Kind regards, Petra Fisser Programme director of the Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programmes Educational Science and Technology

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Part A: Educational Science as a Discipline

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1.

Educational Science

1.1

What is Educational Science?

The main focus of educational science is on the learning and development of people in a diversity of contexts. This might be the instruction of young children at primary school, of young adults during their vocational education, or adult employees in a company, such as fire fighters or teachers receiving in-house training. Educational scientists study and research learning processes, preconditions for learning, learning environments or teaching materials with the aim of understanding, explaining or improving them. Educational sciences are studied at different levels: At learner level (micro level): This concerns the research, development, introduction and/or evaluation of teaching and learning processes, curricula and educational learning environments at the level of the individual and the group/class. Think, for example, of the development of new teaching materials, such as the digital BlackBoard. Educational scientists pursue such questions as: Which learning processes are supported by using this? What is a good didactics for teaching with a digital BlackBoard? How can teachers be prepared for working with such a BlackBoard? How do we introduce it throughout a school and how can we find out if it functions satisfactorily? And what are the right techniques for evaluating the results of the instruction? At organisational level (meso level): This concerns the research on and the development of the organisation, structure and set-up of schools, institutes and business networks. Educational scientists occupy themselves with such questions as: What are the exact implications of organising and setting up a so-called ‘technasium’ (pre-university school with a strong technological learning) within secondary education? What are the effects of class size on the pupils’ learning achievements? What subjects ought to be taught in the training for fire fighter? In which order should those subjects be taught and what is the interrelationship between the contents of the subjects? How can we stimulate, support and design the education and extra training of police employees? At (inter)national level (macro level): This is where educational policy and the relationship between education and society (career, labour market) are studied and developed. Educational scientists pursue such questions as: What are the core objectives of the area of ‘Orientation to yourself and the world’ for primary education? What effects do educational reforms have on pupils’ learning achievements? How do Dutch pupils perform in arithmetic compared with pupils from other European countries? What is the influence of block grant funding (whereby the government grants schools freedom of spending) on the educational infrastructure? Following pre-university education, what knowledge and skills should be tested during the school-leaving examination? As a scientific discipline, educational science has a strong multidisciplinary character and a broad area of application. Both nationally and internationally, four main paths of study can be distinguished:

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1. 2.

3. 4.

Educational science programmes strongly embedded in the pedagogical sciences; Educational design programmes that have emanated from developments in the area of educational media and technology and the systematic design of education (particularly on the meso and macro level); Educational science programmes strongly embedded in policy and organisation studies; Educational science programmes in the field of (developing) human resource in a corporate context (HRD).

By explicitly opting for a design orientation as its main path of study, the Educational Science and Technology (EST) programme at the University of Twente thus falls into the second and fourth category. The programme’s target is to train educational scientists who, supported by their having acquired a systematic and methodical method of working and scientific expertise, can develop solutions to educational issues.

1.2

Importance of educational science

Many educational scientists supervise or advise pupils/students, teachers and school teams with learning difficulties, organisational problems or with the introduction of educational reforms. Societal developments call for a continuous need for people who can plan, set up, execute and evaluate education. Please note that you need to interpret the word ‘education’ broadly: it might mean education in a traditional school context but it could also mean instruction within companies or adult education. In all of these situations there is a demand for specialists in professionalization and staff training. Below are several examples of situations in which educational scientists can make an important contribution: Schools are given increasingly greater freedom in how they present themselves. In order to realise a desired profile, an educational scientist might be called on to support both teaching staff and management. As an educational scientist you can help contribute to the quality of the education, for example by helping teachers to devise a new profile or by designing new teaching material for this. Testing seems to play an ever larger role in society. These days even children at infant school are tested on their language skills. A couple of years ago the Dutch language and arithmetic test was introduced at teacher-training colleges for primary education (in Dutch: PABO). Of course it is essential that the test is of sufficient quality so that one can be certain as to whether a person has the necessary knowledge and skills for fulfilling a job as a primary education teacher. Educational scientists know how to develop tests for any target group or situation. Owing to both the rapid developments and scientific progress, knowledge is soon out-of-date. Lifelong learning is important to stimulate the knowledge society and employment in the Netherlands. Dutch trade and industry annually invests billions of Euros in education and training. Large companies often have their own instruction department for developing and offering training

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to their staff to improve their performance or further their education. As an educational scientist you are able to develop and implement such trainings or assess their quality. You might also engage in workplace instruction or in the rearrangement of the work and the workplace so that learning becomes an integral part of work.

1.3

What isn’t educational science?

Educational science is the science that strives to describe, comprehend and interpret education with the aim of contributing to the improvement of the education system. Educational scientists work in all the places of learning. Contrary to what many people think, an educational scientist is not trained to be a school teacher, nor is this the right course to obtain a teaching certificate. In your future profession you will not be standing in front of the class as a teacher. For the greater part you will be working more behind the scenes and contributing to making knowledge more appealing and accessible to people of all ages and backgrounds. This might be by studying learning processes and situations (for example by researching the effects of certain materials on pupils’ learning achievements) or by directing them (for example by developing material that helps realise certain learning objectives). Good educational scientists are able to combine both activities. In this way you contribute to the educational process, whether that be for the school education system or for in-company learning and development tracks

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2.

Educational Science and Technology (EST) at the UT

2.1

EST’s characteristics

The EST programme is a 1 year (60 European Credits), fully in English taught, master’s degree programme with enrolment in September and February. The programme consists of courses and a graduation project. The graduation project addresses a real-life educational or training problem or research question. Students are challenged to present a solution to this problem or to answer the research question in a scientific and systematic way by studying literature, collecting data and producing sound analyses. The EST programme features two special sub-domains: Educational Design and Effectiveness (EDE) and Human Resource Development (HRD). EDE focuses on curriculum design and implementation, and school effectiveness. HRD focuses on the design of learning trajectories in organisations.

The main focus of the master’s degree programme Educational Science & Technology (EST) of the University of Twente is on the design and evaluation of learning arrangements in schools and organisations. This might be the instruction of young children at primary school, of young adults during their vocational education, or adult employees in a company, such as sales managers or teachers receiving in-service training or training on the job. In the EST programme you will acquire knowledge about theories of learning and assessment, curriculum design and implementation, learning technologies, effective training approaches and learning interventions. You also will learn how to design and evaluate different learning arrangements and to translate this into advice and solutions for practical problems.

The systematic, technological, and design- and evaluation-based orientation characterises the EST programme and distinguishes our programme at the University of Twente from other education-related degree programmes in the Netherlands. •

In-depth domain orientation As an EST student you may specialise in either Educational Design and Effectiveness (EDE) or Human Resource Development (HRD) or any combination thereof. Graduates have a firm and broad knowledge of (one of) these focal areas, and adjacent specific expertise that can be used productively and creatively in various related professional contexts. Applied character In various subjects during the programme you will address real-life educational issues. You will thus be applying your knowledge in practice. This way you will learn how to ‘recognise’ the newly acquired educational theories in practice and also apply them in real-life situations.

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Ample attention to academic training Ample attention is paid in the curriculum to students’ academic training. The programme broadens your research skills so, as well as learning how to conduct both qualitative and quantitative research, you are also taught how to write scientific articles. And you put all these skills into practice during your final project. International character The EST programme attracts students from various backgrounds: graduates from the faculty’s Bachelor’s degree programme Educational Science, international students, graduates from Dutch HBO (higher vocational education) undergraduate degree programmes, and professionals who wish to broaden and deepen their knowledge and skills. Attention to the use of technology In our teaching we also pay attention to the role of technology in learning processes. For example: To what degree does the kind and amount of environmental characteristics influence the learning achievements of employees? And: What role can the computer play with assessing educational effectiveness? Design-oriented and problem-solving approach The programme teaches how to analyse educational and training problems in a systematic way and how to design good, workable solutions for those problems. To do so, you first need to gain a clear picture of the issue in question. Your research will mostly be for the benefit of design processes for organising learning trajectories, the design of media applications, the evaluation of real-life situations or the development of education policy. Graduates are able to systematically frame up, fill in, augment, evaluate, and implement designs to support learning environments in various education and training contexts.

Graduates from the EST programme will become scientific educational professionals, experts who connect scientific research, scientific design and (their own or future) practice. The outcome of their expertise is based on educational questions and problems from practical contexts (both schools and organisations), which they translate into research questions and which they try to answer by applying a systematic approach, thus finding appropriate solutions for the specific problem. The result of this approach is a design (or a set of designs) of a solution, which is tested in the context of the problem to see if that solution helps realising an improvement or innovation. This evaluation does not only lead to an improvement or innovation, but it also leads to more knowledge and the forming of new theories. Our graduates work in a wide range of organisations, from government, ministries, publishers and educational support services to universities, higher education institutes and multinational companies. A number of graduates have started their own education and training consultancy bureau.

2.2

EST’s goals

The main aim of the Master's programme in Educational Science and Technology is to deliver competent researchers who are scientifically schooled, independent and critical educational

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designers, decision makers and advisers who can contribute to the subject area of education in general and to their chosen area of concentration in particular. To reach this goal the programme has established the following standards: •

2.3

Domain orientation: Graduates have a firm and broad overview of education and of the specialty areas within, and specific expertise in one of the specialty areas that can be used productively and creatively in various related professional contexts. Design competency: Graduates are able to systematically frame up, fill in, augment, evaluate, and implement designs to support learning environments in various education and training contexts. Research competency: Graduates are able to systematically collect, analyse, and interpret research data, to draw conclusions there from, and on the basis of that advise or decide regarding possible alternatives and activities to be conducted, particularly in a design context. Advice competency: Graduates are able to advise (educational) organisations, in part based on the three competencies mentioned above, with regard to the implementation of better and more efficient learning environments and organisational as well as policy related arrangements for learning and teaching. Academic reflection: Graduates are able to critically reflect on processes, resulting products, and achieved results from systematic and well-chosen scientific, social-cultural, and ethical perspectives in such a way as to contribute to the professional development of the educational specialist and to a broadening and/or deepening of the scientific subject area.

EST’s philosophy

The EST programme has been designed around the following ideas: Integration of research, design, advice and reflection skills; a curriculum in which students get increasing responsibility for his or her own development; and a strong link with the professional practice. This has the following consequences for the programme: • There are no separate research courses, design courses, advice courses or reflection courses. In each course students will work on multiple skills at the same time and they will learn how to integrate them. For developing a good design, students need research skills and advise skills to implement the design successfully. A good research needs to lead to advices for practice, and the other way around: as a scientist, students need to be able to base one’s advice on the state of the art research findings. • Every semester starts with courses with a strong theoretical component and assignments designed by the lecturers. In the second part of each semester courses are offered in which students choose a case to work on, that matches with one’s interest and the skills the student wishes to practice. Students will be mentored by experts from the university and from practice.

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2.4

In the last semester students dominantly will work on their Final Project. Students will prepare themselves by working in groups under supervision of a teacher on their research proposal. They will choose their Final Project themselves, and they will design it in consultation with the educational organisation or company they work for. The EST programme has structural relations with several educational organisations and companies who often have projects available. The final project always has a strong research part and depending on the project it might also have a significant design, evaluation or advise component. During the Final Project, students are responsible for their own learning processes, but, of course, they will be supported by a community of peers and their university supervisors. Problem-based and project-based learning are major characteristics in the programme. Assignments are based on real problems from practice, and students will visit schools or companies. Parts of the student’s study trajectory will take place in “live contexts” inside educational organisations or companies in which the student will learn together with and from professionals. This will also help students to orient themselves on their Final Project and of course on their future career. Depending on background, future goals and time limits, students can design their own curriculum. For example, if you want to go abroad for your Final Project, you might choose to follow all your courses in the first semester. Also for part-time students, various trajectories are possible. Students are also allowed to follow courses from both the HRD and EDE area or they can even request to take a course from another relevant master’s degree programme. To make deliberate choices in designing their learning routes, students will get advice on this from the programme coordinator and study counsellor who will explain possibilities and restrictions.\

EST’s programme outline

The EST programme (see the programme’s outline below) starts with the core course “Trending topics in Educational Science and Technology”, which is obligatory for all EST students and therefore offered in September and in February. In the core course, several instructors will present their field of expertise, which are aligned with the current scientific research areas in our research group. The presented topics will cover the Educational Design and Effectiveness (EDE) as well as the Human Resource Development (HRD) domains, e.g.: • Talent management / talent development • Data-based instruction and decision making • Life-long learning skills • 21st Century skills & the school of the future • Leadership for learning • Professional learning communities Each trending topic will be dealt with in a 3-weeks mode: (a) the instructor introduces the topic in a lecture, (b) a seminar where instructor and the students will focus on the topic’s content-related and methodological issues, and (c) 1 week for group-based completion of a topic-related assignment. The nature of the assignments varies and the full set of to be attained competences (design, research, advice, and reflection) are addressed.

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Next to the core course a preparation course for the Final Project is organised. During this course students learn how to search for relevant literature, how to design a research project and how to write a research proposal for their Final Project. Students will work on their research proposal and a first literature review in thematic communities of learners, supervised by one of the instructors who is an expert in that specific area. Programme outline Quartile 1

Quartile 2

Quartile 3

Trending topics in educational science and technology 201200034 (10 EC) Research Proposal EST 201200035 (5 EC) Final Project EST 201200036 (25 EC) Regulation and facilitation Learning at work of workplace learning 201200028 201200031 (5 EC) (5 EC) HRD design in live context 201200030 Monitoring and improving Assessment of and for (5 EC) schools and educational learning systems 201200025 201200022 (5 EC) (5 EC) Designing and evaluating Leadership and effective HRD organisational change interventions 201200032 Curriculum innovation and 201200029 (5 EC) implementation (5 EC) 201200024 Design in educational (5 EC) Teaching and learning settings with ICT 201200026 201200023 (5 EC) (5 EC)

Quartile 4

HRD consultancy in live context 201200033 (5 EC)

Teacher learner and development 201200027 (5 EC)

Core Course - obligatory Preparatory Course for the Final Project (Research Proposal) Final Project Elective Courses

Do you want to know more about the content of these courses? Please visit our course catalogue: https://osiris.utwente.nl/student/OnderwijsCatalogus.do or check Part D of this programme guide.

2.5

Educational Design and Effectiveness (EDE)

The main focus of Educational Design and Effectiveness (EDE) is on the interaction between curriculum design and curriculum implementation, teacher and school development, school effectiveness, and ICT in a variety of educational contexts. Curriculum design and curriculum implementation involves the planning, development, and implementation of innovative learning trajectories. Effective implementation of these trajectories

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at both school and classroom level requires teachers and schools which are ready for the implementation. Teacher development is therefore one of the crucial elements when designing, developing and implementing a curriculum renewal. Much attention is paid to the role of ICT and new media when designing a reformed learning environment. Measuring the effectiveness of education and the implemented educational innovations is essential, as is structural monitoring and assessment of education. Schools should be able to track the quality and results of their teaching, not just through pupil assessment, but also at the teacher and school level. Core questions in this field are: How can curriculum innovations be designed and implemented? How can schools and teachers be supported in the design, development and implementation of curriculum renewal at both school and classroom level? How can teachers be empowered in their own professional development while designing their own curricula? How can technology be used and integrated in education? Is it possible to improve the performance of schools by giving them feedback on the level of their performance? To what degree do school leadership, school culture and the teamwork between teachers influence the effectiveness of schools? Do schools perform better as a result of education inspectorate or does this lead to apparent improvements? This focal area has an applied character in which the integration of research, design, and reflection skills is central. An EDE graduate is able to: • understand and analyse different theories and paradigms related to curriculum design and –implementation, teacher and school development, school effectiveness and ICT in a variety of educational contexts and indicate what they mean for practice, • plan, design, and implement innovative curricula to increase the quality of education and able to assess the effect of these curricula, • improve the performance of schools by taking school leadership, school culture and teamwork between teachers into account, • reflect on the various core issues in the field of EDE and on his or her own position in this. As a graduate of the EDE specialisation, a student has excellent career prospects. Current graduates work at schools and other educational institutions, centres for expertise, consultancy bureaus, educational publishers, the ministry of education, etc. Some graduates pursue a research career at universities in the Netherlands and abroad.

2.6

Human Resource Development (HRD)

The main focus of Human Resource Development (HRD) is on learning and development of people in a work context. Lifelong learning is important to stimulate the knowledge society and the employability of people. Companies and institutions invest billions of Euros in education and training. Large companies often have their own corporate department for developing and offering training to their staff for improving their performance or to further their education. An HRD graduate will be able to develop and implement such trainings or to assess its quality. Graduates might also be engaged in workplace instruction or in the rearrangement of the work and the workplace so that learning becomes an integral part of work.

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Core questions in this HRD field are: How do people learn during their work? How do people become experts? How may one facilitate workplace learning and professional development? What are effective training programmes and how to evaluate these? How to manage learning and knowledge in a company? How do organisations change and do HRD professionals assist in this process? What is the role of new media in learning? In the field of HRD knowledge and research, approaches from a mix of disciplines are used to answer these questions: Psychology, Educational Science, Business, Human Resource Management, and Sociology. Besides acquainting a firm and broad knowledge of HRD research, this HRD programme has also an applied character in which the integration of research, design, advice and reflection skills is central. An HRD professional graduated at the University of Twente is able to: • understand and analyse different HRD theories and paradigms and what they mean for practice, • design innovative and well-thought interventions to increase learning and development in a company or institution, • advice companies and institutions on questions related to learning and development of their employees, • do research on HRD problems and know how to use research for designing good learning interventions and giving solid advices, • reflect on the various core issues in the field of HRD and on his or her own position in this. As a graduate of the HRD specialisation, a student has excellent career prospects. Current graduates work as an HRD manager, HRD coordinator, HRD consultant, HRD researcher, teaching specialist, course designer, training materials developer, HRD needs analyst and evaluator. Interested in where our alumni are working? Read the Career Book! A distinguishing feature of the courses at the University of Twente, and particularly those of the Faculty of Behavioural Sciences, is its applied character. Research is important but so, too, is the way it is translated into practice. To inspire both future and present students we have compiled a new Career Book (Carrièreboek) with stories of former students. This book comprises 29 interviews with UT alumni from the fields of communications, educational science, social scientific research, technological philosophy and university preparatory education. If you wish to receive a copy of this book, please fill in the form on the website: http://www.gw.utwente.nl/carriere Note: The Career Book (Carrièreboek) is only available in Dutch!

2.7

EST in a part-time mode

The one-year Master’s degree programme EST can be studied both in a full-time mode as well as part-time. In the latter case the course lasts two years.

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In this regard (particularly for facilitating this part-time mode) the following applies: • All courses are scheduled on a maximum of two fixed days per week, Mondays and Tuesdays. • Classes of a specific course always take place on the same day during the week. Thus, as a ‘part-timer’ you may timely arrange with your employer which day of the week you will be spending on your studies. Note: The nominal study load in the part-time mode depends on the selected courses. Thus, it is possible that your study load is not always evenly distributed.

2.8

Doctorate programmes

With its Graduate School, the University of Twente offers a growing number of integrated Master’s-PhD programmes for talented research students who aspire for a career in scientific research. These programmes are concentrated around core research projects of the research institutes of the University of Twente and they are led by excellent UT researchers. EST students, who consider a scientific career, may wish to consider the graduate/PhD programme ‘Learning in Educational and Training Settings’. The EST programme is one of the UT Master’s degree programmes involved in this graduate research programme. Students who are admitted to the Graduate School specialise during the (EST) Master’s phase in their preferred area of research and can, during this time, already focus on the subject of their PhD dissertation. This way they can transfer faster into a PhD trajectory. Students who are admitted to the Twente Graduate School use the thesis period during their EST master’s degree programme as the initial step on their route to PhD research. In this way students could graduate faster than in a regular PhD programme. Students in the Twente Graduate School are invited to attend additional courses to broaden their perspective and to support their scientific career. After the first year, and upon excellent academic achievement, students will be invited to apply to available PhD positions in the Graduate School.

2.9

University of Twente characteristics

Irrespective of which programme you will study at the University of Twente, all our Master’s degree programmes strive to train entrepreneurial academics that are able to address and solve social issues by conscientiously pinpointing problems, investigating possible solutions or designing and developing new products or applications. We emphasise that our students, next to knowing their way around in their own discipline, are capable of working together with professionals from other domains. After all, many social issues demand a multidisciplinary solution.

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We aim at educating students to become excellent professionals who possess both scientific as well as professional competences. Therefore, the following characteristics apply •

Small-scale instruction Next to the more or less traditional lectures, instruction is particularly organised in small group workshops and practicals. In our opinion, small-scale and strongly-supervised (contact-intensive) instruction is of paramount importance to the development of professional and academic skills. Students carry out (individual and small-group) assignments where collaborative, evaluative and other social and communication skills play an important role.

Strong connection between education and research The contribution of faculty members to the Educational Science and Technology programme is recognised and highly valued, both nationally and internationally. The Master’s degree programme is strongly linked to topical research that is conducted in the departments concerned, and lecturers draw many examples from their own research during their lectures. It also occurs that students actively contribute to the lecturers’ research, e.g. during their graduation phase. The subjects and assignments of the Master’s degree programmes are often linked to current research projects within the research lines of the departments. In this way you will be initiated in the professional and academic field of action.

Extensive student supervision The Master’s programme has been designed in such a way that you yourself are to some extent responsible for your study trajectory and your study progress and substantial freedom to make intrinsic choices yourself is offered. This could imply: independently devising subjects for assignments, choosing your specialisation, opting for spending study time abroad, and the theme of your final research project. It is important that your choices are made consciously and are well-considered. In this regard, you may count on a good tutor to help you making the right choices and be there for you.

International possibilities for studying abroad We think it is important that students broaden their academic horizon during their studies. In this respect, we support ambitions that include spending some time abroad (e.g. taking courses, participating in on-going research). Please feel invited to contact your study counsellor and/or the faculty’s Co-ordinator Internationalisation for discussing your ambitions and possibilities.

Encouraging entrepreneurship For beginning entrepreneurs with innovative ideas the UT has introduced the so-called TOP regulation (Temporary Entrepreneurs Positions), which helps to bridge the first, usually most difficult year of a new enterprise with basic funding, support and advice.

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Encouraging student activism The University of Twente fervently encourages all kinds of student activism (ranging from membership of a committee or board, to assisting university staff or starting a small business). It is the university’s firm belief that students will benefit from extra-curricular activities.

Open and informal atmosphere between lecturers and students The programme’s atmosphere (educational climate) can be characterised as pleasant. Communication between lecturers and students is quite informal.

Guest lectures by well-known researchers In recent years various (internationally) famous researchers have honoured the programme with a visit, in many cases delivering a lecture or a lunch seminar.

What does this mean to you? Our students are enterprising, curious, dare to take risks, have self-knowledge and insight into the tasks, functions and roles that a job entails. Characteristics such as self-discipline, personal responsibility, using one’s initiative and independence are important to us. Our students are open to the contributions made by people with other expertise, other backgrounds, and other methods.

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Part B: Admission and Enrolment to the Master’s degree programme EST

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3.

Admission criteria and application procedures

3.1

Admission criteria

The EST’s Admissions Committee assesses all applicants to the MSc programme Educational Science & Technology (EST) on an individual basis. The assessment of the applicant’s skills is based on formal as well as content-related admission criteria. The formal criteria are as follows: A.

Bachelor’s degree or equivalent.

B.

IELTS minimum overall score of 6.5 on the IELTS (where each minimal sub score is 6.0) or an internet-based TOEFL (iBT) minimum overall score of 90 (where each minimal sub score is 20), or equivalent. Note: Dutch students are exempted from this formal criterion Check as well: http://www.utwente.nl/master/international/admission/genadmissionreq/

C.

Any additional information required by the admission committee and/or the University of Twente Admission Office (see: http://www.graduate.utwente.nl (e.g. a resume that summarises educational and professional career).

The content-related admission criteria require that a student possesses and demonstrates evidence on sufficient knowledge and skills concerning the following: D.

The content of the domain of educational science and technology.

E.

Design methodology.

F.

Research methodology.

G.

Research techniques, including the use of statistics for data analysis.

You are invited to check as well the concerned web pages on: http://www.utwente.nl/master/international/est/admission/ Ad D. Content of the domain The domain of Educational Science and Technology can be characterised by the following: a field that encompasses the analysis of learning and performance problems; the design, development, implementation, evaluation, and management of educational and training processes, resources, and arrangements intended to improve learning and performance in a variety of settings. A student meets the domain-specific admission criterion if he/she possesses a Bachelor’s or Master’s level degree in a domain that is similar or related to the domain of this definition, and/or

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if he/she has substantial relevant work experience from which he/she has mastered the aforementioned conceptual knowledge. Ad E. Design methodology This is a typical content characteristic of all behavioural Bachelor’s and Master’s programmes in our Faculty, aiming at educating scientific designers. This methodology for systematic problem solving aims to support and control science-based, systemic approaches and processes for the development, the implementation, and the evaluation of solutions for problems in education and training. To give evidence that a future student has mastered this methodology, he/she has to send us an overview of relevant courses taken and/or reports of systematic design projects he/she has intensively been involved in. Ad F. Research methodology This refers to the main concepts, procedures, and methods used in social science research, and which aim at systematic, conceptual (literature) analysis, modes of data collection, data analytical schemes, and procedures for interpretation of findings, in order to better understand social phenomena and processes, and/or to support all levels of making choices in and for social reality. This methodology supports the systematic design, execution and evaluation of research activities. A student’s basic mastery of this methodology should be proven by courses which he/she has taken in this area, and/or reports of research projects or activities he/she has been involved in substantially. Ad G. Research techniques, including the use of statistics for data analysis This area is dedicated to the skills and understanding of techniques for collection and for analysis of both quantitative and qualitative data. If a student masters this area he/she is able to apply descriptive statistics (distribution, correlation, regression, cross tabling), theory of probability (calculation, expectation, variance, binomial distribution), and aspects from inductive statistics (average based conclusions with known population deviation). Experience with the use of SPSS or a comparable computer-based statistical package is part of this mastery. Evidence of this can be presented by content review of courses which he/she has taken, and/or use of these techniques in research, demonstrated by means of a report or an article.

3.2

Evaluation of the admission criteria

The programme’s Admission Committee will review the information and documents presented by an applicant and will decide whether he/she meets all stated criteria sufficiently. In order to be considered for admission, an applicant has to meet the aforementioned formal as well as content-related admission criteria, and upon meeting these criteria fully or partly, the following enrolment options apply. 1. If a student meets all formal and content-related criteria he/she will be admitted to the EST Master’s programme directly and unconditionally. 2. If the Admission Committee has some reservations about a student’s general academic qualities, the mastery of design methodology, or about the domain-specific knowledge,

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even if he/she meets all other criteria sufficiently, the Admission Committee will use an extra check, by sending the student a domain-specific assignment, which he/she will have to perform. 3. If a student does not meet the full spectrum of entry requirements, to be decided by the Admission Committee, he/she will be offered the possibility of taking the EST preMaster’s programme. A student may ask to be exempted from one or more units of study of the pre-M trajectory, upon formal enrolment/registration at the University of Twente, at the Board of Examiners. Note: full information on the pre-Master’s trajectory can be obtained from Chapter 4 of this programme guide. More in detail the following – more or less common - options apply: •

Students with a bachelor’s or master’s degree from a (Dutch) university of applied sciences (in Dutch HBO-instelling) enrol in the full (54 EC’s) version of the pre-Master’s trajectory. Students with a bachelor’s or master’s degree in Arts or Science (in Dutch: Alfa- or Beta opleiding) from a (Dutch) research university enrol in the full (54 EC’s) version of the pre-Master’s trajectory. o These students lack the required domain-specific (Educational Science) knowledge. They therefore have to complete the domain-specific pre-Master’s courses, plus o (despite their assumed academic level in reasoning and doing research) these students miss the social science competences in this regard. They therefore have to complete the research methodological pre-Master’s courses, including the course Academic Writing, and the so-called pre-Master’s Final Project. Students with a bachelor’s or master’s degree in Social Sciences (in Dutch: Gammaof Sociale wetenschappen) from a (Dutch) research university will, depending on their specific prior education, only take specific components of the pre-Master’s trajectory (with a max of 24 EC’s). o In general, it is assumed that these students possess sufficient generic academic and research methodological competences. They are exempted from the pre-Master’s courses Data-analysis and Measurement 1, Dataanalysis and Measurement 2, Academic Writing, Research Methodology, and the pre-Master’s Final Project. Therefore they subsequently, taking into account specific prior domain-specific knowledge, will take a max. 24 EC’s programme (i.e. the pre-Master’s courses: Educational Design, Curriculum Theory, Organisation Theory, Evaluation, HRD Fundamentals, Management of Education and Training). Students with a bachelor’s or master’s degree from specific – domain related (research university) programmes (e.g. Educational Sciences, some sub-domains in Pedagogy or Psychology) are exempted from the pre-Master’s trajectory fully or partly. This is assessed in detail on a portfolio base where professional experience will be taken

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into account as well. Students in this category are invited to contact the EST programme’s co-ordinator, Mr Jan Nelissen (e-mail:: j.m.j.nelissen@utwente.nl) • Students with a bachelor’s or master’s social science degree from a University of Twente (UT) programme will only take specific components of the pre-Master’s trajectory (with a max of 24 EC’s). o In general, it is assumed that these students possess sufficient generic academic and research methodological competences. They are exempted from the pre-Master’s courses Data-analysis and Measurement 1, Dataanalysis and Measurement 2, Academic Writing, Research Methodology, and the pre-Master’s Final Project. Therefore they subsequently, taking into account specific prior domain-specific knowledge, will take a max. 24 EC’s programme (i.e. the pre-Master’s courses: Educational Design, Curriculum Theory, Organisation Theory, Evaluation, HRD Fundamentals, Management of Education and Training).

3.3

Application procedures

Depending on their prior education, applicants are subject to the following procedures: a. UT Bachelor’s students in Educational Science Technology (B-EST) and EST preMaster’s students Having obtained your Bachelor’s degree in Educational Science (in Dutch: Onderwijskunde) at the UT or having completed the EST pre-Master’s programme, you automatically qualify for a direct and unconditional access to the Master’s degree programme EST. Formal registration for the Master’s degree programme EST must be submitted to the UT’s Central Student Administration (CSA). In practice, the staff of your Educational Affairs Office (in Dutch: BOZ) will contact you timely. In addition, they will inform CSA whether you have satisfied all the requirements for registering to the EST Master’s degree programme. Note: You have to renew your formal registration at the UT every year! CSA will remind you in this respect by sending you an e-mail message with a link to the digital re-enrolment form annually. b. Other UT Bachelor’s students As said afore, this mostly implies that in that case you have to take parts of the preMaster’s programme in order to be prepared optimally for the master’s degree programme in Educational Science and Technology. The Educational Affairs Office (BOZ) of your own programme will contact you in due course about which master’s degree programme you are interested in, and, if applicable, they will guide you to the staff of the EST programme. On the basis of your bachelor’s degree programme (and, if applicable, other study trajectories in higher education), the Admission Committee of the

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EST master’s degree programme will assess in detail how your pre-Master’s trajectory will look like. c.

Other applicants On the basis of detailed information on your prior education, the Admission Committee of the EST master’s degree programme will assess how your pre-Master’s trajectory will look like. In any case you have to apply online via: http://www.utwente.nl/master/home/ Note: Although most applicants first have to take the EST pre-Master’s programme (or parts thereof), it has to be underlined that there is NO separate application procedure for the pre-Master’s programme. You simply apply via the master’s application website! Application deadlines In order to facilitate a smooth start of your studies at the University of Twente, your application has to be submitted preferably before: September enrolment: • 1 May: Students who require an entry visa • 1 June: Students not requiring an entry visa but who do require housing • 1 July: Students neither requiring an entry visa nor housing February enrolment: • 1 October: Students who require an entry visa • 1 November: Students not requiring an entry visa but who do require housing • 1 December: Students neither requiring an entry visa nor housing Please bear in mind that you may apply even if you not yet formally obtained your prior (bachelor’s) degree (in this regard, we expect that you will obtain your bachelor’s degree officially before 1 September or 1 February).

If you have any questions regarding the application procedures and the application form, please contact: University of Twente, Student Services / Admission Office (AO), Building: Vrijhof, room 236 Tel: 053 - 489 4317, E-Mail: studentservices@utwente.nl If you have any questions regarding the content of the EST master’s or pre-master’s programme, please contact the programme’s co-ordinator: Mr Jan Nelissen Building Cubicus, room C104

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Tel: E-Mail:

053 489 3588 j.m.j.nelissen@utwente.nl

Or the programme’s study counsellor: Ms Yvonne Luyten-de Thouars Building Cubicus, room C110 Tel. 053-489 1117 E-mail: y.c.h.luyten-dethouars@utwente.nl

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4.

Pre-Master’s programme

As said, many students wishing to be admitted to the master’s programme Educational Science and Technology (EST) will first have to complete (parts of) our pre-master’s programme. Whether you will have to take the full pre-master’s programme, a partial pre-master’s programme or no pre-master’s programme will depend on your previous qualifications (See: Chapter 3). All students will be evaluated by the programme’s Admission Committee on their own merits. The pre-Master’s programme has to 2 terms of enrolment (September and February. Please note: • The pre-Master’s courses are taught in English. • All assigned pre-Master’s courses must be successfully completed in order to be admitted to the Master’s programme Educational Science and Technology!

4.1

Programme Outline

The full (54 European Credits / EC’s) pre-Master’s programme comprises of both domain-specific (Educational Science and Technology) and courses which address generic academic and research methodological competences. Generic academic course Domain-specific courses: students will take these courses together with students from the bachelor’s programme Educational Science and Technology

September enrolment

Pre-master’s programme Autumn Semester (Sep-Jan) Quartile 1 (1A) Quartile 2 (1B)

Spring Semester (Feb-Aug) Quartile 3 (2A) Quartile 4 (2B)

Data-analysis and Research methodology* measurement 1* 191960510 191960550 5EC 5EC Educational design 191958400 2EC 2EC Academic writing* 192412240 2EC 3EC

Data-analysis and measurement 2* 191960560 5EC Final project (pre-M) 191900269 10EC 3EC

Organisation theory 191920130 4EC

Management of education and training 191920160 4EC

Evaluation 191920170 4EC

7EC

HRD fundamentals 191924010 4EC

Curriculum theory 191950380 4EC 13EC

14EC

16EC

27EC

* Note:

11EC 27EC

Students will take these courses together with students from other pre-M programmes (Psychology and/or Communication studies).

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February enrolment

Spring Semester (Feb-Aug) Quartile 3 (2A) Quartile 4 (2B)

Autumn Semester (Sep-Jan) Quartile 1 (1A) Quartile 2 (1B)

Data-analysis and measurement 1* 191960550 5EC

Data-analysis and measurement 2 * 191960560 5EC Final project (pre-M) 191900269 10EC 3EC

Research methodology* 191960510 5EC

Academic writing * 192412240 2EC…………………………….3EC Evaluation 191920170 4EC

7EC

Educational design 191958400 2EC

2EC

HRD fundamentals 191924010 4EC

Organisation theory 191920130 4EC

Management of education and training 191920160 4EC

12EC

14EC

Curriculum theory 191950380 4EC 15EC 27EC

* Note:

4.2

13EC 27EC

Students will take these courses together with students from other pre-M programmes (Psychology and/or Communication studies).

Pre-Master’s programme in a part-time mode

Basically the pre-Master’s programme is a full-time programme with a maximum of 54 EC that can be studied in one year. This implies the following: there is no formal part-time variant but it is possible to spread the pre-Master’s courses to be taken over a period of two academic years. In this regard we apply a generic recommended sequence of courses (see below), but we require that students who opt for this part-time mode first consult our study counsellor (Ms Yvonne Luyten-de Thouars / e-mail: y.l.t.luyten-dethouars@utwente.nl) in order to draw up a detailed plan of study where a student’s particular situation will be taken into account.

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Generic academic course Domain-specific courses: students will take these courses together with students from the bachelor’s programme Educational Science and Technology

Pre-master’s programme (part-time) – September enrolment Autumn Semester (Sep-Jan)

Year 1

Spring Semester (Feb-Aug)

Quartile 1 (1A)

Quartile 2 (1B)

Quartile 3 (2A)

Quartile 4 (2B)

Data-analysis and measurement 1* 191960550 5EC Organisation theory 191920130 4EC

Research methodology* 191960510 5EC

Data-analysis and measurement 2* 191960560 5EC Evaluation 191920170 4EC

HRD fundamentals 191924010 4EC

9EC

4EC

Academic writing* 192412240 2EC……………………………..3EC 11EC

8EC Educational design 191958400

2EC

Year 2 2EC

Final project (pre-M) 191900269 10EC

2EC Management of education and training 191920160 4EC 6EC

3EC Curriculum theory 191950380 4EC

7EC

7EC

7EC

Pre-master’s programme (part-time) – February enrolment Spring Semester (Feb-Aug) Quartile 3 (2A)

Year 1

7EC Evaluation 191920170 4EC

Year 2

8EC HRD fundamentals 191924010 4EC

Curriculum theory 191950380 4EC 8EC

* Note:

Quartile 4 (2B)

Data-analysis and Research methodology* measurement 1* 191960510 191960550 5EC 5EC Academic writing* 192412240 2EC………………………..3EC

Autumn Semester (Sep-Jan) Quartile 1 (1A)

Quartile 2 (1B)

Data-analysis and measurement 2* 191960560 5EC Educational design 191958400 2EC

7EC Organisation theory 191920130 4EC

2EC

Management of education and training 191920160 4EC 6EC

Final project (pre-M) 191900269 10EC 4EC

3EC

7EC

7EC

7EC

Students will take these courses together with students from other pre-M programmes (Psychology and/or Communication studies.

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5.

Costs

The University of Twente applies both statutory tuition fees as well as institutional tuition fees. In this regard the tuition which has to be paid basically depends on: • the status of your enrolment (e.g. pre-Master’s or Master’s degree student, part-time1 vs. full-time) • your nationality (Dutch and/or European Union (EU/EEA) vs. non-EU/EEA The exact amounts are indexed annually. Full information can be obtained from: http://www.utwente.nl/master/international/feesfunding/ Next to the tuition fees, you need to bear in mind the following annual costs: Teaching materials (approx. € 400 - € 500

1

Enrolment for the pre-Master’s programme is only possible as a full-time student. Students who opt for

studying on a part-time base in the pre-Master’s programme have to pay the full-time tariff.

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Part C: General information

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6.

Practical issues

6.1

Student Charter

Just like all higher education institutes, the University of Twente has its own Student Charter. This has its statutory basis in Art. 7.59 of the Higher Education and Research Act (WHW). The charter is law-making, which means that you can invoke the Student Charter in case of problems or conflicts. The Charter’s is kept up to date and is available online via the UT’s website: http://www.utwente.nl/so/studentenbegeleiding/en/regulations/charter/index.html A printed version of the Charter can be obtained from the Student Counselling Desk (Bastille, Red Desk, level two). A printed version of the Charter can be obtained from the Student Counselling Desk (Bastille, Red Desk, second floor.). The programme-specific part of the Student Charter (OSS), which includes the Education and Examination Regulation (In Dutch: Onderwijs en Examenreglement (OER)), comprises a general section applicable to all Behavioural Sciences Master’s programmes and a section with appendices drafted for each individual programme. The Education and Examination Regulation can be found on http://www.utwente.nl/owk/masterest/

6.2

Faculty introduction

In order for you to prepare yourself adequately for your pre-Master’s programme and meet your fellow students, a one-day faculty introduction is organised in the week preceding the programme’s start (i.e. during the last week in August or the last week in January). During this introduction, timetables (rosters) will be handed out and explained, books can be purchased, you will meet your lecturers and the educational support staff, and you will be shown round the faculty building.

6.3

Communication and information

One of the first things you will notice when you decide to study at the University of Twente is the multitude of means of communication the university, the faculty and your programme use to communicate with you, be it directly or indirectly. It starts as soon as you pre-enrol for the University of Twente. As an early registrant, you will be given your own UT e-mail address, user name and password that allow you to surf the net via the university, as well as 400 MB disk space on a central network computer, where you can save your documents and homepage, if you have one. The Internet and e-mail are by far the most important means of communication for both the programme and the faculty. E-mail E-mail is used for rapid communication between the programme or an individual lecturer and an individual student or small group of students. Only if absolutely necessary e-mail is used to communicate with large groups of students, for instance if a lecture is suddenly cancelled or an examination postponed. In that case, the Educational Service Centre (in Dutch abbreviated as:

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OSC = Onderwijs Service Centrum) will not be able to reach all students in time via the usual means of communication, i.e. the educational announcement. All e-mail sent by the OSC should be read immediately. UT students generally have <studentname>@student.utwente.nl as their e-mail address, where <studentname> represents a student’s initials and last name, e.g. h.j.pieters@student.utwente.nl (exceptions can be made for students with the same initials and last name), or S<student number>@student.utwente.nl, e.g. S0012345@student.utwente.nl. You can find a list of e-mail addresses of UT students and staff on the UT’s web pages. Go to http://www.utwente.nl/, click on phone book in the menu in the bottom left-hand corner. In the search box, fill in the last name of the member of staff or student you are looking for. Student portal My.utwente.nl is the portal for students from which students can easily log in to all systems of the University of Twente: http://my.utwente.nl/ut BlackBoard: the digital learning environment of the UT BlackBoard is the digital learning environment of the University of Twente and can be found at http://BlackBoard.utwente.nl. It is a simple programme with which students and lecturers can communicate with one another. Osiris: the student information system In Osiris students can consult a wealth of information: the list of addresses, your grades, the teaching catalogue with information on e.g. courses and minors, and information regarding your tutor or study advisor. You need to register via Osiris: https://osiris.utwente.nl/student/StartPagina.do for courses and exams Programme website The website of the Faculty of Behavioural Sciences is: www.gw.utwente.nl. The intranet for staff and students is: www.gw.utwente.nl/intra. Also each programme has its own website. The website of the EST programme is: www.utwente.nl/est. Here you will find news items and manuals concerning for example the master’s thesis.

6.4

Student Card

The UT student card serves as both a valid ID (within the university campus) and proof of enrolment. After your enrolment has been completed and you have had your passport photo taken (for first-time UT entrants), you will receive your student card by regular post. You must present this card upon request when you are using university facilities (e.g. taking classes or exams, visiting the library, etc.). The distribution of the card depends on enrolment form processing, receipt of payment and availability of a digital photograph (must be taken at the CSA).

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For details on how to use the card, what to do in case of loss or theft, transfer to another degree programme, or termination of your studies, please visit the Student Services website (http://www.utwente.nl/so/studentservices/en/). You also may visit their office (e.g. for taking your digital nd

passport photo) in Vrijhof, 2

6.5

floor, room 239 B.

Annual rosters

The Faculty of Behavioural Sciences operates with a term system, whereby each academic year is divided into two terms. Each term consists of two blocks. A block is divided into seven weeks of lectures, a subsequent week of study in which as few lectures are planned as possible, and two exam weeks. For the rosters/timetables: http://www.utwente.nl/so/student/onderwijs/roosters/ Printed rosters are also available at the Educational Affairs Offices (i.e. the so-called BOZ offices in the Cubicus building).

6.6

Lectures

Overview lecture hours A typical lecture day has 9 periods. The 5th period, from 12.45 - 13.30 hrs. is the lunch break (when no lectures are scheduled). 1st period: 2nd period: 3rd period: 4th period: 5th hour = lunch break: 6th period: 7th period: 8th period: 9th period:

08:45 - 09:30 hrs 09:45 - 10:30 hrs 10:45 - 11:30 hrs 11:45 - 12:30 hrs 12:45 - 13:30 hrs 13:45 - 14:30 hrs 14:45 - 15:30 hrs 15:45 - 16:30 hrs 16:45 - 17:30 hrs

The roster indicates how each subject is taught. (Note: Officially speaking, we call a subject a ‘unit of study’. This term is also used in the Dutch Higher Education and Research Act (the socalled WHW)). Types of lectures In the roster you can see per subject what type of lecture will be delivered. There are four different kinds: 1. lectures (abbreviated HC = in Dutch: hoorcollege), whereby the lecturer presents a topic in oral form and the students listen and take notes; 2. seminars (abbreviated WC = in Dutch: werkcolleges), characterised as interactive tutorials in which the students play an active role); 3. a combination of the two (abbreviated HW – in Dutch hoor-/werkcolleges); and 4. practicals.

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During a lecture, a lecturer will clarify/illustrate and/or supplement the subject matter. Usually such lectures last for 90 minutes, with a short break. Seminars are usually just as long but are more interactive by nature (students work in groups on assignments that help to digest the subject matter). Practicals usually last an entire morning or afternoon (4 periods), during which students work either in groups or individually on a project or with a specific computer programme. Attending practicals is compulsory. Attending lectures or seminars is not compulsory, unless stipulated as such by the lecturer. If attendance is obligated, this will be announced on BlackBoard.

6.7

Attending courses

Enrolment for the courses via BlackBoard You must enrol for each unit of study (i.e. course) via BlackBoard (http://BlackBoard.utwente.nl) You will need an account to access the courses. The university’s Department for Information Technology (ICTS) will provide you with a username and password. The password will be the same as the one you originally received for accessing the UT network. You were informed about this in a letter. If you have not received a username and password for BlackBoard, or if you have forgotten your password, go to the FAQ on the BlackBoard Start page: http://BlackBoard.utwente.nl. If you are still having difficulties, contact the ICT Service Centre Helpdesk (ICT-S) (phone: 053 4895577) with your student card or contact the BlackBoard coordinator of the Faculty of Behavioural Sciences: Huub Engbers (h.t.engbers@utwente.nl; telephone: 053 4894122; room: Cubicus C101). But, please consult the FAQ on the BlackBoard Start page (http://BlackBoard.utwente.nl) first before contacting either the ICT-S or Huub Engbers. After logging in on BlackBoard, you can enrol for all the courses that you will be attending in the coming block/quartile. To do so, click on ‘Courses’, and then on faculties, after that you click on ‘Gedragswetenschappen’. To enrol, click on ‘Master Educational Science and Technology’ (for master courses and some pre-master courses) or click on 'Bachelor onderwijskunde' (for some specialisation specific pre-master courses). On BlackBoard you will find –per course- the button ‘Enrol’. To have access to the course on BlackBoard, click on this button. After a few minutes you have access to the course environment. Also via BlackBoard you will be able to see - per course - information on e.g. the contents, the exam subject matter and the roster. Lecturers also use BlackBoard as a means of communication during a subject, just as you can communicate via a forum with students who are also attending the course. Enrolment for work groups also takes place in the course environment. Note When you enrol via BlackBoard for a course or a unit of study, you will receive the following message: • Participation in the unit of study may require specific prior knowledge;

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In case the student does not possess the obligatory prior knowledge, he/she must withdraw from the unit of study before the final registration date; • If a student questions whether he/she is eligible to take part in the unit of study concerned, he/she should contact the study advisor; • Unauthorised participation in a unit of study will be penalised); • In the event of illicit participation in an exam component, any work handed in will not be graded; • In order to prevent unauthorised sitting for interim examinations, faculty staff will check whether a student has registered for participation through OSIRIS during the interim examination; • In order to prevent unauthorised sitting for interim examinations, faculty staff will check the identity of the students by their student identification cards during the interim examination. In case you are unable to attend a seminar, practical or exam, you must report as soon as possible (at the latest on the same day of your absence!) to the relevant teacher and send a copy to your study counsellor and the Educational Affairs Office (BOZ). Retrieving subject-related information Via Osiris you can find all kinds of information on the courses’ contents, lecturer(s), literature, etc. Go to http://www.utwente.nl/so/osiris/ for more information, including an explanation of the system.

6.8

Finding your way at the University of Twente

Study locations Classes are scheduled in various lecture halls on campus. These halls are indicated by the abbreviation of the name of the building, followed by a room number, e.g. SP1, RA5 or ZI-U3. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Carré (CR) Chalet (Clt) Cubicus (CU) Hal B (HB) Horstring (HR) Horsttoren (HT) Kleinhorst (KH) Nanolab (NA) Oosthorst (OH) Ravelijn (RA) Spiegel (SP) Sportcentrum (SC) Vrijhof (VR) Waaier (WA) Westhorst (WH) Zilverling (ZI) Zuidhorst (ZH)

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6.9

Teaching facilities

The University of Twente has the following facilities: Classrooms/lecture halls The EST programme uses university lecture rooms that are distributed by the central Facility Service Centre. (Almost) all classrooms are equipped with internet connections, and a LCD projector. Most classrooms are also equipped with a desktop computer. The average classroom used for the EST programme houses 25-50 students, and are furnished with tables and chairs that are easily rearranged (square, traditional class arrangement or separate islands). Computer and network facilities In Cubicus are two computer rooms. Cubicus is open on weekdays from 08.00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 18.00 hrs. For access outside of these office hours, you must ask for special permission (application forms available from Cubicus reception desk). This will allow you to enter the building with a chip card in the evening and during the weekends. The computers in the Cubicus building are located in two rooms: B205C: PC-Room 1 (also called: study hall or, in Dutch studielandschap) B205D: PC-Room 2 (a PC room equipped for computer-based group teaching. For those approaching graduation who do not have a workstation at their disposal in the department where they are graduating, extra study spaces have been created that can only be reserved by them. There are also a number of observation rooms available for research. If they are not being used for scheduled instruction, the computers in the study landscape are available for private study/independent learning. Students may also use the computers in B205, a room generally not used for classes/tutorials. The computers have all been equipped with instructionrelated software. For those students with permission, these computers are also available at the weekend and in the evening. Students can work on their notebook computer throughout the building, using the dense network of notebook power sockets and wired Internet. In addition to this, wireless Internet (Wi-Fi) is available at the entire campus. Library The University Library is housed in the Vrijhof. Here you will find the collection of books and journals specifically tailored to the components of educational science. Also the theses can be found here. The library also houses a more standard collection of books and magazines, as also a computer room with liberal opening hours for independent learning. More and more of the journal collection are available electronically. You can also borrow books from other libraries. Opening hours on weekdays: 08.30 - 22.00 hrs, on Saturdays: 11.30 - 16.30 hrs, and on Sundays during exam periods: 09.00 - 17.00 hrs (solely for the purpose of study). The Info Desk is open 08.30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 17.00 hrs from Monday to Friday. See also: http://www.utwente.nl/ub/en/. Limited opening hours apply during holidays. 2012.139 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2012-2013

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Cafeterias A number of UT buildings house cafeterias where you can buy coffee, tea, soup, rolls, etc. The cafeteria in the Cubicus building is open from 11.30 - 13.30 hrs. (N.B. Different opening hours apply during holidays.) There you will also find vending machines selling sweets, beverages and lunches. You pay at the cash desk or the vending machines with your chip card, which you can upgrade at the upgrade machines (e.g. in the Cubicus lobby). In the Waaier is a large cafeteria that also serves low-priced hot meals in the afternoon and evening.

6.10 Purchasing study materials You will need books and/or lecture notes/readers/syllabuses for almost every course. For these please go to student association Dimensie and/or the Union Shop. Buying books You can order your text books via the bookstore, but it is easier and cheaper to place your order with your student association Dimensie http://www.dimensie.utwente.nl/ as you will often get a discount and you can simply pick up your books from the student association before the start of the course or during the introduction days. Henceforth you will receive an e-mail from the student association informing you of the deadline for ordering books online. Occasionally, you can also buy second-hand books via www.studieboekentwente.nl – make sure that it is the right edition! You can also resell your books via this site. Also the books that lecturers have designated as ‘compulsory literature’ can be found and looked at in an especially reserved part of the Central Library. Buying lecture notes, readers and syllabuses The lecture notes, readers and syllabuses are sold from the beginning of each term in the Union Shop. Via the website you can check if they are in stock: www.studentunion.utwente.nl/unionshop In the Union Shop you can also buy UT gifts and clothing, and there is a copy service. Besides copying, the self-service section also has provisions for binding reports, cutting flyers, etc. The Union Shop is located on the ground floor of the Bastille and is open every weekday from 10.00 17.00 hrs.

6.11 Purchasing a laptop During your studies, a computer is as good as indispensable. You can buy a laptop/notebook via the UT’s Notebook Service Centre (NSC). Especially for students this centre has special offers and excellent service conditions. The NSC moreover takes care of the financial agreement, both flexibly and fast. More information on the offers and the NSC can be found at: http://www.utwente.nl/icts/nsc/ Of course you can also work on the PCs in the computer rooms in the Cubicus building. However, owning or buying your own PC or laptop does have a number of advantages over working on the UT’s PCs:

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The computers at the UT are often occupied (particularly in peak periods, during lunch breaks and at the end of a term). Hence it is not always possible to use a computer when you want or need to, which can be stressful if you are working to a deadline. You can work from home, during the evenings and weekends.

The Faculty of Behavioural Sciences offers all of its students the Microsoft Office package free of charge.

6.12 Examinations Exam roster At the start of the academic year, all students will receive a hard copy of the roster for the first term, indicating dates and times. Each programme presents its examination schedule on its website. Changes in examination dates are announced via the BlackBoard sites of the courses in question and via educational announcements. The Educational Service Centre (OSC) will not be able publishing a new hard copy of the roster at every change in examination dates. Compulsory registration for exams (Osiris) If you want to sit an examination (or part of an examination), you need to register via Osiris. You can also go to Osiris for an exam roster and view those exams for which you have registered. As the roster does not mention where the exam will take place, you can consult Osiris from 4 days prior to the exam for the exact location. Please note that if you have enrolled for a course this does NOT automatically mean that you have registered for the exam! You must register separately for each exam! This can be done up to 8 (week) days prior to the first Monday in the exam period. After that date it is no longer possible to register. Being registered means entitlement to participation (on the condition that demands are met regarding your prior knowledge). Students who have registered may be confident that there are sufficient desks and chairs in the exam hall and sufficient copies of the exam. Starting the academic year (2012-2013) there are some major changes with regard to registering and de-registering for (written) exams. • Registering is obligatory for all (also interim) exams. • The registration period is open from 40 till 14 days before the actual date of a specific exam. • Students will not anymore receive a general announcement or reminder via e-mail. • De-registering for an exam till 1 day prior to the exam. This implies that there are not any longer fixed periods for registering and de-registering per quartile/block.

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In case you decide to cancel your registration for an exam, you may withdraw your registration till 1 day before exam date (i.e. till 24:00h of the day prior to the exam date) Note: A check will take place on the basis of the Osiris list of participants whether students who have registered are actually eligible/authorised to sit for a certain exam. If a student is on the list that is not entitled to participate, the examiner(s) will be notified of this. All regulations concerning registration, cancellation and force majeure (i.e. circumstances beyond one’s control) go via the Educational Affairs Office (BOZ) and not via the lecturer responsible for that specific exam. Note Each examination is entered into Osiris well in advance to allow you to register for it. Don’t wait until the very last moment! Should something go wrong, inform your Bureau of Educational Affairs as soon as possible, either by e-mail or by telephone so they can take action if necessary. Once the registration period has ended, the Bureau will not be able to help you. The examination schedule may change after you have registered, e.g. an examination may be moved to a different location. So, before the examination, consult the educational announcements, BlackBoard or the examination schedule available on Osiris for any changes. General rules • • • • • • •

If you wish to sit an exam, register in good time via the appropriate systems. De-register in time if you are unable to sit the exam after all. You only sit exams for which you are sufficiently prepared. With exams, assignments, projects, theses and any other kind of testing, you do not borrow or adopt work or ideas of others without mentioning the source (fraud!). You are aware that if you violate this code of conduct, the sanctions imposed by the exam committee will be severe. Lecturers will forward the marks to the Bureau of Educational Affairs within 20 (week) days. The Bureau of Educational Affairs will subsequently issue the marks within 2 (week) days by distributing the grade slips via the students’ mailboxes.

Rules during the actual examination Start exam Arriving late

Aids Filling in the exam slip

A written examination has a maximum duration of four hours and begins promptly at the scheduled time. Late arrival means that one can possibly still sit the exam if no other examinee has meanwhile left the exam hall. This applies for the first 30 minutes after the exam has commenced. After that it is no longer possible to participate. Desks may only hold materials that are absolutely necessary for you to complete the examination. So you are not allowed to use your notebook. If exam slips are handed out before the session commences, please fill these in in capital/block letters. In many cases, assessment lists are used

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Presence of examination monitor Going to the toilet

instead of exam slips. You will need to fill in your student number, name and initial(s), address, postal code and city/town, subject name, subject code, name(s) of lecturer(s) and the date of the exam. You must also name the programme in which you are registered. If you are registered with two programmes, then fill in the one that manages/is accountable for the result of this subject. An examination monitor â&#x20AC;&#x201C; usually a course lecturer â&#x20AC;&#x201C; will be present during the examination. You must be able to show your student card upon request. All pages of the work handed in must bear your name, initials and student number in legible handwriting. If you need to go to the toilet, you must ask for permission from the monitor. Only one person may go at a time. During the examination, you may not contact anyone directly or indirectly, either inside or outside the examination room.

Rules after the examination Period for marking exams

Requesting to see your exam paper Inspection of your exam

Period of storage of exams

Except in instances of force majeure, examination results are announced within fifteen (15) working days after the examination. If the results are not known within one week before you are to resit an examination, you may request the board of examiners to arrange the possibility to resit an examination at a later point in time. If you have been graded more than once for the same part of an examination, the highest grade applies. In principle your exam paper remains in the possession of your lecturer. For a period of twenty (20) working days, starting on the day on which the results are announced, you may, upon request, inspect your own graded work. If the examiner decides that the nature of the work allows it, you will be entitled to make copies (costs of copy at your own expense). The examiner sees to it that written examinations are kept for at least two years after the examination date.

Oral examinations An examiner may decide to hold oral examinations at a time to be determined by the examiner or examiners in consultation with you. Normally this will be arranged within one month following completion of the course (holiday months not included). An oral examination will not exceed two hours. The examiner is allowed to examine more than one student simultaneously, provided none of the involved students raises objections. An oral examination is a public event unless the board of examiners or the examiner has decided otherwise, or the student raises objections against publicity. Retrieving examination results Some courses still use examination notes (also called: grade slips). In this case, (and during the examination) the invigilator will hand out examination notes to be completed by the student completely prior to the start of the examination. After your grade has been awarded a copy of the 2012.139 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2012-2013

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examination note will be put in your mailbox. If you have sat part of an examination, some lecturers still will give you a so-called test card indicating the grade received for that part. You will receive your final examination note upon final course completion. Examination results are confidential and are treated as such by the Bureau of Educational Affairs. The examination notes are put in students’ mailboxes. Retain your examination notes! If the Bureau of Educational Affairs misplaces one, you must be able to prove that you successfully completed the course. Note: In case a lecturer issues examination results lists of so-called assessment lists (instead of examination notes), you will receive via e-mail or BlackBoard (anonymously) your result. Although you may not derive rights from such e-mail messages, it is strongly recommended to retain them! If the Bureau of Educational Affairs misplaces a result, you must be able to prove that you successfully completed a unit of study. In that case we recommend you to contact your Bureau of Educational Affairs as soon as possible. Overview of grades Via Osiris you can get an overview of e.g. all your exam marks or grades in a specific academic year. Once an exam has been marked and processed by the Educational Affairs Office (BOZ), the results are made known to you as soon as possible. If you passed a subject but detect that the mark has not been processed in Osiris, please contact BOZ as soon as possible. Resit exams The programme offers to sit for an exam once per academic year during the instruction period of that subject, with one 2nd chance to resit it during the exam period of the following block. For exams in the last block of the academic year, the programme offers you a resit opportunity in August. Period of validity of examination results The validity of the examination results of the MSc EST programme is five (5) years. In case the final assessment of a course (unit of study) is composed of more than 1 component, than the grades of these partial exam components are valid until the end of the subsequent academic year, counting from the moment the exam component started. These periods of validity also apply to assignments or papers. With regard to the EST pre-Master’s programme, additional conditions apply, namely the maximum period of enrolment for the pre-Master’s programme is two years and during this period a student has a maximum of 3 chances per exam component.

6.13 Student activism Activism possibilities within EST: • Board or committee member of student association Dimensie; • Student assistant: you assist the lecturers with the preparation and/or execution of a subject. For example, you carry out the groundwork and/or you are the person to whom students can turn if they have a question about the subject matter during a tutorial. It is also possible to be a student assistant in one of the departments of EST. • Student member of one of the quality assurance committees of EST. 2012.139 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2012-2013

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Student association Dimensie Each programme has its own student association and for Educational Science and Technology that is Dimensie. Within Dimensie are various committees which organise all kinds of study-related activities, such as lectures, excursions and symposia. Dimensie also organises leisure activities, such as get-togethers and parties. Furthermore, Dimensie organises the sale of books, publishes an association magazine and compiles an annual almanac. For more information, see the website: www.dimensie.utwente.nl.

6.14 Alumni association ToPoS ToPoS is the alumni association of EST graduates of the University of Twente. ToPoS is the meeting place where professional skills are honed and where mutual relations and contact with the faculty and current students are kept up. For more information, see: www.topos-online.nl.

6.15 Sports and cultural facilities on campus Of course you can also become a member of one of the UT’s cultural or sports clubs with or without being active on a committee and/or board. You can choose from 20 cultural and 38 sports associations. Student Services provides the facilities and the instructors/teachers and investigates the possibility of new areas and facilities. Student Services moreover supports students with the organisation of events and sports games. Vrijhof Cultural Centre Anything to do with performances, cultural courses, exhibitions, art library and cultural student associations can be found in the Vrijhof. For more information, see: www.cultuur.utwente.nl. Sports Centre Anything to do with sports at the UT, information on the 38 different sports associations, facilities, courses, training and sports events can be found in the sports centre on the Boulevard.

6.16 ICT Service Every student and staff member with a problem and/or question concerning ICT can go to the Horst. The ICT Service Desk is open on weekdays from 08.30 – 12.00h and 13.00 -17.00h and can be reached on phone number 5577. The Service Desk can be found in Horstring W122.

6.17 Children’s day-care centre ‘De Vlinder’ Children’s day-care centre ‘De Vlinder’ (in English: the butterfly) can be found on the UT campus and takes children in the 0 - 4 age group. What makes the building special is its shape: like a butterfly (hence its name). The main hall forms the body of a butterfly, with 8 group rooms

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branching off in the wings. Each group is named after a butterfly. Of course De Vlinder is a centre for all children, not just for those who live on campus or whose parents work at the UT. For more information: http://www.catalpa.nl/vestigingen

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7.

Student support and counselling services

7.1

Study guidance

During your EST programme you can count on support and monitoring from several staff members. The study counsellor can offer support with your individual plans for both your preMaster’s and/or Master’s study trajectory. With the UT also offering additional student supervision and counselling, you can, if necessary, go to the Student Psychologists Office (BSP) and its student deans.

Study counsellor Yvonne Luyten–de Thouars As study counsellor, Yvonne Luyten–de Thouars offers advice on study-related issues and she can inform you of practical matters concerning your study, such as examination regulations and legal status. You may consult her also on your personal problems. You may e.g. discuss with her your experiences, complaints, study choice, planning, delay, graduation support, exemptions, etc. If necessary, she can refer you to other support bodies in or outside the university. Contact: Cubicus, Room C110 E-mail: y.c.h.luyten-dethouars@utwente.nl Phone: 053 489 1117

Programme coordinator Jan Nelissen As programme coordinator, Jan Nelissen provides policy support to the programme director of the EST programme and he is responsible for the organisational, procedural and intrinsic coordination and harmonisation of the EST programme. If you have a complaint or a question about the programme or certain subjects, the programme coordinator is the first person to see. Contact: Cubicus, Room C104 E-mail: j.m.j.nelissen@utwente.nl Phone: 053 489 3588

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Student Service Staff members Mirjam Friskus / Monique Davids (contact person for international students) Mirjam Friskus is your contact at Educational Affairs Office. She is responsible for providing information to students and all administrative tasks related to the programme. Contact: Mirjam Friskus (Mondays - Thursdays) Cubicus, Room C105 E-mail: m.friskus@utwente.nl Phone: 053 489 3836 For International Students! Monique Davids Cubicus, Room C107 E-mail: m.davids@utwente.nl Phone: 053 489 8028

7.2

Additional UT student support

Various services have been organised for students and they have been combined to form the Student and Educational Service Centre. Accommodated at the Student Services Desk, the most important services are the following: Student Information Desk The Student Information Desk (formerly the ‘Blue Desk’) provides all kind of services. You can go there to have your digital passport photograph taken for your student card, to enrol, to register or to cancel enrolment. You will find the Student Services Desk in the Vrijhof, room 239 B (opposite the University Library). See also: http://www.utwente.nl/so/en/ Student Counselling Service The Student Counselling Desk (the ‘Red Desk’) is in charge of individual and collective care for and supervision of UT students at the co-ordinating level, supplementary to the faculties’ obligations vis-à-vis their own students in this area. In addition to the student counsellors, the Red Desk provides such services as a student psychologist, and various training courses, (‘selfmanagement’, graduating, job interviews). You may contact the student counsellor for questions on financial support, changing your studies, personal problems, admission exams, etc. The Red Desk can be found on level two (first floor) of the Bastille building. For further information, go to: http://www.utwente.nl/so/en/

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Student psychologist You can go to the student psychologist if you need to talk about a personal problem, such as an issue with your parents, friends or fellow students. You do not require a referral to see a student psychologist; you can make the appointment yourself. The Student Psychologists Office strives to arrange a first visit within one week of the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s having contacted them.

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8.

Quality assurance

The Faculty of Behavioural Sciences sets great store by the quality of its education. Students are generally appreciative of the education provided by the faculty, yet critical of certain specific aspects. The programmes are extremely responsive to this and do their utmost to improve quality. Quality education requires the firm commitment of lecturers and students as well as proper communication. The core of the internal quality assurance system is formed by the course evaluations and the annual systematic feedback from students. The quality cycle comprises the following internal quality assurance instruments.

8.1

Internal quality assurance

Evaluation of the courses When you have completed a course, you are supposed to give our opinion on it by means of an anonymous survey. The lecturer will integrate the results of this survey in preparing for the next cycle of the course and curriculum. Your contribution as a student is essential, which is why participation in evaluations is compulsory. The results of the course evaluations can be found several weeks later on the BlackBoard page course evaluation (in Dutch: ‘onderwijsevaluatie’). Both the lecturer and the department chair to which he/she is accountable receive the results of the course evaluations, which, if necessary, also can be discussed by the Programme Committee or Board of Examiners. Student Satisfaction Survey Each year the programme conducts an internal student satisfaction survey on the students’ assessment of all kinds of education-related issues, such as the content of the curriculum, the quality of the lecturers, the quality of the teaching material, the communication between programme and student, the relationship with the labour market, the options available in the curriculum. This survey is an important source of information to faculty management and may instigate amending the curriculum. Ultimately the faculty wishes to score above average on all points. The results of this survey are discussed in the term evaluations, on the Programme Committee and, if necessary, on the Exam Committee. Guaranteeing the quality of the lecturers The UT follows the rule that both novice and newly appointed lecturers must pass the Basic Qualification in Education within two years. For more experienced lecturers a Task-oriented Qualification in Education is currently being developed, which on the basis of their experience and expertise will enable lecturers to develop further. Furthermore, the programme management always discusses the results of the course evaluations with the lecturer(s) concerned so that they are aware of which parts of the instruction according to students can be improved.

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Internal evaluation Once every five years, as with all university programmes, the programme is evaluated by an external committee. Hence this is called the educational review. Prior to this, the programme writes an internal evaluation. Items to be evaluated are e.g. the objective of the programme, the curriculum, the deployment of staff, the facilities, the internal quality assurance and the testing and results.

8.2

Consultative committees

Board of Examiners The Board of Examiners is responsible for all aspects of testing the instruction, e.g. the procedures during exams, the quality of the exams and the regulations with which both students and lecturers must comply. The Board of Examiners also assesses applications for a personal study trajectory and the evaluation of requests for exemption from exam components during your studies (exams, practicals etc.). There is one Board of Examiners for the Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programme. The Board of Examiners consists of three lecturers and is supported by a registrar. It moreover has three advisors: the programme director, the study counsellor and the programme coordinator. The Board of Examiners meets several times a year. You can find the actual dates of committee meetings on the website http://www.utwente.nl/owk/masterest/contact/Examination%20committee.doc/. If you have a request to make, you will need to submit this at least one week prior to the date of the meeting to ExamenCommissies-GW@gw.utwente.nl . Programme Committee EST has its own Programme Committee, which is applicable to both the Bachelor’s and the Master’s degree programme. The Programme Committee occupies itself with all issues directly related to the set-up and quality of the instruction, such as advising where necessary to make alterations to the course. The programme director and the programme coordinator are involved as advisors. In accordance with the law, the Programme Committee consists of students and staff. On EST’s Programme Committee there are five lecturers and five students. The members of both the Programme Committee and the Board of Examiners are appointed by the Dean. The Programme Committee advises the programme director and the Dean, the latter particularly with regard to educational affairs that are addressed in the Faculty Council, such as the Education and Examination Regulations (in Dutch: the OER). Term meetings The programme management and the lecturers involved gather twice per year at term meetings. Topics of discussion are: the course evaluations, the personal observations of lecturers with regard to study load, time-related issues, the quality of lectures and teaching material, facilities, testing, the coherence in the curriculum, evaluation of the instruction and the figures on students’ progress and pass marks per individual student. The desired content and set-up of the courses are discussed as are the ways in which the interrelationship between subjects/courses can be made clearer.

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8.3

External quality instruments

Educational review With its accreditation the NVAO (the Dutch-Flemish Accreditation Organisation) gives official approval to a programme that has stated that it has met all specified quality requirements. In connection with this, the NVAO reviews each programme in the Netherlands and Flanders once every five years. Both in the Netherlands and in Flanders, an accreditation is a condition for the government’s funding/financing of a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree programme and for the entitlement to award recognised/validated diplomas. In the Netherlands it is also a prerequisite for issuing student grants and loans. The Master’s degree programme EST has recently been accredited in spring 2012 and the conclusion was that the programme met all the criteria.

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9.

Faculty of Behavioural Sciences

9.1

Faculty organisational chart Faculty Council

Services

Dean

Chamber of

prof. dr. K.I. van Oudenhoven –

Professors

Departments

Programmes

Managing Director drs. M.A.R. Kamp

• Cognitieve Psychology & Ergonomics (CPE) / prof. dr. ing. W.B. Verwey

• Communication Studies (dr. O. Peters)

• Labour and environmental support

• Communication Science / prof dr. M.D.T. de Jong

• Dean’s Office

• Instructional Technology (IST) / prof. dr. A.J.M. de Jong

• Educational Science and Technology (dr. P.H.G. Fisser)

• Communication • Financial Administration

• Media, Communication & Organisation (MCO) / prof. dr. J.A.G.M. van Dijk • Educational Science (OWK) / prof. dr. P.J.C. Sleegers • Research Methodology, Measurement and Data analysis (OMD) / prof. dr. C.A.W. Glas

• Teacher Training programme / Science Education and Communication (dr. J.T. van der Veen) • Philosophy of Science , Technology and Society (prof. dr. Ö. Aydin) • Psychology (dr. H. Boer)

• Psychology & Communication of Health and Risk (PCGR) / prof. dr. E. Giebels • Philosophy (WIJSB) / prof. dr. P.A.E. Brey

Programme Committees

• Teacher Training Instituut ELAN / dr. P.L.J. Boerman)

Boards of Examiners

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9.2

Programmes

In addition to EST, the Faculty of Behavioural Sciences offers the following Master’s degree programmes: • Communication Studies (offered in English) • Psychology (offered in Dutch). • Philosophy of Science, Technology and Society (offered in English) In addition to these programmes, the Faculty’s Centre for Expertise Development in Secondary Education (abbreviated to ELAN in Dutch) offers the following teacher training programmes at Master’s degree level: • the one-year Master’s degree programme ‘Leraar Voortgezet Hoger Onderwijs Maatschappijleer’ (a top-up course to first-level teacher of Social Studies) • the two-year Master’s degree programme ‘Science Education and Communication’ (university teacher training programmes Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Informatics, and Science Communication)

9.3

Recruitment and Public Relations

Within the Faculty of Behavioural Sciences, the Communication and Media staff is responsible for the recruitment and public relations of our Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programmes. In close collaboration with our students, they organise open days, experience days with a current student, fairs and information sessions at schools. The communication staff also takes care of all the public relations materials (brochures, leaflets) and creates and maintains the websites of our bachelor’s and master’s degree programmes. However, information provision would not be possible without the help of students. Student assistance is required for a lot of activities, for instance as hosts for participants when experiencing a day with a student. A lot of students appreciate the opportunity to attend lectures for a day, and they are accompanied by first-year Bachelor’s students. As said, they also work together with students to organise the Bachelor’s/Master’s open days. Most of the programme for these days is determined by the students themselves. In addition to campus-based information activities, information days are also held at pre-university education and higher vocational education institutes and student fairs. If you want to be an external information provider, you can follow a presentation training course at the university’s Communication Department. If you would like to help out, send us an e-mail! Of course, the information activities mentioned above will be amply rewarded. Contact: Marjolein Lindeman (communication advisor), phone: 053 489 1017, m.a.h.lindeman@utwente.nl Cubicus, room C-109, Monday-Friday. Or Linda Jonker (communication officer), phone: 053 489 2875, l.c.jonker@utwente.nl Cubicus, room C-109b. Monday-Friday.

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10. Special regulations for students There are several special university-wide regulations governing transfers to another programme, top sports and provisions for study delays that could occur for a number of reasons. A summary description of these regulations is given below. For more detailed information, please consult the Student Charter on line at: http://www.utwente.nl/so/studentenbegeleiding/en/regulations/charter/ This UT Student Charter contains a wealth of information about studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rights and obligations as well as other, more general information.

10.1 Transitional regulations If courses are drastically changed or cancelled, you will be informed of the consequences in writing at the beginning of the academic year.

10.2 Individual regulations UT students with certain special personal circumstances are eligible for the graduation support regulation. Students may invoke this regulation if, during the period in which they receive a combination of public and private financial assistance (granted by the IBG during the course, consisting of a basis grant plus a possible additional grant and loan) have suffered a delay in their study due to accepted special circumstances. The combination of public and private financial assistance concerns the period for which part of the grant can be converted into a gift, in other words, the period during which the student is entitled to the basic grant. To apply for graduation support, contact the Student Service Desk in the Bastille or check: http://www.utwente.nl/so/studentenbegeleiding/en/regulations/ (in Dutch) Top athletes Studying at university level and performing at a top level in sports often causes problems. Neither of the two activities can be postponed â&#x20AC;&#x201C; studies as well as sports require the person in question to show results in the short term. The UT understands this, which is why it has drafted a policy and regulation for top athletes. For more information, http://www.utwente.nl/so/studentenbegeleiding/en/regulations (in Dutch) Studying with a handicap People with a handicap who want to study face many problems. The UT makes every effort to facilitate studying for students with a disability. The Faculty of Behavioural Sciences has a special dispensation regulation for students with a physical or sensory handicap and dyslectic students. They are offered the opportunity to sit examinations individually adapted to their particular needs wherever possible. Subject to this regulation, it is the study counsellorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s responsibility to bring students to the attention of the Educational Affairs Office and the involved Behavioural Sciences lecturers. The students in question must report to the Educational Affairs Office, timely and identical to the regular registration procedure, requesting if they can sit a customised examination. More information can be obtained from:

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http://www.utwente.nl/studentenbalie/rode_balie/handicap/ (in Dutch!). You also may go to http://www.handicap-studie.nl (in Dutch).

10.3 Studying abroad Exchange programmes (particularly Erasmus) Under the EU student exchange programme Erasmus, Behavioural Sciences has concluded several contracts with other participating European universities. The primary objective of the Erasmus programme is to promote cooperation in education between participating countries. It offers an excellent opportunity to study at a foreign university for a few months. All students that meet the programme standards are entitled to apply for participation in the Erasmus exchange programme. Participating universities agree on the number of students eligible for exchange. For the time being, that number is limited, as the Erasmus scheme is based on the concept of 'tuition waivers’ and, secondly, on limited grants. For information on the universities with which Behavioural Sciences has concluded an Erasmus agreement, visit the UT Exchange programme website: http://intoffice.utwente.nl/letsgoabroad. For more information on completing parts of your programme abroad, please contact the Faculty’s exchange co-ordinator Jan Nelissen: E-mail: j.m.j.nelissen@utwente.nl, tel.: 053-489 35 88, Cubicus C-104:

10.4 Copyright In general a student owns the copyright on any realised product within the framework of a study programme. This implies that a student decides whether to make reproductions or release the product publically. However, as long as a student has been registered officially in a faculty’s study programme, the faculty is entitled to use the product internally without any compensation to the student as long as its use fits the faculty’s goals. Using the student’s product for educational purposes is seen as internal use. The same applies when a former student is no longer registered as a student; however, it is understood that a former student will be notified in writing before the product is used. The following exceptions apply: • If realisation of the product took place in the framework of a formal tenure at the faculty of the student, then the faculty holds the copyright. • If the realisation of the product took place in the context of a graduation project or internship and classified information is involved, then the institute or company where the student did his/her project or internship holds the copyright. Therefore, the institute or company decides whether to make reproductions or release the product publically. • If the realisation of the product took place in the framework of a group project or group assignment, then the faculty holds the copyright. • If the realisation of the product took place in a context where the student has been substantially guided and instructed, then the student does not automatically hold the

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copyright. This exception requires explanation, and if unimpeded, it means that the faculty, in line with the general rules, is entitled to use the product. In this regard the following may apply: o An assignment and its report have been completed with strict directives from faculty staff. The student has been informed beforehand that the staff member intends to publish the report and mention the student as a co-author. This situation may apply in the framework of a Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree programme where the student plays a junior role. In that case the staff member mentions the student in the acknowledgements. o In a collaborative setting, both student and staff member agree that, depending on the quality, the product will be published. In that case the nature and volume of the authorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; contribution to the publication will determine which author will be mentioned first. o If it is clear that the student holds responsibility of the product and that the staff member played the role of expert reviewer giving critical feedback, then the student holds the copyright. The rules mentioned above illustrate that it is necessary that in the context of copyright, aims and conditions need to be explicitly described before realisation of the product.

10.5 Student activism regulation UT students with certain special personal circumstances are eligible for the graduation support regulation. Students may invoke this regulation if, during the period in which they receive a combination of public and private financial assistance (granted by the IBG during the course, consisting of a basic grant plus a possible additional grant and loan) have suffered a delay in their study due to accepted special circumstances The combination of public and private financial assistance concerns the period for which part of the grant can be converted into a gift, in other words, the period during which the student is entitled to the basic grant. To apply for graduation support, contact the Student Service Desk in the Bastille or check: http://www.utwente.nl/so/studentenbegeleiding/.

10.6 Support with entrepreneurship Each year the University of Twente makes a limited number of TOPs (Temporary Entrepreneurs Positions) available for beginning entrepreneurs with innovative ideas to help them bridge the first, usually most difficult year of an enterprise. Also the commercial side, one that often suffers during the first year, receives attention. The TOP regulation is open to graduates and doctoral candidates of the UT, graduates from other universities (including colleges of higher education and universities of applied sciences) and enterprising individuals who wish to develop a product or service with the help of the UT. The condition is, however, that your service or product is associated with one of the research groups of the UT. Your enterprise must be able to stand on its own feet after one year. For more information, check: http://www.kennispark.nl/ondernemen/top-regeling/ (in Dutch)

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Part D: Course descriptions - Pre-Master’s and Master’s degree courses -

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Appendix D1: Pre-Master’s courses (alphabetically) Academic Writing (192412240) The course provides participants with the necessary skills for the preparation of academic articles/manuscripts in English. Participants will also be taught the techniques of effective information search, the ways to work with scientific articles and evaluate them, and the conventions used in literature citation and referencing. In the first block there will be seven lectures and attendance is obligatory. Participants will be expected to perform skill-building exercises after every lecture. Writing tasks will also be given to provide participants the opportunity to practice and/or improve their writing skills. Before the first block ends, course participants are expected to submit a literature matrix based on at least 6 relevant scientific papers as a major requirement. In the second block there will be five lectures. Attendance is still obligatory. Alongside the lectures, skill-building exercises and written assignments will be given. A major requirement for the second block is a comprehensive literature review based on at least 10 papers. For the duration of the course, participants are expected to do the following: • search for relevant scientific articles that would be used for the writing of academic articles/manuscripts; • evaluate scientific articles using a set of criteria; • write their reflections on and assessments of selected scientific articles; • prepare a literature matrix to effectively work with different scientific articles; • effectively use information from scientific articles for the writing of academic articles/manuscripts; • apply the conventions of source citation and referencing into their own academic articles/manuscripts; and • prepare a literature review using varied scientific articles.

Curriculum Theory (191950380) The course introduces via lectures, seminars and recommended literature a number of issues: 1. defining the `curriculum concept, 2. orientation of characteristic curricular problems, 3. presenting a scope of curricular examples, 4. educational innovation process and the complexity of sustainable improvement, 5. basic approaches in curriculum development, 6. a concise historic and thematic overview of curriculum theories and curriculum research, 7. an analysis of contemporary curriculum problems. 8. The course also addresses the positioning of curricula and curriculum design in the framework of instructional issues. At the end of the course the student has knowledge on and insight into: • the definition of the concept “Curriculum”, • characteristic curricular problems • a variety of curricular examples • educational innovation processes and the complexity of sustainable improvement • basic approaches in curriculum development • a concise history and thematic overview of curriculum theories and curriculum research • contemporary curriculum problems.

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At the end of the course the student is able to apply curriculum theories in analysing curricular problems in educational policy and practice. Data analysis and Measurement - 1 (191960550) This course introduces descriptive statistics, theory of probability and concepts from inductive statistics (i.e. tests and confidence intervals). The following descriptive statistics topics are addressed: displaying distributions with graphs, describing distributions with numbers, correlation, regression, relations between categorical variables (contingency tables). The section on theory of probability includes elementary laws of probability calculus, sampling distributions, stochastic variables, expectation, variance, binomial distribution, and the central limit theorem (CLT). Concepts from inductive statistics are discussed on the basis of conclusions concerning an average with a known population standard deviation (i.e., z test). Additionally, several popularly used statistical techniques are treated: t-tests (both independent and dependent), binomial tests (both for a single proportion and two proportions), and chi-squared tests of independence. During the in-class computer exercises, students are taught to use the SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) statistical programme. During 8 lectures of 2 hours the theory will be discussed. In 4 seminars of 2 hours exercises about the discussed theory will be discussed. In 3 practical lessons of 2 hours an introduction will be given about the SPSS programme and SPSS-exercises will be reviewed and practiced. At the end of the course the student has knowledge of or insight in: 1. examining distributions, 2. examining relationships, 3. producing data, 4. probability, probability theory and sampling distributions, 5. inference (for distributions, for proportions and for two-way tables). At the end of the course the student is able to: 1. examine distributions, 2. examine relationships, 3. produce data, 4. execute probability, probability theory and sampling distributions exercises, 5. execute exercises about inference (for distributions, for proportions and for two-way tables) Note: students have to register for the SPSS practicals via Blackboard Data analysis and Measurement - 2 (191960560) In this course several popularly used (more advanced) statistical techniques are addressed as a continuation of Data analysis and measurement 1 (191960550): simple linear regression, multiple linear regression, one-way and two-way analysis of variance (one-way ANOVA and two-way ANOVA), and nonparametric tests. During 8 lectures of 2 hours the theory will be discussed. In 4 seminars of 2 hours exercises will be discussed and practiced. During 4 practical lessons of 2 hours, students are taught to use the SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) programme. The assessment of this course is based on an exam consisting of two parts, namely a theoretical part of 3.5 hours with open questions and a SPSS part of 2 hours. Both parts will be administered around the same time. The theoretical part consists of 5 theoretical exercises for which students can score a maximum of 50 points. The SPSS part consists of 3 exercises for which students can score a maximum of 30 points. The cutting point (separating sufficient grades from insufficient grades) is set on the total test score. Furthermore, the theoretical part will be weighted twice as heavily as the SPSS part. For the theoretical part sheets with formulas and tables will be available and the use of a simple calculator (not a graphical calculator) is permitted. Students are allowed to use the study books for this course for the SPSS part. An insufficient mark (5 or lower) means students have to 2012.139 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2012-2013

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retake the entire exam. Weaker performance on the SPSS part can thus be compensated by stronger performance on the theoretical part, and the other way around. At the end of the course the student is able to: 1. apply inference for regression, 2. perform exercises with multiple linear regression, 3. apply one-way analysis of variance and two-way analysis of variance, 4. perform non-parametric tests Note: students have to register for the SPSS practicals via Blackboard.

Educational Design (191958400) Educational design (educational design) is a main orientation within the Bachelor of educational science. Educational design refers to the systematic and scientifically based analysing, designing, developing, evaluating and implementing solutions to problems in all kinds of education and training sectors (primary, secondary and tertiary education; pre-vocational; corporate training and adult education) on macro-, meso-or micro level. Design education in the bachelor curriculum consists of this introductory course as well as several design studios. Each Design Studio is a learning and working environment which is working on individual and group assignments for the application of theory in educational design processes. There are four thematic ateliers in the first two years of study and one (in the third year) in which an integrative design challenge is executed that is part of the bachelor assignment. The four themes are: Media (first year, first semester), Curriculum and instruction (first year, second semester), organisation and management (second year, first semester) and evaluation and assessment (second year, second semester). The course is divided into two blocks. The first block runs into the first quartile. In 8 (interactive)-lectures and/or work colleges of 2 hours, a theoretical and systematic introduction to the educational design is given. On the basis of a generic design model, activities are undertaken to explore basic concepts and core activities for educational design (analysis, design, construction, evaluation and deployment), as well as to elaborate on systems processes and four main approaches for designing education. One of the four main approaches, the engineering approach, will be applied throughout the course. This block concludes with a written exam featuring both closed and open questions. The second block is scheduled in the second quartile. This block is the so-called "parade of professors". Four professors sketch each their educational field (Curriculum development and education innovation, Instructional technology, Human Resource Development, Educational organisation and management, and Research methodology, measurement methods and data analysis) and how that discipline relates to educational design. This block is concluded with an individual writing assignment. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able: â&#x20AC;˘ to identify and use techniques to design, develop, test and implement valid, practical and effective solutions to educational problems.

Evaluation (191920170) Evaluation is nothing special. We do it all the time. Our daily conduct is largely based on it. Most of our decisions are guided by (often implicit) judgements. Evaluation research, on the other hand, is something special. It should adhere as much as possible to the standards of scientific research and at the same time produce knowledge that is practically relevant. In principle anything can be evaluated, but this course focuses on the evaluation of educational products and programmes. Evaluation is basically about assessing the value of something. As

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such it is an important aspect of any design process. Often evaluation research will focus on the question whether or not something "works". Answering this basic question in evaluation research first of all requires information on the goal and target population of a product or programme. In practice goals and target populations are usually stated in rather general terms. An important aspect of evaluation research is "translating" goals and target populations in more detail, so that goal attainment and coverage of the target population can be assessed in such a way that the scientific ideal of objectivity is approached as closely as possible. Another important aspect of evaluation research is a reconstruction of the (implicit) theory on which a product or programme is based. The basic question in this respect is why the product or programme is believed to bring about the desired results. This theory may be evaluated in itself (especially its plausibility), but it also provides the basis for assessing to what extent a programme or product is put to practice as intended. In many cases the reason for disappointing effects is incorrect use or faulty implementation. The final objective of most evaluation research is to determine the effectiveness of products and programmes. This requires that evaluation research meets the scientific standards of reliability and validity. Alternative explanations for the observed results must be eliminated as much as possible. At the end of the course the student has knowledge of or insight into: 1. basic characteristics of high-quality scientific research, 2. the cohesion between research and its research questions and contextual background, 3. measuring abstract concepts, the relation between cause and effect, and statistical significance HRD Fundamentals (191924010) In this course an introduction is given to Human Resource Development (HRD). HRD is often translated as business training or training and development, but these concepts are too narrow to adequately explain the scope of this field. The HRD field will be explored and attention will be paid to recent developments and theories in this domain. HRD policy will also be discussed. Attention will be paid to the meaning and different forms of learning and development at work, and how this can be stimulated and facilitated. The main goal of HRD: the development of human capital in organisations- will be discussed thoroughly. The activities that are necessary to achieve this are discussed in different HRD definitions that vary and show a constant movement of development and dynamics in the HRD area. These dynamics are increasing from the innovations and trends in organisations and society, which in turn influence the perspectives on HRD and other funding disciplines. During the lectures students will be introduced to HRD. Several theories will be discussed during lectures. This course will be concluded with a visit from a guest lecturer who will share experiences in the work field of HRD. The assessment of this course will be based on a written exam. At the end of the course the student will have knowledge of or insight into: 1. HRD as an integral part of HRM. 2. The value of HRD methods and the differences in applying them. 3. Evolution of HRD. 4. HRD and Corporate strategy. At the end of this course the student will be able to apply the acquired knowledge of HRD to a practical case.

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Management of Education and Training (191920160) This course consists of 6 modules which address the following topics: 1. Introduction to the organisational and managerial aspects of schools 2. School effectiveness 3. Motivation and commitment of teachers 4. Characteristics of the primal process in schools from an organisational perspective 5. Coordination and governance of schools: the administrative structure 6. School leadership In general, the course aims at providing knowledge on and insight in organisational theories and its practical implications with regard to the effectiveness of schools. During 6 lectures, theories will be dealt with, which will be illustrated with examples from departmental research in educational management. In addition, students will work on interim assignments during 6 workshops. At the end of the course the student has knowledge of or insight in: • the organisational theories with respect to the actual functioning of schools, • the relation between organisational characteristics of schools and its effectiveness • the administrative structure of educational systems Organisation Theory (191920130) This course is an introduction course, in which theories, which will be applied in later courses, will be discussed. This regards theories about the way school organisations function. At first the history of organisational theory and thought will be traced by using three competing systems perspectives: rational, natural and open; and in which schools are seen as open social systems with five important elements or subsystems: the structural, the individual, the cultural, the political and the pedagogical subsystem. Organisational behaviour in schools then is a function of the interaction of these elements in the context of teaching and learning. After that the subsystems will be discussed. First attention will be paid to the way organisations are structured, such as the way work is divided in organisations as well as how this division makes a significant unit (the principles of task division and coordination). Also the way in which the functioning of the organisation is related to the goals, the environment, the technology, the people and the strategy will be discussed thoroughly. In this course attention will also be paid to the individual in the school organisation (their needs, motivation and beliefs), the culture and climate of the school organisation, power and politics, decision making in schools and leadership. In this way students will be equipped with a conceptual framework to analyse and (re)design organisations. At the end of the course the student has knowledge of or insight in: 1. different system perspectives in organisation theory, 2. theories and scientific understanding with respect to: a. the structure of (school) organisations b. the culture and climate of (school) organisations c. needs, motivation and beliefs of individuals in (school) organisations d. power and politics within (school) organisations e. decision-making in (school) organisations f. leadership in of (school) organisations At the end of the course the student is able to analyse and design organisations by the conceptual framework.

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Research methodology (191960510) In this course students are introduced to the basic principles of empirical research in the social sciences. The role of research in both testing theories ('empirical cycle') and design methodology will be treated. Doing so, also some attention will be paid to some science-philosophical background (especially to Popper's critical-rationalism). The students get acquainted with some important types of research (experimental, quasi-experimental and correlational research) and its potential threats to internal and external validity. The following phases of conducting scientific research will be dealt with in more detail: 1. formulating research question(s) (embedded within a relevant theoretical framework and mostly emanating from a literature study), 2. splitting up (central) research question(s) into sub questions, 3. formulating hypotheses, 4. setting up a research design, 5. developing measurement instruments (including reliability and validity as its two most important quality criteria), 6. collecting data (including sampling strategy), 7. analysing data, 8. drawing conclusions and reporting results (including discussion). In addition, attention will be explicitly paid to qualitative research as complementary to quantitative research. Teaching methods: During 8 lectures of 2 hours theory, practices and recent departmental research will be discussed. During the last lecture, an example test will be treated and it will also be possible to ask questions about all test contents. During the lectures, supplementary materials (i.e., not included in the text books) may be treated. The assessment is based on a written exam of 3 hours. At the end of the course the student has knowledge of or insight in: • the empirical cycle • science philosophy, especially of Popper’s critical-rationalism • the possibilities and limitations of experimental, quasi-experimental and correlational research • the possibilities and limitations of a number of research strategies and data collection methods • qualitative research and the weaknesses and strengths of this type of research in comparison with quantitative research • measurement instruments in the social sciences and their properties, especially regarding the two classical quality criteria reliability and validity • factor analysis

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Appendix D2: Master’s degree courses (alphabetically)

Assessment of and for Learning (201200025) It is essential pay attention to the quality of assessments in education, both with regards to formative as well as summative assessments. What are important characteristics to consider when designing assessments, and how? How can we make sure that assessments are used summatively as well as formatively (to improve education)? In this course we will use examples from different projects that focus on supporting schools in the use of assessment data (and other types of data), such as the Focus project (http://project-focus.gw.utwente.nl/?page_id=8) and the data team project (www.datateams.nl). After following this course the student will have knowledge on formative and summative assessments, will be able to explain what constitutes a high quality assessment, and has knowledge on the use of assessments in schools (formatively and summatively) and has knowledge on the type of support schools need in the use of assessments (as well as other data). At the end of the course, students have knowledge of and insight into: • formative and summative assessments, • the use of assessments in schools (formatively and summatively), • the type of support schools need in the use of assessments (as well as other data). At the end of the course students will be able to: • explain what constitutes a high quality assessment

Curriculum Innovation and Implementation (201200024) Many curriculum innovations often fail or are implemented in an unsatisfactory way. To ensure sustainable implementation teacher development, curriculum development and school development need to be closely connected. In this course students develop an understanding of important curriculum implementation concepts and theories and learn how to apply these concepts in the analysis and design of curriculum innovations from an implementation perspective. Concepts that will be discussed are: adoption, implementation and incorporation of innovations; curriculum enactment perspective; ownership, bottom up versus top down strategies. These theoretical insights will be illustrated with concrete examples from practice, such as the implementation of ICT in education. As a final assignment students will analyse a concrete case prom practice and they will design interventions to prevent unsatisfactory implementation of the innovation. At the end of the course, student is able to: • explain the main curriculum implementation concepts and theories • analyse the implementation of curriculum innovations and design interventions to prevent implementation failure.

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Design in Educational Settings (201200023) In this course students develop in-depth understanding of educational design knowledge and skills and apply these in authentic design tasks. The course features both theoretical insights pertaining to educational design (e.g. types of design models and theories) and, related to these, practical techniques for the educational designer. Students will be exposed to several authentic design challenges and the ways in which they were met by professional designers. They are also stimulated to reflect on how things could have been done differently, and to justify the potential benefits of alternate approaches. In the concluding assignment, students put both knowledge and skills to work in proposing both a design product and the process through which it will be created. (NB: Partial problem/context analysis will be given in the call for proposals.) The following outline briefly describes the content and activities in each of the 7 weeks • Intro: Design as a noun; design as a verb; design in other disciplines; design in education; start looking for a designer to interview in week 3; start reflecting on own questions about designing • Generic model for educational design (Chapters 1-3): Comparison to other design models; comparison to EDR; theoretical underpinnings; discuss next week’s assignment: interview • Self-study: Interview a designer, write a brief reflection report (max 2000 words) describing a designer’s specific design experience, relating it to one of the design approaches discussed in Module 2, and justifying this relationship with relevant literature (beyond the course text). • Analysis/Exploration & Implementation/Spread (Chapters 4 & 7): Guest designer or teacher tells about how this phase was tackled in an authentic project; students prepare/ask questions based on literature; small groups discuss and critique the process, including if/how/why they would revise the process if doing it again; result is submitted as homework (max 1500 words, references excluded) • Design/Construction & Implementation/Spread (Chapters 5 & 7): same as above • Evaluation/Reflection & Implementation/Spread (Chapters 6 & 7): same as above • Practicing the art and science of design: The concluding session will introduce the final assignment, in which students respond to a call for design proposals. In this call, funding is sought for one year of development work to address an authentic curriculum problem at the meso level, such as a series of lessons for a new curriculum domain; guidelines for teacher design teams; an assessment framework for measuring 21st century skills; formats for on line courses etc. In small teams (3-4 students), students will:  Provide a brief overview of the proposal (300 words)  Describe the scientific foundations for the proposed solution (2000 words)  Describe the proposed solution in detail (2000 words)  Describe development processes that will be undertaken and how quality will be monitored (1000 words)  Describe the relevant outputs of this initiative (500 words) After successfully completing this course, students will have studied, developed and be able to use a repertoire of techniques for educational design, taking into account conditions, expertise and available time. They will be able to explain and the theoretical grounding and justify practical approaches that are useful under specific circumstances, during each main phases of analysis/exploration, design/construction and evaluation/reflection. Across each phase, students will also be able to demonstrate how attention is given to implementation considerations.

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Designing and Evaluating Effective HRD Interventions (201200029) This course is organised as a laboratory in which we create, evaluate and reflect on specific HRD interventions. The design methodology in the context of HRD is the central topic, applied to a variety of interventions, suitable for specific problems in an organisational context. Major questions are: What makes an intervention effective? How does one design such interventions and how do we assess the effects? What are the financial implications of HRDinterventions, such as cost effectiveness and return on investment? The aim is to actively engage in the design and application of several HRD interventions and to develop an evaluation plan for one of these interventions. In addition, students are invited to reflect on these interventions. This reflection will include the effectiveness of the intervention, perspectives on which it is based, its applicability in different organisational contexts and its role in the future of HRD. The interventions will be based on current organisational issues. Student have to demonstrate their attained competences by writing an academic paper that consists of a practical description of the design of the intervention, e.g. a hand-out which could be used directly by an HRD professional and an evaluation plan for assessing the effects of the intervention. This includes a description of the goals of the intervention, the theoretical underpinning, description of the expected effect and assessment of these and the financial implications. Furthermore, a reflection on the role of the HRD professional is included. At the end of the course, students have knowledge on and insight into: • designing and evaluating innovative and well-thought interventions to increase learning and development in a company or institution. At the end of the course, students are able: • to design and apply HRD interventions and to develop an evaluation plan for one of these interventions, • to reflect on these interventions.

HRD Consultancy in Live Context (201200033) In this consultancy course student will work on a real HRD case, which is formulated by a company. The course starts with an introduction to HRD consultancy and practicing some HRD consultancy skills necessary for this course. The students’ consultancy teams will visit the company and they will investigate the problem at hand. They will do so by means of a tailor-made research plan to try finding an evidence-based solution for the specific problem that they have been invited to examine. This course offers a unique chance to apply HRD-theories and design methodology and it provides a relevant preparation for the students’ Final Projects. Students will present a portfolio which includes the following elements: an analysis of the initial questions, reports on field research, proposed consultancy activities, supporting materials, and criteria for evidence of effects; furthermore reflections on the problem, context, consultancy style, theoretical underpinning and effects, and the added value of HRD as perceived by the client in this case. The aim of this course is to consult in a real-life context and to offer a dedicated HRD-advice, based on the specific request of a company. This consultancy process requires the integration of HRD theories and research approaches in a live context. Not only academic skills are needed but also the competencies to act as business partner, building relationships, establishing trust, examining facilitating and inhibiting factors in the day to day work environment, and gaining support at managerial, operational and individual levels are required.

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At the end of the course, students have knowledge on and insight into: • advising a company on a real-life HRD issue, • the competencies which, next to academic skills, are required in a live context HRD consultancy process At the end of the course, students are able: • to consult a company in a live context, • to offer a dedicated HRD advice to a company, • to integrate HRD theories and research approaches in their advice, • to apply both academic competencies as well as so-called soft skills in their consulting role as business partner.

HRD Design in Live Context (201200030) In this design course students will work on a real HRD case, which is formulated by a company. The course starts with an introduction to HRD design and practicing some HRD intervention skills necessary for this course. Students will visit the company and work in a group on a design and research plan to find a solution for the specific case at hand. This course offers a unique chance to apply the HRD-theories and design methodology and offers a relevant preparation for the programme’s Final Project. The aim is to design an HRD-intervention in a real context, based on a specific request of an organisation, firm or company. The design process requires the integration of HRD theories and research approaches in a live context. Not only academic skills are needed but also the competencies to act in a business environment, negotiating on facilitating and inhibiting factors, and gaining support at managerial, operational and individual levels. Presenting a portfolio including: analysis of the initial questions, reports on field research, design of interventions, supporting materials, instructions for practitioners, evaluation methodology, evidence of effects; furthermore reflections on the problem, context, design approach, theoretical underpinning and effects, and the added value of HRD in this case. At the end of the course, students have knowledge on and insight into: • designing a real-life HRD intervention At the end of the course, students are able: • to integrate and apply HRD theories and approaches in a live context, • to apply non-academic competences in the HRD real-live design process, • to present a portfolio, • to reflect on the presented HRD design.

Leadership and Organisational Change (201200032) This course deals with the role leadership can have for improving the functioning of organisations. Leadership plays a critical role in mediating the influences of the external policies and social and cultural demands, building capacity in organisations, changing existing practices and through these influences contribute to the improvement of the functioning of organisations. Governance structures, leadership practices, structural and cultural conditions and their effects on the functioning of organisational members are examined in different organisations, including schools. Special attention will be given to issues such as motivation for learning, organisational commitment, citizenship behaviour, shared decision making, innovative climate and politics in organisations.

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The course starts with a review on general theories of leadership in organisations. Next, current themes and dimensions of leadership are introduced and related to the role of leadership in motivating organisational members to learn and change their practices. Through discussion and practical assignments, students not only learn to reflect on current research into leadership and organisational change but also to design possible ways to optimise leadership practices in different organisational contexts. The final assignment will consist of an evaluation of a leadership problem in real-life organisation, resulting in a research plan to study the improvement of the leadership and organisational change. Organisation of the course: All meetings are in seminar format. Each week, students get new assignments. Assignments must be fulfilled in order to participate in discussion. To facilitate discussion, students will be challenged with specific questions. Assignments will be announced during the seminars and through Blackboard. Blackboard will also be used for making available the research papers. The course concludes with an assignment: writing a research plan to study the improvement of leadership and organisational change based on real-life problems. At the end of the course, students have knowledge on and insight into: • new developments in theories and models of leadership • leadership factors at the meso and macro-level on learning and development. At the end of the course, students are able: • to describe recent developments in theories and models of leadership and factors at the meso-and macro-level on learning and development, • to select tools and/or interventions aimed at improvement in this regard, • to analyse and evaluate leadership problems in organisations, • to write a research plan on how to study leadership practices in an organisation.

Learning at Work (201200028) The course is thematic and explores topics like, strategic HRD, management development, educational design, talent development and learning in a knowledge society, all related to learning at the workplace. The various perspectives on learning in the workplace will be supported by research in the field of learning and development in organisations. Learning at the workplace will be studied at three levels: the individual, the team and the organisation. Important questions to be addressed are: how does the development of expertise take place, what learning activities are supportive, for workplace development, how do formal, informal en non-formal activities relate, and what favourable and inhibiting factors can be identified at various levels? At the end of the course, students have knowledge on and insight into: • the most important theories in the area of Human Resource Development (HRD) that are helpful in designing, implementing and evaluating learning at work, At the end of the course, students are able: • understand and analyse different HRD theories and paradigms and what they mean for practice.

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Monitoring and Improving Schools and Educational Systems (201200022) The main goal of educational effectiveness research is to analyse the associations between schooling conditions and outcome measures (such as student achievement) as a basis for improving the quality and results of schooling. In short, this research aims to find answers to the question ‘what works in education’. This course deals with the conditions of schooling at class, school and system level enhancing educational effectiveness. Examples of such conditions are time on task, opportunity to learn, performance evaluation, educational leadership, the role of national inspectorates, and features of educational policies at system level. This course is not limited to theories about these conditions, but also pays attention to strategies for monitoring and improving the effectiveness of schools and educational systems. This is illustrated by means of actual projects, such as projects on data based instruction and decision making (e.g. the FOCUS-project, and the data teams project), and international comparative studies of educational achievement (e.g. TIMSS, PIRLS and PISA). At the end of this course the student has knowledge about and insight into: • the conditions of schooling at the class, school and system level enhancing educational effectiveness; • how educational effectiveness can be monitored at class, school and at system (country) level • how the results of both educational effectiveness research as well as of monitoring at class, school and system level can be used for improvement interventions.

Regulation and Facilitation of Workplace Learning (201200031) This course deals with the variation in regulation and facilitation of workplace learning. This may vary from formal training courses to self-directed learning. Central in this course is how you can facilitate diverse ways of learning at the workplace. How do you create a good learning climate? How do you make employees self-responsible for their own learning and how can you manage this? Which factors inhibit and stimulate learning? What are roles of others (mentoring, coaching, and peer-support) and tools (ICT, portfolios) in this? The course will start with some introductory lectures. During the course students will search and present research outcomes of the influencing factors and outcomes of various learning tools. The final assignment will consist of an analysis and evaluation of a corporate curriculum, resulting in an advice report on how to optimise this curriculum. At the end of the course, students have knowledge on and insight into: • factors that influence workplace learning, • analysing and evaluating a corporate curriculum, • reporting on this evaluation. At the end of the course, students are able: • to describe advantages and disadvantages of different ways of supporting and regulating learning at the workplace, • to describe factors which influence the learning climate, • to select tools for supporting learning that matches learning goals and context, • to evaluate the quality of a corporate curriculum, • to write an advice on how to optimise a corporate curriculum in an organisation.

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Teacher Learner and Development (201200027 The quality of teaching and teachers is crucial for how much pupils learn in schools. This quality varies quite a bit between and within schools. During educational reform efforts it is also important to pay careful attention to the knowledge and skills of teachers which are implied by the reform. In this course we explore the different kinds of knowledge and skills that are crucial for quality teaching. Additionally, we address the effectiveness of different forms of professional development as well as important conditions for teacher learning and change. At the end of the course, students have knowledge of and insight into: • aspects of teachers’ knowledge and skills which are relevant for quality teaching and sustainable educational reform. At the end of the course, students are able to: • explain how professional development measures which will affect practice • explain what school conditions are needed to be in place to improve the effectiveness of the process. • link the issues concerning professional development with other important developments in school such as curriculum development, school development and data use.

Teaching and Learning with ICT (201200026) ICT plays a key role in education, in particular because it provides teachers with ‘hooks’ for innovative and potentially powerful ways of learning. Research suggests that the effectiveness of technology-enhanced learning depends on the characteristics the learners, the subject matter, the technology itself, the underlying pedagogical approach, and the support that is being offered by the teacher or via tools embedded within the learning environment. This course introduces students to various state-of-the-art ICT learning environments and tools. At the end of the course, students have knowledge of and insight into: • how and why technological, pedagogical, and subject-matter features can work in tandem to increase the effectiveness of the teaching and learning process. These insights provide a solid basis for educational professionals interested in designing ICT learning environments and tools, or coaching teachers in their choice and use of these applications

Trending Topics in Educational Science and Technology (201200034)e In this (obligatory for all EST students) core course, several instructors will present their field of expertise. The presented topics therefore will be aligned with the current scientific research areas in our research groups. The presented topics will cover both the Educational Design and Effectiveness (EDE) as well as the Human Resource Development (HRD) domains, e.g.: • Talent management / talent development, • Data-based instruction and decision making, • Life-long learning skills, • 21st Century skills: the school of the future, 2012.139 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2012-2013

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Leadership for learning, Professional learning communities.

Organisation of the course: After a generic introduction session, each trending topic will be dealt with in a 3-weeks mode, where (a) the instructor introduces the topic in a lecture, (b) a seminar where the instructor and the students will focus on the topic’s content-related and methodological issues, and (c) 1 week for group-based completion of the topic-related assignment. The nature of the assignments varies and the full set of to be attained competences (design, research, advice, and reflection) are addressed. At the end of the course, students have knowledge on and insight into: • contemporary developments in the domain educational science and technology, both with regard to domain-specific topics as well as research methodological issues. • EDE- and HRD-specific aspects, research areas and research methodologies within the trending topics

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FacultY oF Behavioural sciences

Programme guide master’s degree Programme 2012/2013 educational science & technologY

msc

T + 31 (0) 53 489 1017 I www.utwente.nl/est

vErSION NUmbEr 1

STUDENT SErvICES

EDUCATIONAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMME GuidE MAstER’s dEGREE PROGRAMME 2012/2013


Educational Science & Technology