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2017 ARTISTIC DIRECTORS Charles O. Anderson | Jeremy Arnold | Lyn C. Wiltshire

FEBRUARY 15–18, 22–25 AT 7:30 P.M. FEBRUARY 19 AT 3:00 P.M. FEBRUARY 25–26 AT 2:00 P.M.

OSCAR G. BROCKETT THEATRE F. LOREN WINSHIP BUILDING

THEATREDANCE.UTEXAS.EDU

DANCE

CHOREOGRAPHER

A-peeling Gianina Casale Bach in Time Jeremy Arnold black is the new black Oluwaseun Samuel Olayiwola Hand in Heart Adrienne Hurd Lec/Dem or How Do You Spell Femaphobic Gesel Mason Paramodernities #3 Netta Yerushalmy (Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile Charles O. Anderson Second to Khan Rennie Harris Slow Fade to Black Lyn C. Wiltshire Under the Asphalt Abby Zbikowski Walking with Natasha Ananya Chatterjea

There will be one 15-minute intermission. Videography and photography is strictly prohibited. Dance DECODED There will be a discussion with the cast following performances on February 16–18 and 22. February 15–18 at 7:30 p.m.: Lec/Dem or How Do You Spell Femaphobic, (Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile, black is the new black, Hand in Heart, Under the Asphalt, Bach in Time, A-peeling, Slow Fade to Black, Walking with Natasha, Second to Khan February 19 at 3:00 p.m., February 22, 24 at 7:30 p.m. and February 25 at 2:00 p.m.: Bach in Time, Paramodernities #3, black is the new black, (Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile, Under the Asphalt, Hand in Heart, Slow Fade to Black, A-Peeling, Second to Khan February 23, 25 at 7:30 p.m., February 26 at 2:00 p.m.: Bach in Time, Paramodernities #3, black is the new black, (Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile, Under the Asphalt, Walking with Natasha, Slow Fade to Black, A-peeling, Second to Khan

COVER PHOTO: LAWRENCE PEART

Stage Manager: Dack Justiz


NOTE FROM THE ARTISTIC DIRECTORS This year’s concert pays tribute to two significant African American events in dance that transformed the field for years to come: • The First Negro Dance Recital in America produced by Harlem Renaissance dancers Hemsley Winfield and Edna Guy (1932) and Chanin’s Theater in the Clouds in New York City. • Parallels, a dance series curated and produced by post-modern improvisation choreographer, Ishmael Houston Jones at Dancespace, St. Mark’s Church in New York City in 1982 (and again in 2012). The focus of this year’s Dance Repertory Theatre concert is on the impact and influence of African American culture upon contemporary American performance. By no means is this concert comprehensive in addressing this large and complex topic, however, the motivation behind it is to provide artistic and intellectual space to consider it and its socio-cultural implications. The artists and works that comprise this concert represent key ideas in considering this theme. This representation ranges from choreographers who are not of African American descent, but working with movement idioms, iconic works of art and/or issues centrally rooted in or relevant to African American culture with deep integrity to choreographers of African American diasporic communities. Ultimately, this concert serves as a pedagogical laboratory for the B.F.A. in Dance students who comprise Dance Repertory Theatre and provides a space for them to consider how art informs and is informed by culture and society. What we endeavor to create in this concert is not about “dancing black,” nor is it about demonizing whiteness or devaluing those not knowledgeable of the influence of African American culture upon dance or creating a hierarchy of dance styles of aesthetics. This concert reflects our program’s collective commitment to embody what it means to be inclusive in the field of dance and to support, investigate and celebrate diversity in dance. This concert is a glimpse into the rigorous and ongoing work that pursuing a professional dance career fundamentally demands and it is a clear indicator that this work extends beyond remembering steps and superficial engagement with process and performance. To be a dance artist in general requires depth of character, generosity of spirit and dedication to principles and ideals greater than entertainment. To be a dance artist (in this concert in particular) has required the members of Dance Repertory Theatre to find the ability to grapple with one’s understanding of how identity informs dance, technique and performance. With last spring’s concert, Bodies & Souls, we achieved a truly beautiful and poignant concert under horrific circumstances. In many subtle ways, Momentum builds upon this progress, extending to issues that reach beyond our community.

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A-PEELING Choreography: Gianina Casale Costume Designer: Jessi Rose Lowerre Lighting Designer: Yi-Tai Chung Projection/Scenic Designer: Jon Haas Cast: Emily DiFranco, Rasley Goode, Anna Ingram, Allison Irby, Aminah Maddox, Mario Alberto Ramirez, Georgina Wilson From the Choreographer This piece takes a millennial approach in challenging what is appropriate on stage and how we deal with the discomfort of taking risks; Having the courage to choose authenticity and worthiness when you feel everything around you says not to.

BACH IN TIME Choreography: Jeremy Arnold Music: Bach A La Jazz by Matt Herskowitz, Nettwerk Music Group d/b/a/ Nettwerk Productions Costume Designer: Jessi Rose Lowerre Lighting Designer: Yi-Tai Chung Projection/Scenic Designer: Jon Haas Cast: Lizzette Chapa, Laura Beth Flett, Haley Fuller, Ginnifer Joe, Abby Loper, Jordyn Marsh, Cassidy Oldham, Dayna Palmer, Francis Rodriguez From the Choreographer Why is it that tap dancers traditionally mimic classical music compositions note for note rather than dancing over, under and through the music as they do in most other genres? Standing on the African American cultural roots of rhythm tap, this piece is an interpretation and exploration of the different ways we hear and react to Bach as both dancers and musicians.


BLACK IS THE NEW BLACK Choreography: Oluwaseun Samuel Olayiwola Music: black is the new black by Chris Walker Costume Designer: Aaron Kubacak Lighting Designer: Yi-Tai Chung Projection/Scenic Designer: Jon Haas Cast: Lizzette Chapa, Rasley Goode, Kaitlyn Jones, Nicholas Kao, Abby Loper, Aminah Maddox, Morgan Mikes, Kanami Nakabayashi, Francis Rodriguez, Hunter Sturgis, Mackenzie Voorhies From the Choreographer “I do not always feel colored...I feel most colored when I am thrown against a sharp white background...I do not always feel [black]... I feel most [black] when I am thrown against a sharp white background.” —Zora Neale Hurtson

HAND IN HEART Choreography: Adrienne Hurd Costume Designer: Aaron Kubacak Lighting Designer: Yi-Tai Chung Projection/Scenic Designer: Jon Haas Cast: Sofia Aranha, Lizzette Chapa, Leigh-Alice Clark, Emily DiFranco, Andrea Duong, Laura Beth Flett, Anna Ingram, Allison Irby, Ginnifer Joe, Vivian Lugo, Victoria Antoinette Murillo, Antonia Neal, Oluwaesun Samuel Olayiwola, Tabitha Pupo, Eileen Yuriko Roby, Hunter Sturgis, Georgina Wilson, Claire Wood From the Choreographer Conceived as a love letter to New York City, this work is developed in the style of Alvin Ailey’s early “theatre ballets.”


LEC/DEM OR HOW DO YOU SPELL FEMAPHOBIC Choreography: Gesel Mason Music: Sound score designed by Gesel Mason Dance Projects courtesy of Gesel Mason Dance Projects. Lighting Designer: Yi-Tai Chung Projection/Scenic Designer: Jon Haas Featuring Gesel Mason and Bonnie Cox with special guests from Dance Repertory Theatre: Raquel Baron, Gianina Casale, Haley Fuller, Claire Goodman, Allison Irby, Isaac Iskra, Kaitlyn Jones, D’Lonte K. Lawson, Jordyn March, Becky Nam, Oluwaseun Samuel Olayiwola, Tyrik J. Patterson, Jesus Quezada, Anna Starr, Georgina Wilson From the Choreographer Part TED Talk and deconstructed strip tease, Lec/Dem or How Do You Spell Femaphobic invites the audience to consider its gaze and navigate how labels and concepts placed upon the female body can shift from humorous and lighthearted to offensive and troubling. This performance is co-sponsored by the College of Fine Arts Diversity Committee.

PARAMODERNITIES #3 Choreography: Netta Yerushalmy Costume Designer: Jessi Rose Lowerre Lighting Designer: Yi-Tai Chung Projection/Scenic Designer: Jon Haas Cast: Camille Collins, Andrea Duong, Rasley Goode, Aminah Maddox, Morgan Mikes, Kanami Nakabayashi, Oluwaesun Samuel Olayiwola, Tabitha Pupo, Francis Rodriguez From the Choreographer Paramodernities #3 is a meditation on different tracks of modernism within and beyond the purview of dance. It is a series of dance experiments that I generated through systemically deconstructing landmark modern dance choreography. Performed alongside contributions by scholars from different fields in the humanities who situate these iconic works within the larger project of modernity, Paramodernities #3 explores foundational tenants of modern discourse such as sovereignty, race, feminism and nihilism, and includes public discussions as integral parts of each installment.


(RE)CURRENT UNREST PT. 2: IN D’NILE Choreography: Charles O. Anderson Music: Sound designed by Charles O. Anderson and Benjamin Galvan Costume Designer: Aaron Kubacak Lighting Designer: Yi-Tai Chung Projection/Scenic Designer: Jon Haas Cast: Raquel Baron, Veronica Boccardo, Gianina Casale, Camille Collins, Emily DiFranco, Laura Beth Flett, Anna Ingram, Issac Iskra, D’Lonte K. Lawson, Christian Leal, Vivian Lugo, Victoria Antoinette Murillo, Antonia Neal, Cassidy Oldham, Dayna Palmer, Tyrik J. Patterson, Jesus Quezada, Mario Alberto Ramirez, Eileen Yuriko Roby, Lizzy Tan, Claire Wood From the Choreographer The second installment of my (Re)current Unrest project unites reimagined and original early works by Steve Reich, rhythm and blues, and choreography to excavate the original source material of Reich’s early works—African American voices. Inspired by current sociopolitical tensions between church and state; race and gender; (Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile immerses the audience in a sonic landscape—aural, kinetic and visual—exploring notions of citizenship and personhood.

SECOND TO KHAN Choreography: Rennie Harris Costume Designer: Aaron Kubacak Lighting Designer: Yi-Tai Chung Projection/Scenic Designer: Jon Haas Cast: Raquel Baron, Gianina Casale, Lizzette Chapa, Haley Fuller, Ginnifer Joe, Kaitlyn Jones, Nicholas Kao, D’Lonte K. Lawson, Christian Leal, Abigail Loper, Aminah Maddox, Jordyn Marsh, Antonia Neal, Tyrik J. Patterson, Jesus Quezada, Anna Starr, Lizzy Tan, Georgina Wilson From the Choreographer Second to Khan is a hip-hop meditation on the rise in mass shootings on school campuses in recent years and a reflection on police brutality.


SLOW FADE TO BLACK Choreography: Lyn C. Wiltshire Music: Compositions by Sam Lipman Costume Designer: Jessi Rose Lowerre Lighting Designer: Yi-Tai Chung Projection/Scenic Designer: Jon Haas Cast: Sofia Aranha, Camille Collins, Nicholas Kao, Vivian Lugo, Morgan Mikes, Victoria Antoinette Murillo, Kanami Nakabayashi, Antonia Neal, Mackenzie Voorhies From the Choreographer Slow Fade to Black originally took its influence from a photo series of the same name by Carrie May Weems depicting “blurred, soft-focus images of mid-twentieth century stars.” At moments when the creative process is impacted by current events, the process shifts, naturally moving from blurred and soft focus to a crystalized reality of intention, reaction and result. This is now where Slow Fade to Black resides, emergent…to responses, to civic action, to artist citizenship and evolving events.

UNDER THE ASPHALT Choreography: Abby Zbikowski Music: Baby Don’t Sleep written by Daveed Diggs, William Hutson, Jonathan Snipes and Steve Kaplan, performed by Clipping, courtesy of Sub Pop Records and Sub Pop Publishing. Granular Jazz pt. 2 by Merzbow and Sun Ra, Cold Spring Records coldspring.co.uk Costume Designer: Aaron Kubacak Lighting Designer: Yi-Tai Chung Projection/Scenic Designer: Jon Haas Cast: Emily DiFranco, Rasley Goode, Nicholas Kao, D’Lonte K. Lawson, Christian Leal, Vivian Lugo, Morgan Mikes, Kanami Nakabayashi, Mario Alberto Ramirez, Hunter Sturgis From the Choreographer The surface aesthetics of this work are about finding symbiotic relationships between formalized dance and punk music form. Internally, this work became about the performers banding together to keep it alive, connecting with newly-discovered drives in order to deal with highly physical and aggressive movement head-on.


WALKING WITH NATASHA Choreography: Ananya Chatterjea Costume Designer: Jessi Rose Lowerre Lighting Designer: Yi-Tai Chung Projection/Scenic Designer: Jon Haas Cast: Raiye Adeleye, Sofia Aranha, Lizzette Chapa, Andrea Duong, Laura Beth Flett, Allison Irby, Ginnifer Joe, Kaitlyn Jones, Abigail Loper, Lizzy Tan, Claire Wood From the Choreographer Walking with Natasha is an homage to young black and brown women thriving in the face of hate. It invokes both Natasha Nkhama, the student at Baylor University, and Professor Omise’eke Natasha Tinsley. While Natasha Nkhama is a reminder of the context in which this piece is made, the feelings after the recent election and the refusal of young women of color to submit to it is my tribute to Omise’eke Natasha Tinsley. It is about the way in which two women of color have found each other to create a practice of solidarity without necessarily making a deliberate “plan” and continue international love and support.

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CREATIVE CHARLES O. ANDERSON (Co-Artistic Director, Choreographer—(Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile) is head of the dance program and producing artistic director of Dance Repertory Theatre. Born and raised in Richmond, Virginia, Anderson earned his B.A. in Choreography and Performance with a minor in African Studies from Cornell University and his M.F.A. in Dance from Temple University where he specialized in African Diasporic dance. Professionally, Anderson is artistic director of the criticallyacclaimed dance theatre X which he founded in 2003. He has performed in the companies of Ronald K. Brown, Sean Curran, Mark Dendy and Miguel Gutierrez, among others. His work has been presented nationally and internationally and has earned recognition from numerous and organizations such as the Pew Fellowship for the Arts, one of “25 to Watch” by Dance Magazine and one of “12 Rising Stars in the Academy” by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education magazine. JEREMY ARNOLD (Co-Artistic Director, Choreographer—Bach in Time) is currently in his second year as an adjunct professor of tap dance at The University of Texas at Austin. He received his B.A. cum laude from Muhlenberg College in 2012. In September 2014, Arnold moved to Austin, Texas to join Tapestry Dance Company where he is a principal dancer in his third season. Arnold has served on the faculty of Revive, Dance Master of America, Dance Olympus and the Soul to Sole Festival.

of Theatre Arts & Dance, locates her research and teaching at the intersection of creative and scholarly research. She is the founder and artistic director of Ananya Dance Theatre, a company of female artists of color committed to social justice choreography and to making “people-powered dances of transformation.” Trained originally in classical and folk Indian dance forms, Chatterjea specialized in the classical tradition of Odissi under the tutelage of Sanjukta Panigrahi. Vitally interested in the creation of a contemporary Indian dance mode, Chatterjea began her explorations of form and theme in dance and has now formalized a contemporary Indian dance language, Yorchha, TM based on deconstructions and extensions of the movement principles of Odissi, vinyasa yoga and Mayurbhanj Chhau. Through her study of street theatre and feminist praxis across the world, she arrived at her fierce commitment to the immediate relationship between bodily artistic practices and the social justice movement. ananyadancetheatre.org

GIANINA CASALE (Choreographer—A-peeling, Performer—Lec/Dem or How Do You Spell Femaphobic, (Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile, Second to Khan) began performing in high school in the Dallas Area. Most recently, she performed as “Zuli” in In the Red and Brown Water and in Charles O. Anderson’s (Re)Current Unrest (Bodies & Souls, Texas Theatre and Dance, 2016). After graduating in May 2017 with a B.F.A. in Dance, she plans to pursue a career in choreography.

RENNIE HARRIS (Choreographer—Second to Khan) is an artistic director and celebrated choreographer who creates hip-hop culture on his own terms by using some of the world’s most influential forms of movement, music and storytelling to revolutionize contemporary concert dance. Since the age of 15, Harris has been teaching workshops and classes at universities around the country and is a spokesperson for the significance of “street” origins in any dance style. He was voted one of the most influential people in the last 100 years of Philadelphia, his hometown, and has been compared to twentieth century dance legends Alvin Ailey and Bob Fosse. In 1992 he founded Rennie Harris Puremovement, a hiphop dance company dedicated to preserving and disseminating hip-hop culture through workshops, classes, lectures, residencies, mentoring programs and public performances.

ANANYA CHATTERJEA (Choreographer— Walking with Natasha), a professor of dance at the University of Minnesota’s Department

ADRIENNE HURD (Choreographer—Hand in Heart), a native New Yorker, began her training at the Joffery Ballet School, School of American


CREATIVE Ballet and the Alvin Ailey School. She has danced with The Neubert Ballet, Dance Brazil, Ailey II, The Jamison Project and Earl Mosley’s Diversity of Dance. She served as an assistant and rehearsal director for Judith Jamison (The Jamison Project) and has worked with Alvin Ailey, Michael Peters, Paula Abdul, Twyla Tharp, Garth Fagan, Donald McKayle, Graciela Daniele, Jeff Calhoun, Vince Patterson and Earl Mosley. Hurd has appeared on Broadway in Down To Earth, Dangerous Games and Annie Get your Gun. Hurd has taught at the University of Minnesota; Open Look Dance Festival St. Petersburg, Russia; Dance New Amsterdam; American Ballet Theatre Summer Intensive (NYC); Joffery Ballet School; Professional Performing Arts School, The Ailey School and Steps on Broadway, among others. She is the resident choreographer for the Nomad Contemporary Ballet Company and has choreographed for The Ailey School/Fordham University, The Ailey School Junior Division and Lynch Ballet Company, among others. She has choreographed original musicals CRACKED, The Lost Boys, Open Rehearsal (Theatre for the New City) and SPEAK the Show (SummerStage NYC). GESEL MASON (Choreographer—Lec/ Dem or How Do You Spell Femaphobic) is a choreographer, performer, educator and arts facilitator. She is artistic director for Gesel Mason Performance Projects and has been an assistant professor at the University of Colorado Boulder since 2013. She was a company member of Liz Lerman Dance Exchange and Ralph Lemon/ Cross Performance Projects and has performed with Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company, Repertory Dance Theatre of Utah, Jacek Łumiński (Silesian Dance Theatre), Murray Louis and Victoria Marks. Mason utilizes dance, theatre, humor and storytelling to bring visibility to voices unheard, situations neglected, or perspectives considered taboo. Her current creative research collides the genres and cultures of postmodern dance and erotic dance in an embodied effort to find and hold on to what Audre Lorde calls “the yes within ourselves.” Numerous venues and festivals have presented Mason’s choreography including Joyce SoHo; 651 Arts; Bates Dance

Festival; Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center; University of Albany; SUNY Potsdam; South Dallas Cultural Center; Painted Bride; Dance Place; the International Contemporary Dance Conference and Performance Festival in Bytom, Poland; DanceAfrica and the International Association of Blacks in Dance. OLUWASEUN SAMUEL OLAYIWOLA (Choreographer—black is the new black, Performer—Hand in Heart, Lec/Dem or How Do You Spell Femaphobic, Paramodernities #3) began dancing at the age of 14 in high school color guard in Mansfield, Texas. He then performed with the Bluecoats Drum and Bugle Corps from Canton, Ohio in Summer 2014, earning second place at the Drum Corps International World Championships. He is currently a third-year B.F.A. in Dance (Dance Studies Option) major. Olayiwola plans to perform and choreograph professionally after graduating, while maintaining a professional teaching career. LYN C. WILTSHIRE (Co-Artistic Director, Choreographer—Slow Fade to Black) has performed and toured with several notable directors and dance companies including Dance Theatre of Harlem and nationally and internationally with the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. She has performed in film, television and with symphonies across the country. Her dance movement foundation is rooted in professional training with worldrenowned choreographers and directors, including Arthur Mitchell, Jose Limon, Martha Graham and Alvin Ailey. Wiltshire’s most recent project is the cultivation of a student exchange program with Centre National de Danse Comptemporaine—Angers (CNDC). NETTA YERUSHALMY (Choreographer— Paramodernities #3) is an award-winning dance artist based in New York City. Her work aims to engage with audiences by imparting the sensation of things as they are perceived, not as they are known, and to challenge how meaning is attributed and constructed. Awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Jerome Robbins


CREATIVE Bogliasco Fellowship, a NYFA Fellowship, a Six Points Fellowship and residencies at Gibney Dance Center, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, Baryshnikov Arts Center, Tribeca Performing Arts Center and the Institute for Cultural Inquiry (Berlin), Yerushalmy’s work has been presented at Danspace Project, The Joyce Theater, American Dance Festival, Harkness Festival, La Mama, HAU Hebbel am Ufer (Berlin) and Curtain-Up (Tel-Aviv). ABBY ZBIKOWSKI (Choreographer—Under the Asphalt) is a choreographer interrogating dance aesthetics and culture. Zbikowski’s work with her company, the New Utility, has

been presented by the Bates Dance Festival, Dance New Amsterdam, the Gibney Dance Center and the Kelly Strayhorn Theater, among others. She has studied intensively at Germaine Acogny’s L’École de Sables in Senegal and holds a B.F.A. in Dance from Temple University and an M.F.A. in Dance from Ohio State University. As a performer, Zbikowski has worked with choreographers Charles O. Anderson/dance theater X, Megan Mazarick, Nora Gibson, Paige Phillips and Maree ReMalia. She has performed nationally and internationally with the Baker & Tarpaga Dance Project and is currently an assistant professor of dance at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

DIRECTOR’S COUNCIL The Department of Theatre and Dance Director’s Council is a premier volunteer group designed to foster strong and collaborative connections between The University of Texas at Austin and the local community by supporting initiatives in marketing, public relations, student recruitment and development. As advocates for the department, this group of alumni, parents and fine arts supporters play a key role in continuing to build a professional theatre and dance training program serving thousands of talented Texans for generations.

2016/2017 DIRECTOR’S COUNCIL MEMBERS Carol Smith Adams Francesca Brockett and Jim Pedicano Barrett Bruce Jean Cheever Joanne and Jack Crosby Dee Dawson Laura Eastman

Gary Farmer JoLynn Free Missy Grimes Pam and Edmund McIlhenny Annie McKinnon Debbie Oliver Miriam Relyea

Diane Robinson Russ Sartain Nancy Scanlan Marc Seriff Laura Sheffield Karen Skolnik Leah Stolar Sharon Watkins


PRODUCTION YI-TAI CHUNG (Lighting Designer) is an M.F.A. in Design and Technology candidate with a focus in lighting design. Chung has worked as a freelance lighting designer, assistant, technician and stage manager in various theatre productions. His recent designs include Twelfth Night, Lost Girl (Texas Theatre and Dance, 2016) and Dialogues of the Carmelites (Buter Opera Center). Yitaichung.com JON HAAS (Projection/Scenic Designer) is a second-year M.F.A. in Design and Technology candidate with a focus in integrated media for live performance. His latest project was designing multimedia for Lost Girl (Texas Theatre and Dance, 2016). He has designed projections for Dance Repertory Theatre’s Fall For Dance (2015) and Bodies & Souls (2016), as well as Ears, Eyes + Feet. Haas was an artist-in-residence this summer at Robert Wilson’s Watermill Center and continues to run dance and performance company, VECTOR, alongside collaborator Leah Wilks. DACK JUSTIZ (Stage Manager) is a B.A. in Theatre and Dance major with an emphasis in stage management. Broadway: Disney’s The Lion King. Regional: Theatre Under the Stars, TUTS Underground, ZACH Theatre. Academic: The University of Texas at Austin (opera, theatre, dance and special events), Humphrey’s School of Musical Theatre. Following Momentum, Justiz will be in New York City working with Broadway

Cares/Equity Fights AIDS on the 31st annual Easter Bonnet Competition. dackjustiz.com @dackjustiz AARON KUBACAK (Costume Designer) studied fashion design and apparel construction for several years prior to coming to The University of Texas at Austin as an M.F.A. in Design and Technology candidate with a focus in costume design. He was a stitcher at Glimmerglass Opera on their production of The Magic Flute and served as an assistant to the costume designer for In the Red and Brown Water (Texas Theatre and Dance). Most recently, he was the costume designer for Dragoween: Spellbound—A Drag Fairy Tale as well as a student film entitled Horndog. JESSI ROSE LOWERRE (Costume Designer) is pursuing a M.F.A. in Design and Technology with a focus in costume design. She came to The University of Texas from California after receiving certificates in costume stitiching, cutting and draping, wardrobe and design assisting from Fullerton Community College. She began her study of dress after receiving a B.A. in Anthropology from California State University— Fulterton. She designed costumes for the winter opera Love, Parisian Style at Fullerton Community College and worked as a stitcher at The Kingsman Shakespeare Festival in Thousand Oaks, California and as a costume intern at The Summer Repertory Theatre in Santa Rosa, California.


CAST

Raiye Adeleye

Sofia Aranha

Raquel Baron

Veronica Boccardo

Gianina Casale

Lizzette Chapa

Leigh-Alice Clark

Camille Collins

Emily DiFranco

Andrea Duong

Laura Beth Flett

Haley Fuller

Rasley Goode

Claire Goodman

Anna Ingram

Allison Irby

Isaac Iskra

Ginnifer Joe

Kaitlyn Jones

Nicholas Kao

D’Lonte K. Lawson

Christian Leal

Abby Loper

Vivian Lugo

Aminah Maddox

Jordyn Marsh

Morgan Mikes

Victoria Antoinette Murillo

Kanami Nakabayashi

Becky Nam

Antonia Neal

Oluwaseun Samuel Olayiwola

Cassidy Oldham

Dayna Palmer

Tyrik J. Patterson

Tabitha Pupo

Jesus Quezada

Eileen Yuriko Roby

Francis Rodriguez

Anna Starr

Hunter Sturgis

Lizzy Tan

Mackenzie Voorhies

Georgina Wilson

Claire Wood


CAST RAIYE ADELEYE (Walking with Natasha) is a graduate student currently working with Black Womens’ embodiment knowledge and wellness in the African Diaspora. Her participation in Momentum is one medium through which she is exploring these concepts, sharing her process and enacting her embodied practice of theorizing. After graduating in May 2017 with master’s degrees in Latin American Studies and Information Studies, Adeleye will continue working as a wellness coach for Black Women in the African Diaspora. SOFIA ARANHA (Hand in Heart, Slow Fade to Black, Walking with Natasha) hails from Richardson, Texas where she danced for 17 years before moving to Austin to study dance and economics under the Liberal Arts Honors Program at The University of Texas at Austin. Last spring, she completed her first season with Dance Repertory Theatre. Upon graduation, Aranha plans to attend law school. RAQUEL BARON (Lec/Dem or How Do You Spell Femaphobic, (Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile, Second to Khan) began dancing in Dallas, Texas at a young age and attended Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts for dance. After graduating in May 2019 with a B.F.A. in Dance and a minor in Business Foundations, Baron plans to dance professionally and pursue her passion for event planning. VERONICA BOCCARDO ((Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile) began performing in Venezuela at age five. Most recently, she performed in Little Women The Broadway Musical (Texas Theatre and Dance, 2016) and choreographed Rippling Essence (Dance Action’s S.E.E.D.). After graduating with a B.F.A. in Dance (Dance Studies Option), she plans to dance professionally and teach. LIZZETTE CHAPA (Bach in Time, black is the new black, Hand in Heart, Second to Khan, Walking with Natasha) began performing in the Rio Grande Valley area at the age of four. Most recently, she performed in Bodies & Souls (Texas Theatre and Dance, 2016) and at the San Francisco Conservatory of Dance. After

graduating in May 2017 with a B.F.A. in Dance, she plans to dance in a contemporary company, choreograph and begin her own company. LEIGH-ALICE CLARK (Hand in Heart) began performing in Dallas, Texas with the Dallas Metropolitan Ballet. Most recently, she performed in Dance Repertory Theatre’s Threshold by Lyn C. Wiltshire (Bodies & Souls, 2016). After graduating in May 2017 with a B.F.A. in Dance she plans to work in arts administration and pursue a graduate degree in dance. CAMILLE COLLINS (Paramodernities #3, (Re) current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile, Slow Fade to Black) is a fourth-year B.F.A. in Dance major. She began her dance studies at the Houston Ballet in 2006. In 2009 she was accepted to Houston’s High School for the Performing and Visual Arts (HSPVA). Since then, Collins has performed in works by Troy Powell, Thang Dao, David Curwen, William McClellan, Manuel Vignoulle, Alex Ketley, Christian Von Howard, Sidra Bell, Andrea Beckham and Erica Gionfriddo. Collins plans to graduate in May 2017. EMILY DIFRANCO (A-peeling, Hand in Heart, (Re) current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile, Under the Asphalt) began dancing at the age of three in Rowlett, Texas. In 2011 she performed as a member of the Collin Dance Ensemble at Collin College where she began practicing modern concert dance. In 2014, DiFranco transferred to The University of Texas at Austin and plans to graduate in May 2017 with a B.F.A. in Dance. Upon graduating, she plans to move to the Pacific Northwest to continue performing and creating dance. ANDREA DUONG (Hand in Heart, Paramodernities #3, Walking with Natasha) began dancing at the age of five in Des Moines, Iowa. She plans to graduate in 2019 with a B.F.A. in Dance and a B.A. in Urban Studies. LAURA BETH FLETT (Bach in Time, Hand in Heart, (Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile, Walking with Natasha) began performing in Louisiana at the age of four. Most recently, she performed in Dance Repertory Theatre’s Bodies & Souls and with Dance


CAST Waterloo in the site-specific project, Panorama Playground. Flett is a third-year B.F.A. in Dance (Dance Studies Option) major pursuing a minor in Business Foundations. Upon graduating, she plans to travel, teach dance and continue performing. HALEY FULLER (Bach in Time, Lec/Dem or How Do You Spell Femaphobic, Second to Khan) began dancing at the age of three. She is currently pursuing a B.F.A in Dance as well as a Business Foundations Certificate. After graduating in May 2019, Fuller hopes to become a performer for Cirque du Soleil in Las Vegas, Nevada. RASLEY GOODE (A-peeling, black is the new black, Paramodernities #3, Under the Asphalt) is a fourth-year B.F.A. in Dance major. Goode recently performed in Dance Repertory Theatre’s Bodies & Souls (Texas Theatre and Dance, 2016). She plans to graduate in May 2017. CLAIRE GOODMAN (Lec/Dem or How Do You Spell Femaphobic) grew up studying ballet in the Dallas/Forth Worth Area. She recently performed in They Have Big Voices Where the Universe Ends and (Re)current Unrest (Bodies & Souls, 2016). She spent a semester in Angers, France studying under Robert Swinston and Marie Ballester at Centre National de Danse Contemporaine— Angers (CNDC). Upon graduating in May 2017 with a B.F.A. in Dance she plans to move to Europe to pursue dance professionally. ANNA INGRAM (A-peeling, Hand in Heart, (Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile) is currently a fourth-year B.F.A. in Dance major. Ingram recently performed as “Nani” in In the Red and Brown Water (Texas Theatre and Dance, 2016) and choreographed her own work, Kindred, which represented The University of Texas at Austin in the Round Rock Independent School District All-District Dance Performance. Ingram has trained in China, New York and France where she was in residency with members from worldrenowned dance companies. ALLISON IRBY (A-peeling, Lec/Dem or How Do You Spell Femaphobic, Walking with Natasha)

is a B.F.A. in Dance major and is originally from Denver, Colorado where she began technique training in ballet and contemporary styles. Shortly after graduating high school, Irby studied dance at Hillsong College in Sydney, Australia and spent the spring 2016 semester studying abroad at Centre National de Danse Contemporaine—Angers (CNDC) in Angers, France. She plans to graduate in May 2017 and further pursue her dance career. ISAAC ISKRA (Lec/Dem or How Do You Spell Femaphobic, (Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile) is a second-year B.F.A. in Dance major from Austin, Texas where he began dancing at the age of 17. He has performed in Bloop Whoosh Ding by Allison L. Irby and Emily DiFranco (Dance Action), Dance to Breathe 2016 Choreographers Ball by Shepherd Allen and has choreographed for theatre, including She Kills Monsters, directed by Jose Figueroa and Why Torture is Wrong and Why We Love Them for It directed by Morgan Stuart. GINNIFER JOE (Bach in Time, Hand in Heart, Second to Khan, Walking with Natasha) began dancing in Spring, Texas. Most recently, she performed in Kindred by Anna Ingram as well as debuted her first choreographed work entitled I Love You Anyway (S.E.E.D., Dance Action). Upon graduating in May 2019 she plans to perform in a professional company. KAITLYN JONES (black is the new black, Lec/ Dem or How Do You Spell Femaphobic, Second to Khan, Walking with Natasha) began dancing at the age of two. A native Houstonian, she was cast in Houston Repertoire Ballet’s The Nutcracker for eight consecutive years. Most recently, she performed as “Yewa” in In the Red and Brown Water (Texas Theatre and Dance, 2016). After graduating with a B.F.A. in Dance in May 2019, she plans to pursue a doctorate in physical therapy. NICHOLAS KAO (black is the new black, Second to Khan, Slow Fade to Black, Under the Asphalt) began dancing at the age of 14 in Dallas, Texas. He has performed in Texas Theatre and Dance’s production of Fame The Musical and as part of Dance Repertory


CAST Theatre, working with noted choreographers Kate Watson-Wallace, David Justin, Manuel Vignoulle, Johnnie Cruise Mercer and Alvin Rangel. After graduating in May 2017 with a B.F.A. in Dance, Kao plans to pursue a career in performance before returning to graduate school. D’LONTE K. LAWSON (Lec/Dem or How Do You Spell Femaphobic, (Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile, Second to Khan, Under the Asphalt) began performing in high school in the Austin Area. Recently, Lawson performed as “Egungun” in In the Red and Brown Water and in Charles O. Anderson’s company, dance theatre X in Re(Current) Unrest. After graduating in May 2017 with a B.F.A. in Dance he plans to stay in Austin, Texas to perform and create works and eventually establish a dance company. CHRISTIAN LEAL ((Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile, Second to Khan, Under the Asphalt) began dancing in a hip-hop program in Houston, Texas. Upon entering high school, he joined a pre-professional dance company, Inertia Dance Company. At The University of Texas at Austin he has performed in Ears, Eyes + Feet and was recently seen as “Balla” in Tarell Alvin McCraney’s In the Red and Brown Water (Texas Theatre and Dance, 2016). This spring he will perform as part of The Cohen New Works Festival 2017 (presented by Broadway Bank). Upon graduating in May 2019 with a B.F.A. in Dance, Leal plans to perform with a professional company around the world. ABBY LOPER (Bach in Time, black is the new black, Second to Khan, Walking with Natasha) is a second-year B.F.A. in Dance and elementary education major. Throughout high school, she danced with a pre-professional dance company where she was given many training and performance opportunities. As a first-year student at The University of Texas at Austin, she performed and choreographed in Dance Action’s S.E.E.D. Loper plans to continue dancing, choreographing and teaching. VIVIAN LUGO (Hand in Heart, (Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile, Slow Fade to Black) began dancing

at the age of three in San Antonio, Texas. She is currently pursuing a B.F.A. in Dance (Dance Studies Option) and a B.S. in Corporate Communications at The University of Texas at Austin. She has performed in works by Charles O. Anderson, Andrea Beckham, Erica Gionfriddo and Alvin Rangel. Upon graduating, she plans to pursue a career in performance, non-profits and dance education. AMINAH MADDOX (A-peeling, black is the new black, Paramodernities #3, Second to Khan) began dancing at the age of three. She is a graduate of Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts in Dallas, Texas. Since joining Dance Repertory Theatre, she has performed works by Sidra Bell, Christian Von Howard, Charles O. Anderson, Alex Ketley, Lyn C. Wiltshire and Alvin Rangel. Upon graduation in May 2017 with a B.F.A. in Dance and a B.S. in Exercise Science, she plans to continue her career in dance on the East Coast. JORDYN MARSH (Bach in Time, Lec/Dem or How Do You Spell Femaphobic, Second to Khan) began dancing at the age of two in San Antonio, Texas. Most recently, she performed in (Re)Current Unrest by Charles O. Anderson and Threshold by Lyn C. Wiltshire (Bodies & Souls, Texas Theatre and Dance, 2016). Upon graduating with a B.F.A. in Dance (Dance Studies Option), she plans to pursue a career in teaching within the Texas education system. MORGAN MIKES (black is the new black, Paramodernities #3, Slow Fade to Black, Under the Asphalt) began dancing when she was three-years-old. Before attending The University of Texas at Austin, Mikes trained with a preprofessional dance company. Recently, she performed in Dance Action’s S.E.E.D. and a unique collaborative piece entitled String Circle. She plans to join a professional contemporary dance company upon graduation. VICTORIA ANTOINETTE MURILLO (Hand in Heart, (Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile, Slow Fade to Black) began performing at the age of three in El Paso, Texas where she trained in


CAST ballet, jazz and ballet folklorico. She transferred to The University of Texas at Austin to pursue a B.F.A. in Dance in 2015 and recently performed in String Circle, collaborative work with alumni and faculty. Murillo is currently choreographing and producing Si Se Puede for The Cohen New Works Festival 2017 (presented by Broadway Bank). Upon graduation, she plans to dance professionally in New York. KANAMI NAKABAYASHI (black is the new black, Paramodernities #3, Slow Fade to Black, Under the Asphalt) is originally from Tokyo, Japan and began dancing in Portland, Oregon at the age of three before continuing training in Tokyo and Ontario, Canada. Most recently, she performed in Poem (Part 1) by Alex Ketley at the American College Dance Association National Conference. After graduating in May 2017, she plans to join a professional dance company. BECKY NAM (Lec/Dem or How Do You Spell Femaphobic) began dancing at a local studio in College Station, Texas. Last fall, she studied abroad in Angers, France at Centre National de Dance Contemporaine—Angers (CNDC). After graduating in May 2019 with a B.F.A. in Dance and B.S. in Psychology she plans to join a modern dance company. ANTONIA NEAL (Hand in Heart, (Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile, Second to Khan, Slow Fade to Black) is a second-year B.F.A. in Dance major. She began dancing at a young age and graduated from the Las Vegas Academy of the Arts. CASSIDY OLDHAM (Bach in Time, (Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile) is a B.F.A. in Dance (Dance Studies Option) major also pursuing a B.S. in Youth and Communities Studies. Oldham began dancing at Boni’s Dance Studio in The Woodlands, Texas and later trained and performed in a pre-professional program with the Houston MET too Youth Company. She also performed in Fall For Dance, Bodies & Souls (Texas Theatre and Dance) and Ears, Eyes + Feet. After graduating, she plans to perform in a tap or contemporary dance company as well as teach.

DAYNA PALMER (Bach in Time, (Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile) began her dance career at the age of five and graduated from the High School for the Performing and Visual Arts in Houston, Texas. She is currently a secondyear B.F.A. in Dance major at The University of Texas at Austin. While also pursuing a pre-medical track in order to receive a Health Professions Certificate, Palmer aspires to dance professionally in New York upon graduation. TYRIK J. PATTERSON (Lec/Dem or How Do You Spell Femaphobic, (Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile, Second to Khan) began performing in high school in Richardson, Texas. This is his first performance with Dance Repertory Theatre. Upon graduating in May 2019 with a B.F.A. in Dance, Patterson plans to relocate to Los Angeles, California in order to work as a backup dancer for touring artists. TABITHA PUPO (Hand in Heart, Paramodernities #3) has been dancing since the age of four. Pupo is pursuing a B.F.A. in Dance and B.A. in Early Education. She recently performed in Lyn C. Wiltshire’s Threshold (Bodies & Souls, Theatre and Dance, 2016). Pupo has been invited for the second time to Salzburg, Austria to continue her studies as a professional dancer over the summer. Upon graduation, she plans to continue dancing and teach gifted and talented children. JESUS QUEZADA (Lec/Dem or How Do You Spell Femaphobic, (Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile, Second to Khan) began dancing in middle school. After performing with Inertia Dance Company in high school, he was encouraged to audition for the dance program at The University of Texas at Austin. Quezada plans to graduate in Spring 2019 with a B.F.A. in Dance (Dance Studies Option). MARIO ALBERTO RAMIREZ (A-peeling, (Re) current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile, Under the Asphalt) began to dance in middle school in Dallas, Texas. As he continued through high school, he also trained in folklorico, danza azteca and flamenco. He recently performed in Dance


CAST Action’s S.E.E.D. and the collaborative work Loose Gravel (Frank Wo/Men Collective). After graduating in May 2019 with a B.F.A. in Dance (Dance Studies Option) he plans to join a dance collective and pursue teaching. EILEEN YURIKO ROBY (Hand in Heart, (Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile) is a third-year B.F.A. in Dance major, originally from Fayetteville, Arkansas. She plans to graduate with a prephysical therapy certificate in order to become a physical therapist for dancers and athletes. Roby is also interested in how dance therapy affects individuals. She recently performed in Fall For Dance and Bodies & Souls (Texas Theatre and Dance). This is her third season performing with Dance Repertory Theatre.

Sturgis plans to pursue a career in the arts in New York City. LIZZY TAN ((Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile, Second to Khan, Walking with Natasha) began dancing in Houston, Texas at the age of four. She recently performed and choreographed in S.E.E.D. (Dance Action: 2014, 2015, 2016); Bodies & Souls (Texas Theatre and Dance, 2016) and Ears, Eyes + Feet. She is currently working on a project for The Cohen New Works Festival 2017 (presented by Broadway Bank). She is a third-year B.F.A. in Dance and B.A. in Economics major with honors and plans to pursue an interdisciplinary career in performance, choreography and arts administration following graduation.

FRANCIS RODRIGUEZ (Bach in Time, black is the new black, Paramodernities #3) began her dance training in the lower Rio Grande Valley. She spent the spring 2016 semester at Centre National de Dance Contemporaine—Angers (CNDC) in France where she worked with choreographers Robert Swinston, Aurélien Richard, Philippe Priasso and Asha Thomas. After graduating in May 2018 with a B.F.A in Dance (Dance Studies Option), she plans to dance professionally.

MACKENZIE VOORHIES (black is the new black, Slow Fade to Black) is a third-year B.F.A. in Dance major who is also pursuing a pre-physical therapy certificate at The University of Texas at Austin. Voorhies is from Allen, Texas and has been dancing since the age of two at Academy of Dance Arts. She performed in the Dallas Repertoire Ballet’s production of The Nutcracker for 12 years. She traveled to Austria during the summer of 2015 with Young! Tanzommer Dance Festival. Upon graduation, Voorhies plans to heal dancers and other athletes.

ANNA STARR (Lec/Dem or How Do You Spell Femaphobic, Second to Khan) is a third-year B.F.A. in Dance major from Dallas, Texas. She has been a member of Texas Pom for three years. At Texas Theatre and Dance, Starr performed in They Have Big Voices Where the Universe Ends by Erica Gionfriddo (Bodies & Souls, Texas Theatre and Dance, 2016) and Gobetween by Leigh-Alice Clark and Sarah-Grace Poitevent (Ears, Eyes + Feet, 2016).

GEORGINA WILSON (A-peeling, Hand in Heart, Lec/Dem or How Do You Spell Femaphobic, Second to Khan), originally from California, is a fourth-year B.F.A. in Dance major. She has recently performed works by Erica Gionfriddo, Johnnie Cruise Mercer and Morganne Mazieka (Bodies & Souls, Texas Theatre and Dance, 2016). Upon graduation, she plans to further her career as a professional dancer.

HUNTER STURGIS (black is the new black, Hand in Heart, Under the Asphalt) began his dance training in high school. Sturgis is a fourth-year B.F.A. in Dance major at The University of Texas at Austin. He has performed in works by Charles O. Anderson, Andrea Beckham, Kate WatsonWallace, Erica Gionfriddo, Kira Biazek, Amy Marrow and Abby Zbikowski. Upon graduation,

CLAIRE WOOD (Hand in Heart, (Re)current Unrest pt. 2: In D’Nile, Walking with Natasha) is a second-year B.F.A. in Dance (Dance Studies Option) major from Mansfield, Texas. Most recently, she was a choreographer and dancer in Dance Action’s S.E.E.D. and a member of the String Circle project. After graduation, she plans to perform, choreograph and teach dance.


CREW ASSISTANT STAGE MANAGER ELIZABETH WALKER ASSISTANT LIGHTING DESIGNER JIAJING QI ASSISTANT PROJECTION DESIGNER KAIWEN FA AUDIO COORDINATOR BEN CAMPBELL SCENIC STUDIO SUPERVISOR J.E. JOHNSON SCENIC ART SUPERVISOR KAREN MANESS ASSOCIATE SCENIC STUDIO SUPERVISOR JASON HUERTA MASTER CARPENTER HANK SCHWEMMER ASSISTANT CHARGE SCENIC ARTIST KARA KONOP

PROP MASTER R.SWITZER PROP SHOP GRADUATE ASSISTANTS ZOE ANDERSON DAVID MOLINA GARZA PROP ARTISANS JACKIE PEREZ TAYLOR TRAVIS MORGAN STUART PROP STOCK MANAGER LINDSEY DENNIS PROPS ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT LINDSEY DENNIS PROP CONSTRUCTION CREW ALÉ GARZA MADELEINE HAYES DIAMANTE MARTINEZ AMENA MASSWI ANDREW RODRIGUEZ CATHERINE SABA CARLIE SCHOULTZ

GRADUATE PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS ZOE ANDERSON IMAN CORBANI

SCENERY/PROPS CREW MARGARET FORTUNE LILY GONZALES ALEX JEREB ADDISON NORMAN MYRAH PORTER EMILY TOLSON

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT SAMANTHA HINDERT

COSTUME SHOP SUPERVISOR PATRICIA M. RISSER

PRODUCTION LEADS JARED HORN CHRISTINA JANSEN ASHTON MURPHY REED NEAL GOBI-KLA VONAN

COSTUME PROJECT MANAGER DARCY WEBERG

PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS JACOB CAIRE ARRI CAVINESS SHANE COLWELL TAYLOR COOPER LIAM DOLAN-HENDERSON CARLY DOLLINGER BEN MONTERO BRIAN NGUYEN CHRISTIAN SCHELLER NYLES WASHINGTON NAT WATKINS RYAN WELLMAN HENRY WHEATLEY-RUTNER GABE WILLIAMSON SCENIC ART INTERNS CAROL ENDICOT TAYLOR JONES MIGUEL TAMEZ CHRISTIANA THOMAS PROPERTIES SUPERVISOR REBECCA SWITZER PROPERTIES ASSISTANT SUPERVISOR CAROLYN HARDIN

DRAPERS SARAH ALDRIDGE BETTY CHLYSTEK 1ST HANDS CHEN CHUNG KANG AARON KUBACAK STITCHERS MIA BARRERA EVELYN BRADEY BECKY X PHUNG COSTUME SHOP ASSOCIATE SUPERVISOR DARCY WEBERG COSTUME PRODUCTION CREW TEACHING ASSISTANTS ANANDA KEATOR MARIKA WYNNE COSTUME CONSTRUCTION CREW MEGA BIEDIGER JILLIAN GRISKO HOPE HIGGINS EMMA HUFF JENNEFER MARTINEZ ERYN NOTHCUTT CHRISTINA POZZI CONNOR SULLIVAN

WIG AND MAKEUP SPECIALIST ALLISON LOWERY WARDROBE CREW SUPERVISOR VANESSA LOPEZ WARDROBE CREW MACKENZIE LAWRENCE ANSEL LOWERY TAYLOR SCHMUELGEN KIRA STEIN KHORII TINSON REBEKAH URBAN KAYLA WHITE RENEE WOOLLEY COSTUME CRAFTS ARTISAN TANYA OLALDE COSTUME CRAFTS ASSISTANTS ALEXANDER GREER JACQUELINE HEIMEL COSTUME SHOP OFFICE ASSISTANTS TYLER COFIELD TORI HUSTING COSTUME STOCK SUPERVISOR LIRIT PENDELL COSTUME STOCK ASSISTANTS RAMA TCHUENTE EMILY VIALPANDO 324P LIGHTING FACULTY SUPERVISOR AUSTIN SHIRLEY TEXAS PERFORMING ARTS SUPERVISING ELECTRICIAN MIKELA COWAN TEXAS PERFORMING ARTS LIGHTING SUPERVISOR JEFF ELLINGER SENIOR LIGHTING TECHNICIANS YITAI CHUNG CHIAN-ANN LU ALEX HANNA MERCEDES MCCLEARY AARON CURRY JIAJING QI TEXAS THEATRE AND DANCE LIGHTING CREW KARLA ALVAREZ JACOB BRINKS HALEY BROWER ROSEANNE CARREON DAVID ESTES CLAIRE HARDWICK DAVID HERNANDEZ VICTORIA HUSTING BONNIE MCENNIS LESLY REZA OLGUIN MIRANDA PERKINS CARRINGTON QUEZADA LAURA VALDEZ-ORANDAY TIFFANY WATSON ELIAS WEINBERG

TEXAS PERFORMING ARTS LIGHTING CREW CASEY CANAMAR JESSICA FORTE ANDREA GARCIA MILLAN ALEXANDRA SANCHEZ SHIMSHON ZEEVI LIGHT BOARD OPERATOR SHIMSHON ZEEVI SPOTLIGHT OPERATOR ALEX WAYLAND AUDIO SUPERVISOR MICHAEL MALAK AUDIO BOARD OPERATOR ALEXANDRA BEHAR MEDIA BOARD SUPERVISOR MATTHEW SMITH MEDIA BOARD OPERATOR KELSEY LINBERG MEDIA CREW JOSHUA COLE COSME FLORES KATHERINE LOZANO LUKE MIRE KRISTEN RANEY TEODORO SANTIESTEBAN MACKINLEE WADDELL JESSE WORMINGTON STAGE MANAGEMENT ADVISOR RUSTY CLOYES COSTUME DESIGN ADVISOR SUSAN MICKEY COSTUME TECHNOLOGY ADVISOR JAMES GLAVAN LIGHTING DESIGN ADVISOR MICHELLE HABECK INTEGRATED MEDIA DESIGN ADVISOR SVEN ORTEL ACADEMIC PRODUCTION MANAGER JEFF GRAPKO PHOTOGRAPHER LAWRENCE PEART GRAPHIC DESIGNER MORGAN BATHE

Momentum  

February 15-26, 2017 Oscar G. Brockett Theatre Jointhedrama.org

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