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Friday, September 16, 2011

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Lecturer gives details on ancient city-state Presentation reveals artistry, culture discovered using archaeological methods Steele Gamble Staff Writer Iannis Lolos, member of the department of history, archaeology and social anthropology at the University of Thessaly, came to UT Tuesday to lecture on his recent archaeological exploration of the Greek city-state Sikyon. The East Tennessee Society of the Archaeological Institute of America sponsored the lecture to promote public interest in the field. Aleydis Van de Moortel, department of classics professor and secretary/treasurer of the local AIA chapter, thought the exploration of Sikyon effectively documented the history of ancient civilization. “It showed how much you can learn about the history and organization of an ancient city by just doing surface surveys and geophysical surveys,” Van de Moortel said. “At some point people come move in, and they organize the city in an extremely rational way.” Lolos believes archaeology is an important way to document ancient history due to the lack of written records at the time. “The challenge is to process the material remains in a way that we can reconstruct the history of an area,” Lolos said. “There are many surveys conducted in the Mediterranean, but in the case of Sikyon we were able to conduct a survey in the broader territory and in the city.” Sikyon was located in northeastern Peloponnese on the Gulf of Corinth between the Sythas and Phliasian Asopus rivers. The waterways gave the city-state direct access

to sailing and fertile farmland. These advantages allowed the city-state to be agriculturally and industrially productive. “It wasn’t just a consuming center as is often the case with city centers in antiquity,” Lolos said. “It was also a producing center.” Production is only a fraction of the citystate’s known culture. Archaeologists have found sculptures, paintings and pebble mosaic floors, making it a world-renowned center of ancient art. The architectural design of the urban area contained various monumental structures, for example the theater, stadium, temple and agora. The general urban design contained a unique city grid made of squares that allows archaeologist to see the locations of streets and buildings. Most city grids at the time were rectangular. This grabbed the attention of Van de Moortel. “There’s just (a) completely rational checkerboard pattern in there,” Van de Moortel said. “You could even tell what measure they were using because it was so regularly laid out.” Thorough archaeological explorations, such as Sikyon, require an extensive team of specialists. Van de Moortel described an excavation she is conducting in Greece. “We have specialists in lithics, several specialists in pottery,” Van de Moortel said. “We have human bone specialists. We have animal bone specialists, plant specialists. We use the sciences and use the humanities.” The AIA will hold nine more lectures this year. Members encourage students who are interested in the field to attend.

• Photo courtesy of archaeological.org

Swagfest elicits mixed feelings Ali Griffin Staff Writer

Tara Sripunvoraskul • The Daily Beacon

Desiree Ancar, junior in anthropology, speaks with Dee Odom, junior in sports management, about opportunities available through Teach for America on the Pedestrian Mall on Wednesday, Sept. 14.

Stephen A. Burroughs’ Swagfest kicked off in full force last week at many of the early check-ins. Last Friday, event-goers gathered at different locations across Knoxville to avoid long lines. Burroughs and his daughter were present at the event, along with many other volunteers. Local radio station 94.3 “The X” made an appearance for promotional purposes and provided music for those waiting to check in. Many attendees were excited to see that Burroughs himself was present at such an early stage in the event. “Getting to see him in person was so much fun,” Denise Bowlin, Swagfest attendee, said. “I have seen him on the billboards all over town, and while he’s not a national celebrity, he sure is popular here in E a s t Tennessee.” Those who arrived for early check-in received a blue rubber wristband, which would grant them access into the event. Complimentary Stephen A. Burroughs chap sticks, magnets and brochures were also given to guests. Those who checked in their friends were able to claim the free “swag ” for those unable to attend the early phases. People ranging from childhood to adulthood waited to take pictures with Burroughs. “I’m pretending like I’m here for my daughter, but I’m slightly excited to have a picture with the famous guy on the billboard,” attendee Jason Keith said. On the day of the event, many were disappointed to see how easily accessible the event was. Event-goers were able to freely walk into the Civic Auditorium and Coliseum.

“Everyone made a big deal about getting wristbands and checking in early,” Brittany Hood, senior in journalism, said. “I mean, if I wanted my free T-shirt I had to have the wristband, but otherwise I could have just walked right in.” Along with a free T-shirt, those sporting a blue wristband gained access to the Sunsphere where free food and swag were given away. Access to the Sunsphere, however, was limited, since only a low number of people are allowed into the building at one time. “The event didn’t seem to be run very well,” Elise Baskett, senior in psychology, said. “I feel like the food and swag giveaways should have been held in the bottom of the Coliseum where everyone could have comfortably fit.” One aspect of the event that did not disappoint was the opportunity to take pictures with a cardboard cutout of Burroughs himself. Swagfest visitors were able to take professional Krystal Oliva • The Daily Beacon photographs with the cutout. They were then given a number so they can find their photos on Facebook. Those in the photographs were given the opportunity to win more swag by tagging themselves in posted photos. “Taking the photos with the cutout was pretty cool, but it seemed kind of weird that there was this huge room that could accommodate so many people and everyone else was just standing in a line upstairs,” Erin Conaway, another eventgoer, said. “Taking pictures and walking around took all of about 15 minutes, then I was ready to leave,” Conaway said. “Maybe if I had made it upstairs I’d have better things to say, but I don’t think many people made it there.”


2 • The Daily Beacon

InSHORT

Friday, September 16, 2011

Marigrace Angelo • The Daily Beacon

Brooke Miller, freshman in speech pathology, Sasha Adrian, freshman in nursing, Karlyn Brown, freshman in journalism and electronic media, and Claire Parsley, undecided freshman, help paint at the YWCA as part of Vol Challenge on Wednesday, Sept. 14. Vol Challenge, hosted by All Campus Events, pairs UT organizations with local businesses for community service projects.

1620— Mayflower departs England The Mayflower sails from Plymouth, England, bound for the New World with 102 passengers. The ship was headed for Virginia, where the colonists--half religious dissenters and half entrepreneurs--had been authorized to settle by the British crown. However, stormy weather and navigational errors forced the Mayflower off course, and on November 21 the "Pilgrims" reached Massachusetts, where they founded the first permanent European settlement in New England in late December. Thirty-five of the Pilgrims were members of the radical English Separatist Church, who traveled to America to escape the jurisdiction of the Church of England, which they found corrupt. Ten years earlier, English persecution had led a group of Separatists to flee to Holland in search of religious freedom. However, many were dissatisfied with economic opportunities in the Netherlands, and under the direction of William Bradford they decided to immigrate to Virginia, where an English colony had been founded at Jamestown in 1607. The Separatists won financial backing from a group of investors called the London Adventurers, who were promised a sizable share of the colony's profits. Three dozen church members made their way back to England, where they were joined by about 70 entrepreneurs--enlisted by the London stock company to ensure the success of the enterprise. In August 1620, the Mayflower left Southampton with a smaller vessel--the Speedwell--but the latter proved unseaworthy and twice was forced to return to port. On September 16, the Mayflower left for America alone from Plymouth.

In a difficult Atlantic crossing, the 90-foot Mayflower encountered rough seas and storms and was blown more than 500 miles off course. Along the way, the settlers formulated and signed the Mayflower Compact, an agreement that bound the signatories into a "civil body politic." Because it established constitutional law and the rule of the majority, the compact is regarded as an important precursor to American democracy. After a 66-day voyage, the ship landed on November 21 on the tip of Cape Cod at what is now Provincetown, Massachusetts. After coming to anchor in Provincetown harbor, a party of armed men under the command of Captain Myles Standish was sent out to explore the area and find a location suitable for settlement. While they were gone, Susanna White gave birth to a son, Peregrine, aboard the Mayflower. He was the first English child born in New England. In mid-December, the explorers went ashore at a location across Cape Cod Bay where they found cleared fields and plentiful running water and named the site Plymouth. The expedition returned to Provincetown, and on December 21 the Mayflower came to anchor in Plymouth harbor. Just after Christmas, the pilgrims began work on dwellings that would shelter them through their difficult first winter in America. In the first year of settlement, half the colonists died of disease. In 1621, the health and economic condition of the colonists improved, and that autumn Governor William Bradford invited neighboring Indians to Plymouth to celebrate the bounty of that year's harvest season. Plymouth soon secured treaties with most local Indian tribes, and the economy steadily grew, and more colonists were attracted to the settlement. By the mid 1640s, Plymouth's population numbered 3,000 people, but by then the settlement had been overshadowed by the larger Massachusetts Bay Colony to the north, settled by Puritans in 1629. — This Day in History is courtesy of History.com.


Friday, September 16, 2011

The Daily Beacon • 3

NEWS

Tension rises between Turkey, Israel The Associated Press TUNIS, Tunisia — Turkey’s prime minister warned Israel on Thursday that his country would not sit by and let the Jewish state do as it pleased in the Mediterranean, the latest salvo in a major diplomatic crisis between the two countries. Recep Erdogan spoke during a visit to Tunisia, where he met with the prime minister and expressed his support for Palestinian efforts to gain statehood. The Turkish leader was traveling from Cairo, where he received a warm welcome from foreign ministers at the Arab League. Relations between former allies Israel and Turkey soured following an Israeli commando raid in June 2010 on a Turkish boat containing pro-Palestinian activists, resulting in the death of nine people. Angered by Israel’s refusal to apologize over the deaths, Turkey suspended military ties with Israel, expelled top Israeli diplomats and vowed to send the Turkish navy to escort Gaza-bound aid ships in the future. Erdogan has dramatically stepped up Turkey’s influence in the Middle East as the region is swept by revolts and uprisings. At the same time, many Arabs have cheered his increasingly confrontational stance

against Israel. The prime minister dismissed any plans to normalize relations with Israel until it apologized, compensated the victims and lifted the blockade of Gaza. Israel has defended its raid on the flotilla, saying its troops were attacked by passengers as they boarded and were defending themselves. Last week, Israel expressed regret for the loss of lives aboard the flotilla and said it was time for the two countries to restore their former close ties. Despite the staunchly secular nature of the modern Turkish state, Erdogan comes from the moderate Islamist Justice and Development Party (AKP). In Tunisia, which will be holding its first free elections for a constitutional body in just over a month, one of the most powerful groups is the Islamist Ennahda Party. Tunisia’s more secular politicians have expressed worry over the rise of the Islamists at the ballot box. “In Turkey, 99 percent of the population is Muslim, and it did not pose any problem. You can do the same here,” said Erdogan, who still described Turkey as democratic and secular. The prime minister’s delegation included other ministers and businessmen, and he pledged to boost commercial ties and trade between the two countries.

Tara Sripunvoraskul • The Daily Beacon

Darneisha Riley, sophomore in English, hands out popsicles to students on the Pedestrian Mall to promote RunDown for the Black Cultural Programming Committee on Wednesday, Sept. 14. Run-Down will feature legendary hip-hop mogul-turned-preacher, Joseph “Rev Run” Simmons, discussing the struggles between the hiphop world and religion.

Judge halts freshman drug tests The Associated Press ST. LOUIS — A federal judge has blocked a mandatory drug testing program for students at a Missouri technical college after the American Civil Liberties Union went to court challenging the tests’ constitutionality. The ACLU of Eastern Missouri filed a lawsuit Wednesday on behalf of six students at Linn State Technical College seeking an injunction to end what it called the “suspicionless” screenings of all first-year students and some returning students for drugs including cocaine, methamphetamines and oxycodone.

Linn State implemented the program this fall, saying it was necessary to ensure student safety at a school where the coursework includes aircraft maintenance, heavy engine repair, nuclear technology and other dangerous tasks. The two-year college’s drug testing policy may be the most far-reaching in the country. The testing program requires all first-year students at the 1,200 student school to comply, along with returning students who took a semester or two off and are seeking a degree or academic certificate. Physical therapy students enrolled in cooperative programs between Linn State and two community colleges also must be

drug-tested. The college has campuses in the mid-Missouri towns of Linn, Jefferson City and Mexico. New and prospective students were advised about the testing program in the spring and during fall orientation. The tests screen for 11 drugs, including methamphetamine, cocaine and marijuana. Students who test positive can remain in school if they have a clean test 45 days later. They also must complete an online drug-prevention course or are assigned to other, unspecified “appropriate activities,” according to the school’s written policy. They will remain on probation for the remainder of the semester and will face an unannounced follow-up test.

Reality star hits road with Journey The Associated Press FRONT ROYAL, Va. — While her husband says she’s missing, White House gate crasher and “Real Housewives of D.C.” cast member Michaele Salahi has reportedly been with the band Journey in Tennessee. Scoop Marketing, which represents the band, has told gossip website TMZ that Salahi is with the band, who had a Wednesday concert in Memphis.

Salahi’s husband, Tareq, reported to Virginia authorities that she was missing and said he believed she’d been abducted. But Warren County Sheriff Daniel T. McEathron said a deputy spoke with Michaele Salahi and she assured him she left with a friend. The sheriff’s department would not give any details on Michaele Salahi’s location early Thursday. The Salahis burst onto the scene in 2009 when they crashed a White House state dinner.


4 • The Daily Beacon

Friday, September 16, 2011

OPINIONS

Betterthan Reality T.V. Emmy awards fail to reflect quality Robby O’Daniel Recruitment Editor The Emmys are a bit of a joke. In fact, as soon as one gets past the Oscars, nearly every award ceremony is a joke. The Grammys, the Golden Globes, the ESPYs and MTV award shows all fail to truly recognize the best, either by the very nature of the viewer demographic, the award structure or sheer stupidity. The Emmys, in particular, seem to have this unofficial grandfather rule where once something is nominated, it just keeps getting nominated, whether or not it is still quality or not. “The Office” and “30 Rock” deserved nominations in 2006 but not so much today. Other times, the Emmys dole out nominations simply because something is popular — “Glee” — or because they feel like they ought to — anything on HBO. Since the Emmys are this Sunday on Fox, and since despite a dislike for the show, I will still end up arguing about who should have won after, I’ll just go ahead and give my picks for each category. This is not picking from the Emmys’ nominations because in some cases, the best show or actor in a category was not even nominated. Outstanding Drama Series: “Breaking Bad” (AMC) It was a tough call between “Breaking Bad” and AMC’s other stellar series, “Mad Men,” as both series are in a this-season-will-always-top-last-season mode, but “Breaking Bad” edges it out by building tension throughout its third season last year and ending on a high note. “Breaking Bad” is the best show on television because it does not baby its audience. Like “Mad Men,” show writers bring back plot elements at any given moment. Nothing ever feels like simply a plot device because everything is always set up beforehand, and all the character motivations are clear and logical. “Breaking Bad” is a step above everything on television right now. Runners-up: “Mad Men” (AMC), “Boardwalk Empire” (HBO), “Big Love” (HBO), “Shameless” (Showtime) Outstanding Comedy Series: “Parks and Recreation” (NBC) Fox’s “Bob’s Burgers” came awfully close to taking this award with a hilarious first season, but “Parks and Recreation” built off its breakout second season with an excellent third season last year. The third-season premiere, “Go Big or Go Home,” like the title suggests, started the season off with a bang and demanded

multiple viewings after its airing. The show has built an excellent ensemble cast, and the writing shows a clear understanding of the characters and attempts to put the characters in the funniest situations possible, like the episode “Ron and Tammy: Part Two,” with Ron Swanson and his ex-wife Tammy, or “Media Blitz,” which essentially served as the character-fleshing-out episode of Ben. Adding Rob Lowe and Adam Scott to the main cast was an excellent decision, as both stole the show in their stints at the end of season two. Lowe instantly became a breakout character, and Scott plays the straight man superbly. Runners-up: “Bob’s Burgers” (Fox), “The Increasingly Poor Decisions of Todd Margaret” (IFC), “Community” (NBC), “Hung” (HBO) Outstanding Lead Performance in a Drama Series: Jon Hamm as Don Draper in “Mad Men” (AMC) Each year Hamm takes Draper in new and interesting directions, and this year was no different as Hamm played the divorced man lost in the ’60s well. It’s hard for an actor to get viewer sympathy when he pretty much has it all, but Hamm did that and then some. Outstanding Lead Performance in a Comedy Series: David Cross as Todd Margaret in “The Increasingly Poor Decisions of Todd Margaret” (IFC) Cross played the idiot role with style, making it fun again — not just painful — for viewers to laugh at the inept lead character. In particular, his character’s firstepisode breakdown is must-see, even if one does not watch another second of the show. Outstanding Supporting Performance in a Drama Series: Michael Shannon as Nelson Van Alden in “Boardwalk Empire” (HBO) Shannon, part of an excellent cast on “Boardwalk,” stole the show as the scenery-chewing Van Alden. His character was the cause of more than one double-take moment in the show’s first season, like that strange nightly ritual he had and his attempted baptism of another character. Outstanding Supporting Performance in a Comedy Series: Nick Offerman as Ron Swanson in “Parks and Recreation” (NBC) This is the best category of them all. Will Arnett in “Todd Margaret,” Rob Lowe in “Parks,” Kristen Schaal in “Bob’s Burgers” and Alison Brie in “Community” are all worthy, but Ron Swanson just had too many memorable lines this year. Here’s an example, Swanson on whether he wants a salad: “Since I’m not a rabbit, no, I do not.” — Robby O’Daniel is a graduate student in communications. He can be reached at rodaniel.utk.edu.

SCRAMBLED EGGS • Alex Cline

THE GREAT MASHUP • Liz Newnam

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

UT’s ‘food’ options convenient, bad T he Bur den o f I n fa l i a b i l i t y by

Wiley Robinson It’s kind of impossible to eat well on UT campus. Instead of starting with an ironic build-up on increasingly regrettable food options, let’s start with the fact that at the nexus of campus, the easiest place to get to from everywhere else, there is a Starbucks. They used to just sell sugary coffee and sugar breads, but apparently the fact that the Hodges Starbucks is the first or second top-grossing store in the country means corporate wants to compile some business data on how well selling us small, unfulfilling and overpriced breakfast sandwiches goes. Variety is great, but I wouldn’t be complaining unless the sandwich felt like a great addition instead of a how-else-can-we-screw-desperate-peopletrapped-in-a-library. I (and hopefully the fine people making your coffee) also know better than to expect rewards or special treatment for giving them such amazing business for so long. At Haslam and Art & Architecture, we’ve got an Einsteins, where you can eat bread or a processed wrap. If you’re not feeling cold bread, the UC is pretty close, where you can spend your parent’s money on processed Asian, Sbarro’s (which I adore), chips with processed chili and fake cheese or more bread at Subway. Walk down the hall and the cafeteria food doesn’t look much different, the gourmet Mexican being the highest quality and distinctively most expensive. For variety and wholeness of food, one’s best bet is the Presidential Cafeteria meal plan, but that can be socially taxing to eat at if you’re not 19 years old and/or a freshman, a problem compounded by the music industry’s propaganda TVs blaring garbage. It’s all rather alienating. I sound condescending. But I’ve been quite literally living off of these places for two years now, and I’ve never not felt we’re being completely taken advantage of. I love the molten lava Sante Fe wrap at Einsteins, and just smile at the $5+ tag. I love my Venti Starbucks Doubleshot with white mocha. I just stand and smile whenever they marginally raise their prices over a break to take advantage of artificial demand. To somehow not go with the flow of convenient and mostly yummy, yet universally unhealthy and expensive, would feel wrong. Thought exercise: Your only alternative to eat on a busy day is by planning out and making breakfast, lunch and dinner to take with you in your backpack, so you do it. That makes me feel a twinge of irrational guilt,

because I’d be obviously opting out of the larger commercial culture around me. My subconscious consumer values would feel uneasy about breaking out something homemade in a Saran-wrapped bowl from my kitchen when everyone else is eating Aramark. We want, no, have a biological need to give the prevailing culture we’ve spent our entire lives in the blind benefit of the doubt. Even though the multinational food service corporations that have the singular privilege of operating directly on campus have no loyalty but to themselves, their absurd ubiquity subtly defines us. But our short-term energy and long-term health (as well as savings) mandates breaking away. Government and business agree on just about everything — only magnifying their subtle differences for our theatrical amusement — but they are in absolute concurrence when it comes to what people should eat. The answer? Bread, more bread, grains, sugar, mostly fake cheese, milk and salty, cheap flesh-like substances from bits of sad creatures with starchy filler. “Good” meat is salty, fatty pig meat meant to exude something Italian. No wonder there’s a big vegetarian and vegan movement. But they’re not nutritionally ahead of anyone — they still fill up on grains like cattle shut back in the feed lot after a PR photo-shoot on the pasture. Cows eat grass, not grain, which unlike fruits and vegetables have never relied on seed transportation via ingestion by bird and beast. Why do you think grain cereals have to be fortified to oblivion with nutrients? Because they themselves have almost none. Think grains are synonymous with fiber? They can’t hold a candle to how saturated unstarchy vegetables and fruits are with fiber. Think the profit motive is infallible? Think an unregulated profit motive should be allowed to dictate what we eat? The profit motive synthesizes indigestible food our bodies (which happen to be ourselves) don’t know what to do with, calls it 100 percent beef and theatrical conservatives would cry class warfare and socialism. But government is and will always be content with subsidizing grain and starchy corn, passing it (and incredible government savings for the private sector) off as the staple of a healthy diet. Class warfare has been declared, in the form of discriminating scientific nutrition knowledge vs. the stubbornly maintained cultural myths. Earthfare’s business model is, unfortunately, not just empty marketing, although it pulls many fast ones. UT is no more nutritionally worse off then any modern college campus I’ve been to. But when it comes to eating well, we have nobody to turn to but ourselves — society will not help us. — Wiley Robinson is a junior in ecology and evolutionary studies. He can be reached at rrobin23@utk.edu.

Exploration vital in selecting major Chao s Theory by

Sarah Russell

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I was not one of those lucky souls who entered college with an unshakable faith in my chosen major. I had declared a major in music back in the spring of my senior year in order to get into the program, but I had my reservations. I loved to sing and had taken lessons all through high school, as well as being involved in two choirs and auditioning for every musical role and solo opportunity I could. But deep down, I knew I wanted something more than a life of practicing and auditioning. As a senior in high school, though, I honestly did not know what that something more could be. High school, as our guidance counselors constantly reminded us, was a chance to begin to “find ourselves.” We were encouraged to enroll in sports and fine arts programs, to take as many honors and AP classes we could, and to make time to eat dinner with our families and feed the homeless on the weekends. However, we all knew the real reason we were being encouraged to participate in all of these endeavors — to build up our college applications. Our attempts to appear wellrounded for the admissions officers often forced us into activities we did not want to do. Yet paradoxically, our efforts to find a place among other applicants also forced us into specific niches of interest. Disciplines like engineering and fine arts have such rigid course work that, in order to graduate in four years, high school seniors are advised to enter those programs immediately. While the benefit of an on-time graduation is advantageous, it often creates the assumption that students need to spend all of their time trying to make themselves look appealing to those specific programs. The end result is that several students begin their college careers feeling locked into disciplines they aren’t entirely sure they want to be in, and often by the time they decide to change majors they end up a year behind anyway. Although I was a music major on paper, I basically entered college undecided. Every day I would imagine

what it would be like to take a class about politics or literature instead of introduction to piano. It took me a full year to make the leap and change my major to history, because I spent most of that year trying to find a way to make my music major more inclusive of other disciplines. But in majors as time-demanding as music, engineering or architecture, it is hard to find time to satisfy other interests. It is wonderful if you are dedicated to one of these majors — you know what you want to do and don’t mind doing it to the exclusion of other interests, which certainly shows passion and commitment. For the rest of us with a few more questions, though, being bound to such a program can be incredibly stifling. I am not one to advocate spending four or more years of college taking nothing but lower-level classes and not trying to find an area of interest. I do, however, think it is wise to make sure that you give yourself room to breathe and to learn, especially in the early years of college. For those of you who, like me, had to find this out the hard way, think back to your first few semesters. What made you change your mind, your major and ultimately, the path that your life was headed along? Chances are the choice was neither arbitrary nor spontaneous. Often, the seeds for our interests and our careers are planted during those years in high school when we weren’t fighting our way through AP Physics to appeal to the engineering program or practicing five hours a day to prepare for our college auditions. For me, it was just another class and just another teacher whose influence remarkably stayed with me until college. The decision to take European history was simply to fulfill a curriculum requirement, and being placed in Mr. Drake’s class was sheer luck. But my experiences in his class instilled in me an immutable love of history, and when I realized it was time to pick a new major, the choice was actually quite obvious. I do not regret taking time to discover what I wanted to do, nor should anyone else. I would simply encourage everyone, freshman or senior, to allow yourself to explore. Often, the interests you discover early in life never really leave you. — Sarah Russell is a junior in history. She can be reached at srusse22@utk.edu.


NEWS

Friday, September 16, 2011

The Daily Beacon • 5

Doctors practice surgery on dolls The Associated Press MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Anesthesiologists who assisted in a rare, risky surgery to separate conjoined twins came up with a novel way to practice flipping the patients without tangling the various lines attached to them: They rehearsed it on a pair of Cabbage Patch dolls sewn together. Doctors said the maneuver, and practice in general, was key to the successful operation at Memphis’ Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital. Joshua and Jacob Spates were joined back-to-back at the pelvis and lower spine, each with separate hearts, heads and limbs. The 7month-old boys were separated Aug. 29 but the procedure was not announced until Tuesday. Doctors involved in the procedure spoke to reporters Wednesday about the challenges, which included avoiding injury to the spine. Bill Warner, an orthopedic surgeon in the hospital’s spine clinic, said the boys have health problems that will require ongoing treatment, but he expects Joshua will be able to walk with braces and hopes that Jacob will do the same. “The outlook is bright as far as them being functional in the community,” Warner said. The way Joshua and Jacob were joined makes them pygopagus twins, which represent about 15 percent of all conjoined twins, according to the hospital. Only once in the past 11 years have pygopagus twins been successfully separated with both children surviving, said

Giancarlo Mari, director of the hospital’s fetal center and a professor at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. One of the most critical decisions was when to deliver the babies, who had been identified as conjoined twins through an ultrasound, Mari said. Leaving them in the womb posed a risk because of a tangled umbilical cord. But the longer they could be allowed to develop in utero, the stronger they would be at delivery at the better chance they would have to survive. The team decided to deliver the babies by Caesarean section at 34 weeks. Then came another tough decision: when to separate them. Jacob was born with a serious congenital heart problem and high blood pressure in the lungs. Dr. Max Langham, who led the surgical team, said waiting to separate the two increased the risks for Jacob, but lowered the risks for Joshua, who needed time to grow. Waiting until the twins were 7 months old also gave the surgery teams, consisting of more than 100 people, lots of time to practice. Langham said the teams rehearsed well enough that when the actual surgery happened, there were no surprises. Jacques Samson, a maternal fetal medicine fellow with the health science center and the fetal center, delivered the babies Jan. 24. He said the surgical teams were prepared at the time for the possibility that the twins Rebecca Vaughan • The Daily Beacon would have to be separated Fans walk en-masse to Neyland Stadium before a game against Cincinnati on Saturday, Sept. 10. The streets in immediately. and around Neyland Stadium will remain relatively empty this Saturday, as the Vols travel to Gainesville, Fla. to Fortunately, they were take on the Gators. healthy enough to wait.

SERVICES

EMPLOYMENT

Booking mixers, parties, events inside or out. Hottrods 2909 Alcoa Hwy. 5 minutes to UT. Call now to plan an event (865)680-1899.

Afternoon respite provider needed. 5 days a week for emotionally disturbed child. Pay negotiable. Call Kristin at 470-4937.

Psychic readings by Rose Renee. $5.00 reading with UT ID. Call for appt. (865)983-9945.

Caregiver/ companion for adult female with Parkinsons disease in West Knoxville. Flexible hours. (865)588-1010, leave message.

TUTORING High Schooler Needs Help with English class ASAP. Also will need help with Spanish. Call (865)690-2595. TESTPREP EXPERTS GRE/ GMAT/ LSAT For over 30 years, Michael K. Smith, Ph.D., and his teachers have helped UT students prepare for the GRE/ GMAT/ LSAT. Our programs offer individual tutoring, practice tests, and computer- adaptive strategies at a reasonable price. Programs can be designed around your schedule, weekdays, weeknights, or weekends. Conveniently located at 308 South Peters Rd. Call (865)694-4108 for more information. Tutor: Exp. university English teacher will help you excel in composition and literature classes. Reasonable Rates. (504)453-5674 or williamdykes@rocketmail.com

Cherokee Country Club now hiring experience full-time and part-time service staff. Apply in person Tuesday Friday from 2-5. 5138 Lyons View Pike. COLLEGE STUDENTS FLEXIBLE WORK Entry-Level Customer Sales and service simple and fun work and no exp necessary. $15 base-appt. Internships and Scholarships possible. All ages 18+, conditions apply. Call (865)329-7509. Apply online at knxwork.com Global Research Consultants, LLC. is a boutique information brokerage serving a select group of multinational corporations with information to help drive their strategic business decisions through a targeted “crowdsourcing” methodology. GRC will hire students on a contract basis, and is prepared to pay up to $1000.00 per contract assignment. More about this opportunity: www.grcknows.com

EMPLOYMENT Customer Service Representative $12.00 per hour. Serve customers by providing and answering questions about financial services. You will have the advantage of working with an experienced management team that will work to help you succeed. Professional but casual west Knoxville call center location, convenient to UT and West Town Mall. Full and part-time positions are available. We will make every effort to provide a convenient schedule. Email: hr@vrgknoxville.com Fax: (865)330-9945. First Baptist Concord/ West Lake FT/PT positions avail. Teacher asst./Floater. Professional Christian working environment. Call (865)288-1629 or email

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PPG / Pittsburg Paints Part Time Inside Sales Associate. For more information call (423)987-3933 or email cdavenport@ppg.com. Apply online at: www.ppg.com/corporate/careers.

THE TOMATO HEAD KNOXVILLE Now hiring dish and food running positions. Full and part-time available, no experience necessary. Apply in person at 12 Market Square or apply online at thetomato-

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THE TOMATO HEAD MARYVILLE Hiring all positions Full and part-time. No experience necessary. Apply in person. 211 W. Broadway, Maryville, TN (865)981-1080 or online www.thetomatohead.com.

Read the Beacon Classifieds!

Massage Therapist in Farragut Chiropractic office. 10 hours minimum, more hours can be available. Call (865)966-5885 or fax (865)966-5995. Email volrehab@hotmail.com. Needs someone for house cleaning, ironing, organizing, and other household chores. West Town area. Call (865)637-3600.

ACROSS

Part-time 20 - 30 hours a week. Lawn Care experience preferred. $9/hr. 216-5640.

STUDENT AUDITOR PT (20hr/wk) Soph or Junior. Business/ Accounting major a plus. Apply at Audit and Consulting Services. 149 Conference Center Bldg, or call 974-6611.

HOUSE FOR RENT

1 FULL BR CONDOS Security/ Elevator/ Pool 3 min. walk to Law School. $520R, $300SD, No app. fee. 865 (4408-0006 , 250-8136).

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NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD • Will Shortz

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Officers

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Word from a waiter

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In haste

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It might help you catch your breath

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One wiping out

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British dish with an American version called a Hot Brown

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Beans and others

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Go on

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Having more bites, say

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“My” girl in a 1979 hit

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Knee cap?

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Coins for Cicero

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College student’s request

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Varmints, in a classic cartoon line

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ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE E M U A B M B O Y O N T S H E B I E S E M S T

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Big name in wafers Creator of “The Simpsons” Blubber Having a hard time connecting?

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Missouri metro

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Native to a certain region

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Like some spirits

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It’s typed with the left pinkie

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Check

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Lie in the sun

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:-(

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Equestrians

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It may be screened

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Softens in water, in a way

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Thicket of trees


6 • The Daily Beacon

ARTS&CULTURE

Palin tell-all stirs controversy The Associated Press WASHINGTON — Sarah Palin’s husband on Thursday called a book critical of his family “disgusting lies, innuendo and smears” as the former Alaska governor’s camp sought to discredit a racy biography that includes allegations of infidelity and drug use. As Sarah Palin weighs a White House bid, her husband released a statement seeking to blunt the fallout from Joe McGinniss’ “The Rogue: Searching for the Real Sarah Palin.” Palin allies also released another denial from the man alleged to have carried on an affair with Sarah Palin. “This is a man who has been relentlessly stalking my family to the point of moving in right next door to us to harass us and spy on us to satisfy his creepy obsession with my wife,” Todd Palin wrote of McGinniss. “His book is full of disgusting lies, innuendo and smears. Even The New York Times called this book ‘dated, petty,’ and that it ‘chases caustic, unsubstantiated gossip.’” The Republicans’ 2008 vice presidential nominee and former governor of Alaska made no new reference on her Facebook account to McGinniss’ book, although Sarah Palin previously mocked McGinniss for mov-

ing into a rented house next door to the Palin home. “We’re sure to have a doozey to look forward to with this treasure he’s penning,” Sarah Palin wrote last year. “Wonder what kind of material he’ll gather while overlooking Piper’s bedroom, my little garden and the family’s swimming hole?” McGinniss’ book also repeats allegations first published in The National Enquirer that Sarah Palin carried on an affair with Brad Hanson, Todd Palin’s former business partner. In a statement released through Palin allies, Hanson again denied the allegation. “This is the same old story that went around in 2008. It is a complete and outright lie,” Hanson said. “Todd and Sarah Palin have been good friends for many years, and in fact we still own property together. We sold a former joint business venture for business reasons, nothing more. These attacks are shameful and those making them seem to be out only to destroy good people and make money doing so.” Appearing on NBC’s “Today Show,” McGinniss defended his reporting. “I think I was as fair as I could possibly have been given the fact that she told all the people who were closest to her not to talk to me,” he said.

Friday, September 16, 2011

Band brings unique spin on jazz

• Photo courtesy of Chris Holly

Patrik Svensson Staff Writer One of the most prominent experimental jazz acts to walk this earth is back in Knoxville at the Bijou Theatre for a sparkling performance. The band that formed out of friendship more than 25 years ago has yet more to tell than through its music. The Necks, from Sydney, Australia, wouldn’t necessarily consider themselves a jazz band. Although the arsenal of instruments is complete with a double bass, a jazz drum set and a piano, pianist Chris Abrahams would categorize the trio as something different and unique. “We’ve been into jazz from the ’60s, such as John Coltrane,” Abrahams explained, “but we have adapted to a certain practice over the years. We are a band that goes up on stage and starts jamming.” Abrahams said that their music also leans towards something experimental. “We play lengthy pieces during our performances and develop a relation with the people,” he said. The band consists of Chris Abrahams on piano, Tony Buck on drums and Lloyd Swanton on bass. Each member has an extraordinary portfolio after decades of music involvement. Abrahams has, besides working sideby-side with his fellow companion Lloyd Swanton in The Benders during the early ’80s, released numerous solo records and collaborated with the singer and songwriter Melanie Oxley for five albums. Tony Buck is a weathered wanderer around the globe and has worked with more than a handful of musicians. He is also well known for his hardcore/impro band Peril. Bassist Lloyd Swanton is, according to Billboard Magazine, “an outstanding

and imaginative Australian bassist and composer,” which in another way tells of the prominence of this trio. Swanton appears on almost 100 records all over the world and is currently a host for a popular radio program “Mixed Marriage,” where crossings between jazz and other genres are being examined. With 15 records released over their musical career, Abrahams said that their music hasn’t changed dramatically as a final product. The prominent piano player said that more emphasis has been put on the actual recording and equipment. “We have been recording all material on tape and stepby-step added more elements by using technology,” Abrahams said. “The whole things about computers make it all easier.” Yet, The Necks revealed that a more rhythmic approach has been implemented on their latest record, “Silverwater.” The Australian fellowship will on this tour promote its upcoming album, “Mindset,” which is the band’s first full-length record since 2009. Abrahams described life on the road as nothing exceptional. “We are not Mötley Crüe,” he said. Although they are in many eyes blessed to be working with their passion, it is a life either “on the plane or on stage,” Abrahams said. Knoxville is by all means a special place for the Australian trio. “We did perform at the Big Ears Festival in Knoxville this year and had a great time; it was fantastic,” Abrahams said in an excited voice. The Necks paid a visit to the Bijou Theatre in downtown Knoxville last year, where they are going to perform yet another long-awaited concert. What the audience can be prepared for is a band that will go on stage and perform an epic show for an hour. “Someone will hit the first chord, and then one thing will lead to another,” Abrahams said with a short laugh expressing his joy to go up on stage again. The Necks promise an acoustic show that builds up for each minute that passes inside the Bijou Theatre to a big crescendo. The concert begins at 8 p.m. Friday at the Bijou Theatre.


7 • The Daily Beacon

Musician Peru’s first black minister The Associated Press SAN LUIS DE CANETE, Peru — Elementary school students serenade Susana Baca in this former sugar cane-milling town where both she and Peru’s slave trade are rooted. One girl recites a paean to Baca, and five other children tap a complex rhythm on boxes known as cajones, a legacy of Africans brought in chains to harvest sugar cane in this fertile river valley. The library of the humble school is being dedicated to the 67-year-old diva, herself living proof of AfroPeruvians’ enduring struggle. The gracious, elegant Baca is not just Peru’s best-known musician but also the Andean country’s first black Cabinet minister. She accepted the offer to join President Ollanta Humala’s government in July, and says she’s determined to end the discrimination that has long made second-class citizens not just of blacks but also of Peru’s indigenous. Baca has been Peru’s de facto ambassador to the rest of the world for more than two decades, a musical anthropologist and a chanteuse who seduces audiences with her velvet voice and barefoot dancing. “I am the symbol of inclusion,” said Baca in her Lima home. “I don’t hate the people who segregated us, who punished us, who hurt us. I just don’t want anyone else in our country to go through what I did.” Her thin experience in cultural bureaucracy has drawn concern from some arts promoters, academics and stewards of Peru’s archaeological riches, of which she is now curator-inchief. They worry she lacks the pugilistic chops for a job fraught with bureaucratic and political confrontation. Baca is known among world music fans for her soulful, inventively phrased interpretations of centuries-old rhythms, lyrics and dances. Her earthiness distances her from Peru’s widely discredited political class. A recent Ipsos Apoyo poll showed Baca to be Peru’s most popular Cabinet minister, with a 62 percent approval rating. To be sure, endearment is Baca’s style, and she’s already begun employing it to try to boost the $30 million annual budget of a ministry that is just eight months old. She’s a slight woman careful not just with her words but also her enunciation. “I am the beggar minister” is how she put it to Peru’s finance minister, Baca was quoted by a Lima newspaper as saying. “I don’t even have leather for my tambourine.” ___ Baca grew up in Lima’s seaside Chorrillos neighborhood but her clan hails from Canete, where black field workers today earn little more than $5 a day picking cotton and corn. Thanks to the perseverance of Baca’s mother, who raised three children cooking and washing clothes for Lima’s wealthy, she’s among the estimated 2 percent of AfroPeruvians with a post-secondary education. The lot of Latin America’s blacks has improved little since Baca, as a girl of five or six, earned her first tips dancing at band concerts on Chorrillos’ promenade.

Friday, September 16, 2011

ARTS&CULTURE

Most of the region’s 155 million descendants of African slaves are jobless or eke out a living by working in the informal sector, according to organizers of the first U.N.-sponsored Summit of Afro-Descendants held in Honduras last month. The estimated 100,000 African slaves brought to Peru toiled in sugar plantations and silver mines, with some becoming urban artisans. At one point, they and their descendants were more than 40 percent of Lima’s population. Blacks now amount to less than a tenth of Peru’s 29 million people. Yet socially, they’ve barely advanced in the 157 years since emancipation. They “have always lived in misery because they never had access to property,” said prominent Afro-Peruvian academic Jose Campos, a dean at the National Education University from which both he and Baca graduated. Leftist dictator Gen. Juan Velasco expropriated large tracts from rich landholders in the late 1960s but his land redistribution benefited not blacks but Andeans. Many blacks migrated to cities, often in the continued employ of their white “patrones.” ___ Baca didn’t know fame until middle age, when former Talking Heads frontman David Byrne introduced her internationally in the mid 1990s through his Luaka Bop label. Success came, she said, “little by little with great sacrifice.” Her family was musical; some of her cousins eventually would go on to formed the well-known Peru Negro troupe. Baca’s father played the guitar, her mother danced. Yet she was barred from choral and dance troupes in both primary and secondary school. “I said, ‘You’ve got to choose me because I’m the bailarina.’ I danced marvelously well. I inherited it from my mother. So I said, ‘I’m surely going to be chosen.’ But I wasn’t. None of the Indian or black girls in my class were chosen. I remember my hurt, my anguish.” Hard on Baca, too, were her early years as a primary school teacher. She was assigned to ill-equipped public schools in the chilly highlands and in Lima’s dirt poor Cerro del Augustin district. “She suffered a lot and there’s the additional ingredient of her being asthmatic, which makes her fragile,” said her husband and manager, Bolivian sociologist Ricardo Pereira. He knew almost no one in Lima when he arrived in the early 1980s, fleeing a right-wing Bolivian dictatorship. One day he happened upon a folk festival and saw Baca, on stage, for the first time. “A skinny, diminutive woman, dressed in black,” he recalled. Baca was lucky she sang a capella well because she rarely could afford to put together a band and pay for rehearsals, Pereira said. She was “adopted” by poets and musicians, taken in for a time by Chabuca Granda, a legendary Peruvian singer/songwriter. “She said, ‘If I have to sing trivial songs in a nightclub I won’t do it’” Pereira recalled.

Country innovator passes away The Associated Press DETROIT — Wade Mainer, a country music pioneer who is credited with inventing the two-finger banjo picking style that paved the way for the Bluegrass era, has died. He was 104. Mainer died at his home in Flint Township, about 60 miles northwest of Detroit, according to the funeral home where his service was to be held. He was a member of late brother J.E. Mainer’s Mountaineers, one of the most popular sibling duos of the 1930s. He made recordings for all the major labels of the day, including RCA in 1935, and invented a two-finger banjo picking style that paved the way for the bluegrass era. “Wade Mainer is the last of the old guard from the ‘20s and ‘30s to pass on. Mainer’s Mountaineers was a huge group during that time. They influenced the Monroe Brothers, The Delmore Brothers, The Stanley Brothers, Flatt and Scruggs, Reno and Smiley and countless other music groups from the South,” country and bluegrass artist Ricky Skaggs said in an email Wednesday to The Associated Press. “My dad loved them as well so I heard lots of Mainer’s Mountaineers in my house, too.” John Ramble, senior historian of the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville, Tenn., said Mainer’s two-finger style helped make the banjo more prominent in old-time, or early country music. Using two fingers, as opposed to the downward strumming motion of the “claw hammer” style, allowed him to be more melodic.

Born near Asheville, N.C., Mainer got his musical start in North Carolina’s mountains and later rediscovered it in an industrial Michigan city. Concerned that country music was dying, he left the stage and the South in the early 1950s and moved to Flint, Mich., to work for General Motors. He played only in church but eventually stopped altogether, putting the banjo under his bed for four years. Mainer returned to music after another musician convinced the born-again Christian he could use his talents to honor God. He told The Associated Press in 1991 that he got back on the circuit in 1970s after countrywestern star Tex Ritter bumped into one of Mainer’s sons. “Ritter said, ‘He’s been dead for 15 years, ain’t he?” Mainer said. “A lot of people thought I was dead.” Mainer said at the time many of his friends gave up the traditional mountain music for the faster-paced, more profitable bluegrass style. “This is the only kind of music there is that’s good listening and tells a story,” he said. Rumble said by the early 1950s, Mainer’s style was “becoming increasingly dated,” and nobody but the biggest stars made much money. But by the time he restarted in the early 1970s, there was a renewed interest in music like his because of the folk revival. “It’s just remarkable that at his advanced age he stayed accessible,” Rumble said. “He was literally a living link to pre-war country music and the first generation of professional country musicians who worked on radio and recorded.”


8 • The Daily Beacon

Friday, September 16, 2011

SPORTS

Gators’ speedy backs, defense await Vols Patrick MacCoon Staff Writer After logging wins against Montana and Cincinnati to open up the season, head coach Derek Dooley and his Tennessee Volunteers will have their first true test of the season as they hit the road for the first time this week to take on the No. 16 Florida Gators, who are led by first-year head coach Will Muschamp. “We haven’t really been truly battle-tested on the road against a good team when they’re loud and ready to go,” Dooley said. “This is going to be a good test for our young guys. I don’t know how we’re going to handle it.” Saturday’s SEC opener between Tennessee (2-0) and Florida (2-0) will be the two programs’ 41st meeting — the Gators hold the series lead at 21-19. However, what many consider to be one of college football’s best rivalry games has been a one-sided affair for the last six years. Since former Florida head coach Urban Meyer took over the reigns in Gainseville back in 2005, the Gators have yet to lose to the Vols and have outscored them by a wide margin of 180-83. Despite the growing trend and the Vols having to play in one of the most hostile environments in college football, it seems to be only a sense of motivation for many Vols, including sophomore defensive end Jacques Smith. “Beating Florida is something that I’ve been wanting to do ever since I stepped foot on campus, and hopefully we can make that happen this year,” he said. “Everybody kind of knows the statistics of Tennessee and where we were back then, where we are now and where we were in between that. All we can do is focus on the future and the opportunity we have at hand, and that’s to go into Florida and beat them and go 3-0.” The last time Tennessee beat Florida, the Vols ended up in the SEC Championship game in 2004. This week the Vols have been working hard at practice and have been watching their fair share of film on the Gators and keying on where they believe their strengths in the game are and what players

they need to watch out for. That would be senior running back Chris Rainey and Florida’s defense as a whole. After being released at one point early on in the season last year and making his way back onto the team, Rainey has continued to excel as a big playmaker in the Gator’s offense, which is now coached by Charlie Weis. Rainey currently leads the team in rushing yards with 27 carries for 198 yards and two touchdowns. Not to mention, the versatile 5-foot-9, 174-pound running back also leads the team in receiving with nine receptions for 110 yards and a touchdown. “Rainey is a problem on defense because if you can’t catch him when they flip him the ball,” Dooley said. “He’s a problem in the return game for the same reason, you can’t catch him. He always shows up as a difference maker in the game.” Another senior running back that the Vols will have to try to contain will be Jeff Demps, who suffered a minor injury in the Gators’ 39-0 win against UAB last week, but appears ready to suit up this Saturday. The Vols’ defense should be very familiar with Demps after seeing him rush the ball 26 times for 73 yards last year in the Gators’ 30-17 victo--ry in Knoxville. On the other side of the ball, the Vols will be facing one of the toughest defenses in the league, which leads the nation in scoring defense allowing just 1.5 points a game, despite only forcing one turnover all season. “I feel their defensive line is a very strong part of their defense,” said Tennessee offensive coordinator Jim Chaney. “Any type of run game you can do will help us solidify the line of scrimmage. It’s important for us to be able to run the ball efficiently in this ball game.” The game is scheduled for a 3:30 p . m . k i c ko f f on CBS.

George Richardson • The Daily Beacon

Jacques Smith sacks Montana quarterback Jordan Johnson during a game at Neyland Stadium on Saturday, Sept 3. Smith hopes to beat the Gators this weekend in The Swamp, which would be the Vols’ first win against the Gators since 2004.

Vols take swagger to Gainesville Matt Dixon Sports Editor

Tennessee fans are probably starting to find it hard to keep their excitement and optimism as level-headed as Montana and Cincinnati’s defenses did trying to slow down the Volunteers’ passing game. But it’s not just how UT has played its first two games of the season that should give Vol Nation reasons to raise its expectations going forward. It’s the culture of the program. From Derek Dooley on down, this Vols team just has a different feel about them. From the positive comments made by coaches and players in the media, to even the way the team approaches practice, this team has an attitude about itself it hasn’t had in recent years. These Vols have swagger. And plenty of it. Is that always a good thing? Maybe not.

Does it mean the Vols will win every game? Of course not. But these Vols believe they’ll win every game, including Saturday’s contest at Florida. Tennessee hasn’t beaten the Gators since 2004. Those six straight losses are the most in the series history. But UT has had longer losing streaks. In 1995, the Vols hadn’t beaten Alabama in nine years. Tennessee entered that Oct. 14 contest and scored on the first play of game, a touchdown pass from quarterback Peyton Manning to receiver Joey Kent. The Vols won 41-14. So what does that have to do with Tennessee-Florida on Saturday? That ’95 UT team had a sophomore quarterback in Manning who could sling the ball all over the field to a plethora of receivers, including Kent and Marcus Nash. Sound a lot like this year? It should. That doesn’t mean Tyler Bray should be compared to Manning. Or that Justin Hunter and Da’Rick Rogers to Kent and Nash, both of whom are near the top of many UT records. But that ’95 Bama game propelled UT

into national prominence and started a run from ’95-’99 that saw the Vols go 45-5, capturing the ’98 BCS National Championship, as well as SEC titles in ’97 and ’98. Again, that doesn’t mean a win in Gainesville on Saturday guarantees championships or smooth sailing for the Vols. After all, in ’96, UT lost at Memphis. But that dominant run UT had in the late ’90s had to start somewhere, much like if Dooley is going to win championships at Tennessee, the wins have to start piling up somewhere. Saturday in The Swamp is the perfect opportunity for UT to show college football it’s back to being the UT of old. A win against the Gators would most likely get the Vols back in the Top 25 for the first time since the beginning of the 2008 season. With a first-year coach and a new system, Florida has just as many question marks as UT. Vol players believe they can win. Their play the first two games of the season has given hope to the Vol Nation. All that’s left is for Tennessee to score more points than Florida. If that happens, the Vols’ swag could go even higher, especially if Bray connects with Hunter or Rogers for a touchdown on UT’s first offensive play.


Friday, September 16, 2011

SPORTS

The Daily Beacon • 9

Florida defense poses biggest problem for Vols Clay Seal Assistant Sports Editor When Tennessee travels to Gainesville to take on No. 16 Florida, they’ll see something new this season. Defense. Led by new defensive-minded coach Will Muschamp, the Gators (2-0), always known for their scathing defense, have only given up three points this season, and shut out UAB last week, 39-0. On top of that, Florida has only allowed 101 yards of rushing in those two games. “Our guys just have to figure out how to block them,” UT coach Derek Dooley said of Florida’s big defensive line. “I don’t know if our five can block their four. If our five can’t block their four, it doesn’t matter what else you can do. We’re going to get whipped.” Florida’s defensive line is talented, to say the least, even if they are young. Three sophomores make up the Gators’ front four: defensive end Ronald Powell (Rivals.com’s No. 1 recruit in 2010), Sharrif Floyd, who will give them a huge boost after missing out because of an NCAA suspension, was fourth in that class, and Dominique Easley was seventh. Redshirt senior Jaye Howard, a four-star recruit in 2007, rounds out the group. Dooley said that Florida has “the most talented defen-

sive line in the nation.” Any extra time will be important for Tyler Bray and Tennessee’s offense, which has averaged 43.5 points a game. Bray and the passing game have been in the nation’s elite with 358 yards per game. He threw for a career-high 405 yards last week against Cincinnati. Florida, which has won the last six meetings against the Vols, has held UT to 20 points or less in each of those games. The Vols lost 23-13 in their last trip to The Swamp in 2009. “I see talent at all levels of their defense,” said Tennessee offensive coordinator Jim Chaney. “From their D-line, the linebackers, the secondary. They are very good. I look around and try to find weaknesses in their physical abilities and I don’t see a lot of that. It will be quite a challenge for us.” Despite the solid overall defense, Florida has only two sacks and no interceptions. “We need to get better with our pass rush,” Gators defensive tackle Omar Hunter said. “In the UAB game, I think we could have gotten to the quarterback a whole lot more. They were releasing the ball pretty quick. We were coming with a lot of different pressures. They did a good job of keeping their quarterback clean.” Tennessee may be able to take advantage of Florida’s secondary. The Gators lost safety Ahmad Black to graduation, and 2010 All-SEC cornerback Janoris Jenkins after Muschamp kicked him off the team in April after

being arrested and charged for misdemeanor marijuana possession. With 10 games started in 2010, redshirt junior Jeremy Brown is the most-tenured Florida CB, even though he missed back-to-back seasons with back issues. On top of Florida’s youth, Vols wide receivers Justin Hunter and Da’Rick Rogers, who stand at 6-foot-4 and 6foot-3, respectively, will look to use height as an advantage. The Gators’ tallest secondary player is 6-foot-3. For many on this young Volunteer squad, this will be their first trip to Ben Hill Griffin Stadium, known to be one of the toughest environments in college football. For Bray, it will be his first start outside the state of Tennessee. “This is going to be our first big test for a lot of reasons,” Dooley said. “One is, of course, that you are on the road. Everything is different when you go on the road. “The bigger thing on the road is when the other team is playing good and the team gets loud, we are going to have to work on things we have never worked on and don’t have a lot of game-ready operation on it, like silent snap counts and those kinds of things. It is going to be a challenge. All you can do — you have to go down there, you can’t be scared and you have to be prepared mentally and you can’t be held hostage to anything that has happened in the past. That’s how we are going to approach it.”


10 • The Daily Beacon

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THESPORTSPAGE

FIRST PLACE: 8-2 (.800) Matt Dixon Sports Editor

Clay Seal Asst. Sports Editor Tennessee 28 - Florida 24 LSU - Miss. State Ohio State - Miami Auburn - Clemson Oklahoma 35- Florida State 21

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Wilhoit still pursuing NFL career game. “I was kind of in shock that I had missed it,” Wilhoit said of the extra point. “I had never missed an extra point in my career. At that moment, once I got on the sidelines, reality started to set in that if this game ends this way, then it’s going to be my fault that we lost. I’ve always been a competitor and never really wanted to go out that way. “I was just determined, whatever I had to do, I was going to win that game and make up for that mistake and I was fortunate enough to get the opportunity to.” But Wilhoit’s UT career wasn’t just that one kick in 2004. He finished second on Tennessee’s career scoring list with 325 points. “It was interesting because by my sophomore year I had already had my defining moment,” he said. “Right after that season, I had surgery on my foot, I had an extra bone in my foot and I had to recover from that. I finished out my career making 26 of my last 30 field goals. “I was glad that I wasn’t just remembered for just one kick, that I actually had a career to back it up.” After his four-year Vol career, Wilhoit tried to make an NFL roster, most notably with the Baltimore Ravens. “I took about two years to try to make it in the NFL,” Wilhoit said. “I got some good opportunities but it seemed like every door was kind of closing for me.” James Wilhoit certainly After studying under some of remembers the last time the top kicking coaches across Tennessee beat Florida. the country, Wilhoit, who has a The 2004 contest between master’s degree in sports psythe Volunteers and Gators chology, now coaches high came down to Wilhoit, then school and college kickers UT’s sophomore kicker. across the state. “There are just a few “I trained over 130 kickers moments to happen in peoacross the state last summer,” he ple’s lives where you know it’s said. “That’s been a very sucan important moment,” cessful business for me. Plus, Wilhoit the Daily Beacon. “For • Photo courtesy of Mark Humphrey over the last eight or nine me, those five-to-10 minutes where I was preparing for that James Wilhoit celebrates after hitting a 50-yard kick with months, I’ve gotten back in kick and I got out there and got six seconds left to give the Vols a 30-28 victory over the shape and stated training for the ready to kick, there was noth- Florida Gators on Saturday, Sept. 18, 2004. Wilhoit has NFL again. I’ve started really ing more important ever in my continued developing his kicking game after his tenure at having success there and I’m hoping over the next six-to-eight life than making that kick. I UT and looks to pursue an NFL career. months of trying to get a legitiremember stepping out on the mate shot at trying to get back in field and having such a focus on what I had to do. Even though there the NFL.” was a record crowd of 109,000 people, it felt like there was nobody else But making it to the NFL hadn’t been on Wilhoit’s mind until he in the stadium at all. It’s a feeling that I’ve never experienced again in started coaching and training current and future college kickers. my life.” “As I started coaching all these guys, my kicking got better,” Wilhoit With only six seconds left and UT down 28-27, Wilhoit faced a said. “My kicking at this point, I’m much better than I was three or potential game-winning 50-yard field goal. “Once I kicked the ball, once it came off my foot, our snapper, our four years ago when I came out of college.” Now, five years after finishing his UT career, Wilhoit still fondly holder and myself, we had worked together enough to where we knew once it got in the air that it was going in,” Wilhoit said. “We all, while remembers moments of his time as a Vol. “Those are things that you look back now and you’re even more the ball was in the air, we’re already celebrating.” But it wasn’t just any game-winning field goal. Following a UT proud of your career and proud of what we did while I was there,” he touchdown with 3:27 remaining, said. “Growing up in the state of Tennessee, I was always going to be Wilhoit had missed the extra a Tennessee fan before I played at Tennessee and I was going to be a point that would’ve tied the Tennessee fan after. Certainly, I’m proud of playing at Tennessee and the program we have.”

Tennessee 30 - Florida 24 Matt Dixon Sports Editor LSU - Miss. State Ohio State - Miami Soon after being named coach of the Tennessee Volunteers, Derek Auburn - Clemson Oklahoma 34- Florida State 17 Dooley created the multi-faceted “Vol for Life” program, led by former UT defensive back Andre Lott, that focuses on four areas of personal growth for players: character education, life skills, career development FIRST PLACE: 8-2 (.800) and spiritual growth. “When we put in that tag-phrase ‘Vol for Life,’ it’s something that’s Robbie Hargett Chief Copy Editor not a creation, it’s real,” Dooley told The Daily Beacon. “These guys, when they leave here, they consider themselves Vols. It’s the whole Tennessee 31 - Florida 27 ‘Once a Vol, always a Vol.’” LSU - Miss. State So what does the term “Vol for Life” truly mean? Ohio State - Miami “I think it’s one: recognizing and appreciating the three-to-four year Auburn - Clemson experience (players) had at Tennessee, and all that Tennessee gave to Oklahoma 24- Florida State 28 them,” Dooley said. “Then, when they leave, there’s a continual bond that the player has with the program and that the program has with THIRD PLACE: 7-3 (.700) the player. It’s so important not to ever feel a disconnect Preston Peeden Managing Ed. between program and former players because they are the Tennessee 35 - Florida 27 ones that made this program LSU - Miss. State the special program that it is Ohio State - Miami and I’ll always remember Auburn - Clemson that.” Oklahoma 35- Florida State 21

THIRD PLACE: 7-3 (.700)

THIRD PLACE: 7-3 (.700) Brent Harkins Ad Sales Tennessee 31- Florida 27 LSU - Miss. State Ohio State - Miami Auburn - Clemson Oklahoma 27- Florida State 24

THIRD PLACE: 7-3 (.700) Will Abrams Copy Editor Tennessee 21 - Florida 31 LSU - Miss. State Ohio State - Miami Auburn - Clemson Oklahoma 31- Florida State 24

Friday, September 16, 2011


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