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Hodges Starbucks, UT’s most profitable retail location prepares for Finals rush

Bahama Mamas: Lady Vols heat up in Junkanoo Jam SPORTS >>pg. 6

A&C Editors rank UT’s Top 10 most notable moments

ARTS & CULTURE >>pg. 3 ARTS & CULTURE >>pg. 3

Monday, December 2, 2013

Issue 68, Volume 124

Students clean up Neyland Stadium after games Online Editor Nearly 98,000 screaming fans packed into Neyland Stadium naturally produce a lot of excitement, noise and Volunteer Spirit – and trash. Facilities Services is now experimenting with a more economic methods of cleaning the stadium due to the high cost of hiring a professional service. Julianna Burchett, junior in environmental sciences and SGA senator for the College of Arts and Sciences, explained that a contractor previously used by the university would charge $8,000 per game, more than most stadiums, professional or collegiate.

“There are a lot of student organizations on campus, such as the Alternative Break Groups, that have to fund-raise for their trips or have to raise money to send people to conferences,” Burchett said. “If you have ever tried to fundraise any kind of money, then you know that receiving a guaranteed $500 is a pretty big deal.” Logan Terheggen, a member of Students Promoting Environmental Action in Knoxville who also interns with the Office of Sustainability, agreed with Burchett, adding that cleaning up the stadium helps students feel more responsible for their campus.

• Photo courtesy of Julianna Burchett

Samantha Smoak

Robert Fischman, sophomore in nutrition and member of the Outdoor Program, assists in the cleanup of Neyland Stadium on Nov. 24.

See CLEAN UP on Page 2

UT seniors end careers on high note, defeat Kentucky 27-14 Lexington, Ky. – Following the 14-10 defeat at the hands of the Vanderbilt Commodores on Nov. 23, the Tennessee Volunteers hopes of a bowl game were washed away. But even with the season-long goal of playing in the postseason gone, the Vols still looked forward to the challenge of finishing the season on a strong note and creating momentum heading into the offseason. When it was all said and done, the Vols did just that as they defeated the Kentucky Wildcats 27-14 inside Commonwealth Stadium on Saturday night. “We talked about needing to be 1-0 for our football program moving forward with our offseason strength and conditioning program, with recruiting, just momentum going into spring football,” head coach Butch Jones said. “I thought our kids really

A.J. Hall • The Daily Beacon

Troy Provost-Heron Assistant Sports Editor

showed up and played winning football.” The Vols opened up the game with a 37-yard kickoff return from junior wide receiver Devrin Young, which set the offense up with solid field position on their own 40-yard line. Two plays later, senior running back Rajion Neal bounced a run outside, sprinted down the Kentucky sideline and 60 yards later, found paydirt. The rushing touchdown did more than just give the Vols an early 7-0 Tennessee senior running back Rajion Neal sprints down lead – one that they would the Kentucky sideline for a 60-yard touchdown run during not relinquish throughout the Vols’ 27-14 win against the Wildcats at Commonwealth the course of the game – Stadium on Saturday. it also pushed Neal over the 1,000-yard mark for potentially being a 1,000-yard good. the season; a milestone no UT rusher. “I was like, ‘Man, I just “It was well-deserved for those player had accomplished since cannot go in here and not get guys up front and on the perimMontario Hardesty in 2009. these 10 yards,’ but to get it eter that helped me out all year.” “It was on my mind all week,” the way we did and to keep the Neal was far from the only Neal said on his thoughts of momentum that we had, it felt senior to take center stage in

Tennessee’s victory, however. Defensive end Corey Miller recorded 4.5 sacks, breaking the Tennessee record held by Reggie White, and the offensive line – comprised of four seniors – was instrumental in the Vols ability to rack up 417 yards of total offense. The offensive explosion came one week after the measly 237 total yards the Volunteers were able to scrap together in their loss to the Commodores. “They mean so much to our football program and they’ve been through a lot,” Jones said in reference to the seniors. “We’ve chronicled it every week and to be able to get a victory on the road was very fulfilling to see that happen for these kids. Like I said, they’ve been through so much. “They’ve been remarkable in terms of buying in and doing everything we’ve asked of them,” Jones added. “To get this victory was very special to them.” See FOOTBALL RECAP on Page 6

Annual ‘Christmas Carol’ production Impact, SAA set puts newfound twist on classic play to merge in 2014 Contributor Many have read or seen a production of Charles Dickens’ classic story “A Christmas Carol.” For the seventh year in a row, the Clarence Brown Theatre brought the story to the stage. This production has become a tradition at the theatre due in part to its popularity, but also due to the fact it is still deeply relevant today. As the Christmas season approaches, seeing the tale of a man who has forgotten the true joys of the holiday season rediscover what Christmas is about is the perfect addition to the holiday festivities. Within seconds of the production beginning, the audience was transported back to the 19th century.

year’s production is anything but a repeat, featuring several new contributions to costume, set, lighting and sound designs. These changes didn’t distract from the message of the story. Instead, they served to enhance and intensify the world of the play. The set was redesigned to create a more functional space for the actors to move and work in, as well as to better accommodate the number of scene changShelton Tison, left as es in the production. Like Tiny Tim, and David previous years, the quick Kortemeir, right as Scrooge, perform in scene changes were made the Clarence Brown possible through the use of Theatre’s “A Christmas moving pallets that brought the furniture and props onto Carol.” the stage smoothly. This is From there, they were particularly important, as it taken through the tale of provided an uninterrupted Ebenezer Scrooge’s journey flow to the story that kept to redemption. the audience’s focus. Though the script may be the same as last year, this See CHRISTMAS CAROL on Page 3 • Photo courtesy of Clarence Brown Theater

Andelyn Barclay

Emilee Lamb Assistant News Editor As of Jan. 1, student philanthropy organization, Impact, will be absorbed by the Student Alumni Associates to create a single group which will give more attention on university fund-raising. “UT alumni have some of the poorest donation rates in the SEC, and Impact was founded on the idea that much improvement can be made if UT students are educated on the importance of giving back before they graduate,” Zach Luze, senior in finance and former SAA Projects Chair, said. Impact will bring its philanthropic goals to SAA, adding a new function to the 32 year-old alumni relations organization. “At first I was pretty skeptical,” Maya Wimmer, junior in economics and Impact member, said. “I didn’t want Impact’s mission to be lost in translation. But after speaking with other Impact members, I’m excited for the change.

UNITE has managed to hold its own, so Impact should [not] be any different.” Luze agreed that the changes bring a mix of reactions from members of Impact. “Impact members were, not surprisingly, a bit taken aback at first,” Luze said. “They are the founding members of Impact, and are very attached to what they have worked so hard to build. However, once they were assured that Impact’s mission will still be very much alive within SAA, I believe many became more comfortable with the idea.” Because Impact is a young organization, formed only a year and a half ago, many of those affected by the merger appreciate the attention the SAA name will bring to the group. “Not everyone knew about Impact, but SAA is a name that everyone recognizes,” Wimmer said. “This merge will propel the visibility of Impact.” See MERGE on Page 2

“I’m not saying befriend them so you can ride their coattails; I’m suggesting you allow those who already possess greatness to bring the greatness out of yourself.” @UTDailyBeacon www.utdailybeacon.com

OPINIONS >>pg. 4

Vols start cold, finish hot in Bahamas Staff Report The Te n n e s s e e Volunteer men’s basketball team cruised to a 82-63 victory against the Wake Forest Demon Deacons on Saturday to claim fifth place in the Battle 4 Atlantis at Paradise Island, Bahamas. An offensive assault highlighted by junior forward Jarnell Stokes’ third double-double in as many days – scoring a seasonhigh 21 points and grabbing 10 rebounds – and freshman guard Darius Thompson’s careerhigh 16 points allowed the Vols to finish their Thanksgiving weekend in the Bahamas on a strong note. Tennessee got off to a hot start and carried it throughout the game, shooting over a 50 percent clip in both halves and finishing the day going 25-for-47 (53.2 percent) from the floor. The offense was aided by the team’s ability to take care of the basketball as UT committed only eight turnovers and mustered just one in the first half, which helped the team jump out to a 43-32 lead at the break. The quality offensive showing was a welcomed sight for the Vols, who just two days prior were unable to get anything going on that end. In their opening game of the tournament on Thursday, the Vols shot a meager 34.9 percent from the field which included a 3-for-21 night from beyond the arc. See B4A on Page 6

INSIDE THE DAILY BEACON News Arts & Culture Opinions Sports

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2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Monday, December 2, 2013 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb

elamb1@utk.edu

Officials: Speed factor in Walker’s crash death LOS ANGELES — Investigators sought to determine the cause of a fiery crash that killed “Fast & Furious” star Paul Walker while the 40-year-old actor’s fans erected a makeshift memorial Sunday near where the Porsche he was riding in smashed into a light pole and tree. The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department said speed was a factor in Saturday’s one-car crash, though it will take time to determine how fast the car was going. Because Walker is so closely associated with the underground culture of street racing portrayed in the popular “Fast & Furious” film franchise, the fatal accident had an eerie quality — a tragic end for a Hollywood hero of speed. The crash also killed Walker’s friend and financial adviser Roger Rodas, according to Walker’s publicist, Ame Van Iden. She said Walker was a passenger in the car when the two drove away in a 2005 red Porsche Carrera GT from a fundraiser in the community of Valencia, about 30 miles northwest of downtown Los Angeles. Sheriff’s deputies found the car engulfed in flames when they arrived at the site of the crash, near the fundraiser at Rodas’ sport car dealership. Officials have not identified either person found in the car. On Sunday, fans of

•Photo courtesy of Rotten Tomatoes

Associated Press

Paul Walker, star of the Fast and Furious franchise, died in a car crash on Saturday. Walker was a passenger in a vehicle that had left a charity event when it struck a light pole and burst into flames. Walker, 40, gathered to leave flowers, candles and memorabilia from the action movies. Walker is “gone but he’ll never be forgotten because there are so many people that look up to him,” Joel Perez, 23, told the Los Angeles Times at the memorial. Sheriff’s deputy Peter Gomez said investigators are working to determine how fast the car was traveling and what caused it to go out of control, including whether the driver was distracted or something in the road prompted him to swerve. After the Porsche crashed into a light pole and tree, it burst into flames. The downed

light pole had a speed limit sign of 45 mph. Walker rode the “Fast & Furious” franchise to fame, starring in all but one of the six action blockbusters, beginning with the first film in 2001. He had been on break from shooting the seventh installment; production began in September and while much of the film has been shot, it’s incomplete. Universal Pictures has not said what it plans to do with “Fast & Furious 7,” which currently is slated for release in July. Walker and Rodas had attended a fundraiser benefiting victims of the recent

typhoon in the Philippines. The event was held by Walker’s Reach Out Worldwide, a charity he founded in 2010 to aid victims of natural disasters. The fundraiser and toy drive took place at Rodas’ custom car shop, Always Evolving. Attendees rushed to the nearby crash to try to put out the flames with fire extinguishers. Bill Townsend, who attended the event, told AP Radio that Walker appeared very happy at the fundraiser. “He was smiling at everybody, just tickled that all these people came out to support this charity,” Townsend said. “He was doing what he loved. He was surrounded by friends, surrounded by cars.” Walker left behind two completed films. He stars in the upcoming Hurricane Katrina drama “Hours,” which Lionsgate’s Pantelion Films is to release Dec. 13. He also stars in “Brick Mansions,” a remake of the French action film “District B13” that Relativity plans to release next year. His “Fast & Furious” costars reacted in shock the actor’s death. Vin Diesel posted a photograph of him and Walker arm-in-arm on Instagram with the message: “I am absolutely speechless.” Lucadris said on Twitter: “Wherever you blessed your presence you always left a mark, we were like brothers.” Walker is survived by his 15-year-old daughter.

CLEAN UP continued from Page 1 “I couldn’t be more thrilled that students are getting the opportunity to make a difference on their campus in an incredibly symbiotic relationship,” Terheggen, sophomore in chemical engineering, said. “Most small student organizations struggle to obtain funding for various projects they want to initiate and this is a wonderfully easy opportunity to earn money for your club while making a difference for your university. I think this is a step in the right direction for the UT.” Burchett said she found the early morning and hard work to be a bonding experience for her group from the UT Outdoor Program. “We are a group of people that place a high emphasis on leadership,” she said. “Being able to come together and utilize our teamwork skills made for a fun day, and personally, I think that outweighs any drawbacks to this system.” Victoria Knight, senior in microbiology and columnist for The Daily Beacon, assisted with the clean up after the Vanderbilt game on Nov. 23

MERGE continued from Page 1 Both Impact and SAA serve to improve relations with UT alumni and raise support for the university through various events and fundraisers. Due to similarities in the two organizations’ goals and functions, the administration decided their purposes would be better served by a single, united group. “From Impact’s creation, there was a natural tendency for the two organizations to collaborate on events - I Heart UT Week being one example - and these combined efforts always yielded great results,” Luze said. “After evaluating the situation, I think the alumni office grew disillusioned with this arbitrary wall placed between the two organizations, and decided to make them one, unified force.” Despite the benefits of combining the organizations touted by the administration, Luze said that the changes are being met with some hesitation from SAA. “There is some trepidation about how the Impact mission will change SAA programming and events, but I think any anxiety is coupled with an equal

with the nine other students from an Alternative Spring Break group. Knight said she was initially overwhelmed by the amount of work to be completed during the 7 a.m. to 12 p.m. time frame. “As soon as we got one area semi-cleaned up, there was just miles more of trash to be seen all around the stadium,” Knight said. “And though there were quite a few student groups, there were just not enough people to complete it all by the time 12 p.m. rolled around. They did not keep us longer than our projected time, so all the student groups left the stadium before even half of the stadium was cleaned up.” Knight said the experience was an eye-opening one. “I had no idea before the clean-up how messy people were at the game,” Knight said. “It made me really sad that as easy as it is to just go and throw your trash in the trash cans which are just steps away from most people’s seats, many people made no effort to do so… It also made me really appreciate the work the people did who used to pick up all the trash. That is a huge job, and must take a ton of manpower and effort to make Neyland look as clean as it does every Saturday.” sense of anticipation,” he said. Once Impact is brought into the SAA fold, members of the latter organization will participate in several Impact events. In addition, active members of Impact will be invited to become members of SAA. “Having served on the executive board of both SAA and Impact last semester, I was privileged to interview both SAA and Impact candidates concurrently, and saw many Impact members who I thought would make wonderful SAAs, and vice versa,” Luze said. “To see both of these extraordinarily passionate and talented student groups together is really exciting.” Following the changes, Impact will no longer have a separate recruitment process, but will draw its participants from the ranks of SAA. Although it brings major changes to both organizations, Luze expects the combining of SAA and Impact to further each group’s ultimate goal. “I have absolute faith in the merger,” Luze said. “Now Impact’s mission can benefit from SAA’s larger budget, membership pool and track record of extraordinary service to the University of Tennessee.”


Monday, December 2, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

Students fill up on Starbucks as finals, projects loom Contributor Amidst the horrors of dropping temperatures and the terror of final exams, zombie-like students stumble across campus, moaning “venti peppermint mocha, double shot.” Most of them end up in the Hodges Library Starbucks. “It can definitely be just a mad house,” Marion Kirkpatrick, junior in journalism and electronic media and Starbucks employee, said. “We have a line out the door all the time.” Mary Patterson, an Aramark representative, said the Starbucks locations at Hodges Library and the UC have served a combined 90,000 customers this semester. This statistic is made up of both students and faculty, many of which are regulars. “A lot of teachers come through; most of them get normal coffee,” Kirkpatrick said. “They all get a discount through Aramark for being faculty of the university, so I think that’s probably why they come here a lot. It’s nice to see their faces.” Marli Patten, a freshman in advertising who has been going to Starbucks since eighth grade,

CHRISTMAS CAROL continued from Page 1 The ghost of Jacob Marley now enters from a trapdoor underneath the stage, which is accentuated by red lighting and fog that spills up out of the pit into Scrooge’s bedroom. The iconic chains he carries are incredibly realistic, with the clinking and clanking of the chains accentuated at points for emphasis, and his voice is also magnified to a ghostly echo that reverberates throughout the audience. When he descends back into his pit, the chains are pulled in before him, giving the appearance he is being pulled

“I’ll go to has seen a big increase Starbucks, like the in her consumption since one on Cumberland living on campus this year. Avenue and just sit “I used to go maybe and study and get once every two weeks; free refills for three now, since I’m in college, hours,” Porter said. I go almost every day,” “It makes it a lot Patten said. “Since I’m in cheaper.” the library every day ... I This system has get it. I am also doing a lot also been benefimore homework, so I need cial to the company the caffeine.” itself. According The rush period for this to Starbucks’ web location tends to be around site, the company 8-12 p.m., especially durreceived $174 miling exams. Patten follows lion in activations in this trend, being “more the fourth quarter likely to go at night,” than of 2013, averaging any other time of day. at around $14 per Michael Porter, senior activation. Activating in political science, said can either involve he finds himself satisfying purchasing a gift card a Starbucks craving late in Tyler Harwell, barista at Hodges’ and applying it to the the day. account, or choosing “I’m an avid coffee drink- Starbucks, prepares a latte on Sunday. a certain amount to er,” Porter said. “I make my coffee, which is just plain that Porter is a Gold Card mem- load via a debit or credit card. After the money on the card black coffee, every single day. So ber of the Starbucks Rewards when I go to Starbucks, it’ll be system. While he could gain has run out, customers can more in the evening. It’s like a rewards at the campus loca- reload the cards or add new tions, stores like the one on ones if using another gift card. fancy treat.” While Patten said she mostly Cumberland Avenue let him uti- Reloads have averaged at $22, goes to the Starbucks in the lize perks that are unavailable on totaling $876 million in net sales for the fourth quarter of 2013 library, Porter said he gets coffee campus. One example of this would be alone. on Cumberland Avenue “at least the free refills on iced or brewed While the convenience of three times a week.” this system and perks for both The main reason for this is coffee and tea. Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

Kendall Thompson

back to where he came from. The Ghost of Christmas Past appears through the use of a fly. When she descends into Scrooge’s bedroom, she brings with her all the magic of every Christmas past. Her costume and the sound effects that accompany her give a wistful tone to Scrooge’s memories. The Ghost of Christmas Present is made splendid by the bountiful scene that he brings with him to his entrance. He sits upon a huge carved throne and is surrounded by a feast, representing all the good of the Christmas that still is. Though all the other ghosts affected the story in their own way, it was the Ghost of Christmas Future that really

became a focal point of the production. It is with Future that Scrooge finally sees the error of his ways and makes a turn for the better. To accomplish this successfully, the production found a way of making Future larger than life…literally. Whereas last year Future was made up of only a projection, this year used a combination of projections and a large puppet that was controlled by three crew members. The huge, ominous, black-shrouded ghost makes his appearance in a swarm of crows, almost as if he is coalescing from them. Though he does not say a word, his intent is clear. Altogether, the production was a huge success in retelling

a classic story in a new way. Through a combination of a new design, as well as incorporating live musicians into the cast, the Clarence Brown Theatre was able to produce a show that reminded the audience of the true meaning of Christmas. As the play ended and the cast stepped forward to sing the final song, the audience sang along too, rejoicing in welcoming the holiday season in all its wonder. Many of the other changes were incorporated in the scenes with the ghosts. The designers’ efforts of costuming, lighting, sound and projections came together to create an elaborate and incredibly vivid scene with each of Scrooge’s visitors.

the customer and the company are substantial, some students, namely freshman, opt to use the dining dollars available to them. “We do have a lot of freshman come in, just because you have dining dollars to spend, so you can be kind of frivolous with those and get coffee when you want to,” Kirkpatrick said. “You know, more often than if you’re living off your own dime. I know that I’ve even struggled with that moving freshman year to being a junior now.” Porter shares a similar view. While he was a freshman, he took advantage of dining dollars and the occasional meal equivalency. “I wasn’t even going to Starbucks on Cumberland Avenue since it was like right here on campus and I could use

my dining dollars, which were already kind of paid for in a way,” Porter said. “It was also tax free, so it was cheaper.” However, the overall appeal of Starbucks goes beyond dining dollars or academic year. “I think a lot of it is the name,” Patten said. “Starbucks has a lot of different flavors, and there are a lot of them everywhere, especially on campus, compared to Einstein’s or something.” Porter named the atmosphere as the main appeal. “It’s just really casual, and that’s regardless of whether it’s the one on campus or Cumberland Avenue or wherever,” he said. “They have comfy chairs and couches, and the lights are kind of dim, so it’s comfortable, its cozy and it feels really homey.”


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Monday, December 2, 2013 Editor-in-Chief R.J. Vogt

OPINIONS

rvogt@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

This is what 11 semesters have taught me Uphill Both Ways by

Nate Talbot

I’ve been studying at UT since the fall of 2008. In that time, I have been blessed with many things, but the one thing that stands out as truly spectacular are the people I have met and formed my life around. Herein lies my last piece of advice to the general student populace of this university that has been the base for the best five and a half years of my life. Surround yourself with the best people you can, and allow them to affect your life. Humans have a tendency to view those around them as being better than themselves. This is why “50 Shades of Grey” is so popular. People might say that the series is popular because of the more…provocative scenes, but the reason those scenes hit home so hard is because Anastasia is easy to relate to. She sees her roommate as being smarter, more beautiful, more stylish and in general a better person. Through those perceptions of her “superior” roommate, she works to become more like her roommate. In fact, she is working to become more like the ideal that her roommate represents. We are all Anastasia, excepting the more…provocative scenes (Editors Note: or not?). We hear our own thoughts, we know when we have failed and we know our own weaknesses. We perceive those around us as being without those flaws, and subconsciously want to become more like them. We implicitly try to become more like those around us. This has the potential to bring us to greatness. If you are shy, surround yourself by outgoing people. If you struggle with school, surround yourself with people who do very well. If you lack confidence in general, surround yourself with people who you see as the ones who will run this world someday. We are surrounded by these people at UT. This is a powerhouse institution, just from my own friends I know two people who have already started successful businesses before graduating from UT. I know the editor-inchief of the student newspaper, I know a Rhodes Scholar, I know a girl who has committed her life to cancer research, I know people who will be doctors, lawyers, teachers, writers, musicians, television reporters and producers, politicians, military officers and professional athletes. Why would you not want to be around these people? I’m not saying befriend them so you can ride their coattails; I’m suggesting you allow those who already possess greatness to bring the greatness out of yourself. We all have something special within ourselves to lead a noble life. Sure, we won’t all own our own business, or play in the NFL, or write a New York Times best seller, but we do all have the capability of being great parents, great neighbors, great citizens and great friends. A special life isn’t about a title, or the money you make, or the places you visit. A special life is about rising to your potential and leaving a mark on people, institutions, and the world that you feel was ultimately positive. Surrounding yourself by the people nearby who will unintentionally encourage you to be better will change your life, far more than studying abroad, more than a service trip, more than a car accident. Take a real look at the people you surround yourself with and ask if they are headed for the things you want out of life. If you view them as being above you, use their example as a ladder to something special, something greater. If the people around you aren’t inspiring you, maybe you’re inspiring them. That’s great and all, but don’t be complacent in your success. As finals come around, commit to spending your time with the people who are in the library and have their sights set high, and leave the people at the bars at the bars. At least until your last final’s over. We’re blessed with greatness around every corner; don’t squander it by giving your energy to the people who aren’t going to raise you higher. Nate Talbot is a senior in mechanical engineering. He can be reached at ntalbot1@utk.edu.

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Black Friday brings newfound meaning to ‘bargain-hunting’ School of Sarcasm by

Kaila Curry “I am not above arresting nobody tonight and I certainly ain’t above tasering anybody who runs through that door,” hollered a police officer over a crowd of more than 100 people standing outside of Belk Thursday night for the infamous Black Friday savings. Black Friday typically occurs the day after Thanksgiving; the first day of traditional Christmas shopping, millions of American consumers are drawn to retailers by special offers. This year, more than a dozen major retailers actually opened their doors around 8 p.m. Thursday, right around the time everyone had just finished their Thanksgiving meals. Although I enjoy time with family, this early opening gave me the chance to escape the awkward dinner conversations of, “You aren’t 2 years old anymore?” and meet with my friends, who I was ecstatic to see after a long semester apart. Shivering outside Belk, we waited for a solid two hours in hopes of receiving either the $1,000 gift card given randomly to one

Editor-in-Chief: R.J. Vogt Managing Editor: Melodi Erdogan Chief Copy Editor: Gage Arnold News Editor: Hanna Lustig Asst. News Editor: Emilee Lamb Sports Editor: David Cobb Asst. Sports Editor: Troy Provost-Heron Arts & Culture Editor: Claire Dodson Asst. Arts & Culture Editor: Cortney Roark Online Editor: Samantha Smoak

made my way to the clothing section where I found an unexpectedly large amount of husbands guarding nests of stacked boots that their wives were running over to them. I ended the night with two pairs of boots, and after applying my $10 gift card, I paid about $30. I left the mall in utter shock. Where had the polite Tennesseans I had grown accustomed to for the past seven years gone? A Huffington post article mentions Tennessee as the absolute worst place to go on Black Friday. It was reported that Wal-Mart shopping Tennesseans “fight over everything from electronics to towels.” The promise of savings transforms these kind-hearted Southern belles from housewives to warriors willing to be tased and punched just to save a few bucks? For the middle-aged women, it’s a way to get all their Christmas shopping done in one night at a bargain. Kids, do you even know what “Santa” had to go through to get you the new Xbox One? As for college kids, it’s a way to buy winter clothes at a reasonable price. Either way there’s no denying the generous savings and pandemonium of Black Friday. Whether it’s worth the bruises and black eyes are up to you to decide. Kaila Curry is a freshman in English. She can be reached at kcurry6@utk.edu.

Honestly, Thanksgiving just isn’t that important Struggling to be Heard by

Andrea Richardson As I departed from this dearly beloved campus last week, I heard much about inclement weather affecting Thanksgiving traveling plans across the country, especially in New England and along the East Coast. One reporter, commenting on the ruined plans of many, likened missing Thanksgiving Day to missing a graduation or a christening. This made me ponder. It’s really just a day, isn’t it? It’s not like a graduation or a christening. If you’re late to one of those, you’ve actually missed a significant life event of a loved one. If you’re late to Thanksgiving, well, go on and make yourself a turkey sandwich; and, yes, they’ve already broken the wishbone. For many, Thanksgiving was the first time in months that they had seen siblings, parents, cousins or grandparents. I don’t think a shift of the calendar date of one’s arrival makes this reunion less significant. Why do we have Thanksgiving? In truth, it’s an ordinary day. The majority of the United States’ population doesn’t gather to

express thanks for the year’s bountiful harvest anymore. Yet, we have designated this day to convene with previously estranged family members for the purpose of consuming mass amounts of factory-farmed poultry and either ignoring or caricaturing the natives from whom this continent was seized. Of course, Thanksgiving has significance as a day of family unity, and thankfulness in that regard, but what about Christmas? Many tout Thanksgiving as the perfect melting-pot holiday for all Americans because it has no religious affiliation—which according to Time Magazine, is untrue — but the truth is that Christmas is almost just as secularized. Although Christmas is Christian in origin, it has become hugely commercialized. Even if you aren’t Christian, you pretty much have to celebrate Christmas because almost everything will be closed and the holiday will have taken over everything from streetlights to ABC Family. Additionally, it is only a month after. If we wanted to be practical, we’d have Thanksgiving some time in late June. At the very least, that would prevent it from coinciding with Hanukkah. Of course, practicality often yields to tradition, and who wants to be practical, anyway? Thanks to Abraham Lincoln, Thanksgiving has been a nationally celebrated tradition since 1863. But are we

really upholding this sacred tradition? The holiday has become more analogous with turkey, shopping and football than with thankfulness. Black Friday inches closer and closer each year. I’m absolutely positive that in a decade or two we’ll be calling it “Pewter Gray Thursday Evening.” Everybody was mad when Wal-Mart announced it would open at 6 p.m. Thanksgiving evening, but then they hopped in line and fought tooth and nail for Rachael Ray cookware sets. The family unity aspect of Thanksgiving wears thinner and thinner as more people are called in for work on the fourth Thursday of November. So, is there a true meaning of Thanksgiving at this point in United States society? Is it a sanctified vestige of good ole American culture? Is it a dress rehearsal for Christmas? It’s sort of sad that for many U.S. residents, Thanksgiving and Christmas are the only times of the year when they unite with others for the sake of community and family. We shouldn’t need a holiday for that. It’s worse that one of these holidays romanticizes our dark, bloody, imperialist past with a pretty little pilgrim narrative. The parade is nice, though. Andrea Richardson is a sophomore in anthropology. She can be reached at aricha43@utk.edu.

Get Fuzzy • Darby Conley

Non Sequitur • Wiley

EDITORIAL

of the first 100 entering the store at 8 p.m., or one of the minor gift cards ranging from $500 to $5. After the cop rambled his orders out, much like the directions heard before entering a roller coaster, the ride started. A surge of adrenaline rushed through me as I shoved my way through the plethora of middle-aged woman flooding through the unhinging doors. Upon entering Belk, I can’t tell you much of what happened, perhaps because I was overwhelmed by the number of people bumping into me. All I could see was a beacon of light that read, ‘Boots $19.99.’ I made my way to the island of boots and quickly went from trying to find a pair I liked to just grabbing my size off each table. I was suddenly knocked over by a woman on the floor who grabbed me by the ankles and began moaning in a zombie-like manner, “Nooo my boots!” She refused to release me until I handed them over. A fight broke out to the right of me as a woman screamed profanities at a little old lady in a wheel chair who unintentionally snagged a pair of boots from the stack this woman had formed for herself. I couldn’t help but laugh as the elderly lady wheeled off with the boots and the flustered woman’s husband had to restrain her from chasing after the senior citizen’s getaway chair. After grabbing a few pairs of boots, I

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Monday, December 2, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

Knoxville’s Top Ten: The best arts and culture events of the fall This fall, UT and the broader Knoxville community were able to experience a few fantastic moments of art and culture without ever leaving the city limits, including best-selling artists, movie stars and a festival celebrating some of Knoxville’s best musicians. Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson and Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark compiled a list of some of the best artistically-driven moments of the semester.

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Cortney’s Take: This idiosyncratic fashion designer visited the UC auditorium in early November and had the crowd inspired one minute and in laughs the next. Sharing anecdotes from his college career and how he found himself in New York City, to when he found out about auditions for reality television show “Project Runway� and ended up winning the competition in its fourth season. Siriano shared many fashion industry secrets with the audience, and took questions from the crowd. Everyone who attended left inspired and impressed by the Maryland native.

Claire’s Take: While City & Colour brought their usual level of talent and thoughtful lyricism, the real surprise at this show was opener Lucy Rose, a British singer-songwriter. I got to talk to her before the concert, and she was sincere as well as open and interesting, three qualities that manifested themselves in her music. The crowd loved her as well; they cheered her name throughout the show and even shouted for an encore. There’s nothing quite like going to a concert and unexpectedly coming away with a new favorite artist.

“Expressions� Art Show at 1010 Gallery

Elizabeth Gilbert at the Tennessee Theatre

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Cortney’s Take: As I opened the door to the 1010 Gallery on Gay Street, there were various portraits of facial expressions displayed on the walls. As I walked closer to each portrait, each face became slightly pixelated. UT junior, Aaron Inklebarger, used graphite pointillism to create these self portraits. Created with solely dots of graphite pencil, each portrait took eight to 12 hours to complete. To see an example of this art, like “Aaron ‘Inky’ Art� on Facebook.

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Natalie L. Haslam Music Center Ribbon Cutting

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Claire’s Take: Talking to Michael Gungor on the phone, it was evident he had a distaste for genre and the limits categories impose on music. After seeing him and his band at The Square Room, these beliefs were reinforced through the depth and variety of the group’s musical expertise. With dubstep and ballad, Old West and new wave, 80s pop and disco fever, Gungor proved the band will be in this business for a long time. Check out Gungor’s latest album, “I Am Mountain,� for a taste of the skill and passion of this collective.

Cortney’s Take: The ribbon cutting of the Natalie L. Haslam Music Center was truly a milestone for UT’s School of Music. This $40 million building was in the works for years and was completed this summer. Gov. Bill Haslam, Sen. Lamar Alexander, Jim Haslam and Natalie Haslam were in attendance. Natalie Haslam spoke about her contribution to the UT music program before cutting the ribbon. In her speech at the event, she said the project “is the answer to a long dream.�

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1

Catching Fire Premiere at Regal Pinnacle

Claire’s Take: Liam Hemsworth. Hundreds of screaming fans. A fantastic sequel. Did I mention Liam Hemsworth? The Pinnacle has hosted several premieres, each one improving Knoxville’s notoriety. Getting to talk to Hemsworth and director Francis Lawrence was awe-inspiring and a little scary – it also made seeing the movie that much better. Did I mention Liam Hemsworth is Australian? And he speaks with an accent? Sigh.

Cortney’s Take: This concert at The Hill was not an ordinary concert. One hundred percent of the proceeds went directly to Camp Koinania, a camp for disabled children and young adults. This marked the first major event held by The Stoop Kids, a charity organization started this year by UT students. Various bands including O Youth and Johnny Astro and the Big Bang performed well into the night, showcasing their individual sounds. The audience was left wanting encores from each band, while anxiously awaiting the next.

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Claire’s Take: Hearing “Eat, Pray, Love� author Elizabeth GIlbert speak was one of the best nights of the semester. She is so easy to talk to and willing to share her experiences in a way that is incredibly relatable and charming. This was her best line of the night: “I actually don’t get offended because I am remarkably, almost pathologically, self-confident.�

Gungor at The Square Room

Ragefest at The Hill

Christian Siriano

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City & Colour with Lucy Rose at the Tennessee Theatre

Florida Georgia Line at the Civic Auditorium

Cortney’s Take: It’s not often Knoxville welcomes a two-time Country Music Association award-winning duo just two days after their win. Florida Georgia Line has seen the band’s single “Cruise� fly up the country charts, and, after pairing up with Nelly, the pop charts as well. The group won its first American Music Award for this song just last month. The concert was full of energy and kept the crowd involved from beginning to end as the band performed hits like “Round Here,� which recently hit No. 1 on the country charts. Florida Georgia Line left the stage with an encore performance of “Cruise,� as confetti filled the air. If this duo continues with the level of fan appreciation shown in Knoxville, they’ll be here to stay.

Hollywood Movie Producers visit UT

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Claire’s Take: Four movie producers, including UT’s own Matt Milam, came to the Hodges Library Auditorium and talked film, the business and how to make your way into the scary yet thrilling world of Hollywood. Each brought a unique perspective to cinema and encouraged everyone in attendance to follow their filmmaking passion. They also didn’t give any illusion of glamor or glitz, but instead emphasized the importance of hard work and connections in getting work in the highlycompetitive film industry.

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Monday, December 2, 2013 Sports Editor David Cobb

SPORTS

dcobb3@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron tprovost@utk.edu

‘Splash plays’ return, propel Vols offense in season finale B4A Dargan Southard Copy Editor Lexington, Ky. – With unique phrases like ‘snap and clear,’ ‘indisputable role understanding’ and ‘eye discipline’ constantly infiltrating press conferences and interviews, Tennessee followers have needed a Butch Jones-personalized dictionary to comprehend all the unusual sayings the first-year head coach has implemented during his inaugural season in Knoxville. But during UT’s recent four game losing streak — a stretch that saw the Vols struggle offensively while being outscored 14546 — one of Jones’ go-to sayings all but disappeared from his arsenal of words. ‘Splash plays.’ Used to describe explosive, high-yardage gains, the earlyseason favorite of Jones returned in full effect Saturday evening as UT ripped off six plays of 25 yards or more — three going for touchdowns — en route to a 27-14 win over Kentucky at Commonwealth Stadium. “That’s something that’s kind of been missing in our offense, that consistent style of big plays,” Jones said. “We see what happens when we create big plays.

It creates momentum and touchdowns obviously. “I think we’ve been due. We’ve been due for a while.” The ‘splash play’ resurrection began just moments after the opening kickoff as tailback Rajion Neal broke off a 60-yard ground score on UT’s second offensive snap of the game. Two drives later, it was Jason Croom’s 43-yard juggling touchdown catch that upped the big play counter to two. “Rajion Neal getting us started, getting us some momentum ... and then the concentration that Jason Croom had on the long touchdown pass (was huge),” Jones said. “When you go on the road, we always talk about you’re responsible for creating your own momentum.” Midway through the second quarter, the redshirt freshman wide receiver would add another long grab — a 31-yard reception with UT backed up against its own end zone — before exiting with a broken collarbone. One ‘splash play’, however, would soon set up another. Just minutes later, quarterback Joshua Dobbs faked the handoff on the read-option and bolted around right tackle before gliding to the end zone nearly untouched for a 40-yard score.

The run was the longest by a UT signal caller since Alan Cockrell’s 43-yard touchdown rush versus LSU in 1983. Miller time: Early in his Volunteer career, Corey Miller was reminded who owned the UT single-game sack record. “Well I was told my freshman year as soon as I came in that it was Reggie White,” Miller said, “but it’s one of those things that I didn’t think much of it.” That very well may change. In his final performance as a Volunteer, the senior defensive end sacked Kentucky quarterback Maxwell Smith 4.5 times — four solo and one combined — breaking White’s single-game record of four quarterback takedowns, set in 1983. “I didn’t find out until I walked into the locker room,” Miller said. “I’m speechless about it because you never think something like that is going to happen, especially in the last game of your career.” Fellow defensive lineman Daniel Hood wasn’t quite as surprised. “Corey Miller had a heck of a week of practice,” Hood said. “He knew he was going to be able to come in and make some plays tonight against their offensive line, and he did it. It was just impressive to watch him.”

Late in the fourth quarter, the Wellford, S.C., native capped off his record-setting day in fine fashion as the final sack of his UT tenure forced a fumble deep in Wildcat territory. Miller, though, took little of the credit. “That was A.J.’s (Johnson) play right there,” Miller said. “We called a certain play where he comes down and picks the center, I just stepped to the left and wrapped, and (the ball) happened to come free.” The other guys: With Marquez North inactive and Croom exiting early, the UT passing attack was forced to look elsewhere for consistent productivity and additional ‘splash plays.’ Enter Devrin Young and Johnathon Johnson. The two combined for 101 yards on six catches, with Young corralling a third quarter touchdown that pushed UT’s lead to 20. “It give me confidence, and most importantly, it builds trust with the coaches,” Young said. “Showing them that they can count on you, that just makes me feel good.” Johnson set up the Young score with a 26-yard reception on third down that put the Vols inside UK territory.

Lady Vols rout SMU, claim Junkanoo Jam title Staff Report The No. 3 Tennessee Lady Vols used a big second half to defeat the SMU Mustangs, 87-47, on Friday, winning the Lucaya Division championship of the 11th-annual Junkanoo Jam. That final 20 minutes that saw the Lady Vols outscore the Mustangs 48-20 was due mainly to the team’s hot shooting as they rebounded from a first half in which they shot 38.5 percent, to shooting 55.9 percent from the field in the second period of action.

Junior point guard Ariel Massengale led all scorers with 16 points to go along with a team-high five assists. The Bolingbrook, Ill., native shot 5-for-11 from the field. Sophomore forward Bashaara Graves posted her second doubledouble of the year with 10 points and 10 assists. Junior center Isabelle Harrison had 10 points, coming off a big surge early in the second half and played just seven minutes because of foul trouble. Sophomore forward Jasmine Jones was strong off the bench, scoring 13 points off 5-of-8 shooting and corralling four rebounds. Tennessee outrebounded the

Mustangs 54-31 in the game. To get the opportunity to play for the Lucaya Division championship, the Lady Vols first had to defeat the Virginia Cavaliers in their opening game in Freeport, Bahamas on Thursday. The Lady Vols overcame a four-point deficit going into halftime as senior guard Meighan Simmons shot the lights out – the start of the second half was actually delayed due to a power outage that lasted roughly four minutes – and tied a career-high as she drained eight 3-pointers and scored a total of 32 points. Massengale also helped lead the charge offensively as she

dished out a career-best 13 assists and scored 10 points for her second career double-double. Defensively, the Lady Vols also did their part as the Cavaliers shot 44.8 percent in the first half, but were limited to 32.4 percent in the second half. The win marked UT’s first holiday tournament title since winning the 2005 Paradise Jam during Thanksgiving break in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Up next for Tennessee are the Texas Longhorns on Dec. 8 at Thompson-Boling Arena. The game is set for a 1 p.m. tip-off and it will be televised on FOX Sports South.

continued from Page 1 Even with the poor shooting performance, senior forward Jordan McRae rallied from a quiet first period and did everything he could to keep Tennessee in the game as he scored 17 of his 22 points in the second half. His effort, however, went for naught as the rest of the team continued to struggle, and the Vols fell, 78-70. Friday’s matchup faired much better for the Vols. Twelve hours after the squad’s loss to UTEP, UT found itself in a rematch against Xavier, who defeated the Vols 67-63 in its

FOOTBALL RECAP continued from Page 1 The victory marked the first true road victory for the Vols since Nov. 20, 2010, when they defeated the Commodores. It also allowed UT to avoid their first eight loss season in the history of the program. As for the future of the program, the page has already been

season opener on Nov. 12. Stokes and fellow forward Jeronne Maymon took control from the opening tip and combined to score 34 points and gather 16 rebounds, as Tennessee was able to exact some revenge by dominating the post and defeating the Musketeers, 64-49. McRae added 16 points of his own, shooting 6-of-15 from the field. In their three games, the Vols outrebounded every one of their opponents and had a rebounding margin of plus-36. Next up for the Vols will be a home matchup against the Tennessee Tech Golden Eagles inside Thompson-Boling Arena on Saturday at noon. turned toward Team 118 as Jones already has his mind set on getting better next season. “I want to continue to stay positive and move forward, but it’s expected that we go to bowl games from here on out,” Jones said. “That’s our goal. We’re going to have some time off and take advantage of the time we have moving forward and we’ll be back and right into our offseason strength and conditioning program on Monday.”

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