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Friday, November 16, 2012

Issue 59, Volume 121

Event advocates smoke-free lifestyle ‘Smokeout’ educates students on Pedestrian Manuela Haddad Contributor What if there was one day every year when people quit smoking? This idea follows what the Safety Environment and Education Center was aiming for yesterday when it held its first annual “Great American Smokeout” on Pedestrian Walkway. The event was used to remind people of the risks involved with tobacco use and to encourage them to quit smoking on that day, if even only for that day. Siera Seward, senior in psychology, noted that the event probably wouldn’t get people to completely quit smoking but that it would encourage them to try. “I wouldn’t say that it would completely halt everything … but I think it really does help make a first step,” she said. Millions of Americans have a regular habit of smoking. It’s not uncommon to see students walking around campus with a cigarette in their hands. However, tobacco use has many negative consequences, and according to the UTK campus events website, it “remains the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death in the U.S.” The S.E.E. Center made an effort to remind students of these risks by passing out “quit smoking” packets and displaying facts about

smoking on their booth. “One of the things we want to do is educate students of the effects smoking has on their body,” said Rosa Thomas, a coordinator for the S.E.E. Center. “When a person smokes cigarettes, that smoke goes through their whole body and their lungs. Cigarette smoking leads to so many health problems.” Chloe Ashley, a first year graduate student in public health, thinks people should try to quit smoking, and booths like the one the S.E.E. Center has set up can help, but it’s ultimately up to the smoker to make the decision to quit. “I think you should quit while you’re ahead … I think it’s more of a personal choice to stop,” she said. Rosa understands that there are appealing reasons to start smoking. “I think a lot of women start smoking because they see it as a way to lose weight,” she said. “They feel if they keep a cigarette in their mouth, they’re keeping food out.” Seward mentioned that both internal and external factors can drive people to start smoking. “I think it’s due to a lot of stress, and also environmental factors — with friends, they think it’s the cool thing to do,” she said. Thomas also mentioned another lesser known but equally dangerous method of tobacco intake: hookah. A hookah is like a large pipe with an attached hose that is used to smoke tobacco. “A lot of people have been going to the hookah lounge, and they don’t think it’s dan-

File Photo • The Daily Beacon

A student smokes hookah in the Humanities Amphitheatre on Monday, Sept. 12, 2011.

gerous,” she said, citing two hookah lounges near campus that are popular with some students. Thomas noted that smoking hookah for an hour is the equivalent of smoking 200 cigarettes. Another danger involved with hookah use is the possibility of contracting a disease, such as mono or bronchitis, from a sick person who has used the same hookah previously. An American Cancer Society brochure

Unique event benefits diabetes

included in the packets the S.E.E. Center was handing out mentioned several benefits of quitting smoking: after 12 hours of not smoking, the carbon monoxide level in a person’s blood drops to normal; one year after quitting, the excess risk of heart disease becomes half that of someone who still smokes; and 15 years after quitting, the risk of heart disease is the same as that of a non-smoker.

Professor speaks on history, importance of photojournalism Samantha Smoak Staff Writer

Christopher Elizer • The Daily Beacon

Sororities lip sync and choreograph for the “24th Annual Battle of the Bands” in the University Center Auditorium on Wednesday.

Christopher Elizer Staff Writer

David Cobb Assistant News Editor According to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF), 15,000 children and 15,000 adults each year, or 80 people per day, are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in the United States. To combat the disease, Delta Tau Delta fraternity held its “Battle of the Bands” philanthropy event Wednesday night in the UC auditorium. Ticket sales went to benefit the

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JDRF which the fraternity adopted last year, according to Connor Dugosh, a sophomore in philosophy and the fraternity’s philanthropy chair. “I thought that a concert-like experience could generate a lot of energy and competition among participants,” said Dugosh, about his idea for the event. Nine sororities performed with acts ranging from renditions of ‘N Sync to the Spice Girls. Mackenzie Evens, junior in public administration and Phi Mu’s philanthropy and Lip Sync chair, said it was the most fun philanthropy event she had participated in. “There were less rules in this than “Lip Sync,” which meant less pressure

and more fun for us,” she said. But according to Jake Smith, sophomore in journalism and electronic media and brother of Delta Tau Delta, Alpha Chi Omega’s winning routine had plenty of synchronization. “I think what gave Alpha Chi Omega the win,” Smith said, “was the overall coordination of their routine and the effort they showed in the spirit portion of the competition.” Results were based on the judges’ score sheets, which included categories for performance, costumes and crowd spirit. According to Dugosh, the competition was extremely close. See BOTB on Page 3

Since October 2010, the popular photo-sharing site, Instagram, has grown to 80 million users who have shared nearly four billion photos, according to Instagram’s official blog. With the advent of the cell phone camera, everyone has become a photographer. Robert Heller, a professor in the School of Journalism and Electronic Media at UT, will be presenting a lecture at the Science Forum today on the history of photojournalism. Dr. Mark Littmann, who oversees the UT Science Forum, invited Heller to speak because his enthusiasm inspires students. “(Professor Heller) is ... beloved by his students because he is a great artist with astonishing insight that he shares with his students,” said Littmann. “He is a remarkable speaker and listener, and ... he cares about his students.” Littmann also believes that an audience beyond Heller’s students will enjoy hearing the lecture. “I love to hear him speak and I knew that (the) UT

Science Forum audiences would too, and … photojournalism involves technology as well as art, and is therefore appropriate for the UT Science Forum,” he said. Heller’s passion for photography and photojournalism stems from his childhood, where he recalls the magic that came out of the dark room his father had in their home. He went on to earn his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in photojournalism from Syracuse University. He now teaches photojournalism and graphic design at UT and is the resident expert in visual communication. Heller’s lecture will preview what he teaches in his photojournalism classes. The lecture will focus on an overview of photojournalism, as indicated in the title of the lecture, “A Brief Yet Incomplete History of Photojournalism.” “It’s not meant to be a complete look at the history, it’s relatively short, but what I’ve done is gathered some highlights from the history of photojournalism that I find particularly interesting,” said Heller. See PHOTO on Page 3

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Friday, November 16, 2012

2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Associate Editor Preston Peeden

IN SHORT

ppeeden@utk.edu

Managing Editor Emily DeLanzo

edelanzo@utk.edu

Around Rocky Top

TreDarius Hayes • The Daily Beacon

Miroslav Hristov, assistant professor in music, strums the violin with Chih Long Hu, playing the piano, during a music recital in the Alumni Memorial Building on Monday.

TreDarius Hayes • The Daily Beacon Jalynn Baker • The Daily Beacon

A student walks past scenic trees changing colors near Andy Holt Avenue on Oct. 25. The fall semester will officially come to an end on Dec. 4.

Dr. Gregory Downs, associate professor of history at the City College of New York, discusses the meaning of wartime and peace after the Civil War in the Baker Center on Wednesday.

1532 — Pizarro traps Incan emperor Atahualpa

• Photo courtesy of heritage.com

On November 16, 1532, Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish explorer and conquistador, springs a trap on the Incan emperor, Atahualpa. With fewer than 200 men against several thousand, Pizarro lures Atahualpa to a feast in the emperor’s honor and then opens fire on the unarmed Incans. Pizarro’s men massacre the Incans and capture Atahualpa, forcing him to convert to Christianity before eventually killing him. Pizarro’s timing for conquest was perfect. By 1532, the Inca Empire was embroiled in a civil war that had decimated the population and divided the people’s loyalties. Atahualpa, the younger son of former Incan ruler Huayna Capac, had just deposed his half-brother Huascar and was in the midst of reuniting his kingdom when Pizarro arrived in 1531, with the endorsement of Spain’s King Charles V. On his way to the Incan capital, Pizarro learned of the war and began recruiting soldiers still loyal to Huascar. Pizarro met Atahualpa just outside Cajamarca, a small Incan town tucked into a valley of the Andes. Sending his brother Hernan as an envoy, Pizarro invited Atahualpa back to Cajamarca for a feast in honor of Atahualpa's ascendance to the throne. Though he had nearly 80,000 soldiers with him in the mountains,

Atahualpa consented to attend the feast with only 5,000 unarmed men. He was met by Vicente de Valverde, a friar traveling with Pizarro. While Pizarro’s men lay in wait, Valverde urged Atahualpa to convert and accept Charles V as sovereign. Atahualpa angrily refused, prompting Valverde to give the signal for Pizarro to open fire. Trapped in tight quarters, the panicking Incan soldiers made easy prey for the Spanish. Pizarro’s men slaughtered the 5,000 Incans in just an hour. Pizarro himself suffered the only Spanish injury: a cut on his hand sustained as he saved Atahualpa from death. Realizing Atahualpa was initially more valuable alive than dead, Pizarro kept the emperor in captivity while he made plans to take over his empire. In response, Atahualpa appealed to his captors’ greed, offering them a room full of gold and silver in exchange for his liberation. Pizarro consented, but after receiving the ransom, Pizarro brought Atahualpa up on charges of stirring up rebellion. By that time, Atahualpa had played his part in pacifying the Incans while Pizarro secured his power, and Pizarro considered him disposable. Atahualpa was to be burned at the stake — the Spanish believed this to be a fitting death for a heathen — but at the last moment, Valverde offered the emperor clemency if he would convert. Atahualpa submitted, only to be executed by strangulation. The day was August 29, 1533. 1959 — “The Sound of Music” premieres on Broadway Did the young Austrian nun named Maria really take to the hills surrounding Salzburg to sing spontaneously of her love of music? Did she comfort herself with thoughts of copper kettles, and did she swoon to her future husband’s song about an alpine flower while the creeping menace of Nazism spread across central Europe? No, the real-life Maria von Trapp did none of those things. She was indeed a former nun, and she did

indeed marry Count Georg von Trapp and become stepmother to his large brood of children, but nearly all of the particulars she related in her 1949 book, “The Story of the Trapp Family Singers,” were ignored by the creators of the Broadway musical her memoir inspired. And while the liberties taken by the show’s writers, Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse, and by its composer and lyricist, Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, caused some consternation to the real Maria von Trapp and to her stepchildren, according to many later reports, those liberties made “The Sound of Music” a smash success from the very night of its Broadway opening on this day in 1959. With a creative team made up of Broadway legends and a star as enormously popular and bankable as Mary Martin, it was no surprise that “The Sound of Music” drew enormous advance sales. But audiences continued to flock to “The Sound of Music” despite sometimes tepid reviews, like the one in The New York Times that said the show “lack(ed) the final exultation that marks the difference between a masterpiece and a well-produced musical entertainment.” Reviewer Brooks Atkinson did, however, single out the “affecting beauty” of the music from “The Sound of Music” as saving it from a story verging on “sticky.” Sticky or no, “The Sound of Music” was an instant success, and numerous songs from its score — including “Do Re Mi,” “My Favorite Things” and “Climb Every Mountain” — quickly entered the popular canon. Indeed, the original cast recording of “The Sound of Music” was nearly as big a phenomenon as the show itself. Recorded just a week after the show’s premiere on this day in 1959 and released by Columbia Records, the album shot to the top of the Billboard album charts on its way to selling upwards of 3 million copies worldwide. — This Day in History is courtesy of History.com.


Friday, November 16, 2012

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 News Editor RJ Vogt

CAMPUS NEWS

rvogt@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor David Cobb

dcobb3@utk.edu

PHOTO continued from Page 1 Heller believes that many people will be interested in the topic given the prevalence of photography in the everyday lives of people. “Everybody seems to be a photographer these days, everybody carries their cell phone camera with them, everybody posts pictures on Facebook and Instragram, so I would think that there would be a broad interest in topics that have to do with photography, whether it’s ‘How do I become a

File Photo • The Daily Beacon

Robert Heller, professor in photojournalism, teaches a class outside in Circle Park on Mar. 27.

BOTB continued from Page 1 “We had four bands fight for the top spot by a really close margin,” Dugosh said. “The UC auditorium was sold out for the first time ever. We still have money to count. It includes ticket sales, T-shirt sales, donations and participation fees. We should end up (with) around $2500-2800.” A bigger venue, more performances and maybe even some music videos are all possible plans for the event in the future. “We definitely plan on doing this again due to how successful it was,” Dugosh said. The reception has been fantastic and we aim to

better photographer?’ or ‘Where did this all start?,’” he said. Heller’s enthusiasm for photojournalism shines through when he gives his lectures. “I’ll be talking about the first photograph ever made that still exists today ... imagine with that millions upon billions of photographs made every year ... can all trace their heritage back to that one photograph. ... I think it’s a fascinating story,” Heller said. Heller’s lecture will take place today from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in dining room C-D in the Thompson-Boling Arena. The Science Forum is free and open to all UT students, faculty, staff and the general public.

make the event bigger and better for next year.” Smith was also was pleased with “Battle of The Bands” and the reception that it received. “It was a great event with a better turnout than any of us could’ve expected,” Smith said. “The sororities showed a lot of support for JDRF and our fraternity. We were very pleased with the effort put forth in the performances on stage and heard a lot of good comments from the participants.” Dugosh said the best part of it all was selling out an auditorium for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation on World Diabetes Day. “Our chapter,” Dugosh said, “is extremely grateful for all of the sororities putting forth so much effort for a great cause.”

Canadian monk to lecture on Buddhist worldview, ideas Graham Gibson Staff Writer

• Photo courtesy of J. Miles Cary

Robert Heller discusses his project on Holocaust survivors in 2007.

Vol graduate wins award Staff Report Former Vol and current New York Mets knuckleballer R.A. Dickey has been named the 2012 National League Cy Young Award winner, presented Wednesday by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America. The first knuckleballer to ever win the Cy Young Award, Dickey finished the season with 20-6 record and 2.73 ERA, while leading the league in strikeouts (230), innings pitched (233.2), complete games (five), shutouts (three) and quality starts (27). His ERA was second in the league to only the Los Angeles Dodgers’ Clayton Kershaw (2.53), and he trailed only Gio Gonzalez of the Washington Nationals in wins (21). With fellow Nashville native and SEC product David Price (Vanderbilt) winning the AL Cy Young Award, there have now been four former SEC pitchers

to claim the honors. They join Arkansas’ Cliff Lee (AL - 2008) and Brandon Webb of Kentucky (NL - 2006) as Cy Young winners. Dickey, who was coached by current UT head coach Dave Serrano and assistant coach Bill Mosiello during his time as a Vol, joined Ben Cantwell (1933) and Tommy Bridges (1934-36) as the only Tennessee players to win 20 games in the Major Leagues. The third-oldest player in MLB history to record 20 wins in a season, Dickey is also the first knuckleball pitcher to hit the threshold since Joe Niekro went 20-11 in 1980 with the Houston Astros. Dickey is the first Mets pitcher with 20 wins since Frank Viola in 1990. Dickey, who was inducted into the Tennessee Baseball Hall of Fame in January, is the only threetime First Team AllAmerican in Tennessee baseball history earning the honors each year from 1994-96. He was also a two-

time first team All-SEC selection and an academic All-American following his junior year. In addition, he was a member of the bronze-medal winning 1996 USA Olympic Team in Atlanta. During his time at Rocky Top, Dickey wrote his name in the UT record book as the career leader in wins, appearances, games started, innings pitched and strikeouts. Dickey also holds the school single-season records for wins and innings pitched and ranks third for strikeouts. For more information about Tennessee baseball, follow @Vol_Baseball on Twitter or visit UTSports.com/baseball. You can also like the Vols on Facebook at www.facebook.com/volbaseball.

On Friday, Ajahn Punnadhammo, a Canadian monk, will give a lecture in the McClung Museum Auditorium at 2:30 p.m. Punnadhammo, the resident monk of a Canadian monastery, will deliver a lecture entitled, “The Buddhist Worldview and Its Relation to Practice,” in conjunction with the current exhibit in place in the McClung Museum, “Zen Buddhism and the Arts of Japan.” Buddhist practice refers to meditation and the various states of consciousness that can be achieved through such meditation. Punnadhammo is the resident bhikkhu of Arrow River Forest Hermitage of the Thai Forest Tradition, located in Northern Ontario, and is currently working on a book about Buddhist cosmology with an emphasis on the Buddhist worldview as present in the Pali Canon, the earliest Buddhist scripture. His lecture will discuss Buddhist art as well as the Buddhist ideas on impermanence, and will emphasize the Buddhist view of the realms of spiritual existence, from the blissful realms of divine beings to the woeful realms of hell beings. “I will briefly outline the early Buddhist concept of the universe as divided into hierarchically stacked realms, and then show how this view informs and underlies the Buddhist practices of ethics and meditation,” Punnadhammo said.

He also believes that his lecture will help build a better understanding of Buddhism and its beliefs. “In my view, Buddhist cosmology is a fascinating mythological structure that has been hitherto mostly ignored in the western world,” Punnadhammo said. “A familiarity with the mythical universe of early Buddhist would help to round out people’s understanding of Buddhism and illustrate many theoretical and practical aspects in a symbolic way.” Dr. Brian Carniello, professor in history at UT and organizer of the lecture, sees it as a way for students to better understand a different worldview. “As an instructor of world civilization for four years at (UT), I am excited about this opportunity for students to learn about a worldview that has been important to many people around the world and that can be an interesting comparison to other worldviews,” Carniello said. “This talk,” he said, “will relate to Buddhist practice in

the sense that developing a boundless mind means recollecting the full range of possibilities for happiness and unhappiness, many of which are beyond the experiences with which human beings are most commonly in contact, i.e. the experiences of the human and animal realms.” The Losel Shedrup Ling of Knoxville (LSLK), the UT Department of History and the McClung Museum are sponsoring the lecture, which will last approximately one hour and will be followed by a brief question and answer session with Punnadhammo. The event is free and open to the public. Attendees who plan on driving and parking at the event should request a twohour parking permit from the attendant at the entrance to Circle Park for the event. For those who may be interested, Punnadhammo and the LSLK will also be having a retreat that will be open to the public this weekend with an emphasis on meditation practices, the techniques of which can be useful to people of all faiths, beliefs and worldviews.


Friday, November 16, 2012

4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Editor-in-Chief Blair Kuykendall

OPINIONS

bkuykend@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utdailybeacon.com

College-Educated

& Domesticated

Thanksgiving brings gratitude Emily DeLanzo Managing Editor I’m thankful for flush toilets. Paula Deen meatloaf. Corduroy. I’m thankful for my freedom of speech. I have the ability to jabber aimlessly thanks to my military and my great nation. I’m thankful for my father. My father taught me the finer points of comic books, beer and creeper magnets. I have more respect for him than anyone else I have ever encountered in my life. I’m thankful for push-up bras. My mother says it’s false advertising, and to add I have been told it’s quite misleading. These suckers help me fill in the clothes I just can’t. I’m thankful for the National Park Service. That subagency within the government has given me a purpose in life, whether it be to fulfill my lifelong dreams or see every place the United States has to offer. Natalie Portman, I thank you for quality movies and a quality girl crush. Speaking of girl crushes, I’m thanking God for giving the world Beyonce. The song “Countdown” has kept me excited about the future. All I need is a husband and a baby. Hint hint. Wink wink. I’m thankful for my roommates — current and past. From the legitimately smoky summers where I almost burned everything with the aid of an oven to the stressful school year, I have met some pretty incredible people. I’m thankful for razors. My feet are already gross from years of dance, let alone excess fur. For sequins, red lipstick and wool socks. For puppies and cuddling. I’m thankful for the Beacon for giving me countless

friends, memories, angry phone calls and something to be proud of at this university. I’m thankful for a supportive family and enthusiastic friends. I have never gone through a phase in my life and felt alone. And most importantly, I’m thankful knowing I will never fall asleep unloved. I’m thankful for having someone that cares about me, and I’m thankful for my bright future. Wherever you are, I will follow. I’m thankful for the musical genius known as Katy Perry. You obviously knows my joys and woes far better than I know myself. The internet, red cowboy boots, my interdisciplinary program, the hot and ready sign at Krispy Kreme, I thank you. I’m thankful for clean water, breathable air, moments where I find myself in disbelief that I am so lucky and my excessive patriotism at times. I’m thankful for each and every person in my life. I’m thankful to be alive and to be graduating in May. And most importantly, I am thankful that I am happy. Happy Thanksgiving! I’m going to go crawl in a big hole called Mammoth Cave National Park this next week. Pumpkin Pie 3/4 cup sugar 1 1/2 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 can pumpkin 1 1/4 cups evaporated milk 2 eggs, beaten 1 graham cracker crust Heat oven to 425°F. In large bowl, mix filling ingredients. Pour into pie crust. Bake 15 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350°F; bake 40 to 50 minutes longer or until knife inserted near center comes out clean. Cool 2 hours. — Emily DeLanzo is a senior in environmental studies. She can be reached at edelanzo@utk.edu.

SCRAMBLED EGGS • Alex Cline

PALM TREES AND FISHBOWLS • Anna Simanis

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Greater issues than Petraeus affair Chao s Theory by

Sarah Russell Our country is in the aftermath of a highly polarized election and is seeking to determine the best way to proceed. We are dealing with the “fiscal cliff,” the rebuilding of communities destroyed by Hurricane Sandy, a still-high unemployment rate and a contentious situation abroad. And yet, every time I turn on the radio or open a newspaper, I am not bombarded with discussions and debates about these serious and pertinent issues. Instead, I get to learn all about David Petraeus’s sex life. At first, given the enormous media attention, I suspected a conspiracy. Was the FBI trying to cover up something much more serious than an extramarital affair? Are General John Allen, who commands troops in Afghanistan, and Jill Kelley of Tampa somehow involved with the affair? Does Paula Broadwell hold the key to world domination, and is she consequently threatening to blackmail the former CIA director? Is our country at risk because a man cheated on his wife? I do not mean to undermine the criticality of any threat to national security. Regardless of my personal opinions about classified information in regards to First Amendment rights, it is indeed an issue if Mrs. Broadwell is using her point of power in this affair to manipulate Petraeus, if that is in fact what she is doing. As it stands, the CIA and the press have provided no evidence to back up the assertion that Petraeus’s affair is a threat to America’s security, nor have they indicated that General Allen or Kelley are somehow involved in the affair. It is not clear that there will ever be evidence proving that this affair threatens

our safety. The explosion of this story says far less about the state of our national security and much more about our country’s unusual perceptions of sex as an indicator of honesty. Silvio Berlusconi of Italy and Nicolas Sarkozy of France hardly had stellar sexual reputations, but neither felt the need to resign from their prominent positions when news of their scandals reached the public. America is one of the few countries where a leader’s sex life is seen as an unquestionable indicator of that person’s ability to do his or her job. Clinton’s indiscretions prompted an impeachment trial, and there are far more senators than are worth mentioning in a paragraph who have resigned from their positions because of sex scandals. I have written about the powerful nature of scandals before, and the Petraeus affair is no different; we love to read about the moral wrong-doings of those in power and to pass judgment about their qualifications as a result. Unfortunately, the fact that David Petraeus had an affair makes him no different from many other men and women. Hurting someone is morally wrong, and adultry does just that. But on a practical level, why should Petraeus’s sexual activities be inextricably tied to his success as a general and as the director of the CIA? Until it is proven that Broadwell knows top-secret information and intends to reveal it, the Petraeus affair is little more than a story of a man who did not hide his indiscretion well enough. I fail to be shocked at a top intelligence officer having an affair with his biographer. Publicizing such scandals does not achieve the moral message that the pundits intend; it does little more than make a spectacle of a man who did his job and made a mistake, albeit a big one. He did not need to resign to be punished; being dragged through the mud for weeks in the press will be punishment enough. — Sarah Russell is a senior in history. She can be reached at srusse22@utk.edu.

Meaning lies behind O’Reilly’s words Bur den o f I n fa l l i b i l i t y by

Wiley Robinson

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Blair Kuykendall editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com

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The Daily Beacon is published by students at The University of Tennessee Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters and Tuesday and Friday during the summer semester.The offices are located at 1340 Circle Park Drive,11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The newspaper is free on campus and is available via mail subscription for $200/year, $100/semester or $70/summer only. It is also available online at: www.utdailybeacon.com. LETTERS POLICY: The Daily Beacon welcomes all letters to the editor and guest columns from students, faculty and staff. Each submission is considered for publication by the editor on the basis of space, timeliness and clarity. Contributions must include the author’s name and phone number for verification. Students must include their year in school and major. Letters to the editor and guest columns may be e-mailed to letters@utdailybeacon.com or sent to Blair Kuykendall, 1340 Circle Park Dr., 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The Beacon reserves the right to reject any submissions or edit all copy in compliance with available space, editorial policy and style. Any and all submissions to the above recipients are subject to publication.

Did everyone hear what Bill O’Reilly said onair at FOX News during the election count? When Megyn Kelly asked him why the election would be so close, he responded: “Because it’s a changing country, it’s not a traditional America anymore. And there are 50 percent of the voting public who want stuff. They want things. And who is going to give them things? President Obama. He knows it, and he ran on it. “Twenty years ago, President Obama would have been roundly defeated by an establishment candidate like Mitt Romney. The white establishment is now the minority. And the voters, many of them, feel like the economic system is stacked against them, and they want stuff.” He then went on to say how Hispanics, African Americans and women would all “overwhelmingly” vote for Obama. Now, is this seriously just demographic observation and analysis or do his generalizations have a blatantly racist quality to them? And how do we know? Well, let’s see if there’s anything to them. It’s true that minorities voted overwhelmingly for Obama, especially females. According to the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE), a youth research organization at Tufts University, 98 percent of black females voted for Obama, with the next most supportive group being Latinos. Even though their male counterparts were polled as being considerably less enthusiastic, 90 percent of them still voted for Obama over Romney. This is compared to 57 percent of all voters, and 35 percent of all white males. The word “overwhelmingly” was hardly an understatement. But honestly, if O’Reilly is just going to toss women in the minority mix as being an especially culpable flavor of minority, he should also have

cited the 18-29 demographic as just as guilty of being influenced by Obama’s carrion call promising ill-gotten gains for the masses. Out of moral weakness, of course, or a radical, dangerous break from “traditional America,” a peculiar phrase in a country as young as the United States. Youth turnout was huge, and the only youth demographic to favor Romney over Obama were young non-Hispanic white males, voting 54 percent to 40 percent (white women were evenly split). Yet it is true that the Hispanic population is exploding, and Hispanics have recently overtaken blacks as the American minority with the strongest ethnic identity. But they’re also the youngest voting bloc, and with almost a million Hispanics turning 18 every year, their support is being felt much more strongly with every election cycle. So the question remains, were Bill’s statements racist? If statistical demographic analysis itself is not racist, it was still prefaced with the, ahem, qualitative assertion that the “white establishment” is somehow in trouble. Apparently there’s always been a historical white status quo that has lived in a self-sufficient bubble of economic stability — having obviously never given into the dangerous precedent of increased domestic spending — until now, since the country has been hijacked by a selfish, lazy minority agenda with dangerous economic implications. The only things possibly defending the merit of O’Reilly’s refreshing honesty are if the economic dangers of rolling back on austerity and the idea that everyone in the top tax brackets are somehow the country’s prime economic movers are at all accurate. And the reality continues to be the opposite. Just about all entitlements see a direct economic return, and the indirect returns associated with helping people in times of hardship can’t continue to be ignored. They do not drive the deficit. But as long as we’re all being painfully honest, FOX, I look forward to seeing the Republicans attempting to campaign now that their dependence on the “white establishment” is in question. — Wiley Robinson is a senior in ecology and evolutionary biology. He can be rrobin6@utk.edu.


Friday, November 16, 2012

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Arts & Culture Editor Victoria Wright

ARTS & CULTURE

vwright6@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Rob Davis

rdavis60@utk.edu

Students lose popular venues Chris Cable Staff Writer As if nightclubs and music venues weren’t already scarce, the Valarium and CiderHouse will be closing their doors Nov. 25. Needless to say, UT students are shocked at the news, and not in a good way. Most students will say that music venues in Knoxville are few and far between, at least on a large scale like the Valarium. The appeal of nightclubs and music venues is irresistible to students, making the Valarium and CiderHouse two of the premier go-to places for students who are into metal and rock-style music. Amelia Hammons, undecided freshman, is one example

of a surprised student who loved the music played there. “There’s no real place to see the same kind of music the Valarium had to offer,� Hammons said. “It was more than just a venue to the people that went there regularly.� Other students just view the Valarium and CiderHouse closing as nonchalant personally, but still see it as a loss for students. One representation of this is Katie Digangi, junior in English. “It is one less venue in Knoxville. So it will affect the music scene around campus, I suppose,� Digangi said. “I only went to a couple of shows though. I think the last show I went to at the Valarium was John Butler.�

attention from students now that it will have less competition. Students are always looking for more venues to go to, and this will only increase that search. Overall, though students are sad and disappointed right now with the news of the Valarium and CiderHouse closing, they will find other venues that provide the entertainment they want and need. Alternatives that students are already contemplating are the aforementioned Bijou and Tennessee Theatre, NV, as well as The Crown and Goose, Preservation Pub and Tin Roof. “After all of the hype is over it won’t be a huge loss,� Digangi said. “There are always venues coming and going, and this is no exception.�

Maybe there is more to the story than just a closing venue. Perhaps music tastes will change or vary more considering the fact that other venues like the Bijou and Tennessee Theatre don’t host the same types of music that the Valarium has provided. Hammons weighed in, saying, “It is a shame we are losing another venue in Knoxville because there are only a few left as it is.� “NV probably will be a place I’ll go (to) more often now, along with wherever the ‘Midnight Voyage’ ends up going,� Hammons said. The “Midnight Voyage� is a live music extravaganza at the CiderHouse that showcases a myriad of beats from local DJs and producers. Nightclubs such as NV will certainly get more

Students wear Boy band releases classic album blue for awareness Sarah Mynatt Staff Writer With Thanksgiving coming up, students may ponder what they’re thankful for. Things that may come to mind could be family, Vol card money, and a high grade point average. But what about water? “Something that is like air to us is a luxury to other people,� Miranda Jones, senior in English and member of the Wine to Water group on campus, said. “A lot of people have never even heard of global water shortages. It’s not something in our day-to-day lives because water is so easy for us to reach.� The UT Chapter of Wine to Water is hosting “Blue Day Friday� to raise awareness about water scarcity in developing nations. Students are encouraged to wear something blue, whether that be a shirt, scarf or even a hat. They are also asking students to pin a piece of paper to their shirt with the words “why blue� on it in support of “Blue Day.� “It will help to raise awareness for the world water crisis, and hopefully get other people to want to be involved,� Cassandra Shepard, junior in business, said. Wine to Water is an organization that focuses on providing clean water to people in developing nations. The organization builds wells in nations without easy access to water so that peo-

ple can spend less time and energy gathering water from wells that may be hours away. “Over one billion people on our planet lack easy access to clean water, and that is terrible if you think how easy it is for us to turn on a faucet anywhere. There is always water around us,� Jones said. Wine to Water has reached over one hundred thousand people and built wells in 12 different countries that lack access to clean water. Countries such as Sudan, Ethiopia, Cambodia and Uganda have benefitted from the organization’s work. Students who are interested in joining Wine to Water can do so by joining the UT Group’s Wine to Water Facebook page, or by emailing Miranda Jones at mjone139@utk.edu. The club will also be hosting a “Wine to Water Charity Gala� on Nov. 27 in the I-House. Free food will be served, student music majors will be performing at the event, and a Wine to Water spokesperson will also be speaking at the free event. Students, faculty and donors are all invited to attend. Anyone who is interested in helping out should invite donors to the event or donate some kind of food dish or beverage for the event. A table will be set up in the Hodges Library Commons with more information about the Wine to Water group on campus and how to get involved.

wordplay into their music. At this point, most albums would begin to lose momentum and start to become drab, but One Direction stays strong with “Heart Attack.� Starting off slow and average, the booming chorus bursts through and greets you with a fresh reminder of the energy these youngsters possess. A drum beat, similar to that in Queen’s “We Will Rock You,� calls forth the next pulsating track. “Rock Me� exemplifies the band’s ability to play a wide variety of musical styles. Similar handclaps accompany bouncing strings and soothing vocals to produce a chorus that even the youngest of fans can understand and sing along to. Be prepared to return to the arms of One Direction with “Change My Mind.� Light acoustics start off to invoke an air of closeness, while the drums quietly sneak in to establish support. The singer proceeds

rests a little blandly in the back of your mouth. A great transition to the next track leaves the listener on a picnic with band member Ed Sheeran. His serenades do exactly what they were named for. “Little Things� does well as an after-meal mint. It is short and sweet but doesn’t overstay its welcome. “C’mon, C’mon� is representative of extracurricular activities partaken in by youth, otherwise known as “gettin’ up, gettin’ down.� The drums begin to show a little wear in this song, but the angelic harmonies do plenty to make up for it. A catchy beat harkens the coming of the next track, “Last First Kiss.� Skillful guitar playing invokes an aura similar to the Red Hot Chili Pepper’s as One Direction informs their female audience that they would like to be the final “First Kiss.� A smaller secondary award goes to the band for instilling deep

Axel Hranov

Contributor

If there was an award for “most ironic band name,� it would most certainly go to English-Irish boy band One Direction. Through the aural roller coaster that is their new album, “Take Me Home,� listeners will travel up, down, left, cornerways, sideslants, turnways or any other feasible direction into thumping beats and blasting tunes. Happiness, sadness and bliss are only some of the emotions that will be strained to the limit as this thrill-ride of a record comes to a complete, safe stop. The album comes running out of the gates with the upbeat “Live While We’re Young.� Hard-hitting bass drum and firm guitar strumming accompany vocals with energy unseen since the days of ‘N Sync and the Backstreet Boys. Soft interludes bring a nice clash to the song’s usual party tempo. This song promises to be classic, still to be played in cars and clubs for years to come. After the energetic anthem comes “Kiss You.� Effect-heavy chords cause nostalgia for the glory days of high school and teen romance. Apart from a couple of “la-lala’s,� the rest of the track

to serenade the listener about the usual teen lyrical fodder, not reaching much past the “I like you so you should stay with me� stage. “I Would� begins with families of guitar work, giving the listener a mental double-take. While it manages to stay a strong track, the simplicity begins to show through, and before you know it, the song is over. The second half of the record continues to contain similar songs ranging from party anthems to acoustical divertimentos, ramping slightly downwards on an otherwise upward road. One Direction seems to have fresh ideas and a knack for the classic “boy band� — however, it feels like they would work better with longer, less numerous tracks. Their music, while always welcoming and refreshing, tends to overstay its welcome on audible trips through the record. Success is sure to follow this band.

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Friday, November 16, 2012

6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell

SPORTS

lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Vols look for win, hope for bowl game Lauren Kittrell Sports Editor In the aftermath of another conference loss, the Tennessee Volunteers are headed to Nashville to face the Vanderbilt Commodores. Head coach Derek Dooley has been the focus of many rumors, but coaches and players say Dooley isn’t going anywhere. Starting quarterback Tyler Bray said Dooley is going to be at UT for the rest of the season. “We know that he’s here to stay,” Bray said. “We’re just going to try to get these last two wins for him.” Dooley said the experience has been a life lesson for him and for his players. “I think every year you go through life there are a ton of lessons, whether you have success or you don’t have success,” Dooley said. “It is just a matter of being able to see what the lessons are. Sometimes we get blinded by success we have and we don’t see lessons in that, and sometimes we get so consumed with failure that we don’t see any lessons in that. Every day you live, there are lessons to be had on what shapes you as a man and what shapes you as a competitor.” Defensive coordinator Sal Sunseri said the coaches’ mentalities have not changed based on job security. For them, it’s all about doing what they do, and doing it well. “Nothing is going to change,” Sunseri said. “We work right now for (UT) so we are going to work every single day. I’ve been here every morning at 5:30 a.m. and haven’t left until 11p.m. ... at night. That’s what we do.” Fortunately, the rumors haven’t had a great effect on the players. “I know this, kids have been in our meetings and have been bright-eyed, they’ve been going about their business and they are doing what they are supposed to do,” Sunseri said. “That’s what I have seen.” Bray said the team’s consistent fourth-quar-

ter losses are frustrating for the team. He said it’s a matter of improving as a team. “They’re just scoring more points than we are. They’re just executing better than we are,” Bray said. “Defense is not getting stops and offense is just not getting points. It’s always frustrating, we haven’t won like Tennessee is supposed to.” Senior wide receiver Zach Rogers said when things aren’t going their way, it’s easy to get discouraged. “When things are not going our way, it’s very frustrating for us and very disappointing,” Rogers said. “One of these days, things are going to turn around and we’re going to get those fourth-quarter wins like we know how to. So we’ve just got to continue to fight.” Bray said he’s focusing on a Vandy win, especially for seniors like Rogers. “(A win) would mean everything to (the seniors). We sent out the seniors last year with a bad taste, and we don’t want to do that again.” A win over the Commodores is something Rogers is hoping for — not just for himself, but for the team. “I’ve got a lot of family and friends coming to this one,” Rogers said. “I definitely want to do my best to make them proud of me. But at the same time, I’m still fighting for this team and we’re fighting for each other to get these last two wins.” He said he’d love to see the team make it to a bowl game. Watching the games instead of being a part of them was a difficult experience for him last year. “It was tough sitting at home, watching all of those bowl games, knowing that you should be in one of them,” Rogers said. “We don’t want that to happen this year. That was a bad feeling in our stomachs last year. So we’ve just got to come out fighting these next two games and make a bowl game. That’s what’s on our mind right now.”

Tara Sripunvoraskul • The Daily Beacon

Quarterback Tyler Bray sets up for a pass against Missouri on Saturday, Nov. 10.


Friday, November 16, 2012

THE DAILY BEACON • 7 Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell

SPORTS

lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Commodores seek continued streak Scott Fields Contributor Looking to extend the team’s winning streak to five, Vanderbilt (6-4, 4-3 SEC) will have to defeat Tennessee (4-6, 0-6 SEC) for the first time since 2005. Vanderbilt will have to rely on their defense to attempt to keep Tennessee’s offense in check. Their defense currently ranks 16th in the nation while only allowing 18 points a game; however, Tennessee’s offense is 20th in the nation in scoring, averaging 37.9 points per game. “Tennessee has as good of an offense as I’ve seen. The game is played upfront in this league. I think one of the big reasons they’ve been so good is how they’ve been playing on the offensive line. They’re massive. They’ve only given up five sacks all year, and I don't know if I’ve ever heard of something like that before,” said Vanderbilt head coach James Franklin. “Tyler Bray is very accurate and gets rid of the ball quickly. He’s a better athlete than people give him credit for, and does a really good job of buying time in the pocket.” Vanderbilt will have to rely on their core veteran leaders to keep the pressure on. Redshirt-senior defensive end Johnell Thomas and junior safety Kenny Ladler will have to step up and force the Tennessee passing game to make mistakes. “I’ve been watching film and they are a very talented team. Of course, I think they’ve only given up five sacks this year — a very good offensive line,” said Thomas. “They’re talented, but I have so much confidence in Coach (Bob) Shoop and his play calling that I feel pretty confident about this game and

going in to it. I’m looking forward to seeing what this week will bring us.” Though the key to the game for the Commodores may lie in shutting down the high-powered Tennessee offense, it is Vanderbilt’s offense that can be the final difference maker in this matchup. The combination of redshirt-senior quarterback Jordan Rodgers and junior wide receiver Jordan Matthews are set to expose Tennessee’s 113th ranked defense allowing an average of 37 points a game. “I feel in the last couple of games we’ve made strides to get more in the direction of where this passing game needs to be from an efficiency standpoint,” said Rodgers. “It’s always good when you don’t turn the ball over, but the more positive plays and higher completion percentage, the better this offense can be.” One of the keys to the game for the Vanderbilt offense is to get senior running back Zac Stacy on rhythm after having missed the rest of the team’s last game against Ole Miss after just his second carry of the game. If he is unable to play, Vanderbilt will be forced to rely on freshman Brian Kimbrow, who only has 396 yards and 3 touchdowns on the season. “It’s going to be a tremendous challenge, especially with their offense and the challenges they pose to our defense with their size, speed and athleticism,” said Franklin. “One of the things we try to do is pressure the quarterback, and they’re not allowing any pressure on the quarterback. I know our guys are excited about the opportunity and ready to play in our home stadium.” The Commodores will attempt to break Tennessee’s winning streak against them Saturday, 7 p.m. ET, at Vanderbilt Stadium.

• Photo courtesy of James Tatum / The Vanderbilt Hustler

Wide receiver Jordan Matthews streaks down the field against Florida on Oct. 13.


Friday, November 16, 2012

8 • THE DAILY BEACON

SPORTS FIRST PLACE Austin Bornheim Assistant Sports Editor Tennessee 30 - Vanderbilt 31 Syracuse - Missouri Texas Tech - Oklahoma St. Stanford - Oregon USC 31 - UCLA 21

Overall: 38-17

FIRST PLACE Emily Delanzo Managing Editor Tennessee 28 - Vanderbilt 31 Syracuse - Missouri Texas Tech - Oklahoma St. Stanford - Oregon USC 21 - UCLA 17

Overall: 38-17

SECOND PLACE Preston Peeden Associate Ed. Tennessee 28 - Vanderbilt 24 Syracuse - Missouri Texas Tech - Oklahoma St. Stanford - Oregon USC 34 - UCLA 17

Overall: 37-18

SECOND PLACE David Cobb Asst. News Editor Tennessee 45 - Vanderbilt 17 Syracuse - Missouri Texas Tech - Oklahoma St. Stanford - Oregon USC 51 - UCLA 38

Overall: 37-18

THIRD PLACE Lauren Kittrell Sports Editor Tennessee 24 - Vanderbilt 28 Syracuse - Missouri Texas Tech - Oklahoma St. Stanford - Oregon USC 34 - UCLA 17

Overall: 36-19

DEAD STINKIN’ LAST Casey Lawrence Ad Sales Tennessee 30 - Vanderbilt 27 Syracuse - Missouri Texas Tech - Oklahoma St. Stanford - Oregon USC 36 - UCLA 39

Overall: 35-20

Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Lady Vols sail past Rice 101-48 Patrick MacCoon Staff Writer The Lady Vols looked rather poised for their first regular season game at home with an entirely new starting lineup this year, not to mention Pat Summitt’s presence gone from the team bench. In her first official season home opener, Holly Warlick’s 24th ranked team ran away with a 101-48 victory over Rice on Thursday night. The game featured two of the youngest teams in the country. Junior guard Meighan Simmons led the way in scoring with 22 points and sophomore forward Isabelle Harrison finished with 16 points and 12 rebounds, for her second double-double on the season. Both shot 8-of-12 from the field and were key factors in bringing home the victory. “For me I think it means a lot because it’s starting her legacy,” Simmons said of what it meant to be a part of Warlick’s first ever home victory as head coach. “Holly is just one of those coaches that wants to be a great coach and be a great asset to us and

not a liability. She wants the best for us.” The two teams exchanged buckets early on. Lady Owls junior forward Jessica Kuster, who was tabbed preseason Conference-USA player of the year, sunk all five of her first attempts from the field and her jumper with 13:51 put Rice ahead by the score of 16-12. Kuster led the Lady Owls in the game with 16 points, but that wouldn’t be nearly enough. Harrison had an answer on the other end for the Lady Vols (2-1), as she banked in a highly contested shot the possession after for her seventh and eighth points of the first half. Freshman guard Andraya Carter hit her first three-point basket of her career and her intensity on defense created havoc for the Lady Owls. Harrison continued her dominant force down low as she scored two offensive possessions in a row keying the Lady Vols 18-0 run, which lasted over a span of five minutes resulting in a 34-22 lead. Simmons capped off a very impressive first half on offense for the Lady Vols, as she

kissed a three-pointer from the right wing off the glass with ten seconds left. UT took a comfortable 45-27 lead into the break at half. Harrison led the Lady Vols scorers in the first half with 12 points and also hauled in seven rebounds. Her offense was not the only thing she provided her team with, but leadership as well. “Isabelle has really grown a lot since last year,” Simmons said. “She’s made an impact on these younger freshmen who are post players. She goes out there and does her job and does it very well.” The Lady Vols wouldn’t let up in the second half either on offense or the defensive end. Simmons, Harrison and freshman forward Bashaara Graves continued to lead the offensive attack. The three combined for 27 points in the Lady Vols 29-11 run in the first eight minutes of the second half and from there they would cruise to victory. The Lady Vols next matchup will be against No. 23 Miami (2-0) at 2:05 pm Sunday afternoon.

Lady Vols looking for win Bradley Naslund Contributor Coming off their final road match and a win against South Carolina, the Lady Vols (19-6, 12-4) extended their win streak to five as they prepare for Friday’s match against Auburn (17-9, 8-8). Tennessee has been surging the last month after somewhat of a slow start to the season. After beginning their 2012 campaign with a 9-5, 2-3 record, the Lady Vols have won 10 of their last 11 matches, defeating the SEC’s top two teams, Florida and Texas A&M, in the process. They will have a great opportunity to extend the streak and finish the season strong with their remaining four matches taking place at home over the next week. The last month has been all about establishing consistency for the Lady Vols. Tennessee head coach Rob Patrick emphasized this in practice Wednesday night. “The biggest thing is that we’ve been playing more consistently,” said Patrick. “We’re

making less errors, and we’re knowing where to go on the court and who’s going to take which ball when it comes over.” Patrick also made note of the team’s health having a big impact on the season. “We had a lot of kids out, and it takes time to get them up to speed again. We’ve been able to play with a fairly stable lineup for a while now, and that’s something that has allowed us to play more consistently.” Despite a conference record of just 8-8, Auburn has won four of its last five matches against SEC opponents. Patrick and the Lady Vols know Friday’s match will be no easy task. “Auburn is a really good team,” said Patrick. “They have some great athletes who are very, very quick and really aggressive. We have to be able to slow them down, and we have to do it in multiple ways. We have to do it with our serves, with our blocks, and with our digging.” Junior Ellen Mullins was in the news Monday when she was named SEC CoDefensive Player of the Week. This made for her third defensive player of the week award

for the season. “I couldn’t do it without my team and their support,” said Mullins. “I’m really proud of myself and my team.” Mullins kept her focus directed at Friday’s match and on the rest of the season. “A big thing we’ve been saying is ‘protect the streak.’ We’ve been making a huge surge the second half of the season. We’re just focusing on Auburn, taking one game at a time and learning the game plan.” Friday will mark Patrick’s 500th match with the team. “Someone told me that my 500th match was coming up, and it went in one ear and right out the other because I’m so focused on one match at a time,” said Patrick. “I’ve absolutely loved every single minute of my time here. It’s gone by so fast that I can’t even imagine that we’ve played 500 matches. The administration has been very good to me, and I can’t thank them enough.” The Lady Vols hope to get Patrick a win for his 500th match with Tennessee when they face Auburn Friday night at 7 p.m. in Thompson-Boling Arena.


The Daily Beacon  

The editorially independent student newspaper of the University of Tennessee

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