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INSIDE THE DAILY BEACON

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NEWS OPINIONS ARTS & CULTURE SPORTS

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Issue 35, Volume 124

Students brace for Volunteer Vengeance Madison Eubanks Contributor The carnage is coming. Will you survive? On Saturday, Oct. 12, at 1 p.m., that question will be answered as Lakeshore Park and All Campus Events host the first annual Volunteer Vengeance. This university-themed obstacle course event is sponsored by Campus Carnage, a company founded by UT alumnus Hassaan Stamps. Inspired by the crowd outside Olympic Park in London, Stamps sought to recreate this “shared life experience” with students across the country. As the team captain of two UT national championship track and field teams, Stamps was no stranger

to feats of athletic excellence. Rather, he found the environment beyond the stadium most compelling. “I knew at that moment I wanted to create an experience that created those cherished moments,” Stamps said. “Not to downplay the Olympics, but I have been to a million track meets ... But what I took away from the Olympic experience was the people I met from all over the world and their sheer enjoyment of conversation and community.” Although Volunteer Vengeance aims to promote active, healthy lifestyles among college students, community members are invited to sign up as well. See CARNAGE on Page 2

Kiley Ballard

Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

Michael Porter, senior in political science, takes the risk and reaches into a trashcan of sludge on Aug. 23 as a part of Campus Carnage’s promotion.

Steven Cook Copy Editor Rawane “Pops” Ndiaye, the newest member of Tennessee’s basketball front court, shed 80 pounds off his frame before arriving as a junior college transfer in April. He wasn’t done there. The 6-foot-10 Senegal native immediately saw results upon entering the Vols’ summer training program under strength and conditioning coach Nicodemus Christopher. “Throughout the summer, we did a lot of speed and agility movement,” Ndiaye said Monday at UT’s basketball media day. “So it had me dropping weight and I was

coming onto the floor moving quicker. Now, I’m running a little better than I was when I first got here.” Through the early goings of preseason practice, third-year head coach Cuonzo Martin has taken notice of Ndiaye’s emergence and said he agrees with his much-improved quickness. “He plays hard, runs the floor well,” Martin said. “I think those are some of the things I didn’t see as much when I recruited him. But he runs the floor really well. “I like what I’m seeing from ‘Pops.’ ‘Pops’ has good energy. The guys like being around him.” See BASKETBALL on Page 6

Matt Cikovic • The Daily Beacon

Jess Walters offers life advice and a sampling of his literature during Writers in the Library on Oct. 7.

Hodges hosts bestselling author Hollie Hughes “Don’t Eat Cat.” A tip from bestselling author Jess Walter. Writers in the Library featured Walter, who shared one of his short stories, “Don’t Eat Cat” from his first collection of short fiction, “We Live in Water.” The event, which took place Monday evening in the

Hodges Library auditorium, had Walter tackle controversial topics in his reading, from the transformational Miley Cyrus to futuristic apocalyptic zombie attacks. Students, staff, faculty and general members of the community came to support UT’s Writers in the Library events, a series that brings authors in to read and discuss their work on campus. “Don’t Eat Cat” is, accord-

TFA offers educational outlet for graduates Contributor

Ndiaye adds defensive presence to front court

Contributor

Page 2 Page 4 Page 3, 5 Page 6

ing to Walter, a satire that uses zombies to unleash political correctness that also incorporates a love story. Walter got the fictional idea from his friend, who expressed that all his students ever turned in were zombie stories, and after a few drinks, he came up with this comical short story. See WRITERS on Page 5

• Photo courtesy of Tennessee Athletics

Center Rawane “Pops” Ndiaye participates in offensive drills during basketball practice at Pratt Pavilion on Oct. 1.

Eight percent of children from low-income communities graduate college by age 24, while 80 percent of their high-income counterparts achieve the same feat. Teach for America Corps is working to close that gap. Founded in 1989, Teach for America seeks to prepare young educators to better assist students attending school amid poverty and scarce resources. Corps members spend two years teaching in a low-income community while they continue to receive one-onone coaching, professional development and graduate level course work. Through a 7-week summer program, chosen members are trained to face challenges posed by lowincome schools. Though intimidating, campus coordinator Natalie Procter said she believes the process is worthwhile. “You’re definitely not alone in the process ...You may even be in the same school as another TFA teacher,” Procter said. “There’s also people whose job is to travel around and come in to your classroom and help you evaluate yourself and improve ... They’re not just coming to evaluate you. They’re there for support.” Upon completion of service, members are certified to teach, regardless of undergraduate degree focus. “It’s an excellent way to make an impact right out of college which is something that not a lot of people have the opportunity to do,” said Antonio Brkovik, UT’s second TFA coordinator. “Also, it’s an opportunity to gain invaluable leadership skills that, regardless of if you want to stay in education, will definitely help you be able to succeed in whatever you wanted to do afterwards.” See TEACH on Page 2

Foothills Fall Festival ‘a big reuinion’ for musicans, attendees Festival director, explained that the festival looked for acts based on requests from festival guests The Foothills Fall Festival in along with WIVK radio to recruit Maryville, Tenn. will broaden its artists that would attract maxitradition of country and southern mum attendance. “It’s primarily a country music rock artists to include more eclectic and local bands this weekend. and classic rock fan base, but we Jane Groff, Foothills Fall try to find bands that many people

Jenna Butz

Staff Writer

would like,” Groff said. “We have Blues Traveler this year along with Janelle Arthur of American Idol fame. We even have CNN Headline News anchor, Robin Meade. If you haven’t heard of the band before, chances are you will like it if they play the festival. Our performances have been

spectacular.” Black Lilies, a local band, will perform at the festival. Front man, Cruz Contreras, said he thinks the festival has grown to incorporate more unique sounds. He said he believes that they may not have been invited in previous years, and that it is excit-

ed to be a part of the growing sounds of Foothills. “I think it’s a pretty diverse lineup this year; we’re certainly a little more eclectic than bands they’ve had in the past,” Contreras said. “We do everything we can not to be categorized. We try to have musical

integrity and keep our options open. It’s kind of like a stew, but it has a lot of Appalachian roots. “What you hear in the first 30 minutes won’t have a lot in common with the next 30. You can hear traditional country to funk to rock in a show.” See FOOTHILLS on Page 3


2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Wednesday, October 9, 2013 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS CARNAGE continued from Page 1 Participants will test their physical limits on a muddy course of 15 or more obstacles, including UT-themed components like “The Hill,” and “The Body Farm.” Enjoying much success at Purdue University, Campus Carnage expects UT’s event to attract 600-800 participants and spectators. Among them will be Sarah Frazier, a sports management major doing her practicum with Campus Carnage. “There are tons of cash prizes embedded in the course, prizes for winners, prizes for simply registering, and for fun games before and after the event,” Frazier

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb

elamb1@utk.edu

said. Through taking part in the event, participants will have the chance to win $1,000. The winners of the obstacle course race will be named “Carnage King” or “Queen.” Despite outward appearance, Campus Carnage serves a higher purpose as well. Partnered with an organization called Stop Hunger Now, all registration fees will be donated to charity. “As I was coming up with this platform, I wanted to do my part to help end world hunger,” Stamps said. “I did my research and found Stop Hunger Now, and they have been a charity partner since the very beginning. “What was so dynamic about their organization is the meal packaging program, which aims to bring students, faculty, staff and the community together

to prepare meals to help those in need.” Since 1998, Stop Hunger Now has been working to supply food for the nearly 870 million hungry people in the world. With the funds raised from its events, Campus Carnage hopes to provide 10,000 meals. “It is all about creating a fun, partylike atmosphere while giving back to the students and raising money for our community partner,” Frazier said. Stamps agrees, and is fully relying on the Volunteer spirit to bring many attendees on Saturday. “We understand the power of numbers and I challenge all students, faculty, staff and Vol fans in the community to come out and support Volunteer Vengeance,” Stamps said. “What better way to spend your Saturday than with a little mud, cash, and partying?”

Author to flex muscles on masculinity Hollie Hughes Contributor Sports, beards, and muscles. Are these what it means to be a man? Joel Stein thinks perhaps not. On Oct. 10, the Issues Committee will host author and journalist Joel Stein in the UC Auditorium at 7 p.m for a lecture titled “Man Made: A Stupid Quest for Masculinity.” Known for his humorous writing, Stein will explore “masculine identities” and the trials of raising a son in the 21st century. “This would be an important event for students to attend because Joel Stein offers an entertaining way to look at masculinity in a new light,” said Thomas Carpenter, social media director for the Issues Committee. After attending Stanford University, Stein began his career as a writer and researcher for Martha Stewart Living before eventually joining the staff at TIME Magazine. Since then, his work has appeared in nationally known publications including The New Yorker, Esquire, Playboy and GQ. Stein has also worked in television, co-producing three pilot episodes for various networks and writing and produc-

• Photo courtesy of Joel Stein

An exploration of masculine identities encompasses a bevy of topics and perspectives, but Joel Stein will explain his unique ideas on Oct. 10 in the UC. ing for the sitcom “Crumbs.” In 2012, Stein published “Man Made” and has often referred to himself as a “gay man trapped in a straight man’s body.” Carpenter said he views

Stein’s visit as a way for UT to break societal stereotypes not only for men, but for all genders and sexual orientations. ”Stein challenges many of the social norms we have grown to accept,” Carpenter said, “but

does so in a way all of us can relate to.” Jared Glenn, a junior in marketing, agrees that the upcoming lecture will be beneficial for those pursuing careers in writing. “I really think students and faculty alike can gain insight on becoming better writers, not just for journalism, but for other forms of media, such as television series and sports writing,” Glenn said. “Mr. Stein is very talented and has had a wide variety of different media and writing aspects throughout his career. ”There is really something every student can gain by listening to his guest appearance.”

TEACH continued from Page 1 Born in Bosnia, Brkovik’s said his interest in education stems from personal experiences. “I didn’t really realize the issue of educational inequality until I got to college and I actually saw how severe this was,” Brkovik said. “And so I saw it as a way, you know, I wasn’t even born here and I was given a great education, but then there are kids born here every single day who aren’t offered the same opportunities as I was given. “It’s that idea that really fuels my passion for this job.” Brkovik mentioned a particular instance of Teach for America’s

Volunteers urged to serve elderly Jan Urbano Contributor There’s no place like home. Project Living Independently through Volunteer Efforts, better known as Project LIVE, strives to advocate for this fact. By assisting seniors in Knoxville and Knox County in various capacities, Project LIVE seeks to help seniors remain in their preferred residence. Created by the KnoxvilleKnox County Office on Aging, the program operates through the combined efforts of grant money and volunteers from the community. Seniors requesting help from the program are evaluated, then given assistance tailored specifically to each person’s current circumstances. “We complete independent living assessments on each person we serve, and whoever may need extra assistance with something in order to remain independent for as long as possible,” said Misty Goodwin, Project LIVE manager. “Once our assessment is completed, we link seniors with local community resources that can meet those needs. “This may be anything from food stamps, utility assistance, companionship or housekeeping.” The program’s primary mission lies in serving “homebound seniors who have limited support systems and who are unable to pay for necessary minor home repairs or safety modifications to be able to stay safely in their own homes,” according to the Office on Aging’s website. Materials, including housekeeping supplies, electrical appliances and movement-assistance tools, such as safety rails and walkers, are purchased by the program and distributed to staff and volunteers who assist in whatever manner required. Established 31 years ago, the program traces its roots to a single act of kindness. “When the program initially began there was only one individual working for Project LIVE who had one assistant,” said Ashley Rex, volunteer coordinator for Project LIVE. “These two individuals assisted a small number of local seniors in need with transportation, delivering medication and running enormous success with students. “When our current manager, Liz Freedmen, started her two years of teaching she went to Nashville and was in a classroom of kids where 30 percent of them were proficient in math and reading and by the end of her time with them they were all 100 percent proficient in reading and math,” Brkovik said. “I think you definitely have to have a passion for working with these kids and a commitment to making a change,” Procter said. “It takes one person to strike up passion to make a difference in education.” The program will have a booth in Hodges Library on Mondays, from 3-5 p.m., and Tuesdays, from 4-6 p.m., to answer any questions and assist with the

errands. “The program was cut and when it aired on the news, a woman who was unemployed called in to offer herself as a volunteer to keep the program functional and assist the seniors in need.” Project LIVE relies on this spirit of volunteerism to provide day-to-day care. “Volunteer opportunities include yard maintenance,” Rex said, “and with autumn beginning, there will be opportunities for volunteers to assist local seniors with raking leaves and removing debris from the yard, as this proves to be one of the most difficult chores for a senior to do during this season.” Even with Knox County’s rising cost of living and increased senior population, Goodwin said the program is doing its best to coordinate and distribute limited supplies. “We prioritize our referrals and try to handle all cases that come in as a crisis – i.e. someone is without utilities, food, medication, losing their housing,” Goodwin said. “This is quite the balancing act, since most all of our referrals are crisis referrals. We keep things running smoothly by having a knowledgeable, dedicated staff and several interns through the University of Tennessee who help out tremendously.” The program also benefits from connections to local charities, philanthropic organizations and private donors. “We have many partnerships within the community that help us with our mission, including a few private donors who support our program,” Goodwin said. “They help us attain professional services that may be needed when a repair job is above the scope of knowledge of one of our volunteers, or to purchase medications for a client if needed. We have also partnered with one local church who is buying one bed for us every other month and this has helped tremendously.” Anyone who is interested in volunteering and wants more information about Project LIVE can call 865-524-2786 and request to speak with the volunteer coordinator or visit the website, at www.knoxseniors. org/live.

application process. Brkovik stated that TFA is looking for students who are involved on campus and maintain a “high GPA.” But other attributes matter, as well, he noted. “Perseverance in the face of challenges is also a really important trait,” Brkovik said. “For example if you’ve had to go through a difficult time in your life and had to overcome a certain obstacle and been able to succeed through that, I think that that’s a really important characteristic trait that we look for as well.” The first application deadline for the program is Oct. 25. Interested students are encouraged to like Teach for America’s Facebook page or follow them on Twitter to learn more about the opportunity to serve.


Wednesday, October 9, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

FOOTHILLS continued from Page 1

Photo Courtesy of Miley Cyrus

After multiple instances of controversial decisions, comments and attire, Miley Cyrus released her fourth album “Bangerz” on Oct. 4.

Headliners for the festival include jam band Blues Traveler on Friday night, southern rock legend Lynyrd Skynyrd on Saturday and commercial country giants Rascal Flatts close the festival Sunday. For smaller acts, simply being in the lineup with these acts adds an extra level of excitement to their weekend at the festival, Contreras said. “When they invited us, the first thing you do is look at who else you're playing with,” Contreras said. “It makes you feel good, and you see there's this hugely successful band that you get to be associated with.” The Black Lilies are currently on tour promoting their new album, "Runaway Freeway Blues." This album was recorded differently than their previous efforts – adding to their eclectic sound – and will be featured in the band's Foothills set. “We got to build this one up track by track,” Contreras said. “Our first album was made before there was even a band, and the second record

was recorded live. This record formed from the road.” As with any festival, each year brings something new for the Foothills Fall Festival. The ArtWay show will host new artists and craftsmen along with new kids’ attractions such as “rolling video games.” The festival will also introduce many to Maryville’s new restaurants, including Roost, Barley’s, OvenArt, The Corner Café, Grinders and Grains and the new Vienna Coffee location. “We also have our most popular attractions back again – including Twiggy the Water skiing squirrel, rock climbing walls, bungee rides, zip line and much more,” Groff said. “We believe we are one of the top family events of the year in East Tennessee – offering many things to do all weekend long for free or an affordable price. We also believe the festival is a great marketing tool for our city. "People from all over the world visit us this time of year – we even have folks coming in from Norway this year. It’s a great way for us to promote our businesses and our community to visitors and industry.” The festival, which takes around 1,200 volunteers to

operate, has a unique feel since it takes place during the autumn season. “We offer a different atmosphere," Groff said. "Other festivals might have you choosing between one concert or another, but all of ours are in one location. In the fall, the weather is nice, and it’s much more relaxed. Most people who attend consider this a big reunion – with a chance to gather with friends and family. It’s a great family event and people of all ages can enjoy what we have to offer.” With three day passes available online for $70, Foothills aims to offer something for everyone of all ages beyond music. “Festive, entertaining and depending on what you are doing, whether shopping the ArtWay or sitting back listening to some great bands, it’s relaxing and enjoyable,” Groff said. “But, maybe not relaxing if you are on the bungee ride or running through the laser tag maze. Then, it might be best described as fun and exhilarating.” For more information on the Foothills Fall Festival, visit www.foothillsfallfestival. com.

This was seen Monday as Philadanco performed a four part show at the Clarence Brown Theatre. The event was sponsored by the Black Cultural Programming Committee and Multicultural Student Life. Philadanco was founded in 1970 by Joan Myers Brown and is a nonprofit organization that works to strengthen the skills of dancers and choreographers and increase appreciation for dance, according to its website.

Its inception was inspired by the need for a school for black dancers who were denied entry to other dance schools. They are also known for their creativity, well-trained dancers and preservation of AfricanAmerican style dance. Their mission is to teach youth leadership and development skills to help them succeed in both dance and everyday life.

Cyrus joins music Philadanco shines at elite with “Bangerz” Clarence Brown Theatre Kendall Thompson Cell Waller III Contributor Navigating the transition from child star to mature singer, the artist formerly known as Hannah Montana has taken over 2013 and has made us all witnesses. Miley Cyrus has obviously been in the media this year, from her MTV VMA’s performance to her twerk videos, all in preparation of her first album she had real creative control of: “Bangerz.” As the daughter of Mr. Achy Breaky Heart himself, Billy Ray Cyrus, and the goddaughter of country music legend Dolly Parton, she had every opportunity to make it as a child star and very little choice of what she wanted to do. The role of Hannah Montana continued for about five years until she finally grew out of her old persona. After a two year sabbatical, she took to a more hip-hop lifestyle, ditching the crutches of her past and deciding to create an album that reflects her new self. Teaming up with hip-hop producer heavyweights Mike Will Made It and Pharrell to craft the majority of the sound, Cyrus delivers an album that is sure to leave a mark. The album begins with a song that is far from the type

of banger you would expect but is every bit as satisfying. The love ballad “Adore You” is a vocal performance that shows listeners how versatile and talented Cyrus actually is. She steps out of her recent comfort zone with a true R&B/pop track that allows her to showcase how strong of a voice she has over a very blank canvas of a beat. The album takes a hard turn with the lead single “We Can’t Stop.” The summer song of 2013 sets the tone for theme and sound of the rest of the album. With clever lyrics painting a picture of everything from amazing parties to late night hookups, Cyrus shows that she is far from the little kid fans had come to adore. The next song on the album, titled “SMS (Bangerz),” is an infectious track that is somewhat of a passing of the torch from the biggest pop act of the past decade, Britney Spears, to the clear new face of the genre, Miley Cyrus. The album continues with the Pharrell-produced “4x4,” where Cyrus gathers her country energy to give an ode to her past life. Teaming up with the biggest hip-hop/country crossover act of our time, Nelly, she delivers a song that is bound to get anyone thinking of a classic hoedown. “Bangerz” is consistent throughout the midsection

including the number one single “Wrecking Ball,” but the album really finds its stride with the eighth song “#GETITRIGHT.” Yet again, Pharrell and Cyrus craft a song that allows Cyrus show off her actual skills. She uses this whistle-laced track to talk about someone whom she has a clear passion for, and wants to show it to him in a number of ways. The standout track from the album comes in the form of the next track “Drive,” which seems to be the song where the album truly comes together. Cyrus and Mike Will Made It both reach their creative peaks and find the perfect balance between their talents. Cyrus describes a lost love that she believes she can’t go on without over an amazingly drum-filled Mike Will Made It beat that is sure to dominate the radio. Overall, separating her antics and all of the hype from music, Cyrus delivers on a lot of levels with “Bangerz.” There are points in the album where it is obvious that Cyrus has some room to grow from the sometimes lackluster lyrics to some of the tracks being repetitive, but the foundation for this album is definitely there. This album proves that Miley Cyrus is more than just a fad and will be around for a long time in the music world.

Contributor Dance is often its own language. It can tell stories that audiences can relate to and preserve cultures that may have faded from view. The Philadelphia Dance Company, also known as Philadanco, embraces these aspects of dance in the group’s performances.

See DANCE CO. on Page 5


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Wednesday, October 9, 2013 Editor-in-Chief R.J. Vogt

OPINIONS

rvogt@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Shutdown ‘slaughters’ key research programs Crossing Cues by

Melissa Lee

“Whoa, NCBI is down.” I am currently spending my semester abroad performing research at the Brain Research Institute in Zurich, Switzerland. NCBI is the National Center for Biotechnology Information, and those were the words that came out of a post-doctoral fellow’s mouth last Tuesday morning as he was informed, via a red bar at the top of his computer screen, that the United States government had shut down and websites run by U.S. government agencies, such as NCBI, would no longer be updating. NCBI houses most of the major databases relevant to the life sciences. PubMed, for example, an online biomedical library used by just about every life science researcher in the world, is not being updated. Neither is GenBank, a collection of every publicly available gene sequence. BLAST, or the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool, which allows researchers to compare sequences between different genes, proteins and organisms, isn’t updating either. If these things seem inconsequential, consider the huge magnitude of life science research going on all over the world. GenBank, when operating normally, doubles in size every 18 months. Even here in Switzerland, where we use all of these tools on an almost-daily basis, we’re feeling it. This is nothing, though, compared to what is happening at home in the United States, where research at government agencies, already hit hard by sequestration earlier this year, has come grinding to a halt. Seventy-three percent of the National Institute of Health has been put on furlough. Researchers located as far away as Antarctica are being told to come back. Closer to home, Oak Ridge National Lab’s Y-12 National Security Complex has begun an “orderly shutdown.” Make no mistake, this isn’t just a bit of a standstill. This is a slaughter. You can’t just freeze research, because research is time sensitive. Fieldwork can’t just be rescheduled. Environmental conditions don’t put themselves on pause because the government has decided to take a break. Laboratory research isn’t spared either. Though the NIH has included cell

culture and animal maintenance among its essential and allowed activities, experiments that depend on samples collected at a certain time point are doomed. Experiments also often necessitate continuous behavioral training and/or testing animals when they are at a certain age. Interrupting this can waste valuable weeks, months or even entire years of preparation. In these instances, there is no picking up where these researchers have left off. There is only starting over. This is just the tip of the iceberg. The National Science Foundation will not be making payments to those it funds during the shutdown, and neither they nor the NIH, which had a grant application deadline this past Monday, Oct. 7, will be funding any new projects during this time. Much ado has been made over the 30 children directly affected by the NIH clinical trials that are not going forward at this time because of the shutdown. Much less has been said about the indirect effects of this — of the growing backlog of experiments and trials that now must wait that much longer to begin. It’s not an exaggeration to say that, for a cancer patient, such a delay can be the difference between life and death. Undiscussed, too, is the message this is sending to young scientists in the U.S. Not only are we being told that our research is nonessential, we are being shown that we have all but no scientific stability — that all it takes for our funding and continued work to stop in this country is 32 radicals demanding they get their way. In the end, this may be the greatest cost. As NCBI remains stalled, researchers around the world are using alternative tools. The postdoctoral fellow I sit next to here in Zurich comments on how he prefers collaborations with partners in the U.K. to those in the U.S. The default position that the United States has held in the center of biomedical research is slipping. The best researchers go where they can do their best research. It’s looking less and less like the United States is that place. Melissa Lee is a senior in College Scholars. She can be reached at mlee48@utk.edu.

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

A server’s soliloquy: Inside the waiting game In Rare Forum by

Julie Mrozinski Hired almost exactly a year ago, I’ve spent close to 700 hours at the hippie pizza palace down our beloved Strip — Mellow Mushroom. Starting as a hostess, I had little dreams of becoming a server. For whatever reason, I enjoyed my five minute relationships with people, greeting them and walking them to a table. However, as with most things, I started getting bored. This summer, I asked my manager if I could make the move to waitress. My first couple days on the floor felt like a heart attack, nervously assuming that I had forgotten everything. Did I bring them that refill, did I remember to sans the onions, do I have a table I’ve completely forgotten about? Not to mention the new script I had to create. My relationships with strangers just got 40 minutes longer. Oh the tremendously awkward things I’ve said to my tables: “Have a great day,” before I’ve even taken their order; “How’s everybody’s Monday?” on a Wednesday. The others I’ve chosen to block from my memory

Editor-in-Chief: R.J. Vogt Managing Editor: Melodi Erdogan Chief Copy Editor: Gage Arnold News Editor: Hanna Lustig Asst. News Editor: Emilee Lamb Sports Editor: David Cobb Asst. Sports Editor: Troy Provost-Heron Arts & Culture Editor: Claire Dodson Asst. Arts & Culture Editor: Cortney Roark Online Editor: Samantha Smoak

question of timing, how often and how long of intervals do you leave them. When to give the check and then when to come back around to see if they’ve paid. The goodbye is uncomfortable, unless we really feel in love. In those cases, I have no shame in telling them I loved them. No matter how many tables I loved a night, if I got one that hated me, it ruined me. To be a servant demands a resiliency I don’t have. It demands a peppy, southern accent, coupled with a genuine happy demeanor. I used to have one, but serving used it all up. We sincerely can only be fake-happy for so long. Serving demands a hundred minute decisions per table, which adds up. When I leave, $40 and seven hours under my belt, I am exhausted. I’ve been drained of energy resources, for I pour it all out into my clueless, unappreciative costumers. All servers know this, and it’s not hard to recognize a fellow server as a costumer. Maybe this small insight will make you look at your server differently, and appreciate the seemingly insignificant language choices they made for you. For me, it wasn’t about the tip; it was about dealing with nice, genuine, appreciative people who understood. Julie Mrozinski is a junior in English. She can be reached at jmrozins@utk.edu.

Government struggles beg for citizen understanding What The World by

Rebecca Butcher The government has shut down, or at the very least, slowed down. Effective on Oct. 1, the slow down marked the failure of Congress to come up with a new budget plan for the nation. Each year the federal fiscal calendar ends on Sept. 30, and if the Senate and House of Representatives cannot pass a plan to fund the government before the deadline, it closes. You may remember this same talk last year, but the last actual shutdown was 17 years ago. We are now in week two of the shutdown, what some term as a “slim-down.” Last week, the political battle between House Republicans and Senate Democrats rose to the forefront of my Economics class. Our professor alerted us that she wished to discuss the major news topic in America for a few minutes. Thirty minutes later, students were still explaining how the shutdown affects us and what future consequences the heated debate on the Affordable Healthcare Act might inflict. A quick show of hands revealed that about 15 of my classmates were directly affected by the shutdown, many of them the children of government workers.

The professor informed us only essential government workers such as air traffic control, all emergency care and border control are still working. The estimated 800,000 “nonessential” government workers are currently furloughed, or on an unplanned vacation. According to the Washington Post, both the Senate and the House voted unanimously, 407-0, to allocate pay back to furloughed workers. The central cause of the government shutdown surrounds the term “ObamaCare,” which is known properly as the Affordable Healthcare Act. Only a few students in class were able to claim full comprehension of the 2,000-page act and one attempted to sum it up for everyone. A few things highlighted include healthcare agencies being unable to turn away applicants for preexisting conditions. Before the topic was expounded upon, a student seated next to me expressed annoyance that none of this would be on the exam. At this point, he was interested, even tipping me off about a Watergate released tape that showed President Nixon admitting to ripping the American public off with public health care. Whether you have paid close attention or not, one thing you couldn’t have missed is the name Ted Cruz, R-Texas, whose 21-hour long filibuster everyone was happy to hear come to a close. He started off a tirade against Obamacare by saying, “I intend to speak in support of defunding ObamaCare until I can no longer stand.” Looking at the Manhattan Institute for

Policy Research, Cruz had a point. The conservative think tank reports that there will be a 24-percentage increase to health care premiums in 13 states for buyers purchasing insurance their own. In other words, this affects all of us after we get booted from our parents’ plans. The Manhattan Institute site also reports that how much people will pay or whether they pay significantly more or less, depends on whether they qualify for subsidies and current insurance status. In any case, there is now an “individual mandate,” which makes it necessary for everyone to purchase insurance or pay a penalty. Does it seem peculiar for Republicans to hold out on government funding in order to block or lessen the effects of the ACA? It seems so, especially since ObamaCare continues despite the shutdown. The move brings to mind a statement from James Madison: “Power over the purse may, in fact, be regarded as the most complete to effective weapon for obtaining a redress of every grievance.” If, in fact, Republicans are taking cues from the Constitution’s authors, is the fight worth it? You may not be affected by the shutdown. You may think Nixon really did try to do one over on us. Either way you would do well to stay informed about the future of healthcare. Rebecca Butcher is a junior in journalism and electronic media. She can be reached at rbutcher@utk.edu.

Get Fuzzy • Darby Conley

Non Sequitur • Wiley

EDITORIAL

or require too much back story. The nonverbal gestures get stranger, like accidentally spitting on a table’s food when you’re merely talking with vigor or being called upon and doing a back-up dance to find out what your table could possibly need. These things I’ve brought upon myself. Costumers, however, prove to be the worst part of presumably any restaurant and a major force pushing me to leave. Serving people is a like walking on a tight rope; the relationship is fragile, wobbly and with the lightest gust of wind, falls to its death. It’s the attempt to make strangers feel comfortable telling you what to do, and you making them feel like you love to do it. In 5 seconds or less, I determine which lexicon I will use, basing my decision almost purely on looks. Among my most-used greetings are: “howdy gentlemen,” “what’s up players,” “welcome team,” “hi y’all,” “good evening family,” “hey ladies” and “hello everyone!” Word choice becomes a delicate process. When things go wrong it’s as if I hear the dun dun DUN ringing in my head. I have to tell the kitchen to remake my stuff on the fly, I have to tell my table, and tell my manager. Everyone gets to know you’ve messed up. On top of that you have to continue serving them for the rest of their meal. As things dwindle, the meal becomes a

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Main Newsroom: (865) 974-3226 editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com The Daily Beacon is published by students at The University of Tennessee Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters and Tuesday and Friday during the summer semester. The offices are located at 1340 Circle Park Drive, 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The newspaper is free on campus and is available via mail subscription for $200/year, $100/semester or $70/summer only. It is also available online at: www.utdailybeacon.com

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Wednesday, October 9, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE WRITERS continued from Page 1 Walter, a New York Times Best Seller, recipient of the Edgar Allen Poe award and a former journalist, shared life advice for young writers and journalists alike. “If there is a degree in the thing you love, you owe it to yourself to chase after it,� Walter said. Walter said he didn’t receive recognition and fame early in life. He graduated with a journalism degree and worked at a local newspaper. “As a young father, I had to support my family any way I could,� he said. Walter started this collection of short stories in 2005 after he had already pub-

lished two novels. For seven years, his stories were rejected by numerous publications such as The New Yorker and The New York Times. It has taken him 25 years to produce 35 – and counting – short stories. “I feel like there is a much larger manifest for short stories in today’s society than there used to be,� Walter said. “Literary fiction is solely character based. “I love the pace of suspense novels, and I am ecstatic to write new genres in the near future.� Walter’s novels are famous for character scenery. “I love to soak up scenery; this is how I create character settings through my journals,� Walter said. “It’s the news reporter, the journalist in me, but I am also driven to capture poetry.�

Terry Shaw, Knoxville resident, attends Writers in the Library events and said he always feels welcome on campus. “I enjoy coming to Writers in the Library,� Shaw said, “There are absolutely great writers and great resources are utilized.� Shaw said he is an avid fan of Walter’s work and recommends Walter’s novel “Beautiful Ruins� for readers to enjoy. Shaw’s neighbor and friend, Sam Smith, was also in attendance and proclaimed his love of Walter’s novels. “I first heard of Jess on NPR radio and through The New York Times book review,� he said. “I love ‘Beautiful Ruins.’ The novel captures a little bit of everything from Elizabeth Taylor

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

to the Fringe Festival – it ties aspects beautifully.â€? Kristen Beard, a junior in philosophy, said she wasn’t familiar with Jess Walter’s literary works, but was pleasantly surprised by the effect author readings have on the story’s portrayal. “It helps me gain a personal insight and perspective into the literature,â€? Beard said. “It encourages me to seek literature that I normally wouldn’t have interest in when an author reads his own material.â€? Writers in the Library will feature author Pamela Schoenewaldt in November and various authors in the spring semester. For more information on Matt Cikovic • The Daily Beacon the Writers in the Library series, visit www.lib.utk. Jess Walters signs a copy of his book for a fan outside the Hodges Library auditorium after speaking at Writer in the edu/writers/. Library on Oct. 7.

DANCE CO.

Around Rocky Top

continued from Page 3

Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

Augustus, left, Brian, middle, and Katherine Ambroziak enjoy the art at “OSSUARY� on Oct. 4. Brian and Katherine Ambroziak created a piece specifically for the show.

The first of the four 20-minute dances was “By The Way of Funk,� featuring glittering costumes and several solo dances choreographed to upbeat funk music. “My favorite dance was the first dance,� Stacey Rooks, junior in child and family studies, said. “It was really entertaining and had a really good beat.� The second was titled “Gate Keepers,� a dance involving many partner solos as well as group choreography. After intermission, “Moan� was performed. This third section was made up of different dances incorporating real life situations. In one instance, a woman was depicted dancing for money, and another told the story of a broken marriage. Darrisha Triplet, a student at Austin East High School, named “Moan� as her favorite piece at the event. “The partnership was amazing,� Triplet said. The last dance was entitled “Enemy Behind the Gates.� For this, the dancers wore costumes that resembled military jackets and danced mostly in pairs or as a group.

“I liked the last one the best,� said Natasha Wicker, freshman in the Arts and Sciences. “The different styles of music and dance they put together was really cool. It was elegant.� Rooks, a member of the Black Cultural Programming Committee, said the Philadelphia Dance Company shows their love for dance through their performances. “The Philadelphia Dance Company is really, really good,� Rooks said. “They have a passion for dance, and you can see it in what they do.� The Black Cultural Programing Committee is sponsoring more events this semester, including “A Night of Comedy� on Nov. 8. This will feature comedian Gary Owen from “Think Like A Man,� as well as Robert Powell and Gene Harding, according to the event program. A homecoming package will be sold to UT students for $15 until Oct. 18, including tickets for both the comedy event and Stomp Fest. More information on upcoming events hosted by the Black Cultural Programming Committee can be found on its website, multicultural. utk.edu/bcpc/index.php. Further information on the Philadelphia Dance Company and their program can be found on their website or Facebook page.

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Wednesday, October 9, 2013 Sports Editor David Cobb

SPORTS

dcobb3@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron tprovost@utk.edu

Former Vols enjoy 2013 NFL success Beacon Staff Report

Georgia game restores hope to UT faithful

Troy Provost-Heron Assistant Sports Editor In a matter of five minutes, Neyland Stadium went from being the most electrified place in America to the most somber. Alton “Pig” Howard’s endaround in overtime was a microcosm of the Vols’ entire performance against No. 6 Georgia. A great effort, but one that came up just a bit short following a 42-yard field goal by Marshall Morgan that put an end to any hope of the Vols ending the team’s now 19-game losing streak against ranked opponents. When the game concluded, Georgia fans fled the stands as soon as possible, eager to leave the place where their team so narrowly escaped.

BASKETBALL continued from Page 1 Martin’s lauding of his new big man could prove to be rewarding for the Vols, considering Ndiaye enters the program with two years of eligibility and in a position of need. Post contributors Kenny Hall and Yemi Makanjuola are no longer with the program, which makes Ndiaye the only true center to back up a loaded starting front court of Jeronne Maymon and Jarnell Stokes.

For Vol fans, it wasn’t so easy. Some stayed in their seats, unable to move because they were so emotionally distraught. The ones that did get up and leave had very few words as they exited Neyland, and most of them seldom raised their heads. “It doesn’t matter. Our season is over,” said one student to his friend. Obviously, he wasn’t watching the same game everyone else was and honestly that’s a sentiment that should disgust almost every other orange, white or gray-clad fan that witnessed that game. Yes, the Vols did fall to 3-3 on the season, but that’s something almost everyone expected. What they didn’t expect is for the Vols to leave the Peyton Manning Locker Room the way they did. They were crushed, but they also left as a team nobody will overlook anymore. That’s still a long way from being a contender in the SEC, but it’s still a lot better than the pushover they’ve been in the past under Derek Dooley.

It may have been a loss but it was a step in the right direction, another “brick” to piece the program back together. “Our fans should be exceptionally proud of this team,” head coach Butch Jones said after the loss on Saturday. After the fight this squad put up, it’s hard to be anything but proud for this team that finally has that moment they can point to for proof of the future that lies ahead. Jones wasn’t the only one who took notice on Saturday. “We are proud of our Tennessee Volunteers,” exclaimed one fan as he left the game. As this fan base should be. And South Carolina better take notice too, or next Saturday the Gamecocks might not be as lucky to escape Neyland Stadium with a victory the way the Bulldogs did.

Missouri head coach Gary Pinkel can thank the Vols if the Tigers do indeed put an end to Georgia’s national title aspirations. The losses of running back Keith Marshall and receivers Michael Bennett and Justin Scott-Wesley will severely limit how much damage UGA quarterback Aaron Murray can inflict on Missouri’s defense, especially if tailback Todd Gurley is held out for a second straight week. Injuries aside, this Missouri team still proves to be a worthy opponent as the Georgia defense has struggled this season, allowing 32.2 points per game, while the Tigers offense is firing on all cylinders – they are eighth in the nation, averaging 46.6 points per game – after dismantling Vanderbilt last week, 51-28.

Ndiaye is hoping for a big role, but will welcome whatever Martin puts on his plate. “I’m just going to do what I’m supposed to do, whatever coach Martin wants me to do, and play my role,” he said. Simply playing a role last season with Indian Hills Community College in Iowa came with a price. He battled a foot injury that sidelined him four months and he played sparsely over the 2012-13 season, but all signs point to the issue being behind him moving into the new season. “I think I’m 100 percent,” Ndiaye

said. “The foot injury is not bothering me any longer. It slowed me down at the beginning when I first got injured; the recovery and rehab all took a long time.” Ndiaye’s toughness and physicality are the traits that Martin and his staff recruited the big man for, which predictably aligns with Tennessee’s “Tougher Breed” slogan for the 2013-14 season. Perhaps even more predictable is Martin’s vision for “Pops” as a defensive-minded player. “He’s a big body — he has to get better on both ends of the floor,” Martin said. “But I would rather

have him more on the defensive side rather than as a post on offense. “He has decent hands, but I think defensively, we need him more.” With the mantra Ndiaye takes onto the floor heading into each game, Vol fans should expect nothing but passion and hard-nosed basketball from the newcomer. “Play hard every game, just like it’s going to be your last one,” Ndiaye said. “I take every game like it’s my last one, so I’m going to play hard every day. “I don’t take nobody easy. Like we say, it’s a tougher breed here.”

Troy Provost-Heron attended the UT-Georgia game as a fan. He is a sophomore in journalUpset of the Week Last Week: Maryland over ism and electronic media. He can be reached at tprovost@utk. Florida State This Week: No. 25 Missouri edu and followed on Twitter @ TPro_UTDB. over No. 7 Georgia, 38-31

Peyton Manning finally proved on Sunday he’s human. In the Denver Broncos’ 51-48 win over the Dallas Cowboys, the former UT standout threw his first interception of the 2013 season. Through five games – all Denver victories – the 37-year-old Manning has tossed 20 touchdowns and just one interception. His 75.8 percent completion percentage and 1,884 yards are NFL bests, and the next closest challengers to his 20 touchdowns are Tony Romo and Phillip Rivers with 13. Late in the first half Sunday, Manning scored on one of his patented naked bootleg runs for a 1-yard touchdown to put the Broncos ahead 28-17. Manning’s history with executing the play extends to his days a Vol from 1994-97. “The key is you want to do it about every five years or so,” Manning told the Associated Press. “If you do it every game, they’re going to be playing it right. Naked bootlegs only work, the ones I’ve done, when you don’t tell anybody.” Another former Vol, Cowboys tight end Jason Witten also turned in a statistically sound game on Sunday. Witten finished the day with seven catches for 121 yards and a touchdown catch. The 11-year veteran has amassed 313 yards – which ranks sixth amongst tight ends in the NFL – and three touchdowns this season and is second on the Cowboys in receptions with 28.

Sticking with the aerial assault by former Volunteer pass catchers, Oakland Raiders wide receiver Denarius Moore hauled in a team-high five catches for 84 yards and a touchdown in the Raiders 27-17 victory over the San Diego Chargers on Sunday. On the ground, Houston Texans running back Arian Foster, who played for the Vols from 2004-08, rushed for 98 yards on 21 carries in the Texans 34-3 loss to the reigning NFC Champion San Francisco 49ers. For Foster, the 2013-14 season has gone against the norm of his recent seasons as the featured back in Houston. While his yards per game and carries per game are right around his average for his career, the San Diego, Calif. native has only found the end zone once this season, which is off the pace that he has set the past three seasons in which he has recorded 10-plus touchdowns. Defensively, Jerod Mayo of the New England Patriots stood out on the list of former Vols that played on Sunday. In the first losing effort for the Pats all season, Mayo recorded 11 tackles, a pass deflection and half of a sack against the Bengals. While he had a pedestrian effort on Sunday against the Tennessee Titans, Kansas City Chiefs safety Eric Berry – the all-time SEC record holder for career interception yards – has been impressive this season with 21 tackles, two fumble recoveries and an interception that he returned for a touchdown in week 3 against the Philadelphia Eagles.


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