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INSIDE THE DAILY BEACON News Arts & Culture Opinion Sports

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

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Issue 34, Volume 124

English program brings Big Orange to Big Apple Bradi Musil Staff Writer New York, N.Y. Home of the historic Broadway district and numerous acclaimed playwrights, the Big Apple is undeniably the center of American drama. Next semester, students will have the opportunity to live among its inhabitants for 10 days, earning three credit hours in a unique, off-campus English 492/592 class titled “Drama in New York.” Created roughly 30 years ago by English professor Robert Stillman, Ph.D., English 492 remains a testament to the quality of American theater. “We had an ongoing program to Stratford and London, but it

seemed to me that if you want to see great theater in the world, you don’t have to cross the ocean to see terrific plays,” Stillman said. “New York ... (is) a good location to take students to get a firsthand experience and cost a lot less money.” Designed to provide visceral, first-hand exposure to professional theater, the class includes a week of tickets to various notable productions. This year, the schedule includes Samuel Beckett’s “Waiting for Godot,” Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” and “Twelfth Night,” “Matilda, The Musical,” Harold Pinter’s “No Man’s Land,” Tennessee Williams’ “The Glass

Menagerie,” and “Sleep No More,” an interactive retelling of “Macbeth.” The program will spend eight nights in New York City and students will see seven plays in total. ”The whole point of the class is to learn better about how plays work, how theater works and performance,” Stillman said. “It’s much more a productionbased educational experience than your traditional English text-

book-based educational experience.” Despite being categorized as a spring semester course, almost all coursework is finished before the spring semester even begins, Stillman said. There is no formal class meeting during the spring semester; however, students do complete a research paper analyzing one of the plays they had seen while in New York to be turned in later in the semester. Stillman suggests this class for any student wanting either a heavy or light spring semester. While in

New York, students typically meet in the morning to discuss the plays and are asked to keep a journal of their thoughts on the productions. When students are not attending a play or meeting for discussion, they are free to roam the streets of New York, enjoying the city that never sleeps. Royce Best, a second year graduate student studying English, took the class last spring, spending it immersed in culture. “I spent an entire day in the Metropolitan (Museum of Art), like seven hours straight, which was awesome for me because I love to look at art,” Best said. “One day I just decided to walk to Brooklyn. I walked all the way to the bottom of Manhattan and crossed the bridge all the way

down to Brooklyn … I was in a place where I could completely saturate myself in art and culture. It’s an amazing, nonstop experience. I was so exhausted when I got back.” During the class, students are often accompanied by Keith Taylor, a UT alumni holding a Ph.D. in Literature. A former student of Stillman, Taylor participated in the “Stratford, London and Drama in New York” English courses while in school. After having much success with his nonprofit organization Modest Needs in New York, Taylor began helping to fund the class, sponsoring two students’ trips each year and securing exceptional seating arrangements. “(Students) love ‘Drama in New York’ and they love Keith Taylor,” Stillman said. See THEATRE PROGRAM on Page 2

• Photo courtesy of Michael Marcucci

Vols bring ‘tougher breed’ into new season David Cobb Sports Editor Tennessee coach Cuonzo Martin is labeling his 2013-14 team as “a tougher breed,” and he opened the Vols’ media day on Monday by describing what just what that means. ”It’s the way you play all the time, regardless of the outcome, and it’s a brand,” Martin said. “I feel good about it.” The third-year UT coach believes his program is now appropriately able to embody that phrase as it strains for its first NCAA Tournament berth since Bruce Pearl’s tumultuous departure following the 201011 season. “You guys hear us talk about ‘a tougher breed’ now, and that’s something I think that has been a part of our program,” Martin said. “But now is probably the first time I’ve really revealed it as a coach because I feel like we’re built for it.” A cornerstone portion of that mentality is the weight training that UT strength and conditioning coach Nicodemus Christopher subjects the UT players to. Highly-touted freshman shooting guard Robert Hubbs is “15 or 16” pounds heavier with muscle now than when he arrived on campus on May 28. “I was expecting to put on a couple,” Hubbs said Monday, “but not that much in that short amount of time.” See MEDIA DAY on Page 6

European entertainers host dance conference Jenna Butz

Staff Writer Fiery, playful and harmonious. These are just a few of the adjectives used to describe European dancers Stephan and Bethan Freedman who will present a world dance workshop this Saturday and Sunday at the Knoxville Square Dance Center. Incorporating dance styles from all across the globe, the Freedmans’ mix music, meditation and emotions into their choreography to allow their students to connect with dance and music as a whole and as an art form. “Bethan loves Eastern music and rhythms and relishes dances with style and a touch of the exotic; I adore both Arabic and Israeli dances and especially like to offer them in tandem with a peace focus,” Stephan Freedman said. “We enjoy playing music and singing and creating an

informal atmosphere. “With easy familiar dances we often pick up instruments and incorporate other musicians and singers into a spontaneous band while others dance around us.” Victoria Knight, vice chairperson for the Cultural Attractions Committee, said she sees dance as a unique art experience within cultures connecting the Freedman’s unique choreography style with any world culture despite language barriers. “Most of the time performers want to get the audience involved, whether it’s through teaching them the dance moves or having them clap to keep up the rhythm,” Knight, a senior in microbiology, said. “There’s also just something about seeing people dance and express themselves which can move the audience in a way that music or art can’t.” The couple met during a 1985 summer solstice in London and created a strong

connection as more than just dance partners. “We were firm friends before passion kicked in,” Stephan Freedman said. “Bethan is a natural dancer whose training included contemporary and historic dance. It was a natural and swift progression for us to be working in partnership.” As their dance progressed after helping with a dance camp on the East Coast, fellow dancers invited them to California and Canada, eventually allowing them to perform in much of America, Europe and parts of South America and the Middle East. “The traveling crept up on us,” Stephan Freedman said. “It’s a remarkable adventure staying with hospitable people in all these places. But it was never exactly a plan or a decision ... more like being swept up by a tide.”

See VIVA DANCE on Page 3

• Photo Courtesy of World Dance

Stephan Freedman, left, and Bethan Freedman are two popular European world dancers that incorporate rhythms from across the globe.

Fair encourages connection between students, social issues Hannah Davis Contributor Calling all social leaders. This Wednesday, Oct. 9, the Social and Environmental Impact Fair will be held at the UC Ballroom from 2-5 p.m. Hosted by the Center for Leadership and Service and

Career Services, the fair will feature representatives from a variety of organizations seeking students committed to critical environmental and social issues. “We welcome anyone to stop by the fair to learn more about organizations near and far,” said Kate Kennedy, assistant director of the Center for Leadership

and Service. During this event, organizations will set up booths to speak with interested students about their respective areas of concern. Shawna Hembree, who works for the Center for Impact Careers, a department within Career Services, said the fair can lead to employment in a

number of rewarding fields. “The purpose of the event is to connect University of Tennessee students with nonprofits, government agencies, mission-driven-for-profits and campus organizations to discuss volunteer, internship, membership and career opportunities that impact our society’s most pressing problems,” Hembree

said. “This year’s fair will host approximately 50 organizations with diverse missions including environmental conversation, youth outreach, community and international development, social ventures and enterprises, civic engagement, education, clean energy and healthcare to name a few.” See IMPACT FAIR on Page 6


2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, October 8, 2013 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb

elamb1@utk.edu

Ark. reporter stable after rescue from Texas park Associated Press As her husband went for help, Cathy Frye lay on the ground of a remote Texas state park, hiding from the sun under a small tree. She was alone for two days until someone on high ground spotted her. Frye, an award-winning reporter for the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette in Little Rock, remained in an El Paso hospital Monday, one day after she was airlifted by helicopter to safety. Her husband, Democrat-Gazette photographer Rick McFarland, who had left his wife behind at her request, used his camera to eventually locate his car and drive for help. He shared the good news with friends in a text message that read in part: “I’ve not seen her yet, but overjoyed is nowhere near how I feel.” Rescuers found Frye, the 43-year-old mother of two children, in a dry creek known as an arroyo. She had taken off her clothes, was severely dehydrated, and had sunburn, bruises and cactus thorns all over her body, the newspaper reported. The partial federal government shutdown had forced Frye and her husband out of their original destination, Big Bend National Park, on Tuesday. The couple was familiar with that remote park on the U.S.-Mexico border, having been married there in 2001 and visited every year since. But they took a local employee’s advice and went west to Big Bend Ranch State Park, which was still open. The couple arrived Wednesday and headed toward a popular hiking trail. But Frye and McFarland, 58, overshot their mark and spent that night near a scenic overlook, tired and out of water, according to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. They found the right trail the next day, but then lost it again. While resting, Frye accidentally left behind a fanny pack containing food. That night, the couple slept in wet clothes and with no

IMPACT FAIR continued from Page 1 Created five years ago, the fair was originally called the Volunteer and Service Corps. At that time, the event focused primarily on service corps programs. Later, the fair diversified, growing to include organizations on and off campus. Since then, the event’s popularity and success have grown, too. Hembree said she believes the fair will help students discover a love for civil service and hopefully “develop lifelong volunteers with the skills and knowledge to be ethical leaders in their professions and have positive impact on

material to start a fire. On Friday, Frye told her husband she couldn’t go any farther. They decided McFarland should carry on toward their truck, get help and come back for Frye, McFarland eventually found a ridge with a sweeping view. He took a photo with his camera and zoomed in on his viewfinder — eventually spotting a truck. That helped him find the parking spot where he had left their vehicle so he could head to the ranger’s station. More than three dozen people would join the search for Frye, including U.S. Border Patrol agents and the Texas Department of Public Safety. By Saturday, news that she was missing had gotten back to Little Rock. Amy Upshaw Webb, a close friend and former colleague of the couple, said she took comfort in knowing that Frye was a seasoned reporter who had covered major disasters, including the 2010 flooding at an Arkansas campground that killed 20 people. “She’s a preparer,” Webb said. “If anybody could be prepared for something like this, I’m sure Cathy at one time or another read about this type of situation.” She had. Frye told the newspaper that she had read that those who survive her kind of ordeal try to stay in place during the hottest times of the day. Game wardens cleared brush to make room for a helicopter to land. She was eventually flown by private plane to El Paso. David Bailey, managing editor of the DemocratGazette, received the text message from McFarland after noon Sunday. He said his staff’s collective mood went from “really, really somber to ecstatic in a heartbeat.” “I think we’re all just exhausted now, but it’s happy exhaustion,” Bailey said. Frye joined the newspaper in 1999 and is a past winner of the Livingston Award given to journalists under the age of 35. McFarland joined the staff in 1992. The two sometimes work together on assignments. some of our world’s biggest challenges.” Kennedy agrees, and said that the fair allows students already devoted to specific causes to transform that commitment into a potential career. “It is our hope that students will obtain a greater understanding of how they can take their passions of impacting the world around them and apply them to their future jobs, internships and volunteer opportunities,” Kennedy said. “Whether wanting to make a difference on campus, in Knoxville or in the world, students will have a chance to learn about organizations that share the same goals as they do.”

Around Rocky Top

Janie Prathammavong • The Daily Beacon

Miracle, left, and Hank Jr., right, two H.A.B.I.T. therapy dogs, visit with stressed students at Hodges Library on Oct. 7.

THIS DAY IN

HISTORY

On this day in 2009, two people die and more than a dozen others are hospitalized following a botched sweat lodge ceremony at a retreat run by motivational speaker and author James Arthur Ray near Sedona, Arizona. A third participant in the ceremony died nine days later. The sweat lodge exercise was part of a five-day “Spiritual Warrior” event held at a rented retreat center located six miles from Sedona. Participants paid more than $9,000 each to attend the retreat. At the time, Ray, who was born in 1957 and raised in Oklahoma, was known for such books as his 2008 best-seller “Harmonic Wealth: The Secret to Attracting the Life You Want,” and had appeared as a guest on a number of TV programs, including “The Oprah Winfrey Show.” Ray’s sweat lodge ceremony, modeled after a Native American custom intended to purify the body and spirit, was held in a wood-frame structure covered with tarpaulins and blankets. Inside the enclosed space, water was poured over heated rocks to create steam and the temperature became dangerously high, causing many of the more than 2009: Self-help guru’s sweat lodge cer- 50 participants (who had been encouraged to fast for 36 hours prior to the event) to emony turns deadly 1998: U.S. House of Representatives initiates Clinton impeachment inquiry On this day in 1998, the U.S. House of Representatives votes to proceed toward impeaching President Bill Clinton on charges of perjury and obstruction of justice. By December 1998, the Republican-led House had gathered enough information from an investigation committee to vote in favor of impeachment, which in turn sent the case to the Senate. The House of Representatives’ decision to send the impeachment process to the Senate came after a four-year investigation into Clinton and his wife Hillary’s alleged involvement in several scandals including allegedly improper Arkansas real-estate deals, suspected fundraising violations, claims of sexual harassment and accusations of cronyism involving the firing of White House travel agents. Over the course of the investigation, the independent prosecutor assigned to the case, Kenneth Starr, was informed of an extramarital affair between Clinton and a White House intern named Monica Lewinsky.

THEATRE PROGRAM continued from Page 1 Best confirmed Stillman’s statement, and said that Taylor’s hospitality and intellect make “Drama in New York” both an exciting and educational experience. “(Taylor) is just larger than life,” Best said. “Because of him we got to see so many amazing places that we would have never gotten to see because he would just take us out and pay for everything. He’s also brilliant. ”He has a Ph.D in literature and is great to talk to about the plays or New York. He knows everything there is to know about Broadway. He’s a huge aspect of the trip.” Taylor has also been known to arrange meetings for the students with actors and production casts. Just two seasons ago, Taylor set up a 30-minute meeting for the students with

famous Hollywood actor Alan Rickman, who is best know for his portrayal of Severus Snape in the Harry Potter film series. This year, Taylor will be paying for the students of English 492/592 to experience an offoff Broadway production of “Sleep No More.” Having previously experienced “Sleep No More” himself, Stillman said he is confident the production will please the students. “(It’s) a very unusual full immersion experience of a production of Shakespeare’s ‘Macbeth,’” Stillman said of “Sleep No More.” “Instead of watching the play happen you wonder through various rooms of this warehouse in Greenwich Village watching different scenes of ‘Macbeth’ take place and you interact with the actors who are in the production. “I had the experience of being led around by one of the witches and the whole time you wear these masks that look like carnival masks from Venice.” Taking place from Dec. 7-20, students will lodge at the Vanderbilt YMCA, a dormitory-

develop breathing trouble and become disoriented. Witnesses later reported Ray had urged people to remain inside and endure the intense heat as a form of personal challenge. 1871: Great Chicago Fire begins On this day in 1871, flames spark in the Chicago barn of Patrick and Catherine O’Leary, igniting a two-day blaze that kills between 200 and 300 people, destroys 17,450 buildings, leaves 100,000 homeless and causes an estimated $200 million (in 1871 dollars; $3 billion in 2007 dollars) in damages. Legend has it that a cow kicked over a lantern in the O’Leary barn and started the fire, but other theories hold that humans or even a comet may have been responsible for the event that left four square miles of the Windy City, including its business district, in ruins. Dry weather and an abundance of wooden buildings, streets and sidewalks made Chicago vulnerable to fire. The city averaged two fires per day in 1870; there were 20 fires throughout Chicago the week before the Great Fire of 1871. This Day in History is courtesy of History. com. style facility located in midtown Manhattan. Stillman has room for 16 students this year. Eleven spots are already filled, with only five still available. “If you want to learn about great theater and great performance then you’ve really got to go someplace where they have the theatrical productions taking place,” Stillman said. “For us in the United States, that means getting to New York City and Broadway, off Broadway, and off-off Broadway plays. “It’s a great way to mix education with entertainment … Education can’t just be left to a classroom. There are certain things you can only learn out there in the world. Take the opportunity now; it will be so difficult when you leave school and get a job to have those great chances to immerse yourself in those cultural experiences that you will never forget.” Students wishing to enroll in English 492/592 are advised to get in touch with Stillman at rstillma@utk.edu. A $200 deposit is required to reserve a spot in this year’s trip.


Tuesday, October 8, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

Ben Rector ready for ‘right kind of rowdy’ crowd at Bijou Amanda Cleveland Contributor “In an age when everything is less than authentic, here today and gone tomorrow, we stay true to the craft. to We W are not a flash in the pan.” p This is the quote from aan airplane magazine tthat inspired singer/ Ben ssongwriter Rector while writR iing his recently released album, “The Walking in W Between,” w h i c h came out in August. The Nashville-based musician is now on tour, and Knoxville has the chance to h ssee him at his soldout show at the Bijou Theater on B Wednesday at 8 W

VIVA DANCE continued from Page 1 With all the travel, this weekend will not be their first time in Knoxville. Five years ago, Kevin Meyer, a dance teacher and choreographer, invited them to teach a workshop here. “There was a local power cut the first night so we lit some candles and picked up musical instruments; it was a magical night,” Stephan Freedman said. With their popularity and dedication to peace, the couple has performed at the Middle East Peace conference, a humanitarian educational congress and an international conference on conflict and communication, among various others. The duo aims to connect people and provide a sense of physical security. “It’s hard to imagine people who dance together in a circle being in violent conflict,” Stephan Freedman said. “This participatory, non-competitive approach to dance has many benefits to individual and societal well-being. That’s the kind of culture we like to foster. “We are exploring whether dance can play a role in peacebuilding dialogue.” Bethan and Stephan Freedman also recognize dance as a part of world cultures and use this common societal connection to bring their message of peace and connection into perspective with their dancers. “We don’t seek to interpret people’s experience but it’s fascinating to see what bubbles up for them,” Stephan Freedman said. “Some people find different parts of their essential character – by turns playful, dignified, sensual, spiritual, strong and earthy or light and serene.” The workshop costs $125 for the entire weekend or $75 for Saturday only. Interested attendees can register at the event, which is open to all ages.

p.m. Amanda Cleveland, contributing writer for The Daily Beacon, interviewed Rector over the phone to check in on his current tour and find out the details surrounding his musical journey thus far. Amanda Cleveland: You’re returning to the Bijou this October. Are you excited to play in Knoxville again? Ben Rector: I love Knoxville. Part of that’s because of my background in Nashville, but really you guys are just a great crowd. You all are the right kind of rowdy. You get excited and it’s fun. AC: How has your tour been going so far? BR: It’s been great. I had been kind of afraid that only 18 people would show up to the shows. But luckily that hasn’t happened. I have been nervous because we are headlining. It is really amazing, but it’s also a lot to carry on your own shoulders. I can be a pessimist about business and about shows, to be honest. I tend to think things are going to fall apart, but the energy we have been getting from the crowds helps to relieve some of that. So yeah, we have had a really good tour so

far. Everyone has been really responsive a career. I still can’t believe that this is my job. and we have been received well. AC: What can people expect to see AC: Where did you get your inspira- from your upcoming concert? BR: Well, I’m going to be singing, tion for your new album, “The Walking and I’m going to be playing instruments. In Between?” BR: The song writing process came I’ll also converse with the crowd some. pretty easily, but the actual production (Laughing) Just kidding. I hope to just was more difficult just because I really be energetic and to draw people into wanted it to be good. I felt more pressure the music. There are a lot of aspects with this album and I was waiting for a that go into putting on a good show. It sense of satisfaction that I thought would has to be more than just standing there come. But for some reason I didn’t feel playing songs off the record. You have to that for a long time. That’s when I started pull everything together and put effort focusing on the little things that made into it both musically and visually. We’ve me happy, like spending time with my got some visuals, not over the top, but wife. So the songs are about the ordinary, enough with lights and stuff to just look good. everyday things that make up life. AC: How did you get involved in music? BR: I first started playing guitar in high school, I was 16 or 17. And it just felt, I don’t know, natural. Not to say that I picked it up and immediately knew what to do with it. It just felt right, and like it was part of what I was supposed to do, and that’s when I started writing songs. During college I eventually started to realize that I could do this as

AC: How do you feel your music has evolved since you started? BR: Music and songwriting is a process. I don’t want to close myself into a box, I want to grow and to keep moving forward while I keep my own voice. I’ve been pretty consistent, but this new record has some new sounds in it. The most important thing to me is that I just keep growing and pushing myself as a musician and as a songwriter.

Play educates viewers on Australian history Hollie Hughes Contributor The Clarence Brown Theatre debuted this month’s performance with its production, “Our Country’s Good,” by Timberlake Wertenbaker on Oct. 3. The production is based on the novel “The Playmaker,” by Thomas Keneally, and features the story of transporting convicts through the first British prison ships. The production is set in 1788-1789 in the prison colony of Botany Bay, or modern day Sydney. Both the novel and the play are based on the true story of hardship and peril as 1,420 marines and criminals arrived in Botany Bay in 1788, facing starvation and tension among the members on the ship. “‘Our Country’s Good’ is an important play to showcase at because it teaches the audience,” said Emma Wright, sound board operator for the production. “The play is based on fact, so audience members learn about the history of Australia. The idea of a convict colony is unique and provides an interesting story, one that most students have probably not heard.” The production entails a play within a play, as the convicts and captains act and perform their own production to pass time on the ship and to give incentives for the convicts to refrain from committing additional crimes while on the journey. “This play preaches the importance of the theater,” Wright, a junior in English, said. “The play within the play, ‘The Recruiting Officer,’ is put on as a type of therapy for the convicts. While studying, rehearsing and performing ‘The Recruiting Officer,’ the characters of ‘Our Country’s Good’ take a break from the hard labors of their lives.

• Photo Courtesy of The Clarence Brown Theatre

Cory O’Brien-Pniewski, left, and Neil Friedman perform in the play “Our Country’s Good” at the Carousel Theatre. The play runs through Oct. 20. “This is exactly what our audience is doing while watching our production. Students can appreciate the art and relax during the show.” Calvin MacLean, director of “Our Country’s Good,” further emphasized the role of theater in the plot line of this production. “‘Our Country’s Good’ is not satisfied, however, with merely suggesting that the act of theater played a role in the transformation of Botany

Bay,” MacLean said. “It also argues that the transformation of individual lives, of the hearts and minds of audiences and even of the attitudes of entire societies, is at the center of the theater’s power and purpose.” The production features multiple aspects of theater that aren’t seen in everyday plays. Every cast member of the production plays at least two characters, sometimes three, making the audience

pay that much more attention and really focus on the individual characters. “This play is important in the realm of theater because of the meta-theater aspect,” Wright said. “Plays-withinplays are hard to write and perform. By writing a large list of characters for a small cast, almost every actor has to play more than one role. “This really showcases the individual’s talent.” Although the show is main-

ly for amusement purposes, Wright said the information is important to the experience. “Mainly, this play – like all productions – is put on for the audience’s entertainment,” she said. “‘Our Country’s Good’ is very entertaining, but it is also informative about a different place and time.” The production runs from Wednesday to Sunday through Oct. 20 at the Carousel Theatre. Student tickets are $5.


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, October 8, 2013 Editor-in-Chief R.J. Vogt

OPINIONS

rvogt@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

No fairy-tale ending in sight for government shutdown Turn of Phrase by

Sarah Hagaman Although some evenings are perfect getting misty-eyed over “A Walk to Remember,” I think we sometimes transfer the idea of “happily ever after” into our own lives. The flurry of excitement and planning that surrounds engagements and weddings seems to predict nothing but a rosy future for a young couple. Somewhere, between the glowing moments of fairytale excitement and an ugly 50 percent divorce rate, something falls apart. Between the white dress and “irreconcilable differences,” something vital has changed. America does not live in a “happily ever after” story. This isn’t a fairytale; our country’s story isn’t inscribed in a children’s pop-up book. The American Revolution did not simply end with George Washington riding off triumphantly into the fading twilight. Unlike what our romantic comedies might suggest, the long-term prosperity of any union of people, including the people of the United States, requires an extraordinary amount of work. Our government has been shut down for the 17th time since 1977, according to the Congressional Research Service. Some shutdowns have lasted for a day, and some have lasted as long as 21 days. Admittedly, this shutdown isn’t purely economic; it essentially reflects upon Obama’s major healthcare bill, the Affordable Care Act, which the Senate passed through legislation on Dec. 24, 2009. Ideally, our government wouldn’t be shut down because of conflicts in Congress. This is our reality, but it seems that less and less of the issue is with the legislation, and more with the paralyzing animosity between parties in our government. The media’s coverage of the issue has unleashed sentiments that are somewhat appalling — from decrying some congressmen as “Tea Party anarchists” to issuing statements like “we are winning.” The obvious rift between conservatives and liberals has reached new extremes. Meanwhile, the American people are taking the hit for squabbles on Capitol Hill. I am not here to defend the Republican actions, nor to uphold the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. I am concerned with the way in which our country’s leaders are handling major conflict and the cycle of accusations and extreme polarization that our elected representatives perpetuate. Frankly, these issues must, and will, reach a resolution. But the manner in which we reach an agreement threatens to leave behind lingering bitterness and wounds that may not quickly heal. Leave pundits and analysts to sling around derogatory terms; our leaders themselves only do a disservice to the American people by voicing harsh criticisms and underhanded comments to the public. In fact, the comments do little but inflame the accused party. If the president has frustrations with Republicans in Congress (which he obviously does), he has every right to be upset. With this being said, I am disappointed with the way that President Obama has publicly addressed this issue. He recently accused the Republican Speaker of the House John Boehner of wanting nothing more than to appease “the extremists in his party” and the Republican “obsession” to stop the legislation. Rather than publicly decrying enemies, I would like to see inroads being made without name calling and scorn; these things do little to serve our nation in any capacity. The true difference in our nation’s survival will not depend on these circumstances. They will depend upon the ability of our nation’s leaders to face difficulties with grace and determination, to concede on some points, to stand firm on others. But to make statements of resentment — for leaders of both parties — only furthers the divide. America is young, and our government system was the first of its kind; the U.S. implements ideologies of freedom in ways that other countries will never reach. Our government’s incredible uniqueness and influence in the modern world should not be taken for granted. Rather, like many relationships in life, it’s important to remember that conflicts like this are inevitable. No one ideally wants to go to war; no one wants to go through economic depressions, and no one wants the government to shut down. But this is reality, and all of these things have — and will continue — to happen. Our leadership makes the crucial difference at these times, and if these leaders continue to reduce themselves to name calling and escalating tensions, then the idea of “irreconcilable differences” may become the harsh reality. Sarah Hagaman is a sophomore in English. She can be reached at shagama1@utk.edu.

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Reward your servers with more than a grain of salt The Taboo Parlor by

Chase Parker I hate consumers. I don’t mean I hate consumers in a hippie, off the grid, anti-Western ideology type thing. I freely admit to spending my free time yelling at my Xbox, piddling on my iPhone, watching the 3-hour long advertisement we call American football and generally craving a litany of other products I would be terribly lost without – Cookout, you already know. I mean I hate actual consumers. Think about what you do when you go to eat a restaurant. You wait for the staff to clean your table to immaculate condition, wait for them to assign their staff to you so they may serve you in a timely and effective manner and demand drinks, appetizers and entrees be brought directly into your lap and prepared to your exact specifications. The only thing you don’t ask of these people is to cram this food directly into your unappreciative face and fan you with a palm leaf. If any of the aforementioned isn’t met

Editor-in-Chief: R.J. Vogt Managing Editor: Melodi Erdogan Chief Copy Editor: Gage Arnold News Editor: Hanna Lustig Asst. News Editor: Emilee Lamb Sports Editor: David Cobb Asst. Sports Editor: Troy Provost-Heron Arts & Culture Editor: Claire Dodson Asst. Arts & Culture Editor: Cortney Roark Online Editor: Samantha Smoak

extra side of kickback sauce. No one cares your drink isn’t being filled as soon as you gulp the entire glass down because your mouth is Saharan from your hangover. No one actually cares about any of the innumerable asinine hoops you try to make your server jump through for a tip of more pocket lint than change. It is true there are terrible servers. But, more often than not, you’ll find a terrible customer much easier than you will a terrible server. I don’t know where the empathy has gone from a lot of us who seek out every excuse not to pay our servers, but they are human beings, not robots built to coddle. Understand these people have tuition, car payments and even personal well-being to pay for with money that comes largely from your tip – that tip shouldn’t depend on whether she fills your drink seven times instead of eight. Give them the benefit of the doubt, find some empathy in you, and enjoy Knoxville’s fine establishments without looking for an excuse to look down on your servers because you don’t want to cough up that dollar you found underneath your seat. Check please. Chase Parker is a junior in biochemistry and cellular and molecular biology. He can be reached at sparke2@utk.edu.

Voter justice hits a roadblock with ongoing shutdown Struggling to

be Heard by

Andrea Richardson In the past week, we’ve all been bombarded by a plethora of articles that list many of the various ways the government shutdown might affect our lives. One of the effects that strikes me as quite problematic is the hiatus of the pursuit of justice and equity. The Department of Justice has delayed a number of its activities, as many lawyers were furloughed due to the shutdown. However, now that the Pentagon has ordered most civilian government employees off of furlough, perhaps business will soon proceed as usual. Before the shutdown, the DOJ had been in the process of suing the states of North Carolina and Texas. They have passed voter ID laws that are seen as unconstitutional and discriminatory. This is in the wake of the Supreme Court’s repeal of a key portion of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which was passed to eliminate the disenfranchisement that many minorities and poor people faced at the voting polls in the Jim Crow era. Even after the 15th Amendment, which granted suffrage regardless of “race, color

or previous condition of servitude,” there were ways in which individual states would prevent or discourage minorities from voting. Tactics included literacy tests, poll taxes and varying methods of intimidation. The Voting Rights Act prohibited these practices. It also stipulated that certain states and counties have any new voting-related laws reviewed before being passed. The two states in question – Texas and North Carolina – have, since the repeal, passed laws that include strict identification requirements for voters. It bears mentioning that these two states are not the only ones with such laws – over 30 states have at the very least considered voter ID laws. Ostensibly, these laws, which are supported largely by Republicans, are to prevent voter fraud. However, many beg to differ: “There is no evidence of significant in-person impersonation fraud, the type ID laws can prevent,” reads an article titled “Justice Department Poised to File Lawsuit Over Voter ID Law” by The New York Times on Sept. 30. “Democrats say the restrictions are intended to discourage groups that tend to support Democrats, like students, poor people and minorities.” It is true that these laws place an unfair burden on minorities, students and the poor, groups who are more likely to vote Democrat. One might argue that requiring an ID isn’t much to ask – “Doesn’t everyone have an ID?” – but that person would be ignoring the

realities of life faced by many impoverished Americans. Of course, if either the federal or state governments issued free and easily-attainable IDs, then the requirement would not be an unreasonable one. However, that is not the case: in order to obtain a valid ID – and, by the way, in many cases, student IDs, public employee IDs or photo IDs issued by public-assistance agencies are not eligible; a person must go to a local DMV, which may or may not be in an accessible location, or even open more than once monthly, and pay a fee. It is telling that almost immediately after that key part of the Voting Rights Act was stricken, states that had previously been affected started moving to pass stricter voting laws. If the prevention of fraud was the sole, noble motivation, why wait until after the repeal to push this legislation? Surely, it wouldn’t have violated the act as discriminatory. Personally, I don’t identify as either a Democrat or Republican, but I do recognize these restrictive laws as a classic form of Republican voter suppression, à la Paul Weyrich in 1980: “I don’t want everyone to vote.” What sort of country is this, where the disenfranchisement of potential voters is actively pursued? Andrea Richardson is a sophomore in anthropology. She can be reached at aricha42@utk.edu.

Get Fuzzy • Darby Conley

Non Sequitur • Wiley

EDITORIAL

to your exact criteria, you refuse gratuity and your server goes home with the measly $2.13 minimum wage Tennessee law affords them and cleans up your slop you left behind anyway. I realize the service industry is indeed what its name implies, a service, and if that service is less than satisfactory than there is a reason to complain. However, there are droves of you who are set off by the smallest hitch in your meal, scrambling for an excuse not to tip your server because he or she forgot your extra side of ranch to go with your not perfectly pink five-dollar burger. How incompetent could they be? In spite of your constant need to have your every whim catered to, Miserus Caesar, when you sit down for your respective sub-$10 meal, there are at least five other tables with equally demanding and equally as ludicrous requests as yours. You do the math. Anywhere between four to 10 people spread across six tables order at least a drink and an entrée and split the bill to ridiculous proportions because one of the friends couldn’t afford their eighth drink at The Hill last Thursday. If someone has a severe food allergy, they could be leaving the restaurant in an ambulance if their order isn’t followed correctly. Suffice it to say; no one cares about your

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Tuesday, October 8, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Sports Editor David Cobb

SPORTS

dcobb3@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron tprovost@utk.edu

Fundraiser campaign kicks off with $16 million donation Beacon Staff Report UT Athletics announced Saturday the official launch of the Campaign for Comprehensive Excellence, a project aimed to return Tennessee to the top of the nation’s elite programs while positively impacting key areas of the student-athlete experience. The CCE began on July 1, 2013, and will continue until June 30, 2016. During this time, the UT athletics department wants to raise $154.2 million in annual, capital, endowment and planned gift commitments through its donors. Members of the campaign will help enhance the lives of Tennessee student-athletes while investing in the vision that Vice Chancellor and Director of Athletics Dave Hart has challenged student-athletes, coaches and administrators to achieve since his arrival. The UTAD already received a transformational commitment from Mike and Mickala Sisk of Colleyville, Texas, who pledged $16 million to fund construction and improvements that are part of the campaign’s Phase I plan. The Sisks’ pledge is one of the largest in Tennessee athletics history. Mike & Mickala Sisk are originally from Selmer, Tennessee, and are the founders of Low T Centers. Started in 2009, Low T Center has evolved into innovative medical practice model that treats men with low testosterone. The Sisks, along with their daughters Sarah, Sidney and Lexi, are lifelong Tennessee fans and have been members of the Tennessee Fund since 2007. “We feel honored and extremely appreciative that Mike and Mickala would make

this transformational commitment to take the lead in helping Tennessee athletics achieve its goal of comprehensive excellence,� Hart said. “This is a key time in the history of our athletics department, and the Sisk family has stepped forward with a very generous gift that will make a difference in the lives of student-athletes for years to come.� Phase I includes construction of Pat Summitt Plaza, expansion of Haslam Field, a new volleyball practice facility, a state-of-theart broadcast studio inside the Lawson Center, and renovations to the men’s and women’s basketball locker room Goodfriend Indoor Tennis Center and rowing boathouse. Haslam Practice Field Expansion – The athletic department plans to expand Haslam Field to three full fields by constructing two new ones in the space currently occupied by the half-field, Johnny Majors Drive and the Stokely Athletics Center. The estimated project cost is $10 million. The practice fields should be ready by the start of the 2015 season. Thompson-Boling Arena Basketball Locker Room Renovations – The proposed renovation will transform the locker rooms into the national standard. The estimated project cost is $5 million. Volleyball Practice Facility – At an estimated cost of $3 million, the proposed facility will feature three courts, a locker room and coaches’ offices. Construction will be adjacent to Regal Soccer Stadium. Broadcast Studio - This exquisite facility will feature a working studio that will include everything from coaches’ television shows to a production area for

broadcasting live athletic events on campus. At an estimated cost of $10 million, the studio will allow Tennessee to fully capitalize on the launch of the SEC Network in August 2014. Goodfriend Indoor Tennis Renovation – Much of the interior work was not completed during the 2010 renovation, and at an estimated cost of $1.6 million, the coaches’ offices, satellite training and weight rooms, locker rooms and players’ lounges will be completed. Rowing Boathouse – The current rowing locker room space is insufficient for the 40-plus member team roster, and the floor space is currently shared with fitness machines for the squad. The top floor will be modified to make room for an indoor training space, making it possible for an expanded locker room on the lower floor to accommodate the entire squad. Phase II includes continuation of the Neyland Stadium Master Plan renovations, completion of the Day Golf Practice Facility, expanded seating at Sherri Parker Lee Stadium, renovations at Lindsey Nelson Stadium and construction of an indoor track facility, an estimated cost of $42 million. Additional priorities of the CCE include funding for the Renewing Academic Commitment program that allows former student-athletes to return to Tennessee and complete their degree requirements as well as funds for scholarship endowments. The goal is to raise $2.5 million for each of those priorities. The campaign also has a three-year goal of raising $66 million in annual contributions and $10 million in new planned giving commitments.

Around Rocky Top

Matthew DeMaria • Tennessee Athletics

Tennessee Titans wide receiver Justin Hunter, right, and Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Tyler Bray greet one another after the Chief’s 26-17 win over the Titans at LP Field in Nashville, Tenn., on Sunday. Hunter and Bray were teammates at the University of Tennessee from 2010-2012.

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, October 8, 2013 Sports Editor David Cobb

SPORTS

Bye week ‘will be good’ for surging Vols David Cobb Sports Editor The physical carnage of Tennessee’s 34-31 overtime loss to Georgia at Neyland Stadium Saturday caused a shudder from Georgia coach Mark Richt after the game. “I’m just not in the mood to talk about it right now,” Richt told members of the media. “Soon enough we’ll find out what it is and we’ll let you all know.” The already-depleted Bulldogs lost running back Keith Marshall and wide receiver Justin Scott-Wesley for the season due to injuries suffered in the game against the Vols. Physically, it’s the Bulldogs who need a bye week, but actually it’s the Vols who get a breather while Georgia travels to play at No. 25 Missouri on Saturday. UT coach Butch Jones offered a blunt take on the open date in his remarks following the game, which provided carnage of an emotional sort for the Vols. “It’s coaching,” Jones said. “We’ll point out the good, the bad, the indifferent.” The pause comes after a draining loss for the Vols, but the rest of the month features a visit from No. 14 South Carolina on Oct. 19 and a trip to No. 1 Alabama on Oct. 26. “I think you kind of have to move past it,” said UT senior running back Rajion Neal. “You’ve got to believe in your coaches. You’ve got to kind of put your head down and let it go and try not to dwell on the past. Senior linebacker Dontavis Sapp, who issued a speech to

the team in the locker room following Saturday’s loss, said the bye week will be put to good use. “We’re ready to play on every Saturday of the year,” Sapp said. “Fortunately, this week we’re off, so we can go back to work and get some guys healthy, just snap and clear. Just keep our mental stamina. “This week off will be good for us.” Three of the last four years, UT followed its bye week with a loss to an SEC opponent, with a 2011 victory against Buffalo the lone exception. While at Cincinnati from 2010-12, Jones directed his teams to wins in all three of their contests following byes, including a 27-24 win over No. 25 Virginia Tech in 2012. South Carolina (4-1, 2-1 SEC) will be coming off a contest with Arkansas when it enters Neyland Stadium for the noon kickoff. The game falls on UT’s fall break. The Gamecocks bested UT the past three times the two squads have met. “This team has become closer than any team I’ve been a part of, and they hurt, but we’re going to keep grinding,” Jones said. “That’s the only way I know how to do it and that’s the only way they’re going to know how to do it.” Jones did not hold his typical weekly press luncheon on Monday, but the Vols will practice throughout the bye week. “We are always ready to play,” junior cornerback Justin Coleman said. “The bye week will be something to allow us to look a little more into our opponent. We will be ready.”

dcobb3@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron tprovost@utk.edu

Lady Vols fall short against Gamecocks Joseph McCluney Contributor An early overtime goal was enough to give nationally-ranked South Carolina a 1-0 win over Tennessee in a tough defensive battle at Regal Soccer Stadium on Sunday. No. 17 South Carolina’s intense pressure payed off, as sophomore midfielder Raina Johnson scored the winning goal after her run sent her through the Tennessee defense and in on goal. Her shot was barely scuffed by the keeper, but it was enough to get the job done. Tennessee was unable to keep the ball long enough to develop a substantial attacking threat. Coach Brian Pensky attributed that to the Gamecocks’ playing style. “For a better part of the game they had the ball,” Pensky said. “For moments we were able to get it back, we just couldn’t generate enough of an attack ... Their pressure of their front three and midfield three [made] it hard.” South Carolina, who was 10-1-1 entering Sunday’s game, is known for its stout defense, allowing an average of 0.40 goals per game, good for fifth in the country. The Lady Vols found it hard to penetrate that stout defense. Tennessee had only four shots, forcing two saves from South Carolina goalkeeper Sabrina

D’Angelo. The best chances for the Vols came from set pieces, which were ineffective. “The balls we’re getting from our players on our set pieces are now between average to poor,” Pensky said. “We weren’t very good today in that regard, and that responsibility falls on all of us.” Though the Lady Vols’ offense found it hard to repeat the same performance that earned the squad a 3-0 win against Ole Miss on Friday, the defense nearly helped the Vols escape with a tie. A spectacular goal-line clearance by defender Megan Erskine in the 61st minute kept Tennessee in the game. Junior goalkeeper Julie Eckel repeated her heroics from Friday night, parrying various crosses away from the penalty area. “I think they did well again today,” Pensky said. “They’re fatigued. They all went 90 minutes Friday night ... for the entire part they went 90-plus today. I thought that group was good.” Despite the concession of the late goal, keeper Eckel remains confident in her back line, a defense that has allowed on average less than a goal per game. “Everyone has my back,” Eckel said. “It’s just a matter of executing what we’ve been practicing ... I can’t imagine playing with another defense.” Looking ahead to next week’s game at Kentucky, Pensky said he hopes to tweak the Lady Vols’

MEDIA DAY continued from Page 1 That emphasis on weight training is coupled with an intense conditioning regimen and an adamance by Martin that his players finish practice at the pace they start, which takes its toll on the body. “Sometimes it’s hard to maintain that weight because we run a lot and stuff like that,” redshirt sophomore forward Quinton Chievous said, “but coach Nic, that’s probably one of his big things is that we have all those nutrition meals, snacks and things so we can maintain our weight.”

Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon

Tennessee midfielder Michele Christy controls the ball with a knee juggle against Jennifer Miller of Ole Miss Rebels at Regal Soccer Stadium on Oct. 4. style of play and create a more attacking threat. “That’s our job as coaches,” Pensky said. “How are we going to work to put teams on their heels and find less moments to be on our own heels.” Despite the loss, Tennessee will look to continue their streak of not incurring back-to-back reg-

A better shooting breed Tennessee’s lockdown defender a season ago, junior guard Josh Richardson was often dared to shoot from the perimeter as defenders sought to stay in front of UT’s leading scorer Jordan McRae and double Jarnell Stokes down low. If the offseason is any indication, opponents won’t be able to repeat that in 2013-14. Martin said that Richardson has shot about 68 percent from the perimeter over the offseason, and Richardson attributes that to his offseason work. “It’s definitely been a big focus for me,” Richardson said. “The past few years, I haven’t shot the three ball as well as I wanted

ular season losses since October of 2010. To do that, Pensky knows the mood in the camp will have to be one of unity. “When we get tough results, we can’t point fingers at each other,” Pensky said. “And I don’t think they do.”

to. So I feel like this year, I put a lot of work into it. I’m real confident going in. “If I’m able to knock down an open shot, I feel like that will stretch the court a little more.” Dealing with expectation Martin described his squad “as the most talented team across the board” that he has coached in his time at UT. It’s a label that comes with expectations. “I guess you could say that,” Stokes said. “These guys expect to make the tournament. We are very hungry right now.” – Assistant Sports Editor Troy ProvostHeron and Copy Editor Steven Cook contributed to this story.


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