Page 1

Old City Java brews perfect cup of joe

‘Grind for 9’ drives Lady Vols

>>pg. 3

>>pg. 6

Thursday, October 3, 2013

Issue 31, Volume 124

Street Fair alleviates midterm stress stand, a therapy dog and suicide prevention training. Booths from a slew of difAs midterms approach, the ferent organizations lined the opportunity to unwind could edges of the walkway, featuring not have been more timely. one stand representing the UT The eighth annual VolAware Counseling Center. Here, stuStreet Fair took place dents could make stress balls Wednesday on Pedestrian out of balloons and sand. Walkway, offering a variety of Ashley Wilson, a doctoral activities designed to reduce intern in clinical psychology, stress and promote mental supervised this booth. health, including a “makeWilson said school brings a-friend” ball pit, a popcorn stress to students for a number

Manuela Haddad Staff Writer

of reasons. “Students are coming in and they often experience a lot of depression or a lot of anxiety around school related stuff,” Wilson said. “Being a college student is really hard because there’s a lot of work involved, but it’s also a big transition for a lot of people too. It’s very different from high school; a lot of people are away from home, away from family, so there’s a lot of stress that goes in that

too.” Wilson also provided some advice on how students can combat stress. “We have these stress balls here that can be very helpful, something to kind of squeeze and feel the difference between tension and relaxation in your body,” Wilson said. “Another thing that students can do on their own is practicing deep breathing and other self-soothing strategies like going for a

walk, or baking. “Anything that you can do to help yourself feel like it’s relaxing … The best things you can do to stay mentally well – get your eight hours of sleep a night, exercise, and eat well.” Another booth, hosted by the Human-Animal Bond in Tennessee, allowed students to interact with a therapy dog named Shelby.

Play puts focus on real-life struggles Liv McConnell Staff Writer The Clarence Brown Theatre company will raise the curtain on its newest theatrical endeavor, “Our Country’s Good,” for a preview performance this Thursday prior to opening night on Friday. Both shows start at 7:30 p.m. and are located at the Carousel Theatre stage. The play, which is centered around a group of British convicts who are sent to settle an Australian penal colony in 1788, explores themes not only of the transformative power of theater, but also of the human experience. “It’s a good play in that it shows people who are striving for something,” Neil Friedman, Clarence Brown’s resident actor, said. “The government is striving to be more humane with these convicts while the convicts are trying to figure out what to do with their lives now that they’re 15,000 miles from everything they know. “It’s a very human play, to see people going through their lives and trying to figure out which direction to go.”

See VOLAWARE on Page 2

Hudson Forrister • The Daily Beacon

Senior Kimberely Burley tries her luck at a zorbing race during the VolAware Street Fair on Wednesday, Oct. 2.

See OCG PREVIEW on Page 5

Sibling rivalry Final Student Life candidate speaks hits home for two Lady Vols Emilee Lamb

Assistant News Editor

Cody Gross Contributor

but I want to beat her really bad,” Caroline Capocaccia said. “I need that bragging right because I don’t have another chance.” Despite all three being involved with soccer for much of their lives, the age difference between Caroline and Melissa has prevented them from playing each other before. However, sophomore Suzanne has squared off against Melissa in her clublevel days prior to college. “We’ve always been so competitive with each other, but we’ll talk to each other a little bit,” Suzanne Capocaccia said about her sibling rivalry on the field.

For one family, the result of this Friday’s soccer match between Ole Miss (9-2-1) and Tennessee (6-3-2) goes far beyond a win or a loss. A sibling rivalry will take center stage at Regal Stadium on Friday at 7 p.m. as Tennessee defenders Caroline Capocaccia and Suzanne Capocaccia take the field against their younger sister and Ole Miss defender, Melissa Capocaccia. Caroline is a senior for the Lady Vols, so Friday’s matchup against Melissa — a freshman — is her only opportunity to claim soccer supremacy within the family. See CAPOCACCIA on Page 6 “I’m real excited about it,

INSIDE THE DAILY BEACON News Arts & Culture Opinions Sports

Page 2 Page 3, 5 Page 4 Page 6

That’s all, folks. UT hosted an open forum for it’s fourth and final candidate for the position of vice chancellor of Student Life on Wednesday in ThompsonBoling Arena where Vincent Carilli, Ph.D., attempted to show a group of faculty and students why he is the man for the job. The potential UT administrator unveiled his ideas for propelling UT toward Top 25 status. “Pretty impressive group that we’re chasing,” Carilli said. “As I look at this group, I’m pretty hopeful and excited that Tennessee can reach this metric, and move the agenda forward if you will. I think that that’s certainly doable.” Because the U.S. News and World Report rankings of public higher education institutions rely heavily on graduation and retention rates, Carilli provided theories regarding how to motivate students.

“(Students) who identify with a group of peers persist at a higher rate and graduate more quickly than those who do not,” Carilli said. “It’s pretty simple. We have to make sure that they get in here, that we work through the transition, we get them comfortable in their environment and then we get them interacting with their peers as quickly as possible.” Kelsey Theodore, a senior majoring in history, said she related strongly to Carilli’s statements about a student’s first semester. “I really liked how he kept talking about the freshman experience, and how a lot of times it’s those first six weeks of a freshman’s semester that they decide that they want to transfer,” Theodore said. “I’m a senior now, so it’s been a while, but when I was a freshman, my first six weeks I decided I was going to transfer to a different university and just decided to • Photo Courtesy of Scranton University stay here because I got plugged Vincent Carilli, the fourth candidate for the vice in pretty soon after that.” chancellor for Student Life, spoke to students and faculty in the Ray Mears Room of Thompson-Boling See VC CHANCELLOR on Page 2 Arena on Wednesday, Oct. 2.

Like The Daily Beacon is printed using soy based ink on newsprint containing recycled content, utilizing renewable sources and produced in a sustainable, environmental responsble manner.

utdailybeacon.com

The Daily Beacon

Follow

@UTDailyBeacon

Follow

@DailyBeacon


2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, October 3, 2013 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb

elamb1@utk.edu

Around Rocky Top

Diversity panel investigates blurred social media lines Samantha Smoak Online Editor

Hudson Forrister • The Daily Beacon

Matt Seitz, Ph.D. student in counseling psychology, falls while jousting at the VolAware Student Fair on Oct. 2.

VOLAWARE continued from Page 1 Karen Armsey, the program’s administrator, said many students who stopped at her booth talked about their own pets. “You know, we’ve been talking a lot about people’s dogs that they had to leave at home,” Armsey said. “You know, ‘I miss my dog so much,’ ‘I have a dog like this,’ or ‘I lost my dog recently,’ and some grief issues. So, a lot of kids

just … missing their dogs. It all just depends on the person.” Armsey mentioned that her organization will have dogs available for students in Hodges library next week for midterms and again during finals. “We’re just here to make people realize that animals lower blood pressure, and lower stress hormones … (and it’s) just a feel-good thing,” she said. Brooke Conner, freshman in management, enjoyed her time at the fair and looked

forward to returning at 3 p.m. for Yoga Fest, an attempt to set a record for the largest number of students practicing yoga together. “I really liked the ball pit … and the jousting inflatables,” she said. “I liked learning the different booths, like what’s on campus to, you know, get involved with. I liked learning about the counseling center and the resources here on campus, and I got … stress balls, and just goodies like that. I really enjoyed it, and I’m looking forward to the yoga.”

So much depends upon 140 characters. The College of Communication and Information’s annual Diversity and Inclusion Week continued Tuesday in the Scripps Lab of the Communication Building with an afternoon panel on Social Media and Diversity. The panel consisted of students and media professionals who shared their views on the topic. Natalie Spiro, social media manager for Ruby Tuesday’s, discussed the lack of intimacy in social media. “Having a computer screen in front of your face removes a certain personal element,” Spiro said. “It still feels almost like there is a certain degree of remaining anonymity because you’re not in a face to face interaction.” Spiro said that the lack of a personal connection makes pushing, or even crossing, boundaries feel socially acceptable. “There’s something about social media for the good and the bad that removes yourself from it since it is on the world wide web,” she said. “It sometimes feels almost not real and therefore allows people to think ‘Oh, it’s ok to jump this boundary that I would never do in real life.’” Spiro also emphasized the importance of thinking twice before posting something online, particularly when done under an anonymous name. “If you’re ashamed of what you’re saying so you want to have a alternative name then maybe you should think twice about what you’re saying in the first place,” she said. Brittany Jackson, a senior majoring in journalism and electronic media, said she believes that being educated about different views will help decrease discrimination on the Internet.

VC CHANCELLOR continued from Page 1 Comparing his plans for UT with experiences in his current position at the University of Scranton, Carilli emphasized the importance of keeping the postgrad world at the forefront of students’ minds. “What are you going to do for having been educated at the University of Tennessee that’s going to us accomplish this mission?” Carilli said. “We need to raise the expectation level before they ever decide to cast their lot with us ... It’s a very empowering message to be able to say, ‘This is what Tennessee

TreDarius Hayes • The Daily Beacon

Panelist Natalie Spiro, right, senior in public relations, speaks her views on social media and diversity during a Diversity panel as a part of CCI Diversity and Inclusion Week on Oct. 2. “We have to come from somewhere where we can share our thoughts and personal views, but (also) be educated about everybody’s different opinions,” Jackson said. The line between free speech and hate speech is a blurred one, in Rennie Leon’s opinion. Leon is the marketing and social media director in the corporate communications group for Scripps Network Interactive. “There’s no rules for what constitutes hate speech and what is just someone stating their opinion” Leon said. “It’s very subjective.” Leon believes platforms need to cautiously monitor the content of users’ posts. “I think it’s ultimately up to

the social media manager (or) the social media department in terms of determining what’s acceptable in what isn’t, and monitoring day to day, hour to hour,” Leon said “I see some brands’ Facebook pages and I’m appalled at what is allowed and what’s not taken off.” Leon recommended that those beginning the job search soon master the art of social media. “If you harness the power of social media … and have a positive presence on those platforms, this is how recruiters are finding people now a days,” Leon said. “It’s no longer mailing resumes (or) emailing resumes … It’s about your personal brand.”

prepared me to do, and now I want to go out and do it.’” Carilli said he views the future he could bring to UT as one dominated by school pride and a sense of community. “We have to insist that during the undergraduate experience, and the experience that our graduate students have, that they develop an affinity for this place,” Carilli said. What makes this place so special? How can we get students to recognize that the experience that they had over the past four years … connected them to this place, hopefully for a lifetime?” Formerly the associate dean of students at UT, Carilli expressed his hopes

that, under his direction, the Division of Student Life could bring that desire for renewed school spirit to fruition. “I still keep in touch with some of the students that I worked with and mentored when I was here as the dean of students and the associate dean, and they talk about this place with a sense of joy and pride that I think is really special in the higher-ed market,” Carilli said. “And I think that that is something clearly that Student Affairs can help develop and Student Life can help develop in terms of doing that more and creating and building this affinity while they’re on campus.”


Thursday, October 3, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

Knoxville Coffee shop succeeds with strong community bonds Hannah Cather Photo Editor While most of the Old City sleeps, a coffee shop in its midst guides drowsy-eyed customers to consciousness. With a simple yet satisfying menu, Old City Java delivers caffeine deliciously from the break of dawn until the sun has set again every day of the week. Shaun Parrish, owner and main barista, discussed the business of the coffee shop. “It’s all or nothing here,” Parrish said. “You’ll get a second to catch a breath of fresh air and then 20 people walk in.” This sense of community has supported Old City Java since 1991. Shaun and Meg Parrish’s dream turned into reality when the owner decided to sell the business. “We love our sense of community down here,” Meg Parrish, the business’ pastry producer, said. “We get to know so many people, and it’s wonderful.” For about three years, Gaby Horne has worked at Old City Java and has never stopped loving her job and the community of the coffee shop. “It’s about loving something, being geeky about it and doing it really well,” Horne said. “We definitely have regulars. Every now and then they’ll throw a curve ball.” Eric Lee visits Old City Java every day, and unless he’s “feeling frisky,” a black coffee with soy milk is his go-to. When Lee walks in the door, someone grabs soy milk from the fridge, and it sits on the counter waiting for him. “I like Shaun and Meg,” Lee said. “I want to give ‘em my money.” Front doors lead guests through the main space to the counter where they notice a red espresso machine, a chalkboard menu and an iPad serving as the cash register. After ordering,

Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

Old City Java offers seasonal selections of pastries in addition to a variety of loose leaf teas. customers can exit and sit in the alley courtyard or remain indoors. The initial space, with its green walls and circle window, provides a brighter setting. Move through to the larger room for darker, yet cozier tables. Art work hangs on all of the walls, and the alley even hosts graffiti. Working people and students alike visit Old City Java for their morning Joe. Laptops in tow, many even do their work in the shop. Two large rooms and a courtyard provide plenty of space to accomplish daily tasks. Free Internet makes productivity even easier. Mary Rogers sits in a nook of the larger room, under the Starry Night mural that is painted on the ceiling. As a post doctoral research assistant in UT’s plant science department, she frequents Old City Java when in need of a quiet, comfortable place to complete research assignments. “It’s locally owned, and they make good coffee,” Rogers said. “They’re friendly and close to home.” Sitting at a church pew that

extends the length of the main space, a local landscaping business owner worked to improve his branding. Daniel Aisenbrey enjoys a black coffee with his apple pop-tart, a signature pastry at Old City Java, which is topped with a maple glaze and pecans. Flaky and filled with locally sourced apple slices, the “popp-tart” always disappears first. “I’m here mostly for the atmosphere,” Aisenbrey said. The ambiance he refers to understandably entices customers to return. While music typically provides background noise in coffee shops, Old City Java has opted out. The whir of coffee beans grinding and keyboards clicking keep awkward silences at bay. Frequent greetings from the staff and casual conversations add to the murmur of the place, but never to the point of distraction. Overall, Meg Parrish enjoys the community aspect of their coffee shop. “We get to know everyone because they come in every day,” she said. “It’s awesome.”

Marc Jacobs bids adieu to French fashion house Associated Press PARIS (AP) — What was likely designer Marc Jacobs’ last ready-to-wear collection for Louis Vuitton looked like a show in mourning Wednesday — black, black and more black. A dark fountain and a nightmarish carousel with inky horses were the backdrop for a universe of clothes all in black. Maids cleaned away dust from the steps of the disturbing set, which traced Jacobs’ influential 16-year reign at Vuitton. Shortly after the show at the Louvre Museum in Paris, the visual metaphor was explained: French luxury conglomerate LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton announced that Jacobs was stepping down as creative director of its flagship brand. Jacobs, who is also the director of an eponymous brand, is one of the biggest names in the fashion industry. Under his tenure, Louis Vuitton became the most lucrative fashion house in the world, in part thanks to his creation of a ready-to-wear line. LVMH, which owns the Louis Vuitton brand and an array of other luxury names purveying everything from jewelry to champagne, would not say who would replace Jacobs or what his next move would be. From her front-row seat, U.S. Vogue editor Anna

Wintour gave Jacobs an ovation at Wednesday’s show. “Fashion needs rock stars, and they don’t come any starrier than Marc at Louis Vuitton,” she told The Associated Press in an email. “He has always understood that it is a house about travel, and every season he has taken us on incredible journeys with his spectacular shows — shows that made Vuitton a global phenomenon but always brought you back to the heart of Paris.” Such visible acclaim from the powerful editor — to whom he partly dedicated the show — is extremely rare. On the Vuitton catwalk, models filed by in jet-black warrior-feathered headdresses as they displayed Jacobs’ 41 designs. The pieces used embroidered black tulle stockings, Eisenhower jackets embellished with large feathered shoulders, dark embroideries, smoking jackets and some 1940s baggy blue jeans. The glimmering landscape was towered over by a huge clock whose arm went back in time. It was as if the designer was trying to look to the past — or even get some precious time back. Even the clothes went back in time. Floor-length, thick Edwardian dresses with large sleeves fused with black decorative corset details, evoking fashions of the 1900s and contrasting with the more reveal-

ing “showgirl” looks. “We went back and used all the different bits of the sets of the past and made them black,” Jacobs explained backstage. He didn’t elaborate on his plans or comment on reports that he’s focusing on a possible public offering for the Marc Jacobs brand. Jacobs expanded the Vuitton brand from its iconic bags into clothes, launching readyto-wear and shoe collections in 1998. At the time, it was seen as a marketing strategy to help raise the profile of the luxury house, which began as a leather bag and case maker in 19th-century Paris, when aristocratic women needed fashionable travel bags. While Vuitton’s clothes are not a red-carpet staple, Jacobs’ shows always attract A-list celebrities. Kate Moss has been a muse for him, and director Sofia Coppola has just made a series of handbags for Louis Vuitton. Coppola, Princess Charlene of Monaco and the Hollywood’s Fanning sisters were among those at Wednesday’s show. In the program notes, Jacobs enclosed an emotional message to LVMH’s CEO: “For... Bernard Arnault. All my love, always.” Glenda Bailey, the influential U.S. editor of Harper’s Bazaar, said the show signaled “an end of an era.”

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

‘Beauty and the Beast’ musical charms locals Andelyn Barclay Contributor For Disney fans in the Knoxville area, Sept. 30 through Oct. 1 was a dream come true. The Tennessee Theatre’s Broadway series brought Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast” to the stage. More than half an hour before the performance began, crowds were already lining up outside the theater in preparation for the event. Many people were excited about the experience as a whole. “I love coming to the theatre and seeing everything live,” Patricia Copeland of Kodak, Tenn. said. “Seeing all the little girls here dressed up as Belle is really fun. It’s a great experience to be able to come.” For some, it was expected to be a learning experience as well. Brandy Arnold, teacher at Jefferson County High School, said that they are using this performance to inspire their students, who will be performing “Beauty and the Beast” as their senior production. “We look forward to having the opportunity to see it here first and then perform in March,” Arnold said. Other Jefferson County theater students were in attendance as well. “I’m excited to see how the characters act,” Kaitlyn Reed, an actress in JCHS’s production, said. “It will

give me a better perspective on how to act onstage. I’m also looking forward to the dancing. I’ve been a dancer for forever, so it will be good.” The performance began with the overture, and a narrator’s voice told the story of the spoiled, selfish prince who was cursed by an enchantress to become a hideous beast until he could find true love. Then the lights came up and the first musical number “Belle” began. Many of the larger musical numbers were met with applause and the audience sang along. The production also featured the use of several different types of theatrical special effects. At the end of “Be Our Guest,” streamers shot out over the audience while the audience clapped and cheered. Other special effects included the use of large, lifelike puppets during the two wolf attack scenes. The Beast’s transformation into the prince was done through the use of cables to lift the actor into the air. Smoke, fog and strobe lighting were also incorporated into the performance. The special effects could not tell the story alone, however. That is where the music came in. The play had each of the classic songs, such as “Belle,” “Beauty and the Beast,” “The Mob Song ” and “Be Our Guest.” The

Broadway adaptation also contained several new musical numbers, including a new song for Beast called “If I Can’t Love Her.” Belle also gained a new song called “A Change in Me,” which depicted the moment Belle began to realize that she was in love with Beast. “It was really good,” Ben Bean, a senior in biochemistry, cellular and molecular biology and theater, said. “It was tugging my heartstrings when she was singing. It was awesome.” After the performance, the crowd spilled onto the street to take pictures with the marquee poster and talk about the performance. Some attendees found the differences between the play and the movie to be the best part. “Well, I really love ‘Human Again,’” William Young, junior in plant sciences and theater, said. “In the play, not in the movie. They’re not completely different, but I think the differences make it special to go see one and then the other.” The students from Jefferson County High School took more away from the play than just watching a performance. Darby Atchley said she hopes to learn what she saw in her performance for her school’s play. “Everything was really flashy and showy,” Atchley said. “People put a lot of hard work into it.”


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, October 3, 2013 Editor-in-Chief R.J. Vogt

OPINIONS

rvogt@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Capitalism depends on crime Guest Column by

Matt Rowland In response to Adam Prosise, in his Daily Beacon column on Sept. 20 entitled, “Capitalism works to fight poverty with ambition.” I agree with Mr. Prosise that capitalism encourages “ambition.” My definition of “ambition,” however, includes crime. In 1975, economist David M. Gordon wrote “Crime is a rational response … to the problems of poverty and homelessness for the working class.” Capitalism encourages crime for all classes, vis-à-vis its abject materialism. A hero to the suffering classes, “Robin Hood” symbolizes criminality only to the ruling class; by corollary, for the mass of human beings in the world today, the ruling class is criminal, and “crime,” a rational alternative to indigence. Far from being “antithetical” to capitalism, crime is actually a necessary, integral component of its economic structure. Corporations, which by definition must continually profit to exist, have immense incentive to keep workers’ wages as low as possible. They externalize the “costs” of paying workers lessthan-livable wages to society at large. Low wages for workers offsets the problem of poverty to everyone else, with property crime being the necessary, natural result. In short, capitalists expect us to rob them – or at least, to try. Look out the rose-tinted windows of our American SUV. One will see public buses transporting minimum-wage workers to their wage-slave jobs. We take for granted the need for McDonald’s and Wal-Mart. We all know that these wages fall far short of providing livable conditions for workers, yet we insist that McDonald’s and Wal-Mart are legitimate. The demand for underpaid labor exceeds the “supply” of higher-tier income spaces, such that a life of hard work in no way guarantees stability, much less mobility or “success,” by nature of the system’s structure. I argue that, without petty criminal activity, the working classes would not be able to afford their bus passes that get them to their “legal” gigs. Therefore, crime is a necessary component of capitalism; crime empowers the working classes to literally survive. The FBI reported $15.5 billion in property crime in 2012; we can bet that illegal income went back into the “legitimate” economy. At any given time, at least 55 percent of “First-World” citizens reside on the brink of oblivion. If we include the whole world, this “Precariat” class represents the vast majority of humanity. Beyond comprehension, capitalists insist this obscene exploitation is essential to “prosperity” – which is, of course, enjoyed most fully by the Ruling Class. To suggest that the oppressed classes suffer as a result of their own lack of “ambition” offends egregiously. Good ideas, talent and hard work can occasionally result in economic success, but the mere existence of the exceptional hardly justifies the rule of disparity in both this country and the world. Mr. Prosise refers to today’s skyrocketing “canyon-like” income gap – both within America and, more markedly, across the interdependent global economy – as a “perceived problem.” Such extreme disparity is not “maybe” the result of capitalism; it is the definition of mature capitalism. The capitalist responds in typical, nihilistic fashion: “I don’t care.” Lastly, Mr. Prosise uses the typical right-wing verbiage, the so-called “handout” – their pet epithet for social welfare – when it is clear the capitalist class incontrovertibly receive far more “handouts” than America’s poor. The House GOP this month approved a bill cutting $39 billion in food stamps to America’s poor over the next decade; yet in January’s fiscal cliff deal, “A smorgasbord of 43 business and energy tax breaks, collectively worth $67 billion this year, was packed into the emergency tax legislation,” according to reclaimdemocracy.org. If it is rational that the 1 percent deserve such an opulent share of “legal money,” is it not rational for the working classes to have the “ambition” to “achieve” with “illegal money?” Abe Lincoln would agree that today’s Plutocracy is patently un-American. “I see, in the near future, a crisis … Corporations have been enthroned, an era of corruption will follow, and the money power of the country will endeavor to prolong its reign … until the wealth is aggregated in a few hands, and the republic destroyed.” Yes, I’ll not only take a handout from Robin Hood – I’ll help Robin Hood. The capitalist class has been quick to “redistribute labor” entirely to the poor since time immemorial; it’s time we “redistribute wealth” back the other way. Matt Rowland is a pre-med student who used to divide his life into hour-long increments and sell his labor at sub-livable minimum wage, but due to a heaping dose of white privilege is once again a coddled college student. He can be reached at mrowlan3@utk.edu.

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Flooding the field: The GOP’s unsportsman-like conduct Uncommon Sense by

Evan Ford Imagine you’re a softball coach in the ninth inning. You’ve edged out a hard-earned victory, and your team is throwing the last pitch. Then suddenly, the opposing team’s coach turns on a few fire hoses, points them at the ground, and floods the field. Players are sloshing to higher ground, helmets floating out of overflowing dugouts. The game is technically over, you won, but now everyone is losing. There will be no more softball for days, the field’s probably ruined, and everyone in the stands gets their pants wet, which is no fun. The other coach warned you, too. He walked over to your dugout in the eighth inning, pointed to the hoses, and said, “If you don’t throw this game, you know what’s going to happen.” This is exactly what happened in the House of Representatives over the last couple of weeks, and I mean exactly. When the GOP let the government shut down by refusing to pass budget legislation, they flooded the field. If you’re unaware of what’s going on, here’s a three-sentence summary: Three days ago, on Monday, the federal government was set to lose its spending power on the same day it opened a major part of healthcare legislation. The House GOP saw this as an opportunity, and refused to pass a

Editor-in-Chief: R.J. Vogt Managing Editor: Melodi Erdogan Chief Copy Editor: Gage Arnold News Editor: Hanna Lustig Asst. News Editor: Emilee Lamb Sports Editor: David Cobb Asst. Sports Editor: Troy Provost-Heron Arts & Culture Editor: Claire Dodson Asst. Arts & Culture Editor: Cortney Roark Online Editor: Samantha Smoak

the law was being passed, was an appropriate time, as were the three years since when the House has repeatedly tried and failed to gut the bill. They had nine innings to win fairly. Whether you love or hate Obamacare, whether you lean Republican or Democrat, these actions threaten the foundation of democracy in this country. For instance, if you hate Obamacare, you can elect representatives to repeal it. House Republicans are refusing to let this legislative process work. The constitution calls for checks and balances to limit the power of any one section of the government. In this case, a minority in one house of one branch of government is holding power over the rest. They’re ignoring legislative process and betraying the spirit of democracy. Political disagreement and compromise are vital to democracy, and a healthy tension between big government and small government minded men keeps the government accountable for its spending. If Republicans hate Obamacare, the GOP should do what they can to limit it. That’s their job. But this is not war – all is not fair. Even if Obamacare is terrible, the GOP cannot ignore the tenets of democracy just to get their way. They cannot press pause on the salaries of millions of Americans because they want minority rule. They cannot be a bully to get what they want and expect no consequences. But they did. They flooded the field. And all that’s left of our democracy is a pair of soggy cleats. Evan Ford is a junior in philosophy. He can be reached at eford6@utk.edu.

Soothing winds of fall carry refreshment to campus Knight Errant by

Victoria Knight As my fellow students complain about the lingering heat and beg for the arrival of fall, I am struck with the synchronicity of everyone’s requests. It’s hard enough to get college students to agree on our own football coach, let alone a season. But the vote is unanimous: we want fall. So what is it exactly about fall that makes Americans, and more specifically, UT students, love it so? Some would argue that it is the onslaught of football season. Having your weekends revolve around Saturdays and, whether the Vols lose or win, is an intoxicating tradition. No one can deny that standing in Neyland Stadium decked out in orange and screaming Rocky Top is one of the best fall activities that exists. But even if we were on a winning streak, there has to be more to it than that. Temperature is another factor. Despite being an avid lover of summer, even I can

appreciate that once the season has conducted its term, it ought to let fall come on in. We all want to pile on the sweaters, scarves and boots, looking adorable instead of just a sweaty, hot mess, as some of us have all summer. Fall also brings with it the beginning of holiday season — Halloween and Thanksgiving include their own unique traditions of corn mazes, trick-or-treating, food, friends and family. Having these two holidays included in the reign of fall, and leading almost right up to Christmas, gives us the feeling of expectation and excitement throughout the whole season. Of course, there’s the food fall brings as well. All pumpkin everything. Hot drinks – apple cider, hot cocoa and, of course, fallflavored coffee. Also sweets galore: candy corn, assorted breads, cookies, cakes and pies of varying fruit flavors. Thanksgiving beckons a column in itself. Despite all of the wonderful things that the coming of fall brings, none of these seem to really capture exactly why it is so popular. Instead, I would argue that it is the feeling which fall evokes. The crispness in the air gives it a certain heavy sense – a feeling of anticipation. Unlike spring, the feeling in the air is not of something new or liberating; instead this air is a little older and a little wiser. It is just as

excitable, but it carries with it a knowledge of winter and what is to come. It almost feels like the butterflies in your stomach right before you give a class presentation or do anything that scares you, but the butterflies are perhaps a little more amiable, more like when you’re about to kiss someone you like for the first time. There is also a limbo of the seasons, a hovering back and forth between the preceding and succeeding seasons, which somewhat endears fall to people. It keeps us guessing, on our toes – sometimes the day starts out cloudy and cold and then changes to a beautiful semi-warm day. In comparison to the unchanged sweltering heat of summer and the bleak cold of winter, the capriciousness of fall is a welcome change. But above all, fall gives you the feeling that in this day, hour and very moment you are glad to be alive. Walking around on campus, bundled in sweaters and leggings, pullovers and boots, hugging onto your coffee or apple cider, and almost skipping with joy at the wonderful fall feeling in the air, you realize that in autumn, there is nowhere else you would rather be than East Tennessee. Victoria Knight is a senior in microbiology. She can be reached at vknight4@utk.edu.

Get Fuzzy • Darby Conley

Non Sequitur • Wiley

EDITORIAL

spending bill unless the White House agreed to delay and defund Obamacare. Democrats refused, and as a result, all non-essential federal expenditures stopped. As you’ve heard, this shut museums and parks, stopped pay for around a million federal employers and will cost the government billions in back pay. The way I’m telling this story is important. With this order of events, it could seem that the Democrats had the last move and refused to budge, causing this shutdown. This is how the whole thing seems, and a lot of people are buying that this is a refusal to compromise, another failure of the two-party system. Calling this “another failure in Congress” is false. There are plenty of failures of the twoparty system, but this is not one of them. This is one team’s coach flooding the field. Think back to the softball example. Technically, you had the last move. After all, the coach warned you. You could have thrown the game, and spared the flood. You could have compromised. Are you to blame? Two words: hell no. This isn’t a compromise, it’s a threat. It’s what a top White House aide called “a bomb strapped to [the GOP’s] chest.” Obama likened it to being held ransom, and refused to negotiate. Now, in the interest of balance, I should talk about some reasons for the GOP’s actions that make sense. I’m willing to accept some arguments against Obamacare, and maybe they were right in wanting to delay some portions of the bill. Maybe, as Boehner said, “Americans don’t want Obamacare,” even if the 2012 election said otherwise. There is a time and a place to debate the Affordable Care Act. Three years ago, when

Photo Editors: Janie Prathammavong, Hannah Cather Design Editors: Caroline Gompers, Katrina Roberts Copy Editors: Steven Cook, Hannah Fuller, Megan Hinson, McCord Pagan, Dargan Southard

ADVERTISING/PRODUCTION Advertising Manager: Sookie Park Media Sales Representatives: Lauren Gregg, Caitlin McCleary, Ryan McPherson, Alley Wilcox Advertising Production: Jamie Reed

Editorial Production Artists: Hannah Kline, Lauren Ratliff, Steven Woods Classified Adviser: Jessica Hingtgen

CONTACTS

To report a news item, please e-mail editor.news@utdailybeacon.com or call 865-974-2348 To submit a press release, please e-mail pressreleases@utdailybeacon.com To place an ad, please e-mail beaconads@utk.edu or call 865-974-5206 To place a classified ad, please e-mail orderad@utdailybeacon.com or call 865-974-4931

Advertising: (865) 974-5206 beaconads@utk.edu Classifieds: (865) 974-4931 orderad@utdailybeacon.com Editor-in-Chief: (865) 974-2348 editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com Main Newsroom: (865) 974-3226 editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com The Daily Beacon is published by students at The University of Tennessee Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters and Tuesday and Friday during the summer semester. The offices are located at 1340 Circle Park Drive, 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The newspaper is free on campus and is available via mail subscription for $200/year, $100/semester or $70/summer only.

It is also available online at: www.utdailybeacon.com LETTERS POLICY: The Daily Beacon welcomes all letters to the editor and guest columns from students, faculty and staff. Each submission is considered for publication by the editor on the basis of space, timeliness and clarity. The Beacon reserves the right to reject any submissions or edit all copy in compliance with available space, editorial policy and style. Contributions must include the author’s name and phone number for verification. Students must include their year in school and major. Letters to the editor and guest columns may be e-mailed to letters@utdailybeacon.com or sent to Editor, 1340 Circle Park Dr., 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314.


Thursday, October 3, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

OCG PREVIEW continued from Page 1 For the convicts, this inner search is facilitated through the production of a play ordered by their Lieutenant in an attempt to raise morale in their new and often hostile environment. Although 18th century British prisoners struggling for both hope and survival in Australia may seem like subject matter wholly removed from UT students’ everyday lives, set designer Josafeth Israel likens the play to the college experience. “It’s a brilliant play about transforming yourself and becoming something better,� Israel said. “It has this underlying theme that, in order to accomplish something, you have to put all of yourself into it, and that’s what college is really about. “When you enter college, you’re putting your past behind you and working to grow in the hopes of transcending into something even better.� For Kyle Schellinger, full-time Draper for Clarence Brown and lead costume designer of “Our Country’s Good,� the convict’s story and evolution mimics what theater as a whole is all about. “Thinking about ‘Our Country’s Good’ really enforces one thing in particular to me about theater,� Schellinger said. “When you first meet the convicts, they’re very fractured in their own worlds. There’s not a sense of camaraderie between them.� However, throughout the play, the characters learn to overcome their initial distrust and quarreling to truly grow together as a community, Schellinger said. “As the play progresses, you see them change so drastically and become a group that works together to create something,� he said. “There’s this one line near the end where the character says, ‘Think of us as your family.’ And for me, that has really held true

Thursday, October 3 Saturday, October 5

• Photo Courtesy of Itchy Bruddah

• Photo Courtesy of Our Country’s Good

Cory O’Brien-Pniewski, left, and Cynthia Anne Roser perform in an upcoming play, “Our Country’s Good.� The performance will run Oct. 3-22 at the Carousel Theater. for my experience with theater. You’re able to find your family through the work that we do.� A sense of camaraderie was certainly needed to overcome some of the unique struggles the play’s actualization presented, including the use of period dialect and the multi-role duty of the actors. “Almost everybody plays two characters,� said Friedman, who plays both an officer and a convict himself. “Sometimes we change on the corner of the stage in front of the audience and sometimes it’s a full costume change. The dialect difference was also challenging -- my convict character, John Wiseman, speaks with a cockney accent while Captain Phillip speaks high British.� For Friedman, this ability to

delve into another persona and mindset is one of the most interesting and rewarding aspects of his career field. “Acting is really about observing human behavior, and you can learn things about the different characters you explore that have the potential to broaden minds,� he said. “We could just observe other people by sitting on the main walkway of campus with a coffee and watching them go by, but you don’t get the insight that you do in theater. Here, you’re watching people have private moments and feeling what’s inside their heads.� Our Country’s Good will run Oct. 3-20. UT student prices include free admission to the preview, $10 for opening night and $5 for all other performances.

What: October MetroFest Music Tour featuring Itchy and the Hater Tots When: 8 p.m. Where: The Bowery Price: $5 Cortney’s Take: This year MetroFest is a music tour. October’s tour is here and presents Itchy and the Hater Tots, a “schizophrenic roots rock� band. They will be joined by acoustic/ bluegrass group, the Grassroots Gringos. This is sure to get your weekend started early with good music and will serve as your good deed for the weekend, as all proceeds go to the Joy of Music School.

• Photo Courtesy of Dungeon of Darkness Haunted Castle

What: Dungeon of Darkness Haunted Castle When: 7 - 11 p.m. Where: Alnwick Community Center in Maryville, Tenn. Price: $13-$20 Claire’s Take: What better way to celebrate the beginning of October than with a super scary haunted castle? You don’t have to wait until Halloween to clutch your date in fear as you traverse this terrifying terrain.

Sunday, October 6

Friday, October 4

• Photo of Courtesy Sundress Academy for the Arts

What: Sundress Academy for the Arts Poetry What: First Friday: UT Downtown Gallery Os- Reading suary project When: 4 p.m. When: 5 - 9 p.m. Where: Preservation Pub, 21+ Where: UT Downtown Gallery Price: Free Price: Free Claire’s Take: Use your Sunday afternoon to Cortney’s Take: It’s time again for First Friday. experience some culture at a poetry reading The UT Downtown Gallery will feature Ossuary, from a “local artists’ colony that hosts worka project centered around the use of bones as shops, retreats and residencies for writers, art. More than 300 artists have contributed to actors, filmmakers and visual artists,â€? according it, adding some serious and some playful bone to MetroPulse. This is a chance to be inspired by art works. Get into the spirit of Halloween and some of the most creative minds Knoxville has be artsy this First Friday. to offer. • Photo Courtesy of Diane Fox

TUTORING

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

UNFURN APTS

CONDOS FOR RENT

MERCH. FOR SALE

7(6735(3(;3(576 *5(*0$7/6$7 )RURYHU\HDUV0LFKDHO. 6PLWK3K'DQGKLVWHDFK HUV KDYH KHOSHG 87 VWX GHQWVSUHSDUHIRUWKH*5( *0$7 /6$7 2XU SUR JUDPVRIIHULQGLYLGXDOWXWRU LQJ DW D UHDVRQDEOH SULFH &DOO  IRUPRUH LQIRUPDWLRQZZZWHVWSUHS H[SHUWVFRP

&KULVWLDQ/HDUQLQJ&HQWHULQ 3RZHOO&OD[WRQDUHDORRN LQJ IRU DIWHUQRRQ WHDFKHU 6WDUWLQJ DW 30 *XDUDQ WHHGKRXUVDZHHN0XVW ZDQW WR ZRUN LQ D PLQLVWU\ EDVHG SURJUDP &DOO   IRU DQ DS SRLQWPHQW

)ORXU+HDG%DNHU\ +LULQJ IXOO DQG SDUW WLPH HQWU\ OHYHO EDNHUV  0XVW KDYH  DP DQG ZHHNHQG DYDLODELOLW\1RH[SHULHQFH QHFHVVDU\  $SSO\ RQOLQH ZZZIORXUKHDGEDNHU\FRP RU LQ SHUVRQ

6SDFLRXV   %5 DSWV 87 DUHD DQG :HVW .QR[YLOOH DUHD &DOO IRU DQ DSSRLQW PHQW   

%5 %$ FRQGR DYDLODEOH :' LQ XQLW 5HVHUYHG RII VWUHHW SDUNLQJ  PLQXWH ZDONWR/DZ6FKRRODQGVWD GLXP PR    

%22.6 6WROHQ PHPRULHV GDQJHURXV GUHDPV FRO ODSVLQJVRFLHWLHVORVWLGHQ WLWLHVORVWVRXOVHQJLQHHUHG OLIHRXUZRUOGWUDQVIRUPHG 5HDG 5HPHPEHULQJWKH)X WXUH VFLHQFHILFWLRQVWRULHV E\$ODQ.RYVNL$YDLODEOHYLD $PD]RQFRP

EMPLOYMENT &HQWUDO7HFKQRORJLHV,QFRU SRUDWHGLVKLULQJIRU)7LQ VLGH DFFRXQW DVVLVWDQW WR MRLQRXUWHDP0XVWKDYHH[ FHOOHQW FXVWRPHU VHUYLFH VNLOOV\HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQ PDUNHWLQJDQGVDOHV3OHDVH HPDLO UHVXPH WR VX]DQQH#FHQWUDOWHFKQROR JLHVLQFFRP

&DOOWRGD\E\SP DQG\RXUDG FDQVWDUW WRPRUURZ 

&XVWRPHU 6HUYLFH 5HSUHV HQWDWLYH  SHU KRXU 6HUYHFXVWRPHUVE\SURYLG LQJDQGDQVZHULQJTXHVWLRQV DERXWILQDQFLDOVHUYLFHV<RX ZLOO KDYH WKH DGYDQWDJH RI ZRUNLQJ ZLWK DQ H[SHUL HQFHG PDQDJHPHQW WHDP WKDW ZLOO ZRUN WR KHOS \RX VXFFHHG 3URIHVVLRQDO EXW FDVXDO ZHVW .QR[YLOOH FDOO FHQWHUORFDWLRQFRQYHQLHQW WR87DQG:HVW7RZQ0DOO )XOODQGSDUWWLPHSRVLWLRQV DUHDYDLODEOH:HZLOOPDNH HYHU\ HIIRUW WR SURYLGH D FRQYHQLHQWVFKHGXOH(PDLO KU#YUJNQR[YLOOHFRP )D[   5($' 7+('$,/<%($&21 &/$66,),('6

7RPDWR+HDG 0DUNHW6TXDUH *DOOHU\6KRSSLQJ&HQWHU .LQJVWRQ3LNH 1RZ KLULQJ IXOO DQG SDUW WLPH  DOO SRVLWLRQV 0XVW KDYH ZHHNHQG DYDLODELOLW\ $SSO\ RQOLQH ZZZWKHWR PDWRKHDGFRPRUDWWKHUHV WDXUDQW 7KH7RPDWR+HDG 0DUNHW6TXDUH 1RZ KLULQJ IXOO DQG SDUW WLPHIRUGLVKDQGIRRGUXQ QHUV1RH[SHULHQFHQHFHV VDU\0XVWKDYHRSHQZHHN HQGDYDLODELOLW\6XEPLWDS SOLFDWLRQV RQOLQH DW ZZZWKHWRPDWRKHDGFRP 5($' 7+('$,/<%($&21 &/$66,),('6

FOR RENT

Read the Beacon Classifieds!

6RXWK.QR[YLOOH87GRZQ WRZQ%5DSWVPR  RII VW PR V UHQW LI TXDOLILHG   

AUTOS FOR SALE

Classified ads can work for YOU! Give us a call at 974-4931

YHKLFOHV RUOHVV 6SHFLDOL]LQJLQLPSRUWV ZZZ'28*-86786FRP )RUG$VSLUH):'GUF\O VSHHG03*([FHO OHQW FRQGLWLRQ ([WUHPHO\ FOHDQ   

6XEOHDVH 4XDUU\ 7UDLO $SW )XOO\IXUQLVKHGSULYDWHEHG URRP VKDUHG OLYLQJ URRP DQGNLWFKHQDEXQGDQWSDUN LQJVZLPPLQJSRRODWKOHWLF IDFLOLW\ PRYLH URRP DQG IUHH VKXWWOH WR FDPSXV $YDLODEOH LPPHGLDWHO\ PR/HDVHDYDLODEOHRQ PRQWKWRPRQWKEDVLV  ZEXUNKDUW#VXP PLWKHDOWKFDUHFRP

CONDOS FOR RENT %5 FRQGR QHDU /DZ %OGJ ([WUD TXLHW 3RRO HOHYDWRU VHFXULW\ QHZ FDUSHW QHZ FHUDPLF WLOH  

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD â&#x20AC;˘ Will Shortz ACROSS 1 4 8 14 15 16 17

20 21 22 23 24 25 27 29

31 33 34 35

Fig. mentioned in Miranda warnings Feudal V.I.P. Made ends meet? Your substitute? Arabian Peninsula land Lead dancer in a ballet company Exonerated boxer who is the subject of a Bob Dylan song Exceedingly Tennisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Agassi Capt. : Navy :: ___ : Army Grazeland? Young â&#x20AC;&#x2122;uns Drops Transition ___ and the Waves (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Walking on Sunshineâ&#x20AC;? band) Supermanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dog 2008 recipient of govt. largesse Piercing gaze Ingredient in a witchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s potion

39 40 41

45 46 48 50 51

52 53 55

59 60

61 62 63

Address for a G.I. Weighted fishing nets Walt Disney Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ___ Lagoon Name dropper, often? Get extra value from â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ a Spell on Youâ&#x20AC;? (1956 hit) Nevada birthplace of Pat Nixon Resident of an elaborate underground â&#x20AC;&#x153;cityâ&#x20AC;? Hidden valleys Farm females Minor-leaguer whose team is named after a Coney Island roller coaster Orangutan locale Land with a harp on its coat of arms ___ lane Measure of a man? Falls into decay

1

2

3

4

14

C A S T S

L I T U P

H E A P

O N C E

I N C A

N E I L

A D O R E

M A R B L E S S T E E V L O T O R D A O P O

A N G L R O L E M F R O N O M O T L S M O T C H H O L D T W O D O E A T S U E R D G E S A N N E F R E N F O R G E N T R

E X T O L A G M E O R P E B R O S C H O Y

A S S U R E

B A C K S T A G B E A T G H O O P I R L O

B L U E B R A T U V E A S

Y A M S Y A P S T E N E T

6

7

8

15

17

21 23 28

31

25 29

32

36

42

47

43

48

44

45 49

50

52

53

57

54

58

59

60

61

62

63

64

Revolutionary icon

11 12

4 5

6 7 8 9 10

38

40

51

3

37

26

35

41

1 2

13

33

39

64

12

30

34

56

11

22

24

27

55

10

19

20

46

9

16

18

DOWN

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

5

Tenderfoot Hustling is the same as cheating, according to these authorities Where to work out Its code uses just G, T, A and C Four of a decathlonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 10 events Enforced silence Giant Ferris wheel on the Thames Easily passed Terre in the eau zone? Border

13 18

19 25 26 27 28 30 32 36 37 38 41 42

Name in old graffiti Be sassy, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;offâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Autumnal hue Uses sock puppets to talk to a therapist, say Voting against Is suitable for Ogling wolfishly Med. readout Vast treeless area Go up, up, up â&#x20AC;&#x153;That being said,â&#x20AC;? in textspeak Mess hall queue Green, juicy fruit Ending for a record-breaker Certain teachers Unctuous

43

Enlightening experience

44

Ambassador from the Holy See

46

Certain teacher

47

Onetime sponsor of what is now Minute Maid Park

49

Part of an affair to remember?

52

Latch (onto)

54

Portentous nights

56

Air Force ___

57

It means â&#x20AC;&#x153;whiteâ&#x20AC;? in Hawaiian

58

Instant


6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, October 3, 2013 Sports Editor David Cobb

SPORTS CAPOCACCIA continued from Page 1 While Friday night will be the first time all three sisters will be on the same field with one being the opposition, the three sisters did play together in 2009 at Saint Agnes Academy in Memphis. In the 2009 season, the sisters contributed to the a state championship at Saint Agnes, as Caroline was named the Most Valuable Player of the team. The two following seasons, Suzanne and Melissa helped lead their school to

dcobb3@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron tprovost@utk.edu

two state second-place finishes. “I loved it,” Suzanne Capocaccia said. “We would be rudely honest with each other. We couldn’t hurt each others feelings.” Despite being a freshman, Melissa will likely start for the Rebels, as she has for every game this season. Caroline and Suzanne both get time on the field as well. This season, Caroline has played in all 11 games, and Suzanne has seen the field in eight matches. The sisters are not the only ones in the family that are excited about the game. A herd of Capocaccias and supporters are making the six-hour drive

on I-40 East to see the sisters compete. “A lot of my uncles, aunts, family, my mom’s sorority sisters, my dad’s friends [are coming],” Suzanne Capocaccia said. “We’re going to have so many people here.” In many sibling rivalry games, television broadcasters make a priority of spotting the parents of the siblings to discuss their choice in attire. The Capocaccia parent’s outfits are a hot topic in the family. “My mom and dad claim that they are going to wear white, and they also have those circle pins,” Caroline Capocaccia said. “They’re going to have a UT one and an Ole Miss one.”

Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon

Senior guard Meighan Simmons attempts a 3-pointer against Notre Dame on Jan. 28.

Lady Vols carry Final Four hopes Patrick MacCoon Staff Writer

AJ Hall • The Daily Beacon

Senior running back Rajion Neal jukes out of an attempted tackle by South Alabama safety Terrell Brigham during UT’s 31-24 win over the Jaguars at Neyland Stadium on Saturday, Sept. 28.

‘Smokey’ gray uniforms to debut against Georgia Taylor White Contributor Tradition, central to Tennessee football, is being reset this week as UT drops their conventional orange uniforms for a new look. Speculation on Tennessee’s new alternate uniforms ended earlier this week when the football program announced the Vols will be wearing their new “smokey” gray jerseys Saturday afternoon when they take on the No. 6 Georgia Bulldogs at 3:30 p.m. inside Neyland Stadium. “I think it was time,” head coach Butch Jones said. “I think it is something that our fan base has been waiting for. I know our players have been looking forward to wearing them. “First of all, it is an opportunity, national television, CBS, 3:30, against a great opponent in Georgia. Obviously recruiting, players look forward to seeing the different uniforms.” Tennessee players wore their new “smokey” gray socks and cleats on the practice field Tuesday afternoon. “It’s something cool, it’s something fun,” senior offensive lineman Ja’Wuan James said. “It’s just something of an incentive to play as hard as you can.” However, the Vols know it’s going to take more than new uniforms to come away with a win on Saturday against a Bulldogs squad coming off a 44-41 victory over then-No. 6 LSU. “You just use them for extra juice; you use them to motivate guys,” James said. “It’s all about how we play, it’s not about what we

wear.” Jones added Monday at his press conference: “That makes no impact in the outcome of the game. We have to play the game, the game is won between the lines. We just thought the timing was appropriate.” Emergency Lane Tennessee’s Marlin Lane left the game early in Saturday’s win over South Alabama, and Jones has listed the junior tailback as day-to-day for Saturday’s contest Georgia. Suffering from an unspecified injury from the game, Jones remains careful about his player. “Marlin did not practice today,” Jones said Tuesday. “We’ll know a little more tomorrow as he progresses, and it’s going to be day to day. He spent all day in the training room, he was out at practice taking the mental reps that he’ll need, hee was on the bike, so it will be how he progresses throughout the course of tonight and into tomorrow.” With Lane’s availability in doubt, the Vols know that they will need other running backs, such as sophomore Tom Smith to step in and provide solid carries. “Tom has really grown,” senior running back Raijon Neal said. “He’s learning more and accepting coaching, so it’s good to see him grow from when he came in as a freshman.” Neal also knows that he will need to step his game up on Saturday if Lane is unable to play. The senior ran the ball 25 times for 169 yards against South Alabama with Lane sitting out most of the second half.

“My biggest thing is, I just want to show the guys that you can depend on me,” Neal said Tuesday. “And at times we can put a load on my back.” No Lack of Faith A few boos directed at UT quarterback Justin Worley in Neyland Stadium on Saturday have not affected the confidence that Jones and his team have in their signal caller. “Worley is a great quarterback, we just have to help him out,” freshman receiver Jason Croom said. “Anything he does is on us, I mean he is just throwing to a spot and we are expected to be there.” Jones remains careful with Worley, and acknowledged that the quarterback position comes with much responsibility. “It’s playing quarterback, I’ve always said that praise and blame, it’s all the same,” Jones said. “We have a very passionate fan base here and they want to win, and playing quarterback at the University of Tennessee comes with a very high standard of expectations and excellence behind it. That’s part of being the quarterback here and you can’t worry about that stuff.” Chemistry and trust between a quarterback and receiver is crucial to any passing game, and Worley and his receivers have worked hard to establish those aspects. “Just doing little things off the field like watching film together or going out to eat, all that stuff adds up,” Croom said. “Just gaining trust in your quarterback, that you’re going to have his back just like he has yours.”

The Lady Vols basketball team has placed lofty standards for success upon itself. For a program that has the highest winning percentage in Division I women’s basketball, a championship is the expectation year in and year out. Less than a week into practice for the 2013-14 season, there’s no surprise that secondyear head coach Holly Warlick and her preseason No. 3-ranked team is already talking about long-term goals. “Our goals are to play in Nashville, and it’s something we’ve talked about since losing our last game,” Warlick said. “We speak about getting better every day. They are all in and we haven’t had any resistance. They are thrilled to get on the practice floor and get going.” For senior guard Meighan Simmons and her teammates, the excitement to get back out on the court is driven by the “Grind for 9” theme, which the team adopted this summer to symbolize their pursuit of a ninth national title. “I wake up every morning and think about it,” Simmons said. “It’s the first thing I think about when coming into a workout. This is the last goaround for me so I have to grind it out. “I don’t want to leave here without a championship. It’s all about focusing on the task at hand and helping the team win its ninth championship.” While the coaching staff is once again stressing the defensive side of the ball and running an up-tempo offense, a higher sense of urgency can be felt than in previous seasons. “The energy has been so much higher this year,”

Simmons said. “The theme ‘Grind for 9’ gives us more energy and gets our adrenaline going in the middle of practice.” Although the Lady Vols have high expectations, the squad is still taking time for the smaller aspects of the game as they head into their first exhibition matchup against CarsonNewman on Nov. 4. “I think the tempo is going to be a lot different and the coaches are going to do more teaching so we make sure to pay attention to the little things,” Simmons said. “It’s the little things that are going to get us to win a ninth national championship.” With all but two players returning from last season, the team believes they are even better when considering the talent of their two incoming freshman. “Adding Mercedes Russell and Jordan Reynolds has been a great addition,” Warlick said. “I think our team sees we have people in key spots and that we’ve gotten better since last year. They all have a lot of confidence and are displaying it on the court.” There will be plenty of time to work the true freshmen into the system and to help them understand what is expected of them from their teammates and coaches. The team is allowed to hold 30 practices in the next 40 days before their first away game against MTSU on Nov. 8. “I think we are really excited,” junior forward Cierra Burdick said. “This is the most excited I’ve been since being here. We have a great chance of winning the entire thing. We have an awesome opportunity to go to Nashville and compete in the Final Four and bring it home to Knoxville.”

10 03 13  

The editorially independent student newspaper of the University of Tennessee