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Thursday, September 12, 2013

Issue 16, Volume 124

Samantha Smoak

Report links Bray, Couch with cash controversy

Online Editor

Beacon Staff Report

Change is coming. Maybe. Wednesday afternoon, 11 students from the Progressive Student Alliance marched up the stairs in Andy Holt Tower and into Chancellor Jimmy Cheek’s office with a petition and a paper light bulb in hand, symbolizing a “big idea.” Or, rather, two ideas: hiring UT custodian Missy Murray back after what they considered a controversial termination, and providing livable wages for all campus workers. The PSA students sought the attention of the Chancellor, who was unavailable at the time of their visit. Instead, they read their petition aloud to the administrators present. Spearheaded by Robert Naylor, a junior in global studies, PSA serves as the UT branch of the national United Students Against Sweatshops, a college organization that lobbies for workers’ rights issues domestically and internationally. Last year, Murray spoke out about a number of unfavorable working conditions for UT custodians. Recently, after taking two days of sick leave, Missy returned to work last week only to be fired on the grounds that she had exceeded her annual sick leave allowance by 2.6 hours. *** “Usually that happens if you miss some time, but her boss made a really arbitrary decision to say no to letting her use any annual leave, and took it as leave without pay,” Naylor

Former Tennessee quarterback Tyler Bray and current senior defensive lineman Maurice Couch allegedly received impermissible benefits from a former athlete who was acting as an intermediary between NFL agents and college players, according to a Yahoo! Sports story published Wednesday. Between May 17 and Nov. 10, 2012, six Western Union transactions were made to either Bray or Couch, per the Yahoo! report. Those alleged transactions totaled $2,250, the report stated. First-year UT coach Butch Jones said Couch is unlikely to play Saturday at Oregon, but that his uncertain status for the game is not related to the allegations in the Yahoo! report. “Mo Couch had an injury in practice with heat exhaustion and he didn’t even practice today due to that,” Jones said on the Vol Calls radio show Wednesday night. “We expected him back but he couldn’t go. So right now it looks like he probably won’t be able to play and that’s injury related.” Before Jones addressed the issue, Tennessee officials said they are exploring the report’s accusations. “We are aware of the article and are examining all of the relevant facts, and we will not comment further,” Jimmy Stanton, UT senior associate director for communications, said in a statement. Jones was head coach at Cincinnati when the benefits were allegedly dispersed.

PSA delivers big idea to Cheek Hanna Lustig News Editor

Janie Prathammavong • The Daily Beacon

Brandon Cartagena of UT’s Progressive Student Alliance reads a letter for Chancellor Jimmy Cheek to his secretary Wednesday about the alleged mistreatment of Missy Murray, a UT facilities services worker who claims she was unfairly fired for speaking out against workplace abuse. said. “That’s the reason they’re firing her. “It’s pretty obvious to us and to Missy and to the other campus workers that this is a retaliation for her speaking out.” Naylor said 23 percent of UT employees make less than a living wage. A UT Faculty Senate study conducted in the 2010-11 academic year defined a living wage as $9.50 an hour plus benefits. The present base pay for UT facilities workers is $8.50 an hour. “We think it’s perfectly reasonable to ask the Chancellor pay a living wage,” Naylor said. Brandon Cartagena, an undecided sophomore and PSA community liaison, emphasized the importance of addressing the issue’s long-term and imme-

diate concerns. “This campaign is not just a campaign about raising people’s wages,” Cartagena said. “It’s also a campaign about changing the culture on our campus. I was one of the many UT students that had no idea what was going on with our campus workers … we want that culture to change entirely. We want there to be an open, interactive relationship between campus workers and students.” In the past, the living wage movement was a far more influential campaign, even raising the wage for campus workers by $1. United Campus Workers, a labor union that represents some 1,400 employees, has also achieved smaller raises every year. But support, Naylor says, has

yet to come from the administration, despite progress at other universities. “We’re not the first living wage campaign,” Naylor said. “There’s been campaigns at Harvard (and) at William and Mary, that have been won and that living wages are now a part of the policy there and things worked out really well for people.” According to U.S. News and World Report, Harvard is the 2nd-best “national university” in the country; William and Mary was ranked No. 32. “One thing about the Top 25 initiative is that we’re trying to have the best faculty and staff,” Naylor said. “But I don’t think the Chancellor understands that you need to have workers that are respected and workers

David Cobb Butch Jones estimated the total to be 15 years. Through multiple assistant coaching stops and now three head-coaching gigs, the squads which UT’s first-year head coach has been affiliated with have always executed the same punt scheme. That is why he shouldered the blame when Western Kentucky broke through the Vols punt protection on Saturday and blocked a Michael Palardy punt. It resulted in a Western Kentucky touchdown that sliced Tennessee’s lead to 31-17 just before halftime. The botched play ultimately failed to impact the outcome of the game, but it was enough to make Jones cringe when

addressing what happened on Monday. “I’m responsible for it,” Jones said. “I coach the punt. We’ve had very few punt blocks in – I want to say – 15 years of running this punt.” In Derek Dooley’s tenure as UT coach, the Vols had just one punt blocked. Over Jones’ three years at Cincinnati, the Bearcats also had just one punt blocked. Jones makes special teams a point of emphasis at practice, often saving his loudest ravings for the imperfections that surface in punt drills. “We spend as much time on punt as any aspect in our football program,” he reiterated on Monday. “It’s inexcusable.” Through two games in 2013, Palardy is averaging 45.4 yards per punt while three of his five

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Famed textiles artist visits UT

Blocked punt inspires Vols special teams Sports Editor

that are paid well to have the best workers on our campus. “People just deserve respect, too.” PSA plans to continue delivering letters until the Chancellor schedules an appointment to meet with them. “Either we’ll celebrate our victory or we’ll be forced to move forward with our next steps,” Naylor said. The alliance’s letter demanded a response from Cheek by Friday, September 13th at 5 p.m. “We need to have a sense of community on our campus,” Cartagena said. “If everything is segregated, we’re not really a campus. We’re just divided.” PSA meetings are every Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. in Room 53A of HSS.

Kendall Thompson Contributor

Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon

Michael Palardy kicks a 23-yard field goal against Western Kentucky at Neyland Stadium on Saturday, Sept. 7. The senior, who serves as UT’s place-kicker and punter, had a punt blocked Saturday against the Hilltoppers. punts have been downed inside the opponent’s 20-yard line, including one that came to rest at the 2-yard line on Saturday. The UT senior handles the Vols punting, place-kicking and kickoff duties. He’s 2-for-2 on field goal attempts for the year and 13-for-13 on extra-point attempts. Despite the blocked punt

against WKU, Palardy is optimistic about the state of UT’s special teams. “I think we’ve done a pretty solid job,” Palardy said. “I think that there’s still room for improvement like every other position in every other phase of the game.” See SPECIAL TEAMS on Page 5

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Many students have just gotten around to decorating their own dorm rooms. Fransje Killaars, an Amsterdam-based textiles artist, designed the Prime Minister of the Netherlands’ Gentleman’s room. Killaars will be giving a lecture on Thursday, Sept. 12 at 7:30 p.m. in the Art and Architecture building. Her portable work will be featured in the Ewing Gallery today through Oct. 21. The featured pieces are titled “Figures” and “24 hours,” according to Killaars. She has designed many pieces with textiles, both portable for museums and permanent for buildings. “It’s the first time that I have put them together in the same exhibit,” Killaars said. “It’s the same concept, but it makes a different sculpture, another work.” This concept plays with the idea of color and its role in art.

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One side of the “Figures” sculpture features many colorful textiles, while the other contains white or cream-colored clothing on a bare backdrop. “(The idea) is very clear: color or no color,” Killaars said. Killaars’ work for the Prime Minister of the Netherlands, Mark Rutte, moved away from museum pieces and into Rutte’s house. “They told me, this is the room if someone is coming over from outside of Holland to meet the Prime Minister, they meet him in this room,” she said. Her mind went to sample books, each filled with numerous colors and patterns with different cultural connotations. She delved deeper and discovered mixture of fabrics that fit her criteria. “(For) this meeting room for international people, I put up also international cloths, all kinds of countries and backgrounds,” Killaars said. “Typical French, typical Italian.” See FRANSJE KILAARS on Page 3


2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, September 12, 2013 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS Speaker emphasizes roles of literature Clint Shannon Contributor

Art mirrors life, they say. Studying history, then, is necessary to studying creative work, in any form. On Tuesday evening, Lauren Goodlad, a Professor of English and the Director of the Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, affirmed this essential truth in her lecture “The Way We Historicize Now.” But what is historicism? “Historicism is a way of looking at the world that recognizes it as changing in some ways that we can see and in some ways that we cannot see,” Goodlad said. “Just because something is in a certain set of relations or in a certain condition in one era does not mean it will necessarily be just that way or be regarded that way in another.” Historians attempt to relate novels to things specific to the book’s era rather than bicker over its influence and intended purpose. First becoming interested in literature and historicism in graduate school, Goodlad devoured both history and Victorian fiction, gaining distinctive opinions on its study. Using a historical perspective in literature, Goodlad said, allows the reader to better understand not only the time period in which the work was written, but also how that era differs from the present. She also believes that the interpretation of a work cannot be limited to what readers

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb

elamb1@utk.edu

5k gives back to grieving parents Taylor Gray

Contributor

with a physical remembrance of their lost child. I saw a young woman leave the hospital without her child,” Miller said. “I rode the elevator down with her, and it was one of the most heartbreaking things that I had ever seen. She left with nothing tangible to take with her.” The project was launched at the East Tennessee Children’s Hospital in March 2012, and has since donated more than 60 pendants. Sprints for the Prints is the largest fundraising event held for the Precious Prints Project. Armstrong is enthusiastic about how the race will benefit the program. ”[Sprints for the Prints] will tremendously help to sustain the project and allow us to continue providing kits to East Tennessee

Children’s Hospital,” Armstrong said. More than 120 people have registered to participate in the 5k thus far. According to Allison Armstrong, philanthropy chair on the executive board of the Student Nurses Association, that number includes many UT faculty. Even the Dean of the College of Nursing herself, Dr. Victoria Niederhauser, has signed herself up for the race. The runners and walkers of the first annual Sprint for the Prints will travel a route beginning in Circle Park, winding in and around campus, and ending back at Circle Park. Online registration closes on Friday, Sept. 13. However, registration will be open again on race day. Check-in begins at 7 a.m. Saturday and the race begins at 8 a.m. Cost of registration is $28.

believe the author meant. “You can’t be arrogant about The UT Student Nurses Association is givthis,” Goodlad said. “We can’t ing people a reason to run. ever know what [Charles] Sprint for the Prints, a 5k walk and run, Dickens was thinking, and even will be held on Saturday, Sept. 14, to raise if we did know what Dickens funding for the Student Nurses Association’s was thinking, that’s not neces- philanthropy project, Precious Prints. sarily why he wrote the novels Growing out of an encounter between that he did.” Lynne Miller, a clinical instructor in the Mentioning AMC’s hit show College of Nursing, and the owner of the “Mad Men,” Goodlad said local business, Precious Metal Prints, the that its form has resurrected project provides parents who have lost a child American ideas from the early with a sterling silver pendant at no cost to 60s to present viewers with a them. glimpse of the “pre-counterrevMiller, who is now the project head, first olution 60s.” suggested a partnership that would permit This kind of retrospection, the College of Nursing to gift grieving parents Goodlad implied, is the essence of historicism. Andrew Lallier and Heather Hess, both UT graduate students studying 19th century British literature, came to hear Goodlad’s lecture. “I thought it was a useful historical survey and sort of an indication of where things are at the present and where her [Goodlad’s] particular position is,” Lallier said. “I think it very clearly described the state of criticism,” Hess added. Emphasizing books as a common denominator among strangers, Goodlad argued for the value of literature. “Literature has many values: its expression of the imagination; a way of moving people; a way of sharing experience; a way of communicating something that can be enjoyed collectively,” she said. “If you and I are on a bus and we discover that we both like Lemony Snicket, that • Photo Courtesy of Student Nurses Association gives us something in common UT Student Nurses’ Association will host a 5k run and walk on Saturday Sept. 14 at 8 a.m. for its philanthropy that we can talk about.” project, Precious Prints.

Nation pauses on 9/11 to pay tribute to victims Associated Press Life in lower Manhattan resembled any ordinary day on Wednesday as workers rushed to their jobs in the muggy heat, but time stood still at the World Trade Center site while families wept for loved ones who perished in the terror attacks 12 years ago. For the families, the memories of that day are still vivid, the pain still acute. Some who read the names of a beloved big brother or a cherished daughter could hardly speak through their tears. “Has it really been 12 years? Or 12 days? Sometimes it feels the same,” said Michael Fox, speaking aloud to his brother, Jeffrey, who perished in the south tower. “Sometimes I reach for the phone so I can call you, and we can talk about our kids like we used to do every day.” On the memorial plaza overlooking two reflecting pools in the imprint of the twin towers, relatives recited the names of the nearly 3,000 people who died when hijacked jets crashed into the towers, the Pentagon and in a field near Shanksville, Pa. They also recognized the victims of the 1993 trade center bombing. Bells tolled to mark the planes hitting

the towers and the moments when the skyscrapers fell. In Washington, President Barack Obama, first lady Michelle Obama, Vice President Joe Biden and wife Jill Biden walked out to the White House’s South Lawn for a moment of silence at 8:46 a.m. — the time the first plane struck the south tower in New York. Another jetliner struck the Pentagon at 9:37 a.m. “Our hearts still ache for the futures snatched away, the lives that might have been,” Obama said. A moment of silence was also held at the U.S. Capitol. In New York, loved ones milled around the memorial site, making rubbings of names, putting flowers by the names of victims and weeping, arm-inarm. Former Gov. George Pataki, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and others were in attendance. As with last year, no politicians spoke. Mayor Michael Bloomberg watched the ceremony for his final time in office. Carol Eckna recalled the contagious laugh of her son, Paul Robert Eckna, who was killed in the north tower. “Just yesterday, you were 28,” she said. “Today, you are 40. You are forever young. Dad and I are proud to be your parents.”

The anniversary arrived amid changes at the Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, where construction started Tuesday on a new visitor center. On Wednesday, the families of the passengers and crew aboard United Flight 93 recalled their loved ones as heroes for their unselfish and quick actions. The plane was hijacked with the likely goal of crashing it into the White House or Capitol, but passengers tried to overwhelm the attackers and the plane crashed into the field. All aboard died. “In a period of 22 minutes, our loved ones made history,” said Gordon Felt, president of the Families of Flight 93, whose brother, Edward, was a passenger. Outside Washington, hundreds of people gathered for a short, simple ceremony at an Arlington County plaza three miles from the Pentagon. First responders from the county were among the first on the scene that day. Fire Chief James Schwartz said ceremonies like Wednesday’s — which featured an honor guard and a moment of silence— serve as a reminder of why first responders spend so much time preparing for disaster. “I’ve often said this has been the fastest 12 years of my life,” Schwartz said. “But if you are a surviving family

member, I’d imagine this has been the longest 12 years of your life, because you’re waking up every day with a hole in your heart.” Bloomberg also spoke at a remembrance service for the 84 Port Authority employees killed on Sept. 11 at St. Peter’s Roman Catholic Church, in the shadow of where the World Trade Center once stood. “On that terrible day, we were united in prayer and compassion for all of you who lost loved ones,” the mayor said. “As we woke up this morning, our first thoughts were with you as well.” Dozens of family members and colleagues filled the pews as the Port Authority Police Pipes and Drums played during the posting of colors. Around the world, thousands of volunteers pledged to do good deeds, honoring an anniversary that was designated a National Day of Service and Remembrance in 2009. By next year’s anniversary, a 9/11 museum is expected to be open beneath the memorial plaza in New York City. While the memorial honors those killed, the museum is intended to present a broader picture, including the experiences of survivors and first responders. “As things evolve in the future, the

focus on the remembrance is going to stay sacrosanct,” memorial President Joe Daniels said. Douglas Hamatie, whose 31-yearold cousin Robert Horohoe worked for Cantor Fitzgerald and died on 9/11, drew applause from the crowd when he declared that the day should become a national holiday. “The kids today, they know when the next iPhone’s coming out, and they know when the next Justin Bieber concert is, but they don’t know enough about 9/11,” he said. “So let’s change that, please.” The organizers have said they will always keep the focus on the families, and that was evident this year as relatives gathered on the tree-laden plaza, where a smaller crowd gathered — only friends and family of the victims were allowed. Vicki Tureski, who lost her brother-inlaw on Sept. 11, said the victims’ families will help each other through the years to come. “Strangers who are now friends, friends who are now family, family who pull us to our feet each day,” she said. “I promise to continue to keep you in my prayers as we go through decade two of carrying the tragedy of 9/11 with us.”


Thursday, September 12, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

Around Rocky Top Thursday, September 12 What: Zygmunt Plater book reading Where: Union Avenue Books When: 6 p.m. Price: Free Cortney’s Take: “The Snail Darter and the Dam” has to be an interesting read, and what better way to hear it than from the author himself? Zygmunt Plater will read from his book with the extended title, “How Pork-Barrel Politics Endangered a Little Fish and Killed a River.”

Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

Students participate in an ice-breaker during the first interest meeting for UT’s Sex Week. General body meetings will be held every other Wednesday at 8 p.m. in HSS Room 71.

Belk offers night of activities, discounts Amanda Cleveland Contributor

Knoxville’s West Town Mall is offering three things most college students find essential to their daily routine: free food, music and major discounts. Belk, a department store located in West Town Mall, will host College Fashion night tonight at 8 p.m. Specifically for UT students, it is called the “Volunteer Bash.” This store put on the same event in March earlier this year. “I’m going to the Belk College Fashion night because I know they’re offering a lot of giveaways and free stuff for students,” Carly McGuire, sophomore in child and family studies, said. “Who wouldn’t want that?” Belk College Fashion Night welcomes UT students as individuals, but organizations have additional perks of attending. “We’re giving away $1,000 to whichever organization brings the most people to our event, like sororities, fraternities and any other club or organization,” Tara Egley, assistant store manager at the West Town Belk, said. For McGuire, this is an added incentive.

FRANSJE KILAARS continued from Page 1 After the work was finished, however, a fire ravaged parts of the building, including the room Killaars had created. She has previously described standing in the part of the building that was still standing, holding in her hands one tiny square of fabric which was all that was left of her creation. The passion in her voice is evident when she recalls this incident. “(I get) emotional just talking of it,” Killaars said. Sarah McFalls, collections manager at the gallery, pointed out that Killaars is incorporating white clothing borrowed from locals to give the exhibit a more personalized touch, including a dress and a Hanes undershirt. McFalls finds the colors in

“I...think it’s awesome that they are donating money to the group with the most attendance,” McGuire said. “I am in a sorority and I know how much that donation could mean.” Both the men’s and the women’s stores in Belk will be participating, and options abound for everyone. With higher than normal discounts, students have the opportunity to save much needed cash. Additionally, they will be giving students the chance to have items personalized. Free monograms will be given out with a $20 purchase. The Belk College Fashion night will also include activities such as music provided by a live DJ and free food, according to Egley. “We’re going to have games like corn hole, and we’ll also have free makeovers,” Egley said. “Then, we’re raffling off Xboxs, iPads and a bunch of other free stuff. We’ll also be having discount items for college students.” In addition to general price cuts, there will be giveaways and prizes from certain name brands such as Guy Harvey, Ralph Lauren fragrances, Salt Life, Dockers, Miss Me, Columbia and

Calvin Klein. Students can register at fashion night to win prizes, including an iPad, a Keurig mini brewer, a Fossil watch and a designer handbag. Egley has been in charge of planning the college night. She is hoping that the event will be a good time for students to see everything available at Belk, from clothes and apparel to potential jobs. “We want to get the college in to show what we have in Belk and also get them interested if they ever want to work for us,” Egley said. “We lean towards the retail group — they’re the ones helping me with this project. “If students graduate and want to work for our company, we want to let them know the things we do and how they could help out.” It is always a plus when companies hand out free prizes and discounts, and McGuire is especially looking forward to mixing fun with the atmosphere the event possesses. “I like to take advantage of everything that is offered to students,” McGuire said. “Not only around campus but around Knoxville as well.”

the pieces to be “very stimulating,” including many hues which Killaars would have encountered while spending time in India. “I come from an artistic family,” Killaars said. “My father is [a] sculptor, my mother was a painter and a textile artist. I was trained as a painter, and I used fluorescent colors in my paintings.” This use of color lead clients to recommend her to go to India, where she encountered a weaving community to collaborate with on her projects, the Tasara Centre for Creative Weaving. “They use acrylic yarn, which she says takes the color really well,” McFalls said. According to McFalls, these colors are not only eye-catching, but also recall the past. “Some colors evoke memories for people,” McFalls said. “We have associations with colors. We told her that people here will really be drawn to her orange and

white blankets, because those are UT’s colors, and we have such a color relationship with orange.” Killaars was featured in a documentary by Heddy Honigmann for the Dutch series, “Holland Masters in the 21st Century,” in which she expressed her creative vision. “There has to be some friction, something not quite right,” Killaars said in the documentary. “I want you to keep looking, I don’t want it to be fixed. Something which is too perfect, if creating such a thing is possible, is dull, to my mind.” Killaars uses an unusual medium, textiles, to fulfill her artistic vision. “The textiles bring a kind of sensuality to these large spaces,” she said. “People always want to touch them.” For more information on the lecture and Killaars, visit www. ewing-gallery.utk.edu.

• Photo Courtesy of Suzi Camarata

Friday, September 13 What: Dungeon of Darkness Haunted Castle Where: Maryville, TN When: 7-11 p.m. Price: $13-$20 Cortney’s Take: It is Friday the 13th and East Tennessee’s premiere haunted attraction will be open for the first night of the Halloween season. While others will be celebrating the 13th with a lame scary movie, go live it in the Dungeon of Darkness Haunted Castle. It’s just a short drive from campus.

• Photo Courtesy of Dungeon of Darkness Haunted Castle

Saturday, September 14

• Photo Courtesy of Happy Hollerpalooza Street Fair

What: Happy Hollerpalooza Street Fair Where: Central Street between Baxter Avenue and Scott Avenue When: 12-5 p.m. Price: Free Claire’s Take: According to the event’s Facebook page, this is a “family event that strives to associate community members with local businesses, artists, crafters and musicians of the area.” This is such a cool opportunity to take some friends and explore some hidden local Knoxville. Delicious food and awesome music will abound, and this is the perfect day to indulge your hipster tendencies.

Sunday, September 15

• Photo Courtesy of Jack Goodwin

What: Sparky and Rhonda Rucker, “Heroes and Hard Times: American History Through Song and Story” Where: East Tennessee History Center When: 3 p.m. Price: Free Claire’s Take: According to MetroPulse, “Folk and protest veterans Sparky and Rhonda Rucker present music representing three centuries of American history, including slavery, the Underground Railroad, the Civil War, the birth of blues music and the civil rights movement.” This is a great chance to broaden your historical horizons through some incredible music.


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, September 12, 2013 Editor-in-Chief R.J. Vogt

OPINIONS

rvogt@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Syrian conflict overshadows NSA, Snowden coverage Uncommon Sense by

Evan Ford Anyone heard from Edward Snowden recently? Probably not. What we have heard about is the Syrian conflict, complete with the typical media coverage depicting all the badness that accompanies Middle-Eastern dictators and tyrants. I’ve heard about Obama cancelling some trip to California so he can stay and lobby for war, while congressmen argue for and against intervention. Since Tuesday afternoon, I’ve been hearing about a tense agreement with Russia to see if we can get rid of the chemical weapons peacefully. Don’t get me wrong – the conflict in Syria is devastatingly important. Corpses of civilians are found daily in Syria, women and children are sexually mutilated, and whole families silently die from Sarin gas. I’m glad we’re having a conversation about how we can help stop the slaughter — the lives of millions of victims and refugees are pleading for peace. But man, has this war silenced the dissent. Google Trends, which shows how often different terms are searched through the online search wizard, shows some hard evidence of the silence. Queries for ‘Snowden’ consistently outnumbered ‘Syria’ from the moment he was revealed until Obama said “bomb.” Since then, the whistleblower has effectively disappeared from Google searches. I don’t want to fail to communicate the eeriness here. The White House first “confirmed” that Assad used chemical weapons almost three full months ago, on June 14. This revelation was in the midst of the NSA scandal, however, and hardly made national news. Now the opposite is happening. On Sunday, the Guardian released documents revealing that all commercial-grade passwords, firewalls and encryption methods are useless against KEYSCORE, the agency’s Internet spying program. This leak also revealed that the NSA is spying on corporations in addition to individuals. Just yesterday, documents Snowden provided to Glenn Greenwald of the Guardian revealed that the NSA “routinely” shares Americans’ data with Israel. These are egregious privacy violations, moving the NSA out of national defense claims into international espionage. Regardless, the conversation about these abuses has stalled. After all, there’s a war going on. John F. Kennedy pointed out during his presidency that crisis is a two-pronged idea. He noted, “When written in Chinese, the word ‘crisis’ is composed of two characters. One represents danger and the other represents opportunity.” For the White House, this crisis represents an excellent opportunity. This debate is a way to escape the dissent arising over the failure of the White House to explain or respond to the privacy abuses of the NSA. It changes the conversation from “impeach Obama” to “bomb Syria.” Why is the conversation happening now? Heck, we confirmed the chemical weapons three months ago, and have known about them for almost a year. We knew that Assad’s regime was murdering protesters and raping women by the thousands before the war even started. But now the red line has been so conveniently crossed, and now it’s time for America to do what America does best – join together like fingers in a stupid, blind fist so we can pummel the Middle East one more time. What’s the point of having nice, shiny, $1.5 million Tomahawk missiles if you can’t shoot them at ‘terrorists’ every now and then? Thinking of this war with Syria as a distraction also helps make sense of why Obama would make such a politically unwise move. Republicans nearly always disagree with Obama’s policies, but the President has also alienated the Democratic core, which elected him on a platform of peace in the Middle East. It’s a lose-lose situation, politically. So why do it? The reality is that the White House would only really lose if we kept thinking about the NSA. This distraction explains why a President who has repeatedly argued for peace transformed into an adamant war hawk; why we suddenly threaten to take action on information we’ve had for months; why we’re suddenly so concerned with a conflict that has raged for nearly two years and taken more than 100,000 lives. Surely it’s a matter of compassion, and ego, and money and international justice. But it’s also a very convenient way to get the American people to stop focusing on the flaws in our own government. And it’s working very well. Evan Ford is a junior in philosophy. He can be reached at eford6@utk.edu.

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

9/11 anniversary provides time to refine world views Dean’s List by

Katie Dean The week of Sept. 11 is always a reflective time for me. Being a third grader at the time prevented me from fully understanding both the tremendous loss and the global ramifications of the attack. As the years passed I have learned about the reasons for the attack, but I still have trouble comprehending just how impactful 9/11 was for both Americans and the international community. Being a Millennial and growing up in a post9/11 era has had a significant impact on my world view. Our generation is hailed for being more tolerant and open to new things than those before us. The Pew Research Center describes us as “confident, self-expressive, liberal, upbeat and open to change.” This open-minded ideology is a key part of how our generation will shape the world in the coming years. One of the best and most important ways to stay open-minded is to consider alternative news sources. For those of you who also grow weary of faux news and CNN, Al Jazeera America may serve as a refreshing alternative. Al Jazeera America is the first English news channel to be headquartered in the Middle East – Qatar, to be specific – and represents a

Editor-in-Chief: R.J. Vogt Managing Editor: Melodi Erdogan Chief Copy Editor: Gage Arnold News Editor: Hanna Lustig Asst. News Editor: Emilee Lamb Sports Editor: David Cobb Asst. Sports Editor: Troy Provost-Heron Arts & Culture Editor: Claire Dodson Asst. Arts & Culture Editor: Cortney Roark Online Editor: Samantha Smoak

other instances of foreign-owned media that have successful. A Saudi Prince owns the second largest amount of stock in the company News Corp., and the Washington Times was purchased by a powerful South Korean religious official, Sun Myung Moon, in 1982. News sources owned by different countries can be an uncomfortable phenomenon to come to terms with, but sometimes being a more enlightened global citizen requires some degree of discomfort. We may not like it, but it’s indescribably important to consider concepts that remove us from our comfort zone. Watching news that’s actually coming from the Middle East can be incredibly beneficial because it may help broaden your horizons and help you see things from a different perspective. Since 9/11, I have learned that intolerance breeds hate, and hate breeds violence and terrorism. After all that has happened, it is difficult to deny our complex intertwining with the Middle East. The tension will not dissipate any time soon. Now is the time to really make the effort to view the world from all points of view; this week is the time to reflect on the past 12 years and to ponder what we can do to increase cultural tolerance and eliminate xenophobia. I encourage everyone to consider this groundbreaking change in global media, even if the name makes you slightly uncomfortable. Katie Dean is a junior in political science and psychology. She can be reached at xvd541@ utk.edu.

Millennials still profoundly misinterpreted by media Knight Errant by

Victoria Knight As college students, we are a part of the generation termed Generation Y, or the Millenials. And we are being watched. Vigilantly. Type the word “Millenials” into Google and you are bound to find some interesting and somewhat alarming news articles. When I did this as of 12:05 a.m. on Monday morning, my search results included titles such as “Where Do Millenials Shop For Food?” “Flip-flops at Work: Millenials Finally Get What They Want,” and “What Does YouTube Tell Us About Millenials?” Other search results consisted of information such as the Pew Research Center survey that identifies “How Millenial You Are” on a scale from 1 to 100, with a 100 being a straight Millenial. I got an 89, which makes me feel like I missed exactly 11 percent of my childhood. Scroll further down the Google search page and you’ll find in-depth news articles with even more troubling titles: “Are Millenials the Screwed Generation?,” “Do Millenials Stand a Chance in the Real World?” and even “Millenials Struggle with

Financial Literacy.” Based on these results alone, it is clear we are being scrutinized, studied and examined to death – possibly more than any other generation before us. Due to the rise of the Internet within our lifetime, it makes sense that there are more opportunities for almost anyone to post their opinion about us, whether it is through a personal blog, news article or even a short YouTube clip. When I watch or read any of these outlets, several questions pop into my mind: Have these reporters or journalists ever wondered if it helps our cause to constantly barrage us with information that proclaims we are unmotivated, incapable of surviving without technology and possibly more selfish than any other generation? Along with that, are these reports balanced at all, and do any Millenials ever write them or even have a say in their content? Maybe I am just surrounded by the rare Millenials at UT that are highly successful workaholics, who follow real passions and have a healthy balance of both technology and real life – but somehow I think that’s not true. Instead many researchers choose to see only the negative aspects, and fail to see the flip-side of our downfalls; they are the very methods to our success. We are very attached to technology – which can also mean that we are going to be the most up-to-date generation on world and

local news. The presence of technology also increases our ability to multi-task. And sure, we do think we are all special, but what’s wrong with that? Each person is unique, and acknowledging that sooner means taking advantage of your own individuality sooner. We are said to have been sheltered, but naiveté can easily be lost. It may even be an advantage because it makes us less cynical and gives us a more positive outlook overall. In my mind, generation research almost does not even make sense because – though you can predict our possible actions and what our behaviors seem to be – you are not really going to know for sure until we get out into the world and do things. We do not have to stay confined within the boundaries and certain specifications for our generation that society places us in. We may all share characteristics, but we are still individuals who have both good and bad qualities, as any person from any generation is bound to possess. When our time to go out into the real world comes we must recognize the many assumptions placed upon us. And only by defining ourselves as more than just another Millenial can we prove those assumptions wrong. It’s all up to us. Victoria Knight is a senior in microbiology. She can be reached at vknight4@utk. edu.

Get Fuzzy • Darby Conley

Non Sequitur • Wiley

EDITORIAL

style of news that may cause apprehension for some Americans. The goal of Al Jazeera America has been expressed as “to give voice to untold stories, promote debate and challenge established perceptions.” The idea of an American news channel centered in the Middle East is undoubtedly a groundbreaking development in the media industry, and with that comes certain challenges. An NPR story from Aug. 16 featured the title, “Al Jazeera America Will Have To Work Hard to Win Viewers.” Many Americans are skeptical or even hostile about the idea of a news channel centered in Qatar. An experiment done by Al Jazeera America reflected that when the show was played without the name, the participants gave great feedback. The name, however, is unfamiliar to many Americans and – for some – brings to mind perceptions of a radical Islamist agenda and influence from the government in Qatar. Kate O’Brien, a former ABC news employee, is now the president of Al Jazeera America and insists that the channel will not be influenced by any ulterior political agenda. “I frankly wouldn’t be here if I didn’t believe that this is an editorially independent media company and channel” O’Brien told NPR. “I don’t think the director general and the board would have asked me to join had they not respected editorial independence.” Al Jazeera has also been criticized for airing tapes made by Osama Bin Laden. Some interpreted it to mean that Al Jazeera was anti-America. Before getting worked up over Al Jazeera America, however, one must examine

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Thursday, September 12, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Sports Editor David Cobb

SPORTS SPECIAL TEAMS continued from Page 1 Jones emphasized that Saturday’s mistake will get corrected and that Palardy respected his coach’s persistence with the unit. “I haven’t seen anyone who is so in tune with the punt team,� Palardy said. “He says it’s his favorite part of practice and the best period of the day is punt team. I love it. I love his enthusiasm for special teams. I think it puts a lot more confidence in

dcobb3@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron tprovost@utk.edu

me and the whole special teams as a group.� Palardy said Jones is equally focused on special teams off the practice field, making time to dissect it in the film room. “He’s as passionate about what he does inside the film room as he is on the field,� Palardy said. “That’s what we love. We love his passion and his enthusiasm for special teams because that’s what I’ve been doing all my life.� With Devrin Young out after breaking his hand, UT’s punt and kick return duties shifted

hands on Saturday. Wide receiver Vincent Dallas fielded kickoffs while fellow receiver Jacob Carter handled punt returns. According to the depth chart released at the beginning of the week, Dallas and Carter – both juniors – will remain in those roles against Oregon on Saturday. “I enjoyed (returning punts), but it wasn’t anything too different,� Carter said. “I do it every day in practice so I was pretty used to it. It was fun doing it in front of all the fans and in the stadium.�

UT ‘excited’ for home opener Marina Waters Contributor

This weekend’s Comcast Lady Vol Classic is what the UT volleyball team has been waiting for: a chance to prove itself at home. With a 6-1 record coming into their home opener, the Lady Vols are anticipating their home debut to be a successful one, beginning with Thursday’s 7 p.m. match against Austin Peay. “Our goal is to win,� Lexie Dempsey, sophomore setter, said. “We’re looking forward to coming out and showing people that we are Tennessee and we are here to play.� After going 2-1 in the Cincinnati Invitational two weeks ago, last weekend the Lady Vols beat UT-Chattanooga, UNC-Asheville, UT-Martin and Charlotte to be named the Chattanooga Country Inns & Suites Invitational champions. UT came away from the event with more than just team honors, as senior libero Ellen Mullins was named tournament MVP; Dempsey and freshman

Jamie Lea were both named to the All-Tournament Team. Despite the team’s success on the road, Mullins, who was recently named SEC Defensive Player of the Week, is ready for the volleyball team’s first home game in Thompson-Boling Arena. “I’m excited for our fans to be here finally,� Mullins said. “We’ve been away, people have been booing us, and they (the away crowds) are just so much harder on you when you’re away. To finally be in our home gym is really exciting.� Mullins is one of the team’s few veterans and knows what to expect from a UT volleyball game in Knoxville. But 10 players on UT’s 15-person roster will be playing at home for the first time. With leadership as strong as her defensive statistics, Mullins, who broke two school records for digs in Chattanooga, has some advice for the team’s newcomers before this weekend’s tournament. “Just take it all in,� Mullins said. “It’s a great atmosphere to be here in Knoxville. Wear the orange, have our great fans, play

with pride, and protect your home court.� Though the Lady Vols are well qualified to put up serious numbers this weekend as they have in the last two tournaments, there is another key component to this weekend’s success—the seventh man. “We win about 85 percent of our home matches,� head coach Rob Patrick said. “One of the main reasons is because of the great crowds that we have. It’s incredible. “We need the best fan base in the country to come out. They’re really the seventh man for us out there in helping us be so successful at home. And we can’t wait to play in front of the best fans in the country, here in Tennessee.� The tournament opens on Thursday at 4:30 p.m. as ETSU takes on VCU in the opening game. After Thursday’s date with Austin Peay, the Lady Vols will play Wichita State Friday at 7 p.m., ETSU at 12:30 p.m. Saturday and close the tournament with a 7 p.m. match against VCU.

FOOTBALL

and our coaching staff it speaks volumes. All I can tell you is this: we’re well aware of it, we’ve been educating continued from Page 1 our players since we walked in the “All I can speak to is the football door.� Three other SEC players were menprogram that we have in place,� Jones tioned in the report, most notably forsaid Wednesday night. “I think if you at look at our track record of myself mer Alabama offensive lineman D.J. Fluker, as well as former Mississippi

Mens tennis carries championship hopes Patrick Crone

Contributor Asked what the main goals would be for the Tennessee men’s tennis team for the fall season, head coach Sam Winterbotham and junior Hunter Reese produced the same answer: to win. “The program’s goals don’t ever change,� Winterbotham said. “We want to compete for championships.� Reese echoed Winterbotham’s single-mindedness. “Our goal is to win the SEC, and then to be contending for the national championship,� Reese said. “That’s been our goal since last year, and I think that this year we’ve got a team to do it.� The Vols enter the fall season off an appearance in the NCAA quarterfinals in the spring. They are led by highly-ranked players such as All-Americans Mikelis Libietis, a junior who is currently the top ranked singles player in the nation by ITA, and Reese, who is currently ranked No. 24 by ITA. Libietis and Reese are also the top-ranked doubles team in the nation. “He’s just a great tennis player,� Reese said of Libietis. “He’s so powerful. He has all the shots. He’s so talented.� While Libietis may be the bigger name of the coupling, Winterbotham also praised the player who completes that team, saying Reese has performed steadily throughout his whole career. He just competes every day,� Winterbotham said, “and he’s going to continue to do so.�

Despite the high ranking and other honors received by Reese and Libietis, neither is letting the success get to their heads. “It doesn’t really mean anything right now,â€? Reese said. “It’s based purely off of the final rankings from last year. Mikelis and I both know that in doubles. We still got to go out there and beat everybody, and hopefully we’ll hold on to that lead. In singles, it’s the same thing. Just got to keep working.â€? Reese is currently working back after breaking his wrist at the NCAA Championships last spring. “I’m about a month into it now, playing again,â€? Reese said, “and it’s been tough to get back into it, but I’m excited to, and now I’m actually starting to work on stuff to get better, as opposed to getting the rust off.â€? Outside of Libietis and Reese, Tennessee will bring back veteran players such as senior Jarryd Chaplin, a second team All-SEC player from a year ago, Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon and junior Brandon Fickey. Hunter Reese serves in a The Vols will also take the courts with four newcom- match against the Auburn ers this year, but according to Tigers on April 14. Winterbotham, they have carried themselves well since joining the and is the reigning ITA National team. Coach of the Year. “We feel like we really hit the “I couldn’t have imagined havjackpot with character, and that’s ing a better coach,â€? Reese said. something we value very, very “Everything he does with me, it highly here,â€? Winterbotham said. works perfectly. He’s helped me While the players are the so much as a tennis player and ones that win the matches on even more so as a person.â€? the court, nobody is more cruThe Vols open the season cial to the Vols success than at the Southern Intercollegiate Winterbotham, who is entering Championships in Athens, Ga. his eighth season as the head on Friday. coach of the men’s tennis team

that were included in the report. Fluker started all 14 games in the Crimson Tide’s 2012 championship run and reportedly received more than $33,000 in impermissible benefits from Davis. Fluker also started every game of Alabama’s 2011 national championship campaign. Bray, Fluker and Cox are all cur-

State players Fletcher Cox and Chad Bumphis. According to Yahoo! Sports, former Alabama player Luther Davis acted as a “concierge� between the five studentathletes and NFL agents. Davis didn’t comment in the story, but Yahoo! reportedly obtained “a web of financial and text message records� from Davis

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, September 12, 2013


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