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Engineering facility tickles students’ fancy >>page 3

Faculty lead art show in Ewing Gallery >>page 6

Annual football banquet raises money >>page 8

Friday, August 23, 2013

Issue 03, Volume 124

Rainbow House welcomes LGBT community Hanna Lustig News Editor On Thursday afternoon, the OUTreach Resource Center held its annual Rainbow Open House event to welcome new and old faces back for another semester of programming. Providing discussion groups, social events and Safe Zone training since 2010, the center operates on private donation and partial contribution from the Vice Chancellor for Diversity’s office. Since its founding, director Donna Braquet has watched the OUTreach LGBT and Ally Resource Center grow and transform. “We serve as a physical symbol of being welcoming on campus for LGBT and ally issues. We serve as an educational piece,” Braquet said. “We also bring about awareness to other people by doing things like National Coming Out Day and Lavendar Graduation. “So we’re not only serving as a support system for students who identify as LGBT, but also trying to bring awareness and education to the rest of the campus.” Braquet said an alum recently asked to see the cen-

ter, lamenting that such an institution did not exist when she was a student. “We’ve gotten donations from other alums, too and so it means a lot to them,” Barquet said. “They would’ve wanted this when they were here but they’re happy its here now.” As the center’s primary staff member, graduate student Charlie Clifton emphasizes the importance of facilitating “a safe environment.” “The center itself is supposed to be safe space on campus,” Clifton said. “That’s the main function of it – to provide a safe space for LGBTQQIA individuals. But you can also check out books, DVDs and you can come and study.” The upcoming academic year includes new developments for the OUTreach Center including a tailgate for alumni during Homecoming Week, a professional LGBT mentoring network and a new ambassador program, which will begin accepting applications in December. “It’s basically a group of students that’ll provide information about the center to other students,” Clifton said. “Just being advocates of the center and to provide tables for events or do panels.” Additionally, Barquet plans

Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

Students mingle at the Rainbow Open House in the OUTReach: LGBT & Ally Resource Center on Aug. 22. to have an Ally Week, featuring a photography project sponsored by the center. “We’re going to be out on pedestrian walkway and ask people to take photos and sign a banner saying they’re an ally and make a big poster to represent that and show students, questioning or not … how many people on campus

support them and are welcoming,” she said. In the OUTreach Center, it is this mutual acceptance and respect that gathers students together. While the Open House may, for some, be only a chance to grab some food and catch up with old friends, for others, it is their first introduction to a network of toler-

Sophomores included in Welcome Week festivities Savannah Gilman Staff Writer Now more than ever, campus is teeming with the promise of new classes and opportunities. This rang especially true for the sophomores who attended Thursday’s SophoMORE Fest, sponsored by the Student Success Center. The event, run by campus leaders and student volunteers like Demetria Flowers, junior in animal science, allowed many sophomores to see firsthand the resources offered to them on UT’s campus. “Many campus resources and organizations are represented here,” Flowers said. “They are promoting their programs that will give students opportunities to learn what they want to do, but it will also allow them to make mistakes by trying things out and learning if it actually is not

something they are interested in, so they will graduate with a better idea of their goals and interests.” Campus-wide organizations like VOLteach, Student Life and the Student Program Council allow students to gain hands-on experience as they take advantage of everything offered on campus and beyond. For Rachael MacLean, the event was a welcome chance to take a break from classes and discover new opportunities. “The first week back has gone well, but has been really busy,” said MacLean, a junior studying English and history. “I learned about the SophoMORE fest and was excited to attend an event that was specific to what I’m interested in, espeJanie Prathammavong • The Daily Beacon cially studying abroad and how to get connected in undergrad- Sarah Vandagriff, left, sophomore in BCMC, gained insight about campus activities and opportunities at uate research.” the SophoMORE Fest in the University Center on Aug. See SOPHOMORE FEST on Page 3 22.

‘Super Art Fight’ channels competition Cortney Roark Assistant Arts & Culture Editor UT welcomes referees to campus for various sporting events multiple times a year, but it’s not as often that a referee is on campus for a duel between two artists. Super Art Fight, a traveling team of artists, will be at the Humanities Amphitheatre on Friday to battle through expres-

sion on canvas. “Pictionary meets pro wrestling” is how Ross Nover, co-host of Super Art Fight, describes the event. To begin each round, artists are given a topic on which their art is to be based. Two artists work on the same canvas and feed off each others’ creativity, Nover said. These bouts are complete with humorous commentary from Nover, as well as Marty Day,

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while artists are forced to change directions with their art. “Watching art be drawn can be really enthralling, but watching art be drawn while two people make jokes about it can be really fun and that’s what we’re here to do,” Nover said. The event will possess “over the top” drama, akin to pro wrestling, Nover said. The artists visiting UT for the event are Michael “Baron Von

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Sexyful” Brocco, Jamie “Brawlin” Baldwin and the anonymous “El Russo Rojo.” Brandon Calmers will referee the event. Super Art Fight artists, who are based out of the Baltimore, Md. and Washington D.C. area, became a group of close friends after attending the same art convention, Nover said. See SUPER ART on Page 6

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ant, protective friends. For further involvement, Clifton recommended coming into the OUTreach center or joining the Lamba Student Union. Upcoming events include a documentary series, discussion groups and evening pizza parties. The LGBT Resource Center can be liked on Facebook

at www.facebook.com/outreachutk and followed on Twitter @OUTreachUTK. All students are encouraged to stop by for a visit every week day from noon until four, and until six on Wednesdays. The Lambda Student Union can also be contacted through Facebook and Twitter @ utlambda.

UT golfer earns spot in majors Patrick MacCoon Staff Writer Last weekend’s 113th U.S. Amateur Championship was one that Oliver Goss will never forget. The 19-year old rising sophomore golfer from UT finished runner-up to Matt Fitzpatrick, the No. 1 amateur golfer in the world, in the 36-hole championship on Sunday at the Country Club in Brookline, Mass. “For me this was the biggest amateur tournament in the world,” Goss said. “Obviously I wanted to win the title, but to finish runner up was a huge deal for me. I felt like I played some of my best golf ever last week and I’m really proud of how I played.” While he missed out on having his name etched on the Havemeyer Trophy, which features the likes of past winners Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson and Arnold Palmer, Goss still considers the weekend a dream come true. After all, with his second place finish he earns a spot in the first two majors of 2014, the Masters and the U.S. Open. Not to mention, he was awarded the opportunity to throw the first pitch at a Boston Red Sox game this past weekend. “It still hasn’t sunk in yet and it’s a couple days later,” Goss said. “I know I get to

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play and it’s obviously the biggest tournament in the world professionally and I’m really excited about that. “I never thought I would achieve this at such a young age, but thought I would eventually in my career.” The Australian-born golfer, who first picked up a club when he was two years old, actually witnessed the Masters first hand this year when he and some teammates were given one-day passes to Augusta National Golf Club. “It’s golf heaven down there,” he said. “I think every golfer that has ever lived has dreamed of winning the Masters. That’s for sure one of my dreams as well.” In fact the golfer he admires most is a fellow Australian, who won the green jacket this year. “I’d like to live up to the same kind of expectations as Adam Scott,” Goss said, who correctly predicted that Scott would win the Masters in an April 12 Daily Beacon article. “I like the way he handles himself on the course and off the course as well. It’s incredible what he’s achieved.” Another countryman, Greg Norman – history’s most revered Australian golfer – took notice of Goss’ performance last week and reached out to him over Twitter. See GOSS on Page 8


2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Friday, August 23, 2013 Editor-in-Chief R.J. Vogt

IN SHORT

rvogt@utk.edu

Managing Editor Melodi Erdogan merdogan@utk.edu

Around Rocky Top

THIS DAY IN

HISTORY

2006: Austrian teen escapes after eight years in captivity

Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

Roa Maen, left, freshman in pre-pharmacy, asks Devon Harper for directions after noticing his “Beacon of Light” sticker. Members of the community wore the stickers, which stated the Torchbearer’s Creed, as a symbol of approachability.

Natascha Kampusch, an Austrian teenager who was kidnapped at age 10, escapes from her captor, Wolfgang Priklopil, after more than eight years. Shortly after her escape, Priklopil committed suicide. On March 2, 1998, Kampusch was abducted from a street in Vienna while walking to school. One of Austria’s largest missing-person searches followed, during which time authorities checked hundreds of white minivans after a witness reported seeing Kampusch being dragged into a white minivan. Police interviewed Priklopil, the owner of a minivan, but didn’t believe he was a suspect. Kampusch was kept in a secret, windowless basement room at Priklopil’s house outside of Vienna, where she was physically and sexually abused by her captor. As time went by, she was allowed into the rest of the house and would cook and clean for Priklopil. He gave her books and a radio and she managed to educate herself. Early in the afternoon of August 23, 2006, Kampusch, then 18, was vacuuming Priklopil’s car when he walked away from the noise to answer a call on his cell phone. Kampusch used the opportunity to escape and ran to the house of a neighbor, who called police. 2000: First Survivor finale airs

contestants. The voting takes place at the so-called “Tribal Council” ceremony and after a contestant is voted off, the show’s host Jeff Probst informs that person that “the tribe has spoken” and asks the evictee to extinguish his or her torch. 1926: Valentino dies The death of silent-screen idol Rudolph Valentino at the age of 31 sends his fans into a hysterical state of mass mourning. In his brief film career, the Italian-born actor established a reputation as the archetypal screen lover. After his death from a ruptured ulcer was announced, dozens of suicide attempts were reported, and the actress Pola Negri-Valentino’s most recent lover--was said to be inconsolable. Tens of thousands of people paid tribute at his open coffin in New York City, and 100,000 mourners lined the streets outside the church where funeral services were held. Valentino’s body then traveled by train to Hollywood, where he was laid to rest after another funeral. Rudolph Valentino was born Rodolfo Guglielmi in Castellaneta, Italy, in 1895. He immigrated to the United States in 1913 and worked as a gardener, dishwasher, waiter, and gigolo before building a minor career as a vaudeville dancer. In 1917, he went to Hollywood and appeared as a dancer in the movie Alimony. Valentino became known to casting directors as a reliable Latin villain type, and he appeared in a series of small parts before winning a leading role in The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (1921). The film, which featured a memorable scene of Valentino dancing the tango, made the rakishly handsome Italian an overnight sensation. His popularity soared with romantic dramas such as The Sheik (1921), Blood and Sand (1922), and The Eagle (1925). Valentino was Hollywood’s first male sex symbol, and millions of female fans idolized him as the “Great Lover.” His personal life was often stormy, and after two failed marriages he began dating the sexy Polish actress Pola Negri in 1926. Shortly after his final film, The Son of the Sheik, opened, in August 1926, he was hospitalized in New York because of a ruptured ulcer.

On this day in 2000, Richard Hatch, a 39-year-old corporate trainer from Rhode Island, wins the season-one finale of the reality television show Survivor and takes home the promised $1 million prize. In a four-tothree vote by his fellow contestants, Hatch, who was known for walking around naked on the island in Borneo where the show was shot, was named Sole Survivor over the river raft guide Kelly Wiglesworth. Survivor, whose slogan is “Outwit, Outplay, Outlast,” was a huge ratings success and spawned numerous imitators in the reality-competition genre. Produced by Mark Burnett (The Voice, The Apprentice, The Bible), Survivor premiered on May 31, 2000, on CBS. The show centers around a group of sixteen strangers who are stranded for 39 days in a remote location where they must fend for food, water and This Day in History is courtesy of History. shelter and compete in various challenges to win rewards and immunity from being com. voted out of the competition by their fellow


Friday, August 23, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS SOPHOMORE FEST continued from Page 1

For Kimberly Hymer, a sophomore transfer student studying theatre, the SophoMORE Fest helped with adjusting to a new campus, as well as exploring future possibilities. “The study abroad office was a highlight for me, because they were really clear and honest about how it would be a frustrating process to do everything you would need to do, but that it’s absolutely worth it,” Hymer said. “They were very helpful, as they recommended scholarship programs to make studying abroad a reality. A lot of the resources were straight-forward about what we would need and how they could help, which I really appreciated.” Stella Prince, assistant director of the Student Success Center, was pleased with the turnout. “It’s been wonderful, I’m really glad that the students

are coming out and checking out all the resources and learning about different organizations and their resources,” she said. “Hopefully, they can share what they have learned with other students.” Prince emphasized the importance of focusing on students in their second year, when many undergraduates make crucial decisions regarding their studies and eventual occupations. “We really focus on the freshman students, and this is a time to focus on the sophomores and give them what they will need,” Prince said. “Equipping them with the tools they will need for where they are at is our goal. We wanted to have a good mix and have different colleges represented here and, at the end of the day, we want to give these sophomore students the keys to success.”

SGA kick-off pushes student involvement McCord Pagan Copy Editor

In its inaugural run, the first ever Smokey’s Playhouse went off without a hitch. On Thursday, Student Government Association helped kick off the new school year by hosting the event, which featured inflatables as well as free cotton candy and popcorn and was designed to introduce new Volunteers to their student representatives as well as encourage the freshmen to get involved on campus. “This is kind of a new tradition, SGA always tries to do something during Welcome Week, (and) have a presence,” SGA President Jake Baker, senior in political science, said. “Smokey’s Playhouse, we’re kind of bringing it back, we’ve done a few things like this in the past, but nothing at this level.” SGA Vice-President Paige Atchley, senior in marketing, said she wants students to know exactly what campus, and specifically student government, can offer them. “We just kind of wanted to make ourselves known to the freshmen,” Atchley said. “We wanted to do some recruiting and let them know what SGA is, and how to get involved if they’re interested.” Recruiting and connecting with other Vols was a consistent theme as organizers noted the need for interested and passionate individuals to get involved with student government due to its direct link between students and the school’s administrators.

“The biggest thing the next few weeks is the application drive; so we want to let as many students know about joining SGA as possible,” Student Services Director Grant Davis, senior in biosystems engineering, said. “In order to have a good year in SGA, we need good people, and the only way to get those good people is for them to apply.” A second, dual role is for the leaders of student government to listen and hear the concerns of students, but also for others to see the importance of SGA and what it can offer. Sen. Rob Graham, junior in finance, offered a varying perspective on the impact SGA can have on the student body. “The whole of SGA is like a dollar bill in your pocket,” Graham said. “That dollar bill only has worth because you believe it has worth. The whole of SGA and the student body works together as we believe what the students are saying … needs to be passed on and listened to, and we hope the student body believes in the action we’re taking.” Involvement, regardless of the organization, was the sole message pushed by Davis and members of the event. “If you don’t want to be involved with SGA, that’s perfectly fine, go find a home (somewhere)” Davis said. “Statistics show that students that are involved on campus in some aspect are going to graduate on time … Just get involved, that’s what I’m going to say.”

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb elamb1@utk.edu

College of Engineering debuts Tickle Building on The Hill

McCord Pagan • The Daily Beacon

The John D. Tickle Building houses a two-story water tank and cement pit for erosion testing. The tank will recycle water utilized in any experiment.

McCord Pagan Copy Editor Welcoming students from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, the John D. Tickle Engineering Building officially opened its doors on Wednesday. The 110,000-square-foot building, made possible with the help of alumnus John D. Tickle and a multi-million dollar gift from the state of Tennessee, will prominently feature a suspension bridge of fiber-reinforced plastic made by John Tickle’s company, Strongwell Corporation. The bridge, a separate gift from Tickle’s original donation, is expected to become a future symbol for the building, according to William Dunne, the associate dean for research and technology for the College of Engineering. “As time goes by, pictures of this building are going to involve this bridge,” Dunne said. “It will be part of what you see when you see the John D. Tickle building.” As UT recognized the College of Engineering’s need for new space and the fields’ rising importance in today’s job market, administrators fasttracked the building’s construction after breaking ground in 2011, said Dayakar Penumadu of the Civil and Environmental

Engineering Department. “The College of Engineering is rapidly growing, and we are short of research, quality space as well as instructional space,” Penumadu said. “We need ... more quality space like this and that was a pressing need for us to get here as quickly as we can.” The College of Engineering, which has been steadily growing in enrollment at a rate of 15 percent per year, designed the building with specific research in mind. Some rooms move data as quickly as 10 gigabits per second, allowing the engineering students to send data to labs across the country. One of the main attractions is on the first floor in the High Bay Area. The area features a cement pit to recreate erosion environments and test the effects different soils will have on future structures. The floor above also has a two-story water tank on the main floor that will be used for erosion tests conducted in the High Bay Area. The tank will recycle the water to be used in experiments. “It (the High Bay Area) provides either new … or significantly upgraded instructional space for the students,” Dunne said. “It adds space to departments that have not had it before in terms of research.” In addition, the lab has two 10-ton cranes overhead to move in concrete structures and workways, a transfer that is not

possible on every portion of campus, Dunne said. Much of the High Bay Area will be used by a strong biaxial wall system, a distinctive design that allows researchers to create small-scale structures for the purpose of testing its durability. It involves dozens of spots on the floor and wall to tie down materials and see how it reacts. “This is very unique in you can test how structures respond in earthquakes,” Penumadu said. “If you were trying to design government buildings

to resist blast loading, impact loading, we can do those type of measurements here.” The building will be divided, with floors one through four belonging to Civil and Environmental Engineering and the fifth belonging to Industrial and Systems Engineering. “If you were associated with the Industrial and Systems Engineering, you really appreciate (the building),” Dunne said. “They’ve come from inside the stadium to literally the penthouse.”


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Friday, August 23, 2013 Editor-in-Chief R.J. Vogt

OPINIONS

rvogt@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

The day I used neuroscience to murder depression Working Out Happiness by

Andrew Flemming

A piece of me died the first time I held a human brain. That piece of me was the piece that had given up, the piece that thought I was subject to the whims of my crippling sadness. I looked down at the 14 ounces of some guy my professor had plopped in my hands and realized that every battle I thought I’d lost to myself was just a series of inputs and outputs inside my head. It was the most beautiful disillusionment I had ever experienced. Later that year, we studied a concept called cognitive dissonance. Put simply, whenever the brain encounters something that does not make sense, it adjusts accordingly, making sure everything is running smoothly. The incredible thing is that this concept applies to everything we do in our daily lives. When you hear a noise you fail to recognize, your brain flips through billions of stored memories to try and place what you might have heard. Even when everything seems normal, it seems normal because your brain is constantly comparing what you are experiencing to everything you have ever experienced up to that point. As overwhelming as that may seem, you don’t even have to deal with it – your brain does all of this for you without even raising your awareness to it. Now you are probably wondering what any of this has to do with depression. Just for context, my freshman year was arguably pretty terrible from an emotional standpoint. I lost all of my high school friends when we chose different colleges, I lost a close family member to the grave and I lost my girlfriend to her own bad decisions with another guy. I would wake up in time for class and make a conscious decision not to go. My meals consisted of the scraps I ingested at the Morrill hall vending machines. I would neglect new friendships and relationships. I drank way too much and made terrible decisions. I was one tall building away from walking off of a tall building, so to speak. I kept telling myself that I would start working harder when I felt better, but that never happened. That’s because there was no cognitive dissonance to make my brain feel any differently. You see, if you are sad, and you act sad, you will remain sad. However, if you are sad, and you act happy, you just might trick yourself. As we discussed earlier, the brain is a highly observational organ, even observing the things you do on a daily basis. Acting happy literally makes you happy; it’s neuroscience gone right. One day, instead of wallowing in my pit of despair, I decided to go running. I put on the UT gym shorts my mom had bought me on move-in day, looked in the dorm room mirror, and said, “It’s six in the morning, and I’m getting better.” I knew I was lying, but I still ran three miles that morning, which I had never even come close to doing. Then, I showered, because smelling good seemed like a pretty good thing to do at the time. I even managed to find my deodorant underneath the three weeks of laundry at the foot of my bed. I went to every class, even though my legs were sore and Knoxville’s campus is a mountain, because that’s what happy, balanced people do, right? Later, I did homework, I played Xbox, and I hung out with my suitemates. After a decent night’s sleep, I woke up and did it all again. That weekend I even went to a party and talked to the opposite gender, and managed to remember all of it, too. Two years later, I’ve never stopped that routine. The routine just ceased to feel like I was faking it. Andrew Fleming is a junior in neuroscience. He can be reached at aflemin8@utk.edu.

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Economics provide fodder for capitalist mentality To Be Prosise by

Adam Prosise The French economist Frédéric Bastiat once said: “There is only one difference between a bad economist and a good one – the bad economist confines himself to the visible effect; and the good economist takes into account both the effect that can be seen and those effects that must be foreseen.” Bastiat hit the nail on the head. Unfortunately, today’s world is littered with bad economists and history attests that the wrong people, in the wrong places, often push the wrong policies – and the fallout can be disastrous. Whether historical, political or economic in nature, these policies and legislation will be the focal point of this column. I hope you will join me as we analyze and evaluate everything going on in this crazy world through a critical lens. By educating ourselves and discussing the issues of today, we as students can see how these policies will affect us – and give us the right tools to shape a better tomorrow. During my tenure as an undergraduate student, I have been blessed in finding a major that I’m so passionate about that I decided to try my luck and see if The Daily Beacon would give me a column discussing it. Yes, economics – my major – will be a central theme of my column. There is something incredible about allow-

Editor-in-Chief: R.J. Vogt Managing Editor: Melodi Erdogan Chief Copy Editor: Gage Arnold News Editor: Hanna Lustig Asst. News Editor: Emilee Lamb Sports Editor: David Cobb Arts & Culture Editor: Claire Dodson Asst. Arts & Culture Editor: Cortney Roark Online Editor: Samantha Smoak Photo Editor: Janie Prathammavong

I tend to be fiscally conservative and believe that government, like families, should live within its means. I also believe that it is individual liberty, not government, that made America great, and that no economic system has elevated man’s standard of living like capitalism. Our free-market system is not perfect, but it’s better than any of its alternatives. I stand steadfast by my personal beliefs, but I will limit my interjection of them. On the occasions that I do, feel free to respond. I welcome discussion, dialogue and debate, but I do request references and data when one wishes to open a serious discussion. George Washington’s first rule of Civility and Decent Behavior was a wise one: “Every action done…ought to be with some sign of respect to those who are present.” That is certainly how I will treat you – even if we disagree vehemently – with respect. I hope you will enjoy this column as we evaluate the economic ramifications of legislation and the politicians who ratify it. And keep Washington’s 110th rule in mind throughout the course of the semester: “Labor to keep alive in your breast that little celestial fire called conscience.” That’s the beautiful thing about fire – given proper fuel and environment, there is no limit to how large it can become. Let’s resolve to stoke our celestial fires. Let’s fuel it by challenging our basic assumptions and see how large it will grow – and by extension, how far it will spread. Adam Prosise is a senior in economics. He can be reached at aprosise@utk.edu.

Sorority rush brings Greek women together Searching for

Serendipity by

Annie Blackwood I can hear it now – thousands of girls frantically running the halls, the ringing of elevator doors, the grunts of lifting futons up and down eight flights of stairs. It’s move-in day at Tennessee, and for many of these girls comes sorority recruitment a few hours later. After sweating for hours hauling their personal belongings from floor to floor, these girls jump headfirst into one of the more stressful weeks I have personally experienced. Exhausted, they visit 13 chapters in order to find which one matches with their personality enough to be a home for them, and then are asked to judge how they envision their future selves on a mere 15 minutes of conversation. This difficult process can become emotional for the girls, who may just want an opinion from someone who has gone through the situation they are dealing with or something similar. This year I chose to be a Gamma Chi, which, for those of you who are not up to par with sorority slang, is a recruitment counselor for these girls going forward with Rush Week. Although this job may seem easy, or a way for sorority members to get out of actual recruit-

Get Fuzzy • Darby Conley

EDITORIAL

ing data and logic to paint a vivid picture of the world we live in. I hope this column inspires the same passion in you. On par with economics is my deep interest in politics. Over the past two years I have been fortunate to have the opportunity to intern with Sen. Bob Corker and Congressman John Duncan – two of Tennessee’s delegates to the United States Senate and House of Representatives. I bring with me first-hand experience and knowledge of Washington, D.C. – and, for better or worse, an inside perspective on how the sausage is made. You can expect this column to break down the complex politics of our government – and, more importantly, how those politics will affect you – because there are events taking place today that will directly impact your life. Whether it be the Affordable Care Act, immigration reform or tax policy, you will fell the consequences – whether unintended or foreseen – during your time as a student, in your career and for the rest of your life. Enough emphasis cannot be placed on how important it is to understand this sphere of our world. Before we delve any further, it would be appropriate to tell you a little about myself. I was born and raised here in Knoxville. My earliest memories are deeply intertwined with Rocky Top. I remember Peyton Manning leading the Vols to victory; I vividly recall Jeff Hall’s game-winning field goal kick against the Gators in 1998. I have stood by our school through thick and thin, and my support continues to burn bright despite the torrential past three years defined as the Dooley era.

ment, it is far from that. This process is a way for chapter members to invest in the lives of the potential new members and truly humble themselves for the betterment of Greek life at UT. These things can be a positive, but at the same time, there are many trying moments in the process of recruitment. Our world becomes a bubble as Gamma Chi’s can only speak to those participating in the program. Throughout classes, buying books, grocery shopping and sending the girls through rounds, a Gamma Chi is required to disaffiliate and detach themselves from every aspect of their previous chapter. I once thought the saying, “we give up our letters so you can find yours,” seemed cliché, but the phrase now holds a powerful meaning to me. I believed the process of disaffiliating would be a breeze, but it has been a struggle beyond compare. There is exhaustion, dehydration and lack of sleep all compounding upon the 100-plus girls in Gamma Chi who put on a smile every day and encourage the potential new members. Not only are we a shoulder for those girls, but there is also the requirement of attending class and carrying on the normal life outside of the recruitment process. Regardless of the constant stress placed on the women in this program, I have to say, from personal experience, that the outcome far outweighs the daily struggle. To be able to invest in the lives of these girls

who are searching for a place of acceptance and like-minded people has been one of the more humbling things I have ever done. And for as much pressure as we Gamma Chis are under, the most important part of the process is the incoming girls. These young women are faced with the standard trials every freshman/sophomore faces, yet they are asked to visit multiple chapters each night for hours of interviews, all with the pressure of making an impression. The constant demand for a smile on their faces and joy in their hearts is inevitable, but when faced with rejection, the potential new members can get emotional. They need comfort in a time of pain; That is why there are Gamma Chis to love on these hurting women and give an unbiased opinion. I thought Gamma Chi may have been something to try out – offering a different point of view on recruitment – but it has been far more than that to me. It has been an experience of uniting the Greek community, where our diverse chapter background fails to halt our care for one another. Not only have we had the ability to influence these women, but they have influenced us and helped us grow closer to one another. That relationship is well worth the trials faced. Annie Blackwood is a junior in communication studies. She can be reached at ablackwo@utk.edu.

Non Sequitur • Wiley Miller

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Advertising: (865) 974-5206 beaconads@utk.edu Classifieds: (865) 974-4931 orderad@utdailybeacon.com Editor-in-Chief: (865) 974-2348 editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com Main Newsroom: (865) 974-3226 editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com The Daily Beacon is published by students at The University of Tennessee Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters and Tuesday and Friday during the summer semester. The offices are located at 1340 Circle Park Drive, 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The newspaper is free on campus and is available via mail subscription for $200/year, $100/semester or $70/summer only. It is also available online at: www.utdailybeacon.com

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Friday, August 23, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE Farmers Market yields fresh food

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

Around Rock Rockyy Top

Gabrielle O’Neal Staff Writer The UT Farmers Market presents fresh produce, local food and entertainment to the Knoxville community weekly. The market is held in UT Gardens on the UT Institute of Agriculture campus and is run by faculty and student interns. “It’s nice,� said Mary Wortham, a senior majoring in landscape design. “I like to do it, because for me I get to know my plants and know how they grow well in certain situations and that helps me with landscape design. And the farmers market is really nice, you get to meet people.� Becca Harmin, a student intern for the Farmer’s Market, has firsthand witnessed the growth and success the market has undergone since its opening. “The market has been really successful,� Harmin said. “We’ve had a great number of venders, new ones coming in all the time.� The market began in 2009 and supports local farmers. “All of the venders are from within east Tennessee,� Harmin said. “All of the venders make or produce their own products, and so all of the farmers are growing all of their own crops.� The market ranges from about 25 to 30 venders a week and sells various produce and personal care products. The UT Gardens holds a booth at the market where the group of UT workers sell produce while educating interested visitors.

See FARMERS MARKET on Page 6

Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

Lauren Beale, Paule Lee and Zach Jones investigate a free book in the Art and Architecture building on Aug. 21.

Alternative pop artist drops feel-good album Amanda Cleveland Contributor In his latest release, “The Walking in Between,� singer-songwriter Ben Rector has stuck to what he knows best: lovedriven alternative pop with effortlessness and hope sewn into every lyric. Rector, an artist with growing popularity, has been touring and working diligently for the past two years in order to release “The Walking in Between,� his fifth studio album since 2007. Over the years, Rector has developed a unique style and has carved out his own niche into the music industry. This album, released on Tuesday, quickly rose to No. 1 on iTunes’ singer-songwriter charts. “The Walking in Between� features Rector in his happy and upbeat element, which has remained constant throughout his career. The album features 13 songs that cover a large span of topics, including love, summer and bad days. While there are a couple of sad songs scattered

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throughout the album, his sound and perspective brim with optimism. A line that stands out as a fitting summary for the album comes from the song â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Like You,â&#x20AC;? one of the most lighthearted tracks that encourages listeners to enjoy the small, seemingly trivial aspects of life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are way too many love songs/ and I think theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got it all wrong/â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;cause life is not the mountain tops/ itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the walking in between,â&#x20AC;? he sings. Rector seems to be sharing a theme that life is simpler than people often think. He tackles everyday life and puts a positive spin on it, making this the perfect â&#x20AC;&#x153;feel goodâ&#x20AC;? album. He has quite a few love songs on this album, as he has previously, but he certainly does not stop there. In the last three years, Rectorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s audience has widened, evident by the way each release climbed higher on the charts. Those who enjoyed albums such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Songs Duke Wroteâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Into the Morningâ&#x20AC;? will not be disappointed with the new release because it does not stray from his signa-

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instead of living bound by obligations and pointless tasks; this is a good reminder of what is important and how we should take time to do what we love. This artist realizes that the everyday struggles and triumphs that everyone faces are real, significant and worth singing about. Admittedly, countless artists sing love songs, and life is not always as simple and carefree as the songs on â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Walking in Between.â&#x20AC;? But, there is something to be said for an artist who makes it easy to feel good about life, and that is certainly who Rector has become. Bands and artists who are similar to Ben Rector include Matt Wertz, Dave Barnes and Drew Holcomb and the Neighbors, all of whom are based in Nashville, Tenn. Ben Rectorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Walking in Betweenâ&#x20AC;? tour comes to Knoxville at the Bijou theatre Oct. 9. He will be accompanied by Tyrone Wells. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Walking in Betweenâ&#x20AC;? can be found on iTunes, along with his other albums.

ture sound. The songs on â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Walking in Betweenâ&#x20AC;? are not unexpected. Rector has not made any drastic altercations or ventured into new musical realms since his beginning. His songs and albums follow a recognizable and familiar flow. While the melodies and instrumentation arrangements are catchy, it seems as though Rector gave priority to his lyrics and an overarching theme that is threaded throughout every song. There are not many dramatic musical additions to accompany his singing. His voice easily cuts through the mandolins, guitars, percussion and piano, taking precedence in a way that is still beautifully balanced. One of the strongest songs on the album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beautifulâ&#x20AC;? has Rector questioning, â&#x20AC;&#x153;How do we end up like this/living lives that we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care about/too busy fixing things on computer screens/while the grass grows green?â&#x20AC;? Here he expresses his yearning to return to the days when he lived freely

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Friday, August 23, 2013 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

SUPER ART continued from Page 1 Each of the artists were invited to be part of a show that started out as a technological disaster but led the artists to discover live action art fighting, Nover said. “Artists had to find ways to keep the audience’s attention, so it turned into a rumble of art,” he said. “Artists were drawing on each other’s art and the audience loved it. We decided we could do that and went from there.” The team has been performing together for about five years, and Nover said this group of artists never imagined themselves displaying art in this way. “I think there’s this great message here, which is if you find something cool that you want to do, you can get somewhere doing it,” Nover said. Super Art Fight is presented by the Visual Arts Committee as part of Welcome Week. Press secretary Morgan Hardy said VAC has been trying to incorporate live art on campus for years. “We’ve wanted for years to have a live demon-

stration for art and this seems like an interesting way to do that,” said Hardy, a senior in theatre. “I know watching someone paint can be time consuming. It can take hours and hours to do a painting but this is geared to be more fast paced and it will be really exciting.” Hardy said VAC is “starting the year off with a bang” by bringing Super Art Fight to campus. “There is a lot of inspiration around art that I don’t think a lot of people get in person very often,” Nover said. “You see art online or in galleries, but it’s rare that you get the opportunity to see these things live and see that it still exists. “It’s so visual and so much energy that hearing about it and seeing it are two different things.” Super Art Fight will last from 7-9 p.m. on Friday at the Humanities Amphitheatre as a part of Welcome Week. The event will be followed with Vol Night Long. For more information visit www.superartfight.com.

• File Photo

FARMERS MARKET

Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

continued from Page 5 “We’re not so much about profit,” Wortham said. “We like to get our message out and our mission about education, learning and horticulture.” Harmin, who is originally from Dallas, has only been with the farmers market for a short period of time. However, she is impressed with the sense of community in Knoxville. “What’s been really interesting to see are the customers that come back every week, the com-

mitted market goers,” she said. “Also, the same coin different side (aspect), every week seeing new people come out.” However, officials are swift to admit that what the market lacks in funds, it makes up in local support. “The Knoxville community has been really supportive in giving us time and talent,” Harmin said. “Sometimes, the Crown and Goose chief Jeff DeAlejandro will do cooking

demos for us out of the goodness of his heart.” This type community backing has sparked the market’s sudden surge in popularity. “A lot of organization and businesses will freely give their time and energy just because they want to support our farmers market,” Harmin said. The Farmers Market takes place every Wednesday from 4-7 p.m. until Oct. 23 at the UT Gardens. “It’s just great for midweek,” Harmin said. “You can catch your breath get your local groceries and goods and grab dinner. It’s an event and errands all at once.”

Ryan Bohling, senior in Asian studies, admires a piece of “32” in the Ewing Gallery on Aug. 21. “It would really have an impact on people to live in a space that was designed to be inspiring,” said Bohling.

Faculty feature talent in Ewing Gallery art show Gabrielle O’Neal Staff Writer To celebrate “32,” the first exhibit from UT faculty since 2007, the College of Architecture and Design will hold a reception on Friday, Aug. 23 at 5:30 p.m. in the Ewing Gallery.

Since Aug. 1, “32” has been on display in the Art and Architecture Building. The exhibition was fittingly named for the number of participants in the showcase. Sarah McFalls, collections manager of the Ewing Gallery, helped to organize and set up the showcase. “Some of it showcases recent architecture and design projects while other works involve photography, collage, drawing, the construction of instruments and toys and furniture design,” McFalls said. The exhibit includes art within the mediums of architecture, landscape architecture, film, interior design, photography, graphic design, mixed media and more. Scott Poole, the dean of the College of Architecture and Design, contributed to the gallery with a series of objects based on geometry, ratio of numbers and qualities of specific materials. Diane Fox, senior lecturer in the school of architecture and organizer of the exhibition, hopes the event will expose the talented faculty at UT. “My expectation for the exhibit is to feature the faculty’s work so that everybody can see the richness and diversity of our talented faculty,” Fox said. “It is especially valuable for the students to see what we can offer.” Sierra Jensen, junior in architecture, has visited the exhibit and appreciates seeing work created by her professors. “I believe it’s interesting and

helpful to see your professors and faculty in another setting and through another medium,” Jensen said. “Some of the faculty had works displayed that were not just architectural works, like personal projects, which allowed the exhibit to have a lot of variety and personality.” One of the works Jensen found intriguing was adjunct associate professor Matt Hall’s piece on aluminum guitars. “One honorable and interesting work, however, was Hall’s installation,” Jensen said. “It was a piece that you wanted to know more about.” Fox, who teaches graphic design and photography within the college, has four photographs from her series, UnNatural History, that consist of images of dioramas in museums in the U.S. and abroad. “I think the work is very strong and I have several favorite pieces,” said Fox. The last faculty exhibition in 2007 occurred near the time of the school of architecture’s accreditation, according to Fox. “Last time the exhibit happened around the time of the school of architecture’s accreditation and that is true this time also,” Fox said. “The exhibit will result in a catalog that we will be able to present the accreditation team. Since the time of the last exhibit we have several new faculty, a new program in landscape architecture and new administration. “It was time to take a fresh look.”


Friday, August 23, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 7 Sports Editor David Cobb

SPORTS

dcobb3@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron tprovost@utk.edu

Looking ahead at the SEC East sophomore running back Mike Davis will have the Dargan Southard first crack at replacing departed starter Marcus Staff Writer Lattimore. But eventually, all things do come back to Jadaveon Clowney, and rightfully so. The 2013 The number of days until Tennessee football Heisman candidate can single-handedly change the begins has dwindled into single digits, meaning it is outcome of a game at any moment, and will be a time to take a look at the competition the Vols will force against opposing offensive line from the first face inside the SEC’s Eastern Division. snap of the season opener. Florida (11-2, 7-1 SEC) – Faces UT Sept. 27 As has been the case since Will Muschamp took over the Gators in 2011, Florida will rely heavily on its relentless defense to win games in 2013. Led by senior defensive lineman Dominique Easley and linebackers Dante Fowler Jr. and Ronald Powell, the Gator D will aim to finish in the top 10 in total defense for the sixth consecutive season. The offense, however, could get dicey in a hurry as Florida tries to manage without last year’s leading rusher Mike Gillislee and top receiver Jordan Reed – both currently on NFL rosters. Junior Jeff Driskel continues to man the quarterback position, coming off of a 2,000 all-purpose yard season, while sophomore Matt Jones plans to take over as starting running back following a solid freshman campaign. Like the Volunteers, Florida has a brutal schedule, facing Miami (FL), LSU and Florida State as well as the normal SEC East slate. Georgia (12-2, 7-1 SEC) – Faces UT Oct. 5 Picked by most as the SEC East favorite, Mark Richt’s squad will be a dynamic and explosive bunch all season, especially on the offensive side of the ball. Senior quarterback Aaron Murray, who was voted by the coaches as the All-SEC preseason first team quarterback, looks to lead his team back to the SEC Championship in Atlanta for a second consecutive season. This fall also marks the return of the two-headed monster formed by sophomore tailbacks Todd Gurley and Keith Marshall, a deadly combo that produced over 2,100 rushing yards and 25 touchdowns a season ago. The Bulldog defense, however, may be the deciding factor in whether Georgia is a BCS title contender or just simply a 10-win squad. The NFL draft scooped up the likes of Jarvis Jones, Bacarri Rambo and Alec Ogletree, so fresh faces will be abundant in the starting lineup all year. Look for linebackers Amarlo Herrera and Jordan Jenkins as well as safety Tray Matthews to try and fill those holes. South Carolina (11-2, 6-2 SEC) – Faces UT Oct. 19 Clowney. Clowney. And once more, Clowney. While it may not seem like it at times, there is actually more to Steve Spurrier’s squad than the 6-7 260pound behemoth who runs an alleged 4.6 40-yard dash. Senior quarterback Connor Shaw appears ready to build on his 17-3 record as a starter, all while showing the reason he’s considered a prototypical dual-threat quarterback. Two-sport athlete Bruce Ellington returns as Shaw’s top target, and

Missouri (5-7, 2-6 SEC) – Faces UT Nov. 2 While the Tigers’ SEC debut in 2012 was hardly impressive, their 2013 campaign has the potential to be much more successful and possibly save head coach Gary Pinkel’s job. A healthy James Franklin returns for his final season under center and has a decent group of receivers surrounding him, including seniors Marcus Lucas and L’Damian Washington as well as former top recruit Dorial Green-Beckham, who is entering his sophomore season. Junior running back Henry Josey is back from an extensive knee injury and is poised to return to 2011 form when he lead the Tigers in rushing. Question marks do exist on defense as the Tigers replace defensive end and 2013 first-round draft pick Sheldon Richardson. Vanderbilt (9-4, 5-3 SEC) – Faces UT Nov. 23 No longer buried in the basement of the SEC standings, Vanderbilt will seek a third straight bowl appearance for the first time in school history as third-year head coach James Franklin continues to build excitement around this previously overlooked program. Redshirt senior Austyn Carta-Samuels, a Wyoming transfer, is prepared to take over duties under center while top receiver Jordan Matthews is set to prove why he is viewed as one of the most talented wideouts in the SEC. Running backs Wesley Tate and Brian Kimbrow are locked in to replace former Commodore and current St. Louis Ram Zac Stacy. Another nine-win season seems unlikely with a much tougher schedule that includes road games versus South Carolina, Texas A&M and Florida, but a postseason berth is within reach. Kentucky (2-10, 0-8 SEC) – Faces UT Nov. 30 First-year Wildcat head coach Mark Stoops has undoubtedly brought promise and enthusiasm to the Kentucky program since his hiring in late November 2012, reeling in a bevy of noteworthy recruits that has the 2014 class currently ranked No. 7 by Rivals.com. However, the 2013 campaign will, in all likelihood, be another ugly one for Big Blue. Some stability exists at running back as seniors Raymond Sanders and Jonathan George return for their final year, but inconsistencies at quarterback and receiver will create an abundance of offensive struggles throughout the season. Bright spots defensively include linebacker Avery Williamson and defensive end Alvin Dupree.

Around Rock Rockyy Top

Samantha Smoak • The Daily Beacon

Football players mill around during practice on Aug. 20. Thursday, the Vols began preparation for their Aug. 31 season-opener against Austin Peay.


8 • THE DAILY BEACON

Friday, August 23, 2013 Sports Editor David Cobb

SPORTS

dcobb3@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron tprovost@utk.edu

Annual banquet mixes football, alumni McCord Pagan Copy Editor The Knoxville chapter of the UT Alumni Association held its annual dinner in ThompsonBoling Arena Wednesday, featuring football coach Butch Jones and a handful of “Team 117.” The event, one of several different activities the organization sponsors throughout the year, appeared largely successful, with 1386 registered attendees, not counting walkups and the over 100 football players and staff members in who joined the banquet. For over an hour, members of the football team signed autographs and met with Volunteers young and old; even Smokey and the entire cheerleading squad made an appearance. Not only did those in attendance have the opportunity to land autographs from Jones and other football players, but a

McCord Pagan • The Daily Beacon

Guests help themselves to food at the Welcome Back Barbecue in Thompson Boiling Arena on Aug. 21.

GOSS continued from Page 1 “Mate well done in the US Am. Please follow me so I can message u,” Norman tweeted at Goss, who now returns to Knoxville to prepare for the collegiate season with some newfound confidence. “I learned a lot about myself and my golf game last week,” Goss said. “I just want to take the confidence I had and bring it into the golf season that starts in a couple of weeks. I felt like I was swinging it the best I ever have.” Before the UT golf team opens up its first tournament of the season in Dalton, Ga. at

the Carpet Capital Collegiate on Sept. 6, he will look to zone in on his short game. “I really want to improve my short game, especially chipping and putting,” Goss said, who was named to the 2013 All-SEC first team last season and to the 2013 Golfweek AllAmerican third team. “I think that kind of let me down last week, especially my putting. My ball striking has improved a lot but I want to fine tune the other part of my game.” Goss will enter this season as the No. 14-ranked amateur golfer worldwide.

wide range of gifts were handed out – from gift cards and coupons to signed memorabilia. A few of the giveaways included a Holly Warlick basketball, Cuonzo Martin basketball, Butch Jones football and Hilton Hotel stays, Jackie Parreco, director of Alumni Chapters and Outreach said. The UT Alumni Chapter also hosts events such as VolunTOURs, where alumni groups tour new buildings on campus such as the Anderson Training Center and the Haslam Business Building. They also create football watch parties, in addition to hosting educational opportunities where they will professors visit, mingle and lecture, Parreco said. The event mixed football with alumni, as each player sat at a separate table giving everyone the opportunity to interact with those traditionally in separate worlds.

The event also featured Chancellor Jimmy Cheek and the Volunteers’ radio play-byplay man Bob Kesling who spoke to the largely energetic crowd. The audience expressed their enthusiasm for the new football coaches and the positive buzz now surrounding the athletic program. “Top universities like Tennessee pride themselves on not only being great academically, but great athletically,” Cheek said. “I am extremely pleased and proud of where our athletic association is today, and where it’s going. Its future is great.” Kevin O’Connor, a 1982 graduate of UT who still works in Knoxville, was glad to see Butch Jones in attendance, saying he is excited over the optimism and enthusiasm that the first-year coach has brought to the program. “(I’m glad UT has) a coach

that is finally energetic and can show these guys how to play,” O’Connor said. “(I’m) looking forward to finally getting some players who are ready to be coached up. I don’t think we’ve played to our potential the last seven or eight years.” When Jones finally stepped up to the podium, the audience warmly greeted him with a standing ovation before he started speaking about his hopes for the program and his personal commitment to Tennessee. “Quite simply it’s Tennessee, there’s only one Tennessee,” Jones said. “It’s a job that I coveted for a very, very long time. You can’t help … but really feel the passion and energy, the excitement and the tradition. We have everything to be successful, we have great leadership from Jimmy Cheek and Dave Hart and all the way up the line.”

Position change provides much-needed depth Dallas Abel Staff Writer Position changes can be hard for a college football player, but not necessarily for UT junior Vincent Dallas, who has accepted that positions change while keeping only his team in mind. With injuries to cornerbacks Riyahd Jones and Michael Williams coupled with an overall lack of depth in the defensive backfield, Dallas once again finds himself at cornerback after starting fall camp as a wide receiver. “We are just in the process right now of looking at some guys and trying to get our best available on the field, so we are taking a look at Vincent,” said Willie Martinez, defensive backs coach. “We love Vincent. We love Vincent as a staff. He is an unselfish player and has a great

attitude and did a good job.” In his third season with the Vols, Dallas has yet to find a permanent home on the field. His freshman season was spent as a reserve wide receiver where he recorded three catches for 37 yards. As sophomore year approached, former Vols head coach Derek Dooley decided to switch Dallas to defensive back for all of the 2012 fall camp. But prior to the start of the season, Dallas found himself on the opposite side of the ball as a wide receiver. He played all 12 games, finishing with nine catches for 149 yards and one touchdown. “I mean basically he (Coach Jones) just asked me what I thought about it,” Dallas said. “I just told him that I am a team player and whatever he needs me to do I am going to do it.” Versatility is a trait that

already has Martinez excited to work with the Ellenwood, Ga. native. “The great thing about it is, he has played defensive back before,” Martinez said. “So he’s got awareness and anytime you play the opposite position, in this case it is the wide receiver and defensive back, there are a lot of similarities and lingo that he hears so he knows how to attack it. It is very good. He feels comfortable with it.” One of the questions left for the Vols offense is at wide receiver. Dallas had the secondmost receptions of any returning player at the position. “Those are personnel decisions that Coach Jones makes and you know, for our situation at the corner right now, I think Coach Jones is just experimenting a little and putting the best players on the field,” said wide

receivers coach Zach Azzani. The change in position not only affects Dallas, but has also caused some momentary hiccups for quarterback Justin Worley. “It’s funny after going through ten practices with him on your side, and then him out there tackling your receivers so he has done a good job transitioning,” said junior quarterback Justin Worley. “I haven’t heard a word out of him complaining. I think he just wants a chance to play wherever he can and wherever he can help the team out is what he wants to do.” Other position changes Jalen Reeves-Maybin entered fall camp listed as a safety. He is not switching sides of the ball, but the freshman from Clarksville, Tenn. has been moved to linebacker where he should bolster depth as Curt Maggitt continues his return from knee surgery.

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