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Issue 17, Volume 123

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Smartphone apps impact social spheres Gabrielle O’Neal Staff Writer

• Donna Silvey

Boudreaux the dog visits with students of Belle Morris Elementary School through HABIT’s program “Ruff Reading.”

Animal charity mixes readers with pets HABIT program to work alongside UT Hayley Brundige Contributor

Animal lovers and bookworms can enjoy their two passions and give back to the community. The Dog Days of Summer fundraiser will be hosted by the Human Animal Bond in Tennessee program this Friday from 10:30 a.m to 2:30 p.m in Circle Park. For $5 visitors can receive a hotdog and meet six of the adorable animals that are a part of Human Animal Bond in Tennessee, which was established in 1986 and is made up of representatives from the UT College of Veterinary Medicine and over 400 volunteers from around the community. HABIT dogs visit nursing homes, mental health centers, special needs facilities and hospitals, spreading simple, slobbery love to all that they meet. There are about 70 different programs run by the organization. Three guest speakers will give presentations on bibliotherapy, canine behavior and how UT is using HABIT animals on campus and in the community in the College of Communications and Information Auditorium.

Proceeds from the fundraiser will go to HABIT’s various initiatives, such as Ruff Reading, a program in which HABIT volunteers take their dogs to Knoxville-area schools to read with children. Donna Silvey, communications specialist for the School of Information Sciences, HABIT volunteer and self-proclaimed “top dog”, has been taking her mutt, Boudreaux, to Belle Morris Elementary School since 2008. Silvey said she praises the Ruff Reading program for being simple and effective. “You think about all the federal dollars that have to be spent on reading programs, and then there’s this free dog that comes in and makes magic happen,” said Silvey, with the magicmaker himself, Boudreaux, sticking his black and white head out inquisitively from underneath her desk. Boudreaux is a black and white dog of questionable breed rescued from Hurricane Katrina in 2004. Silvey claims he will be the “star of the show” at this Friday’s fundraiser. Perfectly pettable, laid-back and lovable, it’s hard not to fall in love with Silvey’s “lucky Cajun.” And this is precisely what makes Boudreaux a perfect HABIT dog. According to Silvey, Boudreaux has made an enormous impact on the children in the Ruff Reading program and can calm down even the most nervous reader. Through gentle nudges

and prodding, he encourages children to be more confident when reading aloud. Through fundraisers like Dog Days of Summer, HABIT hopes to acquire enough money to buy one book for every child involved in Ruff Reading, which amounts to about 2,000 books. Recently, HABIT dogs started leaving their prints on the UT campus. During exam week, the HABIT hounds are brought to Hodges Library to calm the frazzled nerves of stressed students. Also, this Friday’s fundraiser will be used to spread the word about the new Gary R. Purcell reading room in the Communications Building, where UT faculty and staff will be able to hang out with HABIT dogs every other Wednesday, starting this September. Ruth Sapp, the East Tennessee Program Coordinator for HABIT said the canine companionship programs work so well because of the positive energy that the dogs bring. “The Ruff Reading program makes students more confident because they have a friend with unconditional positive regard that they get to see every week,” Sapp said.”The goal of HABIT is to end human suffering wherever we can, and hopefully make a bright spot in someone’s day.” HABIT is an amazing program, fully dependent on community donations and support. Come by Circle Park this Friday, pay the $5 admission fee.

It’s no secret smart phones are the prime mobile devices used. With 53 percent of college students using smart phones, young users have a plethora of apps ranging from study help to social networking. One of today’s most popular apps is SnapChat, which allows people to instantaneously send pictures to their friends that will delete after a set amount of seconds. “The main reason I like it is that when I studied abroad, I made a lot of friends who live abroad, and it lets me communicate with them pretty easily,” ,” said Honna Miller, senior majoring in honors philosophy and political science. In addition to pictures, SnapChat also allows a video component that allows users record short clips to send to friends. “The fact that we can pretty much instantaneously send each other videos and pictures is what makes it so cool to me,” Miller said. Apps for social media are just as popular for times when people are not near their computers. “I’m a pretty active tweeter,” Miller said. “So I definitely use my Twitter app a lot, but I don’t know if I would say that it’s a favorite or anything, as I mostly just use it out of necessity.” “I like Twitter and GroupMe,” said Anitra Selmon, a senior majoring in sociology. “I also like the ZipCar app. It’s pretty simple and super convenient. If I want to rent one of the Zip Cars I can in a minute.” There are also apps that pertain to dating and relationships. Tinder allows users to rate fellow members as ‘hot or not’ and if the same users both rate each other positively, they can communicate through the app. Lulu allows female members to anonymously rate the males in their Facebook circle. Both are increasingly popular, albeit controversial, according to Miller. “I definitely think they’re super sleazy, to say the least,” said Miller. “I think programs that give people the ability to rate other people the same way you rate a movie or an album are way out of line and only reflect the seemingly intense superficiality that seems so mainstream nowadays.” While apps are mainly known for their ability to keep people entertained on the go, they can also be helpful when it comes to studying. “I’ve been using StudyBlue to host my notes and compare my notes and study guide to other students’ since I started UT,” said Miller. “They also have a pretty nice flashcard maker. It’s definitely more convenient than traditional flashcards, because all I have to do to study is take out my phone.” Colleges, including UT have created their ownapps. The new Tennessee app has everything a UT student needs right at the click of the button. “I would recommend the UT app [to incoming freshmen],” said Selmon. “It has maps, game schedules, academic resources and info about the T. Those are things I wish I had when I first came here, especially the map.”

Obama, Clinton meet for lunch at White House Associated Press When is a lunch more than just a midday meal? When the two diners are President Barack Obama and Hillary Rodham Clinton, and inquiring minds want to know who, if anyone, the president will endorse in 2016. A summertime meal shared by Obama and his rival-turned-ally threw the political speculation machine into overdrive Monday, highlighting how closely both are being watched for signs of their intentions in the next presidential race. For Clinton, it’s a question of whether the former first lady will take the plunge, launching another campaign eight years after she lost to Obama in a hard-fought primary. For Obama, it’s about dueling loyalties to two of his closest advisers who would both covet his endorsement: Clinton and Vice President Joe Biden, who is also said to be eyeing the Oval Office.

Such questions set the table for a midday powwow over salad, grilled chicken and pasta jambalaya whipped up by the White House chef and served al fresco on the patio just outside the Oval Office. Will Clinton tip her hand? Will Obama offer his support? Or will the two dive deep into current events — bloodshed in Egypt, for instance, or a budding new round of Mideast peace talks that eluded Clinton as secretary of state? In all likelihood, none of the above. “The purpose of the lunch was chiefly social,” said White House spokesman Josh Earnest, calling it a “chance to catch up” and adding that Obama had initiated the invitation. “Secretary Clinton and the president have developed not just a strong working relationship, but also a genuine friendship.” So what are the chances that Biden popped in for coffee and desert, a casual reminder that he’s

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still the one with the office closest to Obama’s? “I think the table was set for two,” Earnest said. Not to worry — Biden will have his own chance to shoot the breeze with his former Senate colleague and 2008 primary opponent on Tuesday. The White House said Biden and Clinton will have breakfast together at the Naval Observatory, the vice president’s official residence. Monday’s lunch isn’t not the first time Obama and Clinton huddled since Clinton stepped down in February after four years as Obama’s top diplomat. They saw each other briefly in Dallas at the opening of former President George W. Bush’s presidential library in April. And in March, the Clintons shared a private dinner with Obama that wasn’t announced publicly until after the fact. In the meantime, Clinton has kept up a hectic schedule of

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speeches and public appearances that has provided further fodder to those urging her to run again. A super PAC seeking to create a campaign-in-waiting in case she runs, Ready for Hillary, recently picked up support from some of Obama’s most prominent former campaign organizers. So it’s no wonder that each Obama-Clinton rendezvous is closely analyzed, elating some and prompting eye rolls from others who lament that barely six months in to Obama’s second term, talk about his replacement is already reaching a fever pitch. “In Democratic circles, it makes people fantasize and engage in all kinds of speculation, when in fact it may just be a tete-a-tete between the leader of the free world and the most important person in the Democratic Party,” said Hank Sheinkopf, a New Yorkbased Democratic strategist who worked on President Bill Clinton’s 1996 re-election.

• Barack Obama

President Obama will be visiting the Amazon Fulfillment Center in Chattanooga, Tenn. today and speaking on improving middle class standards.

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2 • THE DAILY BEACON

IN SHORT THIS DAY IN

HISTORY

1964: South Vietnamese boats were implicated in the break-in, but raid islands in the Tonkin Gulf the Nixon administration denied any involvement. Later that year, At about midnight, six “Swifts,” reporters Carl Bernstein and Bob special torpedo boats used by the Woodward of The Washington Post South Vietnamese for covert raids, discovered a higher-echelon conspirattack the islands of Hon Me and Hon acy surrounding the incident, and a Ngu in the Tonkin Gulf. Although political scandal of unprecedented unable to land any commandos, the magnitude erupted. boats fired on island installations. Radar and radio transmissions were 1999: Blair Witch Project released monitored by an American destroyer, the USS Maddox, which was On this day in 1999, The Blair stationed about 120 miles away. Witch Project, a low-budget, indeThe South Vietnamese attacks pendent horror film that will become were part of a covert operation called a massive cult hit, is released in U.S. Oplan 34A, which involved raids theaters. by South Vietnamese commandos Shot with shaky, handheld camoperating under American orders eras, the documentary-style movie against North Vietnamese coastal told the story of three student filmand island installations. Although makers who disappeared into the American forces were not directly woods and were never heard from involved in the actual raids, U.S. again, although their footage was Navy ships were on station to con- later discovered. With the help of a duct electronic surveillance and Web-based viral marketing stratemonitor North Vietnamese defense gy--a relatively new concept at the responses under another program, time--The Blair Witch Project generOperation De Soto. The Oplan 34A ated huge buzz over the question attacks played a major role in events of whether or not it was based on that led to what became known as a true story. In fact, the story was the Gulf of Tonkin Incident. entirely fake. Fake or not, it didn’t matter at the box office: The Blair 1974: Watergate affair approach- Witch Project grossed some $250 es climax. million worldwide and was featured on the covers of Newsweek and Under coercion from the U.S. Time magazines. Supreme Court, President Richard The Blair Witch Project followed M. Nixon releases subpoenaed the young filmmakers as they went White House recordings--suspected into the woods near Burkittsville, to prove his guilt in the Watergate Maryland, to make a documentary cover-up--to special prosecutor Leon about a local legend known as the Jaworski. The same day, the House Blair Witch. The filmmakers got lost Judiciary Committee voted a third and experienced a series of scary article of impeachment against the events and unexplained phenompresident: contempt of Congress in ena, such as strange noises and hindering the impeachment process. piles of stones being inexplicably The previous two impeachment arti- re-arranged. The trio never returned cles voted against Nixon by the com- to civilization, but their film equipmittee were obstruction of justice ment was supposedly found and the and abuse of presidential powers. footage they shot became The Blair On June 17, 1972, five men, Witch Project. Unlike other horror including a salaried security coordi- films that featured bloody scenes nator for President Nixon’s reelection and special effects, The Blair Witch committee, were arrested for break- Project scared moviegoers through ing into and illegally wiretapping implied terror and violence. the Democratic National Committee headquarters in Washington, D.C.’s This Day in History is courtesy of Watergate complex. Soon after, two History.com. other former White House aides

Tuesday, July 30, 2013 Editor-in-Chief Victoria Wright vwright6@utk.edu

Managing Editor RJ Vogt rvogt@utk.edu

Around Rock Rockyy Top

Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

Despite construction on South College, Ray’s Place remains open for business.


Tuesday, July 30, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 3

ARTS & CULTURE

Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan merdogan@utk.edu

R&B album proves to fall guilty of recent music trends Ciara’s self-titled album finally releases after repeated delays, still proves underdeveloped

tion producers gave it or just a good cookie among a bunch of spoiled ones, “Body Party” thoroughly refocuses Ciara’s image as a musician and her focus on music that is sex. These days, pop radio audiences are constantly

hearing sex-tinged lyrics and promiscuous sayings that are not only R-rated but also quite inappropriate for everyday listening. Ciara is only making the case worse with lyrics like “Baby take your time now there’s no need to rush / we can go another

Melodi Erdogan

Arts & Culture Editor If love were ever a dominant subject in regards to music and lyrics, then it has slowly but surely been replaced with sex. This is exemplified by Ciara’s latest self-titled album, released July 5. Ciara first came out onto the music scene with the single “Goodies,” in early 2004. Since then, Ciara has not only collaborated with chart toppers like Usher and Missy Elliot, but she created her own platform as one of few female artists in the R&B/pop genre. “Ciara,” her fifth studio album, features 11 original songs and is her first album since “Basic Instinct,” that was released in 2010. Having laid low for three years, Ciara let way for fellow female musicians/competition Nicki Minaj and Alicia Keys. While most musicians take advantage of their recent successes and milk it for all they can, releasing album on album within just a few months of each other, Ciara took time to find the right “vibe” for the album. Alas, that “vibe” wasn’t possible without some disappointments. Over the past three years, Ciara’s representatives released three different singles that were supposedly on the forthcoming album, but since they all tanked, producers scrapped them. Last April, producers finally released the track list after two failed attempts, and it featured a new song as the lead single entitled “Body Party.” It’s clear that this single was expertly created and highly manipulated to place Ciara in the spotlight after the previous failed attempts. The song has reached number 22 on the Billboard Hot 100 and number eight on the US Billboard Hot R&B/ Hip-Hop charts, and is without a doubt the best track off “Ciara.” Whether it was the extra atten-

• Photo courtesy of Ciara

“W hether it was the extra attention producers

gave it or just a good cookie among a bunch of spoiled ones, “Body Party” thoroughly refocuses Ciara’s image as a musician and her focus on music that is sex.”

round if that’s what you want / cause tonight it’s going down yeah you know it’s going down / we in the zone now, don’t stop.” As she obviously retells a situation she had with her significant other in song, Ciara may be reliving a delightful moment for herself, but there is a disconnect in meaning and value in the song’s lyrics, leaving the listener with a distasteful sound on their palette. The lyrics may ruin the first layer of music on “Body Party,” but the rest of the track is expertly produced. Ciara’s falsetto has no trouble reaching the high notes, and the beat is strong, prominent and guides the whole song. The structure of the song is quite basic, but is made interesting with faded and added effects obviously done by computers. Although, kudos to the producers Mike Will Made It, P-Nasty and Ciara’s boyfriend Future on creating the perfect balance of computer and voice that dominates the R&B sound today. The second single off the album is “I’m Out,” featuring Nicki Minaj. As the first track off the album, the clearly explicit song begins what seems like a rap album, but is really not. Minaj dominates the track with her own lines, while Ciara attempts to follow her beat but fails. The song has one rap layer, a sample layer, a completely different chorus, then another layer and continues like that. With no definite dimension, the song is messy and unorganized, and definitely not the best start to the album. With the exception of “Body Party,” the album follows this unorganized pattern, and by the end of the album, it’s clear that the only theme developed is that before mentioned sex element. As Ciara croons “give me more” in the track “sophomore,” it’s evident that the producers took much confidence in the saying “sex sells” when making this album. “Body Party” is the diamond among the rough, while the rest of “Ciara” remains unorganized and not very entertaining. While most collections contain a story or common motif, “Ciara” only further establishes the fact that innocent, unadulterated love no longer exists in pop music, if it ever did in the first place. “Ciara” by Ciara is available to listen to on Spotify.

Thief crashes exhibit in Cannes, steals $53 million in jewels Associated Press A staggering 40 million euro ($53 million) worth of diamonds and other jewels was stolen Sunday from the Carlton Intercontinental Hotel in Cannes, in one of Europe’s biggest jewelry heists in recent years, police said. One expert noted the crime follows recent jail escapes by members of the notorious “Pink Panther” jewel thief gang. The hotel in the sweltering French Riviera was hosting a temporary jewelry exhibit over the summer from the prestigious Leviev diamond house, which is owned by Israeli billionaire Lev Leviev. A police spokesman said the theft took place around noon, but he could not confirm local media reports that the robber was a single gunman who stuffed a suitcase with the gems before making a swift exit. The spokesman spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the matter on the record. The luxury Carlton hotel featured prominently in Alfred Hitchcok’s “To Catch a Thief,” which starred Cary Grant as a reformed burglar chasing a jewel thief. It is situated on the exclusive Promenade de la Croisette that stretches a mile and a half (2.4 kilometers) along the French Riviera, and is thronged by the rich and famous throughout the year. The hotel’s position provides not only a beautiful view of the sea but also an easy getaway for potential jewel thieves along the long stretch of road. “It’s a huge theft. Anytime you talk about a heist with many millions of dollars it turns heads and feeds the imagination,” said Jonathan Sazonoff, U.S. editor for the Museum Security Network website and an authority on high-value crime. He said the likelihood of recovering the stolen diamonds and jewels is slim, because the thieves can easily sell them. “The fear is, if you’re dealing with high-quality minerals, it’s hard to get them back,” Sazonoff said. “They can be broken up and so they can be easily smuggled and sold.” The valuable gems were supposed to be on public display until the end of August. It was not immediately clear how many pieces were stolen. Leviev, in a brief statement, said: “Company officials are cooperating with local authorities investigating the loss and are relieved that no one was injured in the robbery.” Several police officers were placed in front of the Carlton exhibition room — near a Cartier diamond boutique — to prevent the dozens of journalists and photographers from getting a look at the scene of the crime.

Hotel officials would not comment, and attempts to get comments from Leviev or his company were not immediately successful. Europe has been struck by several brazen jewelry thefts in recent years, some of which have involved tens of millions of dollars in treasure. On Feb. 18 in Belgium, some $50 million worth of diamonds were stolen. In that heist, robbers targeted stones from the global diamond center of Antwerp that had been loaded on a plane headed to Zurich. Authorities have since detained dozens of people and recovered much of the items stolen in that operation. Five years ago, in December 2008, armed robbers wearing women’s wigs and clothing made off with diamond rings, gem-studded bracelets and other jewelry said then to be worth $108 million from a Harry Winston boutique in Paris. Also in 2008 — in February of that year — in a scene reminiscent of the movie “The Italian Job,” masked thieves drilled a tunnel into a Damiani jewelry company showroom in Milan, Italy. They tied up the staff with plastic cable and sticky tape, then made off with gold, diamonds and rubies worth some $20 million. The robbers had been digging for several weeks from a building under construction next door. Cannes appears to be a favorite target this year — in May it was struck by other two highly publicized jewelry heists during the Cannes Film Festival. In the first theft, robbers stole about $1 million worth of jewels after ripping a safe from the wall of a hotel room. In the second, thieves outsmarted 80 security guards in an exclusive hotel and grabbed a De Grisogono necklace that creators said is worth 2 million euros ($2.6 million). Sazonoff said it is normal for robbers to gravitate to a place like Cannes, whose glimmering harbor and glamorous film festival attract the world’s rich and famous. “Why do thieves target Cannes? It’s simple ... On the Cote d’Azur, it’s where the mon-

ied people flow,” he said. Sazonoff also said police would likely probe whether Sunday’s heist is linked to recent jail escapes by alleged members of the Pink Panther jewel thief gang. On Thursday, gang member Milan Poparic escaped his Swiss prison after accomplices rammed a gate and overpowered guards with bursts from their AK-47s, police said. Police say the Pink Panther network’s members are prime suspects in a series of daring thefts. According to Interpol, the group has targeted luxury watch and jewelry stores in Europe, the Middle East, Asia and the United States, netting more than €330 million (£285m) since 1999. Poparic is the third member of the Pink Panthers to escape from a Swiss prison in as many months, according to Vaud police. “The brazen drama of it is their style... The possibility of the reemergence of the Pink Panther gang is very troubling and taken seriously by law enforcement worldwide,” Sazonoff said. “The theft of high value diamonds is exactly what they do, so it’s not a great leap to assume they are on the warpath again. They are a crime wave waiting to happen.”


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, July 30, 2013 Editor-in-Chief Victoria Wright

OPINIONS

vwright6@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Editor’s Note

Post-grad life deserves welcoming despite future plans

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Victoria Wright Editor-in-Chief

New adventures bring rejuvinated life perspectives

AS JULY comes to a close, various apartment leasers prepare to move miscellaneous items out. Many will remain in their previous nest while others will migrate to new environments. As I prepare to move to a new city and tediously sealed my last package, I thought about what college really means. The old saying, “College is the best four years of your life” from well-meaning adults has transformed into a sort of cliché that high school students familiarize themselves with before the big transition. However, that way of thinking automatically places a cap or cage over the youth before they can even begin their wayward adventure. The ideal college experience spans four years, eight semesters and about 35,000 hours on a single campus. And if the average woman and man are living to be around 79 years old, well— That’s a lot of college semesters. College teaches a myriad of important life lessons, such as proper time management skills, how to buy anything at a discounted price and generally how people interact and function during group projects. The foundations laid in the college years are greater preparation for the impending adult world, but the phase of adulthood has transformed drastically in the last 20 years with the advent of emerging adulthood. The term proposed by University of Maryland professor Jeffrey Arnett, PhD, said young adults between the ages of 18 to 25 generally take more time to develop traditional adult attributes, such as marriage and starting a family. The idea of categorizing our life spans in phases is understandably scientific, but after the onset of emerging adulthood, why save all the grandiose experiences for just your college years? There are currently around 7 billion people on this earth, and on UT’s campus, there are around 30,000 students. During a student’s four year span on campus, a coed will become acquainted with most of their peers, making that large number seem suffocatingly small. That busts the myth of how miniscule one’s social circle becomes after college. Both of my older sisters (the middle four years my elder) often tell me that the majority of their closest friends were made after graduation. Of course it’s easier to make pals when your forced into a small dorm room together, however, life after school isn’t a buffer against making real connections. The five year graduate is becoming an increasing familiar student numerous reasons. While some are completely permissible, there are the few scattered on the college campuses who are essentially afraid to leave the walls of academia. College, like any other phase of life, is meant to be a stepping stone. There’s a range of experience in other areas of life, and the fun part is society tells you it’s still appropriate to act like a twenty something college student until you find some type of purpose or viable career. So if your circumstances allow you to graduate next semester, do it. Take your degree, brainstorm on how to pay or evade your impending student loans and take a gamble on life after university. Buddy movies and your parents enure you that college is the peak, but that’s not necessarily true. Life is essentially what you make of it, not the phase that you’re in. Victoria Wright is a senior in journalism and electroninc media. She can be reached at vwright6@utk.edu

Gage-ing your

Interests by

Gage Arnold Remember when you were a little kid on vacation for the first time? You sat on your knees and pressed your palms and forehead against the glass of the bus window as the kaleidoscope of images seemed to zoom past your mushed face. That’s what it was like for me this weekend as my family took on the entertaining challenge of taking a “family vacation” to Washington, D.C. Moving six children (counting myself) and two adults through the nation’s capital is no small feat, especially maneuvering our caravan through the turnstiles at the Metro. I’d compare my mother to Quick Draw McGraw as she wielded out tickets, swiped them through the machine and sent child after child through each turnstile. As I rode into the city on Friday morning, my mind went back to my childhood. On field trips, I’d poke my head against the school bus window and just sit in awe, bragging about which playground I would run around on or which roller coaster I would ride first. That feeling returned on Friday. A fortress of homeless city members resided in the midst of a traffic roundabout, with tarps, tents and hopeless looks staring right

Rising — FBI rescues 105 kids from New York’s La Guardia Airport. The National Transportation Safety Board investigated the prostitution rings crash of the Boeing 737-700 had concluded The Federal Bureau of Investigation made the nose gear punched into the jet’s eleca strong victory on the war on sex trafficking tronics bay. The incidents, excluding the when they arrested 150 pimps and others Southwest Airlines plane, were caused by involved in a child sex trafficking ring. The the human operators, so it leaves one to ask Tennessee Bureau of Investigation reported if stronger safety precautions will be instilled that some of the highest numbers of sex by officials. trafficking in the state occurred in Knox, Rising — Pope Francis says he doesn’t Davidson, Shelby and Coffee Counties, with these counties reporting over 200 victims in judge gay priest 2012. This unspoken but prevalent issue has It’s obvious old convictions of the world finally received the attention needed to hopefully place more emphasis on stopping this are changing, even in the strictest institutions. The Pope stated that he does not judge heinous crime. gays, which will send shockwaves throughout Falling — Train crashes in Switzerland the Catholic church considering its stance on homosexuality. The subtlty of his statement injuring hundreds indicates a changing environment. His views Since the Asiana Airlines plane crash stand in stark contrast compared to former landed on a San Fransisco runway earlier Pope Benedict XVI, who stepped down this this month, a domino effect of transportation past spring and was often criticized for his disasters have occurred all over the world. stance on homosexuality and his rejection on Last week, a high speed train derailed in condom usage. Spain, killing hundred and injuring many Falling — The reality of poverty in more. Back in the U.S., a Southwest Airlines plane’s nose gear collapses while landing at America

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a glimpse of something bigger than themselves. There were no barrier lines of entry. All were welcomed in. That’s what a nation that unifies does to its visitors. It embraces those without a home with open arms and assimilates them as if they had been born into the family. I would love to say that you can step out of your apartment or dorm room door and experience the same tidal wave of cultural meshing but that would simply not be the case in Knoxville. This trip reminded me about what college cannot teach me. In spending time with my family, I learn how to be a future father, a husband and leader. In experiencing a new city, I’m able to learn and further my passions while pondering places in which I, too, can make a difference. College will teach you how to make a living. But it really cannot teach you how to live well. That’s something that has to be gleamed from the wisdom of your parents, mentors, heros and guardians. So next time you have the opportunity to go on an adventure, especially a family adventure, do it. You may just recapture the Kodak moments of your youth all over again.

Gage Arnold is a rising senior in journalism and electronic media. He can be reached at garnold@utk.edu.

News publications reported today that four out of five US adults are unemployed, near poverty or rely on welfare for at least parts of their lives. The numbers come as the Obama administration attempts to regain light on economy. Recently, the President said in a speech at Knox College in Galensburg, Ill. that he wants to focus on decreasing inequality in American’s incomes. The reality is a hard pill to swallow, but not an absurd one. With the doubling on student loan interest rates, that statistic is bound to become more prevalent among young adults, who may find an even more troubling time managing finances after graduation. Rising — The coverage of Kate Middleton and Prince Henry’s bundle of joy The numbers are in. Advertising/content discovery platform Outbrain found that the U.S. past the UK’s coverage ratings of the George Alexander Louis’ birth by 0.4 percent. The overall coverage in the states and across the pond totaled about 13,060 pieces of content. The numbers only solidifies American’s perpetual, and unusual, obsession for British royalty. Perhaps the hysteria surrounding the royal babies birth in the U.S. can be blamed on our obsession with reality television personalities. Despite not having an exact culprit, Americans will continue their perpetual fascination with British royalty. It happened when millions fell in love with Diana, and history is bound to repeat itself.

What the Duck • Aaron Johnson

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • Hilary Price

EDITORIAL

back at me as I rode in my air conditioned, seat reclining bus to tour the city they call “home.” My heart hurt. I recall trekking down the escalator after being united with my Dad. As we shot the breeze I was reminded of the reality of my location. “Excuse me?” Followed by, “EXCUSE ME?!” That’s all the man in the black Armani suit with Starbucks cup and satchel in hand muttered to me before I was barreled over and forced to the side. There is this thing some would describe as “escalator etiquette” in Washington and other major cities. The etiquette is the unspoken rule (usually) that the slow walkers and (for lack of a better word) streets gawkers should migrate to the right side of the breezeway while the fast walkers streamline past the slow movers on the left side, just like driving. Though this man was stereotypical, I learned a valuable lesson from him after being in D.C. for only three minutes. The cultural melting pot I witnessed at the Lincoln Memorial cannot even be accurately described. I don’t know if I can do it justice. On the memorial stairs stood visitors of every tongue, color, tribe, nation and descent all hoping to get just a glimpse of the monument. It’s something I’ll never forget and will be forever etched into my brain. These visitors were all seeking the same thing, to catch

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The Daily Beacon is published by students at The University of Tennessee Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters and Tuesday and Friday during the summer semester. The offices are located at 1340 Circle Park Drive, 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The newspaper is free on campus and is available via mail subscription for $200/year, $100/semester or $70/summer only. It is also available online at: www.utdailybeacon.com

LETTERS POLICY: The Daily Beacon welcomes all letters to the editor and guest columns from students, faculty and staff. Each submission is considered for publication by the editor on the basis of space, timeliness and clarity. The Beacon reserves the right to reject any submissions or edit all copy in compliance with available space, editorial policy and style. Contributions must include the author’s name and phone number for verification. Students must include their year in school and major. Letters to the editor and guest columns may be e-mailed to letters@utdailybeacon.com or sent to Editor, 1340 Circle Park Dr., 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314.


Tuesday, July 30, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 5

ARTS & CULTURE

Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan merdogan@utk.edu

Downtown store relies on individuality McCord Pagan

Staff Writer Union Avenue Books, a relatively new staple of downtown life, has been around since June 2011 and continues to engage customers on a regular basis. The owner, Flossie McNabb, runs the store with the help of her daughter, Bunnie Presswood. Union Avenue Books is locally owned and independent, unlike Barnes & Noble or the local McKay’s. According to Presswood, the attribute makes the store unique, as the book selection is hand selected and allows the duo to be more helpful to customers. McNabb’s previous store, Carpe Librum, closed in December of 2010 as it was too large to manage, but it was not long before she returned to her passion. Union Avenue Books, set in the middle of Union Avenue in downtown Knoxville, contains all genres of books, and hosts book signings and events by local authors. Most recently, local John Rose, the current artist of the Snuffy Smith comic strip, came for a signing of his most recent book, “The Bodacious Best of Snuffy Smith.� Union Avenue Books, at first glance may feel like a typical bookstore, but the focus on the reader quickly becomes apparent. Although the store is small, the layout is open and friendly and causes customer’s eyes to be led from one cover to another, from the large selection of books ranging from all different genres. The selection at Union Avenue Books, while entertaining fans of all genres, is different in that all novels are hand-selected by the staff, giving the experience a much more personal feel. “It’s a smaller, handpicked selection of books, whereas they (McKay’s) have everything, like everything, here we handpick the books that go on the shelf,� Presswood said. McNabb said she is also proud of the employees, saying they are more experienced than those at a larger chain, and that said that she has “knowledgeable bookseller.� “They really read and help out and can help

people pick out books.� As far as events go, Presswood said the smaller atmosphere provides for a better experience overall. “Ours are more smaller, people are able to talk and get questions,� she said. The independence of the store positively contributes to the ‘book culture’ of Knoxville, according to Robin Lovett, rising junior in Spanish. Lovett prefers shopping at Union Avenue Books, and finds in the store a better experience than most other bookstores and said it has “its own personality.� “Any time you go into a Barnes & Noble it looks exactly the same as the other Barnes & Noble that you’ve been in,� Lovett said. “Whenever I have a class where we’re reading a novel instead of a textbook, I always try to buy my books there,� she said. As for Presswood and her mother, both said they proud of the impact they are having on the book culture in Knoxville. “We have a book group that meets here, the last Wednesday of every month, and it’s pretty

big,� she said. “We’re involved with Friends of Literacy, Friends of the Library; it’s definitely a book community.� The store is currently hosting a “Where’s Waldo� event through Aug. 3 with the help of other local businesses. The event allows customers to pick up a passport from the bookstore and go to other downtown businesses looking for the famous striped character, all in exchange for a chance to win a prize. Author Kevin West of Maryville is scheduled to come on Aug. 1 to promote his book, “Saving the Season: A cook’s guide to home canning, pickling, and preserving.� “We’re a local independent bookstore, we are here for the community,� Presswood said. Union Avenue Books is located at 517 Union Ave. The store is open Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and until 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. They are open on Sundays from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. For more information about Union Avenue Books and their upcoming events, visit www. unionavebooks.com.

Photos by Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

SPORTS

Sports Editor Steven Cook scook21@utk.edu

Questions linger as Vols enter fall camp

Steven Cook Sports Editor

New head coach Butch Jones has done more to revitalize Tennessee’s fan base before coaching a game than any coach in recent memory. But as training camp gets set to start up on Friday, the Vols have more questions than answers and will have plenty to sort out before Aug. 31 when they face Austin Peay. Who’s lining up under center? It’s been the biggest looming question surrounding the 2013 Vols ever since Tyler Bray announced his departure for the NFL last spring. To some, the obvious answer is Justin Worley, the junior who started three games as a true freshman in 2011. His one touchdown to five interceptions over his career leaves a lot to be desired, but one could argue that’s a byproduct of him being baptized by fire early on. There’s also Nathan Peterman, a redshirt freshman who can make defenses pay with his mobility. The newcomers are making the most noise, however, as Riley Ferguson and Joshua Dobbs both come in as highly-touted recruits. Ferguson is more of a drop-back passer with elite vision, while Dobbs can run just as well as he can throw—both of which he does incredibly well. I’d be surprised if Vol fans saw a concrete starter at the end of training camp. Unless Worley takes over and shows an incredible amount of promise, the coaching staff may look to give every quarterback playing time to see who will give the Vols the best chance to win in future seasons.

undoubtedly will improve this season. But the question is, how much? Tennessee will be switching back to a 4-3 defensive scheme this season, which on paper looks to help their chances. In 2011, their last season in the 4-3, they finished 27th nationally in defense before a move to a 3-4 by 2012 defensive coordinator Sal Sunseri doomed the Vols. Personnel-wise, the Vols are sound at linebacker but that’s about all the certainty they have. Will the move help the potentialladen defensive line to generate more pressure and stuff the run game? Can the secondary find its full-time starters and keep them healthy? With so many new parts on offense, the defense could hold together a decent season by returning to their 4-3 prowess, or completely fall apart and cause more woes for Vols fans.

Steven Worster • Tennessee Athletics

The team huddles up during the SEC game against the Florida Gators on February 26, 2013.

UT to face UTEP in Battle 4 Atlantis Staff Report

Which playmaking receivers will emerge?

Ever since taking the job, Jones has preached that he needs offensive weapons to step up and fill the shoes of departing players Justin Hunter, Cordarrelle Patterson, Mychal Rivera and more. After all, it’s ‘Wide Receiver U,’ and there’s not much experience returning at the position. The mass of playmakers leaving the Vols has opened a lot of doors for youngsters on the team. Junor Devrin Young, who is returning to receiver after spending a year primarily as a running back in 2012, is the Vols’ most experienced option to become the big-play star. A handful of young receivers such as Jason Croom, Drae Bowles, Alton “Pig” Howard, Cody Blanc and more will look to emerge given the extra chances. Incoming freshmen Paul Harris and Marquez North also have high expectations. Also, don’t forget about junior Vincent Dallas who looks to finally have a serious shot at a starting spot after being passed over by the likes of Hunter, How much will the defense Da’Rick Rogers, Zach Rogers and Patterson in recent years. improve? The door is open, and it’ll be After a historically bad exciting for Vol faithful to see 2012 season, the Vols defense who walks through it.

The 2013 Battle 4 Atlantis tournament bracket was announced Monday. The Volunteers will play three tournament games on three consecutive days, starting with an opening-round clash against UTEP on Nov. 28 at 9:30 p.m. ET (NBC Sports Network). The Miners return three starters and seven lettermen from last year’s 18-14 squad that finished third in Conference USA with a 10-6 league mark. UTEP also introduces a recruiting class led by McDonald’s All-American Isaac Hamilton. The winner of the Tennessee-UTEP game will face the victor of the first-round game between Xavier and Iowa. The opposite side of the 2013 Battle for Atlantis bracket features first-day matchups between Villanova-Southern California and Kansas-Wake Forest. The Volunteers return national honors candidates in senior wing Jordan McRae and

the frontcourt tandem of Jeronne Maymon and Jarnell Stokes. Other returning starters include guards Josh Richardson and Armani Moore. An experienced bench will be bolstered by five newcomers. In head coach Cuonzo Martin’s third season on Rocky Top, Tennessee looks to be among the teams vying for a spot in the various preseason top-25 polls. Tennessee has faced UTEP just once previously on the hardwood, with the Miners notching a 77-57 victory Dec. 28, 1962, in El Paso, Texas. Fans can visit http://bit.ly/ VolsAtlantisTravel for Tennessee-specific travel packages. For information on Atlantis Resort, visit www.Atlantis.com. Atlantis offers a resort experience in mythical proportions amidst the largest marine habitat in the world. Guests can explore the ruins of Atlantis in The Dig, challenge the Mayan Temple and Aquaventure’s water slides, enjoy 11 swimming areas, interact with live dolphins at Dolphin Cay and discover endless action in the Atlantis Casino. Resort facilities include a state-of-the-art

kids club, Atlantis Kids Adventures (AKA), a 30,000-square-foot flagship Mandara Spa, a sports center, a state-of-the-art rock climbing facility, a world-class marina, haute couture shopping, and more than 20 restaurants, bars and lounges. The Vols are scheduled to travel to Paradise Island on Nov. 26, with a return flight set for Dec. 1. Interestingly, the Lady Vols basketball team also is spending Thanksgiving in the Bahamas (but on a different island). The women’s team is playing in the Junkanoo Jam at Freeport, Grand Bahama Island, Nov. 28-29. They will be joined in the eight-team field by Florida, Illinois State, Kansas State, Oregon State, Penn State, SMU and Virginia. Starting Nov. 28, AXS TV will air coverage of the tournament at 1 p.m. ET and 3:30 p.m. ET, while NBC Sports Network will broadcast the daily 7 p.m. ET and 9:30 p.m. ET games. AXS TV is available nationally on DIRECTV (channel 306), Dish (channel 131), AT&T U-Verse (channel 1106), Verizon FiOS (channel 569) as well as Charter, Comcast Xfinity, Insight, Suddenlink and other TV providers.

Former QB, Ainge, charged with DUI Associated Press Former New York Jets quarterback Erik Ainge has been arrested for driving under the influence after police spotted him allegedly swerving while driving on an interstate. A Knoxville police officer stopped Ainge at 1:13 a.m. Sunday. Police spokesman Darrell DeBusk said in a statement that the 27-year-old Ainge failed field sobriety tests and was charged with

driving under the influence, violating the implied consent law and a roadway lane violation. Ainge was released on bond and is scheduled to appear in court Monday. He started 37 games between 2004 and 2007 at Tennessee and was a fifth-round draft selection by the Jets in 2008. He retired after three seasons because of injuries to his throwing shoulder. He has spoken openly of his struggles with alcohol and drugs.

Graves grabs gold again Staff Report Bashaara Graves is golden again. The rising Tennessee sophomore and her USA U19 team claimed their fifth-straight title in that age group with a 61-28 win over France on Sunday in the FIBA World Championship for Women at Klaipeda Arena. Graves, a 6-foot-2 power forward from Clarksville, Tenn. (Clarksville H.S.), previously won gold with USA Basketball at the 2009 FIBA Americas U16 Championship for Women, the 2010 FIBA U17 World Championship for Women and the 2012 FIBA Americas U18 Championship for Women. Earlier this summer, Graves’ Lady Vol teammate, Ariel Massengale, also won her fourth international gold medal, helping the USA World University Games team to victory in Kazan, Russia. Graves contributed nine points and eight rebounds in the contest vs. France, hitting two of six shots from the

field and five of six from the free throw line. For the nine-game tournament, the 2013 SEC Freshman of the Year started all nine games, averaging 8.4 points, 6.2 rebounds and 1.3 steals and assists. She shot a team-leading .592 from the field (29-49) and hit free throws at a 75 percent clip (18-24). The UT standout said she never takes winning for granted. “It feels great (to win),” Graves said. “(Every time) it always feels like the first time...just being out there with my teammates and seeing how happy everyone is. It’s a celebration.” As a veteran member of this team, though, there was a difference in her role from teams she has played on in the past. “I’m one of the oldest ones here and one who has the most experience, so I was just trying to be a leader to the young ones. I’m starting this time, so I was just trying to get the gold any way I can.” The USA, which captured the U19 gold for the sixth time in its last seven trips to the World Championship for Women, beat France for the second time in the tourney to secure the title. The Americans had struggled mightily to top the French just four days ago, pulling out a 69-63 triumph in their final second-round game. “Obviously we had to grind it out on the offensive end,” USA head coach Katie Meier said. “At halftime we talked about our defense. They had only scored 20 points and that was huge for us. So, we just said that when push comes to shove, you win


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