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Issue 16, Volume 123

Friday, July 26, 2013

House directors join the Row

Reform follows after recommendations from Greek Life Task Force R.J. Vogt Managing Editor Frat Row may have once been the site of outrageous parties, but in at least three houses this fall, the previously minimal supervision will be expanded and more closely regulated. That’s right, gents: house directors have been implemented at UT. In lieu of a 2012-2013 school year that sent two chapters packing, a Greek Life Task Force’s recommendations are resulting in mandatory house directors in every house by Fall 2014. The advisers and housing corporations plan to hire extra weekend security in Fraternity Park in the meantime. This fall, Associate Dean of Students Jeff Cathey said that a house director has already been selected for Phi

Sigma Kappa and will be joined on the Row by another house director for Beta Upsilon Chi, the new brotherhood moving into the old Pi Kappa Alpha House. Additionally, the sisterhood of Delta Gamma, which is living in the Phi Gamma Delta house until its new house in Sorority Village is completed, will also have a house director. “We’re looking for the fraternities to give us more in writing the detail of what they’re looking to do this fall,” Cathey said in an interview Thursday afternoon. “And then at a later date, [we’re] looking for them to start giving us proposals for how they plan to provide supervision and house directors for the next fall.” He acknowledged some logistical issues, such as houses that lack the facilities for a house director or have the complications of budgetary concerns and preexisting student housing contracts. To supply supervision in the interim, each chapter’s housing corporation is working with the other advisers on the Row to secure off-duty police officers on the weekends. Word has slowly spread throughout the Greek community that houses will be under a closer watch this football See GREEK on Page 2

Photos by Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

Top: As UT increases supervision on Fraternity Row, a live-in house director will live at the Phi Sigma Kappa House following the Greek Task Force’s recommendations. Above: The Delta Gamma sorority, which is living in the old Phi Gamma Delta house, will also have a house director.

Local radio plays live sets

Concern arises over street parking spot Gabrielle O’Neal Staff Writer

Cars are being towed from what appears to be a parking space next to the White Street parking garage by Clement Hall. Last week, Nathan Murray parked his car in that spot while he was in the conference center. Upon his return, he realized that his car was gone. Murray called the city impound lot and found out that his car had been towed. “I parked in the spot that was demarcated by a white line, so I thought that would be okay to park in,” said Murray, a graduate student in economics. “I’ve seen cars in the spot literally every day, including today and the day I got towed.” It is common knowledge that a yellow curb means that parking is not allowed. However, the confusion about the parking space stems from the fact that the white line in the street is freshly painted while the yellow paint on the curb is old and fading away beneath the onset of grass. Farther up the street, the yellow curbs appear freshly painted and the grass on the curbs is neatly trimmed. According to Murray, there

had been other cars parked in the spot before without being towed or ticketed. “There are several reasons why a curb could be painted yellow, which is prohibiting parking,” said Darrell DeBusk from the Knoxville Police Department. Debusk listed several causes for yellow curbs, including fire hydrants, blind turns and parking lot or private drive proximity. As it turns out, even though others have parked in the spot in question before, it is not an actual parking space. “You have to go by what is on the curb and the signs,” DeBusk said. A parking space will be marked by a white box and not a white line, acccording to Debusk. A few changes to the space will make it more apparent that it is not an actual parking space. “It should be marked very clearly probably on the pavement,” Murray said, “The yellow paint should be repainted and other signs in the area should be more clearly positioned as to whether or not you can park there.”

Cortney Roark Staff Writer

Photo by Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

Yellow paint faintly marks the curb where many drivers park their cars.

INSIDE THE DAILY BEACON: Page Page Page Page Page

Radio stations today pride themselves on playing music from the top of the lists, which is why it’s typical to hear the same song on three different radio stations, multiple times a day. This has never been the case with East Tennessee’s WDVX, 89.9 FM. WDVX focuses its music on local artists, and many of the songs are performed live. This music falls into the category of Americana, which encompasses blues, bluegrass, celtic, folk, cajun and various other genres, according to Tony Lawson, WDVX program director. This unique radio station was created by a group of people, including Lawson, with the desire to give the people of East Tennessee a station that represents their home, according to the WDVX website. This desire created a radio station unlike any other that broadcasts a feeling of home. “It is almost like stepping into a piece of the past,” Andrew Sayne, long time fan of WDVX, said. “Genuine love for good music made by good people. No corporate agenda.” After broadcasting from a camper for five years, WDVX made the Knoxville Visitor’s Center it’s permanent residence in 2005, Lawson said. The radio station proves its unique style through its music and sense of family as an independent, listenersupported community station. “That is one great thing about working here,” Lawson, who is also a DJ for the station, said. “The people, the relationships and the community building. That is the most important, because doing that gives the station life to go forward.” See WDVX on Page 3

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2 . . . . . . . In Short 3 . . . . . Arts & Culture 4 . . . . . . . Opinions 5 . . . . Arts & Culture 6 . . . . . . . . Sports

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Flip to page 3 for more on WDVX


2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Friday, July 26, 2013 Editor-in-Chief Victoria Wright

IN SHORT

vwright6@utk.edu

Managing Editor RJ Vogt rvogt@utk.edu

GREEK

Around Rocky Top

continued from Page 1 season, and Phi Sig’s president Ryan Vernich, a senior in biosystems engineering, said the response has been mixed. “There are a lot of guys who aren’t too happy about it,” he said in a phone interview Thursday. “The cool thing is, the more I’ve learned about it, the more I’m supportive of it. ... It’s actually kind of opened us up to have a little bit more freedom. When you follow some of UT’s regulations, that gives us more freedom to do what we want.” Vernich said the decision was made by their chapter’s alumni in hopes to get out in front of the trend. “Our chapter wants to be the face of the change,” he said. Other fraternity members have weighed in on the issue, and at Sigma Nu, the changes don’t seem so radical. Brian Isham, a resident of the Sigma Nu house for two years, said that their chapter had a live-in graduate student a few semesters ago. “He was a grad student that was originally a Kappa Sig at Georgia Tech,” the rising senior in engineering said. “He was awesome.” Isham indicated that the Sigma Nu experience was nothing but positive, adding that the “house dad” had a lot of good advice for the brotherhood. Though not technically a house director, the resident, like Phi Sig’s, was implanted by the alumni board. The exact role of these universitysanctioned directors, however, is yet to be determined. Cathey admitted that the notion of house directors has not been met with universal acceptance; some advisers think there are better ways to provide supervision. “That’s why I’m saying is it an absolute that every house going to have a stereotypical house director?” he said. “I don’t know.” The University of Florida dealt with similar issues by mandating house directors on their fraternity row. The policy, which was most recently revised in June of 2008 but dates back to the mid’90s, calls for a House Director that can “provide oversight and supervision for all activities occurring at the chapter house in collaboration with the Chapter Advisor.” Despite the precedent set in Gainesville, Cathey was cautious to commit to emulating the Gators. “One thing that’s different is that it’s a wet campus,” he said. “Because it’s a wet campus, students can be a little more open about having some alcohol in the house after a football game. “And one of the things we’ve learned is that some of their house directors clear out on a Saturday night after a football game… That’s not necessarily the only model.” Whether the directors follow the model set by Florida remains to be seen, but for now, there will be three adults living on Frat Row this August.

Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

Workers for Wolf Tree Inc. climb to remove dead limbs from the trees in Market Square on Wednesday.

THIS DAY IN

HISTORY

1775: U.S. Postal system established On this day in 1775, the U.S. postal system is established by the Second Continental Congress, with Benjamin Franklin as its first postmaster general. Franklin (1706-1790) put in place the foundation for many aspects of today’s mail system. During early colonial times in the 1600s, few American colonists needed to send mail to each other; it was more likely that their correspondence was with letter writers in Britain. Mail deliveries from across the Atlantic were sporadic and could take many months to arrive. There were no post offices in the colonies, so mail was typically left at inns and taverns. In 1753, Benjamin Franklin, who had been postmaster of Philadelphia, became one of two joint postmasters general for the colonies. He made numerous improvements to the mail system, including setting up new, more efficient colonial routes and cutting delivery time in half between Philadelphia and New York by having the weekly mail wagon travel both day and night via relay teams. Franklin also debuted the first rate chart, which standardized delivery costs based on distance and weight. In 1774, the British fired Franklin from his postmaster job because of his revolutionary activities. 1943: Entertainer Mick Jagger born

become one of the world’s most popular and enduring rock and roll bands. The group’s many hit songs include “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction,” “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” and “You Can’t Always Get What You Want.” In his personal life, Jagger became famous for his wild rock-star lifestyle and glamorous girlfriends and wives. Although best known as a singer and songwriter, Jagger has also acted in movies. He made his film debut in Performance (1969), which he followed with the title role in 1970’s Ned Kelly, about a real-life Australian outlaw. Among his other film credits are Freejack (1992), Bent (1997) and The Man from Elysian Fields (2002), co-starring Andy Garcia, in which Jagger played the owner of an escort service. 1863: Confederate leader John Hunt Morgan captured On this day in 1863, Confederate cavalry leader John Hunt Morgan and 360 of his men are captured at Salineville, Ohio, during a spectacular raid on the North. Starting in July 1862, Morgan made four major raids on Northern or Northern-held territory over the course of a year. Although they were of limited strategic significance, the raids served as a boost to Southern morale and captured much-needed supplies. Morgan’s fourth raid began on July 2, 1863, when he and 2,400 troopers left Tennessee and headed for the Ohio River. He hoped to divert the attention of Union commander William Rosecrans, who was driving for Chattanooga, Tennessee. Morgan reached the river on July 8, using stolen steamboats to ferry his force across to Indiana. For the next two and a half weeks, Morgan rampaged through Indiana and Ohio, feigning toward Cincinnati, then riding across southern Ohio. His force met little resistance, and scattered local militias who faced them. With Union cavalry in hot pursuit, Morgan headed for Pennsylvania. For more than a week, Morgan and his troops spent 21 hours per day in the saddle. At Pomeroy, Ohio, Morgan lost over 800 men when the Yankees caught up with him and captured a large part of his force. He and the remaining members of his command were forced further north, and on July 26, the exhausted men surrendered. This day in history is courtesy of History.com.


Friday, July 26, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 3

ARTS & CULTURE

Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan merdogan@utk.edu

Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

The Blue Plate Special, a concert series that is held everyday except Sunday at noon and offers live music in the Knoxville Welcome Center.

WDVX continued from Page 1 WDVX holds various live shows throughout the week to cater to its diverse audience. One of these shows is The Blue Plate Special. This show started in the camper as the occasional live set of music among recorded music. Now, it is held Monday through Saturday at noon and is always live, featuring two acts. This show is free to the public and also streams online for the webcast fans. “It’s nice for the music to come here,” Lawson said. “We have shows every day. It’s sort of like a music lover’s dream.” There is also a weekly show called Tennessee Shines that begins in August. This show is held Monday nights at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10 and free for students.

One of the most unique shows that WDVX presents is Kidstuff, a show dedicated to the children of Knoxville. The last Saturday of each month the stage area is transformed into a child riendly setting. The chairs are moved so children can sit with their shakers and interact with the show, which is sometimes put on by kids with musical talents. WDVX has held the title of Bluegrass Station of the Year eight times, the most recent in 2012, by the Society for the Preservation of Bluegrass Music Association. Sayne said the music at the venue is a nuche environemnt that offers something many patrons can enjoy. “You may not hear your new favorite death metal song on the station, but you will hear some great old time music no matter what time it is,” Sayne said, who enjoys playing music himsef. “No other station even comes close to that much local momentum.”

Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

Dave Hadley plays the pedal steel at Tuesday’s Blue Plate Special.

Royal baby of Cambridge recevies formal name Associated Press The little prince was in need of a name, and now, by George, he’s got one. Make that three: George Alexander Louis. The announcement Wednesday that Prince William and his wife, Kate, had selected a moniker steeped in British history came as royal officials said the new parents were seeking quiet family time away from the flashbulbs and frenzy that accompanied the birth of their first child. While the news put to rest intense speculation over what name the couple would choose, the extreme interest around it illustrated how the 2-day-old future heir is already on his way to a lifetime of fanfare and public glare. Kensington Palace said William and Kate were “delighted to announce” their son’s name, adding that the baby will be known as “His Royal Highness Prince George of Cambridge.” The name George — borne by six kings — befits the boy now third in line to the British throne and was a favorite among British bookmakers, evoking the steadfastness of the queen’s father, George VI, who rallied the nation during World War II. Alexander is a name shared by three medieval Scottish kings, and Louis could be a tribute to Lord Louis Mountbatten, uncle to the queen’s husband, Prince Philip, and the last British viceroy of India before it gained independence in 1947. William’s father, Prince Charles, was close to Mountbatten, who was assassinated by the Irish Republican Army in 1979. The announcement of the name, just two days after the baby’s birth, was quick by royal standards. Queen Elizabeth II and Philip took a month before settling on the name Charles for the Prince of Wales. Charles and Princess Diana took a week before settling on William’s four names. While a king usually rules under his given name, precedent shows that the prince is not hidebound by George. The first name of George VI was actually Albert, but he picked his fourth name

to use as sovereign in honor of his father, George V. For now, palace officials say, William and Kate are spending “private and quiet time for them to get to know their son.” Some of their discussions may revolve around how to shield him from the media. The young prince’s relationship with the media appeared to get off to a good start — an encouraging sign for a royal family that has had tense moments with the press. The baby slept through his first photo op Tuesday outside London’s St. Mary’s Hospital, while his parents beamed as they chatted easily with reporters. “I thought, ‘Is this an Oscar-winning performance?’” said Ingrid Seward, editor-in-chief of Majesty magazine. “But I think they were so genuinely overjoyed that they wanted to show off the baby.” After leaving the hospital, the couple introduced their son to his uncle, Prince Harry, and to greatgrandmother Queen Elizabeth II, who was keen to see the baby before she starts her annual summer vacation in Scotland later this week. Then they headed to see Kate’s parents in their village near London — pretty much like any regular family. There has been so much royal drama in the last few decades that it’s easy to forget William had, by royal standards, a relatively normal childhood. His parents’ troubled marriage may have ended in divorce, but Charles and Diana were devoted parents who tried to spend as much time as possible with their children, albeit with an assist from nannies. While the queen was sometimes away on official tours for months at a time when her children were young, Charles and Diana took William along on a tour to Australia when he was just 9 months old. The queen was educated at home, in keeping with royal tradition. But she sent her own children to boarding schools, and Charles and Diana did the same with William and Harry — choosing Eton, one of the most prestigious boys’ schools in the country. “William’s childhood was normal by upper-middle-class standards — private schools, expensive

holidays, McDonald’s in a smart part of town as opposed to a grotty part of town,” said royal historian Robert Lacey. “I think, really, one is going to see more of the same.” Lacey said Kate’s middle-class background will also help ensure her son gets a broader world view than some of his royal predecessors. The baby’s maternal grandparents, Carole and Michael Middleton, are self-made millionaires who run a party-planning business from the village of Bucklebury, west of London.

“From Buckingham Palace to Bucklebury — these are the two elements that will be in this child’s upbringing,” Lacey said. Lacey noted that on Kate’s side the baby prince had “a grandfather who started off dispatching aircraft from Heathrow Airport and a grandmother who started out as a flight attendant and grew up on a council estate, who came from coal-mining stock in Durham” in northern England. “That is all funneling through,” he said.


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, July 26, 2013 Editor-in-Chief Victoria Wright

OPINIONS

vwright6@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Fear & Hoping in

Knoxvegas Knox vegas Redesign may make Big Orange bigger by

R.J. Vogt Managing Editor Sometimes it takes getting your hair cut to find inspiration. Just a few days ago, I dropped into the chair at one of my favorite barbershops and began to indulge in a staple of barbershop etiquette: the inevitable small talk. While clipping away my unkempt hair, Sara asked me what I thought about the swiftly-approaching Cumberland Avenue redesign, which is set to begin in earnest after the upcoming 2013 football season. For those unfamiliar: the City of Knoxville plans to reconfigure the Strip from a “through location” to a “to location,” attracting pedestrians with wider sidewalks and encouraging business with more parking options and amended city ordinances. I saw her brow furrow as she described her own conspiracy theory about the changes. According to Sara, the construction will starve the small business owners out of the Strip and open the door for University control of the area. Her theory is not unfounded, but rather based almost entirely on the precedent set by the Henley Street Bridge project. As construction has dragged on, more and more South Knoxville shops and restaurants have struggled along Chapman Highway, emaciated by the road diet that has eliminated traffic flow to and from the city. In a story published in April by the Tennessee Watchdog organization, one local businessman said he knew of 37 businesses that have closed since the Henley Street project started. A construction project starts that forces motorists away from a specific area for a few years; businesses board up the windows. See the connection? According to Sara, the proposed construction and landscaping on the Strip’s sidewalks and turning lanes will force the businesses there to close up shop as well. She thinks that construction will drag on, as it always does, and the real estate prices will subsequently dive. Enter the Big Orange Idea; ten to fifteen years from now, who’s to say that UT won’t own half the strip, having bought up the former lots of fast food and head shops and replaced it all with more student and faculty amenities? The motive is hard to dispute. Battling to the Top 25 has proven difficult without growing in size, and at a landlocked institution like UT, growth can be hard to facilitate. As a result, the school has begun desperately grabbing up any real estate in the surrounding neighborhood. Just a few weeks ago, this very paper reported on UT’s maneuvering to acquire three historic homes on 13th Street and White Avenue. Over on Alcoa Highway, a new, artsy sign calls attention to Cherokee Farms, another UT outpost that will house a state of the art microscope and hopes to attract a few more businesses. Even the Howard H. Baker Jr. Center, which has stood proudly on the east end of the Cumberland Avenue for the last five years, may be a sign of the bigger, nicer Strip-to-Be.

•City of Knoxville

Artist reading of the proposed Strip-to-be. Imagine pulling off I-40 and onto a Market Square-esque main drag, complete with bike lanes and idyllic foliage. To your right and left, delicious restaurants and outdoor patios beckon; above you, student apartments add to a decidedly city feel. The streets could be practically paved in orange and white. Student life could be city-fed. This vision may be imagined, but the City of Knoxville’s urban design plan for Cumberland Avenue already refers to the blocks between 17th Street and 11th Street as the University’s “front porch.” Before we make this dream a reality, however, it will be a different orange dominating Cumberland Avenue for the next few years. Construction cone orange. And if this barbershop banter proves true, maybe a hint of black will color the streets as the Strip’s small businesses have their funeral. R.J. Vogt is a rising senior in College Scholars. He can be reached at rvogt@utk.edu.

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Power rests in perception, not elite rulers Committee Of Infractions by

Greg Bearringer I was talking to someone the other day when I mentioned that I couldn’t believe Congress allowed interest rates on student loans to double. I had contacted John J. Duncan to voice my concern. For the record, Rep. Duncan was kind enough to send me a cordial email mentioning that he went to UT when tuition was $90 per quarter (mind boggling, I know). Cut back to my conversation with this John Doe. His reaction to my story, much to my dismay, was, “Oh, people have no power. People with money have power and the people with power have money.” This opinionated stranger’s proof? They’ve “seen all the documents.” This bothered me far more than it should. It wasn’t just the uncritically examined information dropped in the conversation—if nothing else, how did this person know they had seen every document. It was just the even-keel, “I’m bringing the light of knowledge with me” attitude with which this “news” was delivered. You know, the kind of air that a freshman who just discovered

port possible. Although, Ataturk’s strong-willed nature in making Turkey the secular state it should be is currently being threatened by the people holding the same position he held almost a hundred years later. PM by Erdogan has made his wishes very clear to the citizens of Turkey; his plans for future Melodi Erdogan government reform include restricting For any new reader of my column, you women’s use of birth control, admonishing should know that this series details the curthe sale of liquor and alcohol in public places rent conflict in Turkey. and, most recently, destroying parks to build The key word there is ‘current.’ Instead of scouring out the most ‘current’ shopping malls. Ataturk served as the first President of news on media websites, I have instead dusted off some Encyclopedias to look at the Turkey from 1923 to 1938. In 1926, he had country’s most influential political leader who the Turkish penal code passed, and Islamic created the foundation for modern Turkey courts were closed; in 1927, he oversaw the opening of the State Art and Sculpture after World War I. Museum, as he was highly interested in Mustafa Kemal Ataturk. The army officer who served as the first bringing culture to the country.; and in 1928, President and Prime Minister of Turkey within a few months, he worked to crelived almost a century ago, but his ideas, ate a new Latin-based alphabet that would politics and achievements still remain rel- diminish the use of the previous Arabic evant among the current state of the Turkish script, which was projected to take years to accomplish. government. Additionally, Ataturk established women’s Having grown up in a Turkish household, rights in a society that had never known of I knew all about Ataturk long before I knew of Santa Claus. Under his leadership, Turkey them before; he abolished women wearing experienced a revolution within its society, headscarves, unified education, gave men specifically through policy and economy. and women equal rights in matters of divorce The country that was easily on its way to and inheritance and, in 1934, women were downfall during and after WWI was held given the right to vote. “There is no logical explanation for the together because of one man’s love, passion and determination to see the citizens of his political disenfranchisement of women,” he country receive the best treatment and sup- said. “Any hesitation and negative mentality on this subject is nothing more than a fad-

Greg Bearringer is a grad student in History. He may be reached at gbearrin@ utk.edu.

Whispering Sweet Somethings

ing social phenomenon of the past. Women must have the right to vote and to be elected; because democracy dictates that, because there are interests that women must defend, and because there are social duties that women must perform.” His modernization was a stark contrast to the religion-based roots of the previous Ottoman Empire rule that controlled the government before him. Turkey was completely independent from Islamic law, which was very strictly only considered in the light of religion. Today, it seems as if Prime Minister Erdogan is trying to go back to the restricted rules and regulations of the Ottoman Empire, basing all of his governmental decisions of a religion-based foundation. The modernization that Ataturk worked so hard to establish is being neglected, ignored and disrespected by a man who openly hates the man who made Turkey what it is today. It’s confirmed that Erdogan’s wishes for Turkey are beyond what is accepted by the majority of the country’s citizens. He has slowly but surely been incorporating Islamic policy into Ataturk’s free-of-religion republic. Maybe there is some merit in the cliché “history repeats itself.” If it really has any truth to it, then maybe all Turkey needs is to revisit Ataturk and see exactly where everything went wrong. Melodi Erdogan is a rising junior in journalism and electronic media. She can be reached at merdogan@utk.edu.

What the Duck • Aaron Johnson

ADVERTISING/PRODUCTION

Editor-in-Chief: Victoria Wright Managing Editor: RJ Vogt Chief Copy Editor: Gage Arnold News Editor: RJ Vogt Sports Editor: Steven Cook Arts & Culture Editor: Melodi Erdogan Online Editor: Samantha Smoak Design Editor: Melodi Erdogan Photo Editor: Hannah Cather

people in the world who do have the power to pull the strings, who have control over the rise and fall of countries, economies and cultural events. That’s fine. But what is the source of their power? Perhaps it’s their ability to control cultural events via the news. Fundamentally, that would mean their power is derived not from having physical control over our actions, but the ability to get us to accept that they have the power. In other words, it is our uncritical acceptance of the world they create as the truth. The answer to this, of course, isn’t to accept impotence as the way things are. If you truly believe that you have no power to affect change, the proper response isn’t to accept it as truth; the proper response is to act like you do have the power. If he ever wanted to make a real difference, he would tell the people who believe as he does that all this power supposedly taken from them, was also ceded by them the moment they imagined the system being outside of their influence. Instead of preventing an over-intrusive government, conspiracy theorists only serve to enhance the illusion that powerful people have innate power we are helpless to stop.

Turkish hero set precedent for secular rule

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • Hilary Price

EDITORIAL

ideas might use to inform you about global warming or consumerism. Having both dealt out and taken in my fair share of stupidity, I was surprised that this bothered me so much. I admit to occasionally tuning into vigilant news programs, such as Alex Jones’ show or Coast to Coast AM, but the people on said broadcasts amuse me. However, those programs didn’t anger me like this did. Perhaps there is something about being famous that gives you free range to be insane; regardless, I tried to imagine what I might have said to this person: Do you have the documents? Where? Why aren’t you showing them to every one? By what standard have you deemed these documents as “truths?” I realized that it wasn’t just the elision of information that bothered me. You see, the reason people read InfoWars or such drivel is that there is some small kernel of truth to what they say, insofar as there is probably some information the government would rather us not know about, and that rich people have too much power. It is hard for me to imagine that there is some dark, torch light room where the “real” power holders decide how the economy works and plan out news stories to cover for them and plot to deaden the collective conscious with Justin Bieber or some such nonsense. Lets say, however, that there are 150

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Friday, July 26, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 5

ARTS & CULTURE

Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan merdogan@utk.edu

‘Stars Dance’ stumbles Gabrielle O’Neal

Friday, July 26

• The City Knoxville

What: Beauty Hunters Free All-Women Boot Camp Where: Victor Ashe Park When: 6 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Price: Free Melodi’s Take: Bikini season may be coming to a close, but that’s never an excuse not to get outside and exercise. The Beauty Hunters group is a community-based fitness program that aims to provide women in the Knoxville area with a free boot camp hoping to instill “selfesteem, confidence and strength to women of all ages, sizes, race and abilities,� according to their website. If you’re looking for some motivation, Beauty Hunters is a great place to start. Visit them online at www.beautyhunters.org for more information.

What: Summer Movie Magic Series: ‘Rear Window’ Where: Tennessee Theatre When: 8 p.m. Price: $8 Melodi’s Take: Attention film fanatics: Alfred Hitchcock is on the silver screen again. Hitchcock’s 1954 classic staring James Stewart as Jeff and Grace Kelly as Lisa is a film that will forever be remembered for its intense rising action and its thrilling mystery plot that never fails to disappoint. Not only is the Tennessee Theatre great for live concerts, the venue also hosts the Summer Movie Magic Series for a cheap yet classy date opportunity during the summer months.

Sunday, July 28

Saturday, July 27 What: Belly Dance for Beginners Where: Alexia’s School of Middle Eastern Dance (10541 Kingston Pike) When: 11 a.m. to noon Price: $12 Melodi’s Take: Ever feel like you’re a fish out of water on the dance floor? Take initia tive to rock that body into some Shakira-like moves with this special event. Alexia’s School of Middle Eastern dance specializes in hip gyrations that will have you owning the dance floor. The class is sure to have your hips lying within the hour. For more information, call 865898-2126.

• Thornton Dial

What: Thornton Dial: ‘Thoughts on Paper’ Where: Knoxville Museum of Art When: 1-5 p.m. Price: Free Melodi’s Take: Free admission to a museum is already a dream, so why not enjoy art work from a renowned artist as well? Thornton Dial, originally from Alabama, has been praised by critics from Time and the New York Times for having art that is so original, it cannot be defined by artistic categories. If you can’t make it out to KMA this weekend, no worries, this exhibition will be on display until Aug. 25.

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indie pop duo The Cataracs. The song has a danceâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;pop sound with some dubstep elements while the lyrics talk about taking things slow. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you want me Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m accepting applications/So long as we keep this record on rotation/ You know Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m good with mouth to mouth resuscitation/ Breathe me in, breathe me out/ So amazing.â&#x20AC;? Once again, Gomez is trying to branch out and show herself in a more adult and sexy light, but actually just confuse listeners. If looking for the Selenaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sexy side, look no further than â&#x20AC;&#x153;Undercoverâ&#x20AC;? which features The Cataracs once more. It follows the same dubstep, dance club sound and an attempt at sexier lyrics. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a sexy machine, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a hollywood dream/ And you got me feeling like a homecoming queen /Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drop out of this crowd, somewhere no oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s allowed /I want you / All to myself, I want you all to myself /And nobody else, yeah /You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need no other lover, we can keep it undercover.â&#x20AC;? The lyrics are predictable and unimpressive; however, the music makes up for it, starting off simple and slowly building â&#x20AC;˘ Selena Gomez up until the chorus where it virtually becomes impossible not to want to dance. The album also has its slow songs like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love Will Remember,â&#x20AC;? possibly inspired by her break-up with Canadian pop star Justin Bieber. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Somewhere in forever / Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll dance again /We used to be inseparable /I used to think that I was irreplaceable / We lit the whole world up,/ Before we blew it up / I just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know how we screwed it up.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love Will Rememberâ&#x20AC;? is your standard pop-ballad that is easy listening, yet lacks depth. While it does branch out from her previous albums, the dubstep and Bollywood sounds make a fun dance album, although the lyrics and vocals are not impressive, leaving the album on a good but not great level. In the end, Selena Gomezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stars Danceâ&#x20AC;? is a typical pop album that is enjoyable to listen to if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a female within the ages of 12 and 22, or Justin Bieber.

Staff Writer Two years after the release of â&#x20AC;&#x153;When the Sun Goes Down,â&#x20AC;? Disney star Selena Gomez released her first solo album titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stars Dance.â&#x20AC;? It is Gomezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fourth studio album, but her first without her band â&#x20AC;&#x153;Selena Gomez and the Scene.â&#x20AC;? With her recent role as Faith in the R-rated drama film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spring Breakersâ&#x20AC;? and the album being released just a few days before her landmark 21st birthday, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stars Danceâ&#x20AC;? shows off Gomezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s adult and more sensual side. The album features 11 songs and several bonus tracks, depending on where you buy the album. (For example, iTunes has two bonus songs, while the Target version has four). â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stars Danceâ&#x20AC;? has dance, electronic and even reggae elements to it, but all in all, it is the standard â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;pop musicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; album. The themes from the album are typical of a Disney music star growing in to an adult with lyrics about love, relationships and attempts to show off her racy side. While the songs have are fun and the music will make you want to dance, the songs generally have the same sound and Gomezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vocals are unimpressive. The albums lead single, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Come and Get It,â&#x20AC;? which was first released in April, is one of the better songs in the collection. The songs Bollywood sound and electro-pop beat make it a fun listen and the lyrics are simple yet catchy enough to keep it stuck in your head. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not too shy to show I love you, I got no regrets/ I love you too much to, much to hide you, this love ainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t finished yet/ This love ainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t finished yetâ&#x20AC;Ś/ So baby whenever youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re readyâ&#x20AC;Ś/ When youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re ready/ Come and get it/ Na na na na/â&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? The song is very Bollywood/Rihanna esque, with itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s foreign sounding background beat and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s uncreative â&#x20AC;&#x153;na na nas.â&#x20AC;? Another stand-out song on the album is the track â&#x20AC;&#x153;Slow Down,â&#x20AC;? featuring the

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Friday, July 26, 2013

SPORTS

Sports Editor Steven Cook scook21@utk.edu

MLB restores lost integrity

Around Rocky Top

NFL hopeful rescues family Associated Press

Steven Cook Sports Editor Major League Baseball is finally serious about their performance-enhancing epidemic. And while it’s bad news for notable sluggers Ryan Braun, Alex Rodriguez and dozens of other players with a bullseye on their backs, it’s great news for America’s past time and millions of its fans. For decades, the MLB has tiptoed around the unquestionable issue of performance-enhancing drugs that overtook the league in the early 2000s and tarnished the reputation and legacy of many of the sport’s all-time greats. All too often, justice doesn’t catch up to these cheaters until it’s way too late. Heck, it even took Congress stepping in with the Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds fiascos to see any sort of large movement for justice—as if the U.S. government doesn’t already have enough on their plate. Now, it seems the MLB has launched a massive investigation into the Biogenesis clinic and founder Tony Bosch that will drastically alter the landscape of cheating in baseball and will set the standard for how punishment will be drawn-up and executed. The first domino fell on Monday. It was then that the MLB announced Braun—the 2011 NL MVP—would be suspended for the rest of the season. Almost simultaneously, Braun publicly admitted to the use of PEDs after a scandal last offseason that culminated in his repeated denial of any wrongdoing. Braun was one of 15 players listed in an investigation of Bosch’s clinic, with the other notable player being Rodriguez. A-Rod, an all-time great slugger for the New York Yankees, could soon see his nickname changed to “A-Fraud” or “A-Roid.” After Braun’s suspension, CBS Sports reported that Rodriguez is “all but assured” of a major ban that would trump the 50-game suspension typically given to first-time offenders. Rodriguez admitted in 2009 to using steroids between the 2001 and 2003 seasons when he broke out as a game-changing home run hitter with the Texas Rangers. He was not suspended, but after coming up on the radar yet again with shocking allegations that Bosch personally visited A-Rod in the middle of a playoff series in 2011, the MLB isn’t happy. Commissioner Bud Selig and much of baseball’s brass had hoped that A-Rod’s long-time secret revealed in 2009 was old enough news to avoid defacing one of the sport’s biggest names, but it’s apparent after these latest developments that the Yankees slugger will likely join Braun as the lying scoundrels who the MLB will make into an example to better their sport. And it’s about time. As much as I enjoyed watching Mark McGwire, Sammy Sosa and Barry Bonds crush baseballs, the sport needs its integrity back. Suspending Braun, A-Rod and the rest of the cheaters is just the first step in major reform coming to Major League Baseball. The next step is a strict, unavoidable testing system that will prevent these players from ever getting an unfair advantage. It’s a trivial time for the sport of baseball, which gets in the national spotlight for negative reasons more so than positive reasons. A game that was built on integrity, sportsmanship and class has now become manipulated. It may tarnish much of the last 20 years and some of the greatest to ever swing the bat, but would you rather blindly proclaim the evidence isn’t there or make a sweeping reform to give the MLB every chance to return to a prideful state? The MLB struggled with this question for years, and it finally seems as if they’re committed to restoring the integrity of America’s past time. Steven Cooke is a senior in journalism and electronic media. He can be reached at scook21@ utk.edu.

Donald Page • UT Athletics

Tori Lamp, a senior at UT, finished women’s 10-meter diving finals at the FINA World Championships on Thursday in Barcelona, Spain.

Hernandez returns to court Associated Press A judge on Wednesday gave prosecutors more time to present evidence to a grand jury in their murder case against former New England Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez. Hernandez was in court for what was supposed to be a probable cause hearing, but prosecutors said the grand jury is still considering the evidence against him. Judge Daniel O’Shea considered defense objections to a delay but decided to reschedule the hearing for Aug. 22. Hernandez will continue to be held without bail until then. Hernandez has pleaded not guilty to murder in the death of Odin Lloyd, a 27-year-old Boston semiprofessional football player whose body was found June 17 in an industrial park near Hernandez’s home. He had been shot five times. Bristol County Assistant District Attorney William McCauley said additional evidence includes boxes of ammunition found at a condominium Hernandez leased and a magazine for a .45-caliber Glock in a Hummer registered to him. Authorities say Lloyd was killed with a .45-caliber gun, though it apparently has not been recovered. McCauley said the ammu-

nition box had Hernandez’s fingerprints on it. Hernandez attorney James Sultan objected to the delay, saying his client has already been jailed for four weeks and that the district attorney could have waited to bring charges, but chose to go ahead last month. “He made it sound like a slam dunk case,” Sultan said. Outside court, another of Hernandez’s attorneys, Charles Rankin, said he was “extremely disappointed” that prosecutors weren’t prepared to go forward and that he’s confident Hernandez will be exonerated. Hernandez’s girlfriend, Shayanna Jenkins, was in court for the hearing — Hernandez mouthed “I love you” in her direction before he was led out — but she did not respond to reporters’ questions as she left the courthouse. Members of Lloyd’s family also attended the hearing but did not comment. Also Wednesday, O’Shea ruled in favor of media organizations, including The Associated Press, that were seeking access to more documents in the case, including two arrest warrants, additional search warrants and other materials. The records will be released at 3 p.m. Thursday if no one appeals. Sultan objected to the documents’ unsealing,

saying he understood the media’s “insatiable appetite” but that the release of records is undermining Hernandez’s right to a fair trial. Prosecutors say Hernandez orchestrated Lloyd’s killing because he was upset at him for talking to people Hernandez had problems with at a nightclub a few days earlier. They say Hernandez and two associates, Ernest Wallace and Carlos Ortiz, drove with Lloyd to the North Attleborough industrial park. Authorities have not said who fired the shots, but documents filed in Florida — and released since Hernandez’s last court appearance — paint the former Patriot as the triggerman. According to the records, Ortiz told police that Wallace said Hernandez fired the shots. Hernandez was kicked off the team within hours of his arrest. New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick broke his silence Wednesday, saying the Patriots will learn from “this terrible experience,” and that it’s time for New England to move forward. “We’ll continue to evaluate the way that we do things, the way that we evaluate our players and we’ll do it on a regular basis,” Belichick said. “I’m not perfect on that, but I always do what I think is best for the football team.” Wallace and Ortiz also

are facing charges. Wallace pleaded not guilty to a charge of being an accessory to murder after the fact. Ortiz has pleaded not guilty to a gun charge. Warrants released Tuesday in Hernandez’s hometown of Bristol, Conn., show police found ammunition, a gun box and documents tied to Ortiz and Wallace at Hernandez’s uncle’s home. The warrants were used to search that home, where Ortiz said he lived; an apartment also linked to Ortiz; and a rental car police say was used by Wallace and Ortiz to return to Connecticut after the shooting. The items seized from the home included clothes, Correction Department documents linked to Ortiz and Wallace, a plastic gun box and two boxes of .38-caliber ammunition. Bristol police also have been investigating a possible link to a 2012 double fatal shooting in Boston, and earlier said they had seized an SUV wanted in that investigation from the uncle’s home. Court records say it had been rented in Hernandez’s name.

Titans linebacker Jonathan “Tig” Willard says he helped rescue a family from a burning vehicle on his way to Tennessee training camp. The rookie was driving on Interstate 40 on Tuesday near Oak Ridge when he noticed a sports utility vehicle smoking. He first told TigerNet.com that he flashed his lights and honked his horn to get the driver to pull over when he saw flames shoot out the back. “As soon as I got to the car, I saw three small kids in the back seat and a dog,” Willard said Wednesday at the Titans’ headquarters. “So for me, I’m thinking, ‘Hurry up and get the kids. Hurry up and get everybody out and get them away from the car.’ You could see probably up under the engine, all that was still on fire. So I’m thinking that the car might go up anytime.” Willard said he handed an infant to the woman before pulling out another child. A second man who had stopped rescued a third child and the family’s dog, and they were able to grab the woman’s purse and a couple bags before the SUV exploded into flames a couple minutes later. He stayed long enough for firefighters to arrive and put out the fire. “A lot of people passed by and didn’t help, so she was just wanting to thank us and show us how thankful she was for us helping get the kids out and kind of grab some of the stuff,” Willard said. A Tennessee Highway Patrol report shows the SUV of Cheri Hubbard of South Daytona, Fla., caught fire and burned Tuesday afternoon near mile marker 340. The investigating trooper told Dalya Qualls, spokeswoman for the Tennessee Department of Safety and Homeland Security, that the witnesses already had left before he arrived and that Hubbard did not get the names of the men who helped her. Hubbard did not immediately return a voicemail left on her cellphone by The Associated Press on Wednesday. Willard certainly knows how to impress his new teammates. Clemson’s leader in tackles last season, Willard is an undrafted free agent with Tennessee and was driving from Myrtle Beach, S.C., to report for training camp when he spotted the smoking vehicle. Coach Mike Munchak said he had been looking forward to hearing Willard’s version of the story. “He got involved in something that could have been bad,” Munchak said.


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