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Issue 11, Volume 123

Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Computer program gives online surfers complete anonymity McCord Pagan Staff Writer

Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

According to a study conducted by social media network, Foursquare, Knoxville was labelled America’s most patriotic city based on the “check-in” rate at parades, parks, and firework retailers.

Fourth festivities prevail despite rain Victoria Wright Editor-in-Chief

Melodi Erdogan Arts & Culture Editor The torrential downpours and the relentless thunderstorms doomed Independence Day long before UT students and Knoxville residents could hope for sunny weather and clear skies. The National Weather Service in Morristown predicted there would be between two to five inches of rain this past weekend, with a 100 percent chance of showers and possible thunderstorms on July 4. Indeed, rain did fall almost all day in downtown Knoxville, but it did not stop students and residents from celebrating the Fourth of July.

“I had a lot of fun,” Morgan Pinns, Knoxville community member said. “I actually danced in the rain.” Many East Tennessee towns either rescheduled or postponed Independence Day activities. Clinton at Lake Front Park and Oak Ridge both postponed firework shows until yesterday, Kingston postponed until Saturday, July 13 and Campbell County altogether cancelled all festivities. One of the year’s largest events, the annual Festival on the Fourth, features performances by the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra in Worlds Fair Park and celebrated its 29th anniversary this year. The Orchestra played as scheduled, with fireworks closing the show. Although, the Knox County Sheriff’s Office helicopter “Fly-Over” and the Knoxville Fire Department Rescue Squad’s rappelling of the Sunsphere were cancelled, and promised to return next year.

Although it had been a cloudy, wet day, residential communities in Farragut and Lenoir City set off fireworks once the sky was dark enough last Thursday. But not without complications. “Dad bought some fireworks that we were all really excited about until the neighbors blew us away with their own,” said Rodolfo Urquieta, rising junior in English, who spent his weekend in Morristown where the weather was just as dismal. “It was pretty comical because it started raining really hard so barely got anything lit.” Despite the gloomy weather, Independence Day 2013 still maintained the real joy behind a holiday. “In the end, the fireworks were an abysmal failure, but the family time was great,” Urquieta said. “I think that’s all that matters and what the holidays are all about.”

Airplane crash kills two, raises questions Associated Press San Francisco fire officials acknowledged Monday that one of their trucks responding to the Asiana Airlines crash at San Francisco airport may have run over one of the two teenage girls killed in the accident. Autopsy results determining whether her death was caused by a rescue vehicle or the plane crash were pending Monday. “One of our fire apparatus may have come into contact with one of our two victims who was at the scene,” Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White said during a news conference. “I assure you we are looking closely at this.” The body of the girl who might have been struck was found on the left side of the aircraft about 30 feet away from where the Boeing 777 came to rest after it skidded down the tarmac, said San Mateo County Coroner Robert Foucrault. The girl was not far from an emergency slide, he said. The other body was found on the runway near where the plane’s tail broke off upon impact, he said. The coroner said both girls were pronounced dead at the airport. Foucrault said senior San Francisco Fire Department officials notified him and his staff at

• Photo courtesy of AP

the crash site Saturday that one of the two Chinese girls killed in the crash might have been struck on the runway. “We were made aware of the possibility at the scene that day,” Foucrault said, adding that he did not get a thorough look at the victims on Saturday to know if they had external injuries. The teenagers’ families are expected to arrive in San Francisco on Monday, and they will receive the autopsy results

before they are made public, Foucrault said. Federal accident investigators have reviewed airport surveillance footage to see if it showed someone being struck by a fire truck on the runway and that “it wasn’t conclusive,” National Transportation Safety Board chairwoman Deborah Hersman said Monday. Interviews with emergency responders and especially the autopsy report are expected to

bring answers, Hersman said. “It is a very serious issue and we want to understand it,” she said. San Francisco Fire Department Assistant Deputy Chief Dale Carnes said a report that one of the first five emergency vehicles might have “come in contact” with one of the girls was made as firefighters transitioned from rescue and suppressing the See CRASH on Page 2

Thanks to the now infamous disclosure of Edward Snowden, Americans today have a much firmer grasp on how much of their online activity is cataloged in vast governmental data servers. Some 500,000 daily users have turned instead to a different sort of online activity: anonymity. Project Tor is one of many organizations that offer layered encryption to its website. Officially known as The Onion Router, a play on the several layers of encryption undertaken by the software, the website was originally built by the US Naval Research Laboratory for more secure inter-governmental communications. By sending a user’s information through several layers of encryption and rerouting information all over the world, the program makes it much more difficult for anyone to track a user throughout the web. While its slower connection speeds can disable videos and Adobe software, Tor provides a means for individuals in repressed countries to communicate without the burden of government eavesdropping. The program requires a one-time download from torproject.org. Tor sends data through thousands of nodes, or computers specifically set up to reroute information and mask the source of the connection. The more nodes Tor has, the more user capacity is available. According to a 2011 Wall Street Journal article, the last node in a user’s connection is the most dangerous, as whoever owns that computer can then be found by authorities. In more than a few cases, law enforcement has questioned node-computer owners, as any and all Tor data will appear to be coming from that computer even though the owner has no control or knowledge of what may come through. “The key to all privacy, not just online, is control over what you share with whom. Online this becomes much more difficult, and thus much more important, because there are automated ways to force you to share more information than you might be comfortable with unless you’ve explicitly shut them down,” said Kevin Nolan rising senior in jazz studies and computer science said. However, the nature of the software makes it so that no one, not even Tor, is able to reveal a user’s location, even to authorities. This anonymity has also allowed for the rise of numerous hidden services, websites that would likely be shut down if hosted in a public place. Instead, hidden service websites are hosted anonymously, meaning that only the creators of the site are able to shut the site down. Silk Road, one of the many sites only accessible through the Tor network, creates a sort of Amazon.com for the black market. Though forbidding the exchange of child pornography and assassinations, Silk Road permits all manner of illegal drugs, books for breaking into ATMs and fake IDs. While Tor Project in no way condones this use of its software, it is not in a position to stop it either, and sees the benefits far outweighing the harm. “Tor aims to provide protection for ordinary people who want to follow the law,” Tor states on its website. “Only criminals have privacy right now, and we need to fix that.” The site also points out that dedicated criminals possess far greater capabilities thanks to the bounty of elite hacking software that goes beyond the promise of anonymity. “We write tools to let people all around the world change the world in the way they think their world needs to be changed,” Tor programmer Roger Dingledine said in a 2011 lecture entitled ‘How Governments have tried to block Tor.’ Tor was originally released in 2003 and today receives 80 percent of its $2 million a year budget from different facets of the US government, as it is a very useful tool for dissidents around the world to protect themselves from their government. Another option for web-protection is Tails, a program that creates a downloadable alternate operating system exclusively for browsing the web. As computers still interact with the web in ways besides a browser, Tails allows one’s computer to run all of its data through the Tor network, creating yet another level of security. The website, found at tails.boum.org, is also free to download and leaves no trace of the program when it is disconnected. Tor Project is actively blocked by several countries around the world, including Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait all block direct access to Tor, with some claiming it is an unsafe website. According to Tor itself, however, the software is widely used by activists to stay anonymous as well as law enforcement who need to avoid being seen to use a police IP address. In addition, the use of anonymity-enabling software can protect all kinds of whistleblowers, from those in the United States, to China and Africa. Social activist groups such as Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch and Global Voices have used or recommended Tor for breaching governmental firewalls and anonymous blogging. Tor does not require technical skill to install or use, however, it does come at a cost. “I think Tor is a wonderful thing, but it’s not for everyone. There is a tradeoff: internet speed for internet anonymity. When your internet query is going through nine nodes before reaching Google, speed has to suffer. For everyday browsing, I find it to be a bit overkill,” Nolan said. There are many ways to stay safe online, but ultimately the choice is up to the user whether or not to make the choice. “The internet was never designed to be private in the first place - the anonymity of the early internet was a side-effect of its infancy as a technology…However, I do think that there will always be ways to maintain anonymity on the web for those who want it,” Nolan said.

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Flip to page 2 for reader response to last week’s column on DOMA


2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, July 9, 2013 Editor-in-Chief Victoria Wright

IN SHORT

vwright6@utk.edu

Managing Editor RJ Vogt rvogt@utk.edu

Around Rock Rockyy Top

CONE ZONE EDITION

Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

The Cumberland Avenue BP station was demolished as a part of the construction plan for an $18 million student housing project.

CRASH continued from Page 1 fire to treating and transporting injured passengers to area hospitals. Carnes couldn’t give an exact time of the report, but said police, FBI and other officials were notified “immediately” after the firefighter at the scene reported his concerns. Hayes-White said the five drivers of the rescue vehicles all passed drug and alcohol tests. No one has been suspended. Some church members have begun donating money, and church leaders were trying to figure out how to contribute to the families devastated by the crash. “We want people to know that we care even though we have not met them,” the Rev. Glenn Kirby said.

Letters to the Editor I am writing in response to Gage Arnold’s article entitled “America abandons their Biblical roots”. There are a number of key points that I would like to address concerning the things that Mr. Arnold has written, that I feel would be of interest to the Daily Beacon. The article itself shows a severe lack of understanding of American history. The first issue is concerning the title itself, and with the bulk of the article. This country was founded by people with an education in the Bible. However, the founding itself was not on Biblical principles. Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson were deists. John Adams was a Unitarian. Many of the Founders were spiritually minded, but did not adhere to a literal interpretation of the Bible. Jefferson actually edited his BIble to exclude any of the miracles or supernatural events that were reported. In the Treaty of Tripoli, John Adams expressed quite clearly that “The Government of the United States is not in any sense founded upon the Christian religion.” The Founders made the First Amendment in order to prevent any one particular religion from being recognized by the government. They did not want a repeat of what happened with the Church of England. They wanted people to be able to follow whichever religion they wished to follow, or to follow none at all. Thomas Jefferson stated “But it does me no injury for my neighbor to say there are twenty gods or no God. It neither picks my pocket nor breaks my leg.” The Founders saw no problem with people belonging to any religion they chose, or none at all. They did not intend for the nation itself to be a Christian nation. In a letter to Thomas Cooper, Jefferson wrote “Christianity neither is, nor ever was, a part of the common law.” For more such similar quotes concerning how the Founding Fathers felt about religion and its role in the government, I direct you to a Google search. Thus, the single connection that Mr. Arnold has drawn between marriage equality and religious freedom breaks down. The country was not founded on Biblical principles in the sense that it was meant for the country to be run according to the Bible. In fact, that is precisely what the Founders sought to avoid. They had just seen it happen in England and wished to avoid the same mistake in this nation. There shall be no

law respecting an establishment of religion. This includes Christianity, or any other religion. There were a number of references which Gage mentions which he implies are part of US Code or the Constitution itself which are merely pop culture references. For example, the quotes from the song “America, the Beautiful”. It is fine for people to sing “God shed his grace on thee” but to declare that as national doctrine upon which all of us must live our lives is a violation of freedom of religion. Those words are not found in the Declaration of Independence or in the Constitution. Neither are the other references that Gage has mentioned. “God bless America” is the title of a song, it is not in any way part of the law of our country. The phrase “under God” that Mr. Arnold mentions is not law either. It is part of the Pledge of Allegiance, but that phrase was not added to the Pledge until 1954. It wasn’t there when the Pledge was first adopted in 1892. It should also be noted that over a century had passed from the time the nation was founded until the creation of the Pledge, so its contents cannot be ascribed to the Founding itself or the Founders. The irony is that in the very paragraph where Mr. Arnold quotes these lines that I have above addressed, he says “suddenly we want to take our truth and replace it with our own version.” What he does not realize is that his own version of history is inaccurate and that God has been written into the Pledge and into our currency much more recently than the 18th Century, when the nation was founded. He asserts that a teacher mentioning the word “God” is grounds for being fired. This is not true. Is he able to cite any sources where a teacher was fired simply for saying that word? The law does prevent public school teachers from indoctrinating students in a particular religion, which is set forth quite clearly in the First Amendment declaring that there shall be no establishment of religion. However, it is not illegal for a teacher to merely mention God or even to entertain discussion on the matter as long as he or she remains neutral in the discussion. -Keith Penrod, professor in mathematics Professor Penrod may be reached kpenrod@ utk.edu.

I am an American. I am, in many aspects, a Christian. I am gay. And I agree with Mr. Arnold’s assertion that American laws should be of absolute Truth, and I also agree that Christianity has a significant presence in American society. However I do not believe that religion has any place in law, nor do I believe literal interpretations of the Bible should be cited as authoritative sources during legislative proceedings. This leads me to my first correction of the article. “God” does not appear, in any form, within the United States Constitution as your article implied. Our Founding fathers may have used religion for their right to independence (because when any man challenges a king, it’s better to appeal to a higher authority); however since this country was founded by people trying to escape the abuse of laws intertwined with religion, the constitutional framers decided not to repeat history. Mr. Arnold also claimed that more than half of these men had a Bible-based education, and that is certainly true. Yet these men had many other things in common: They were white, highly educated, elevated members of society. Many of them owned large shares of land or several businesses, but most of them were incredibly wealthy. And unfortunately enough of these men owned slaves to keep abolition off US legislation for almost 80 years. Also many of our framers were children of the Enlightenment, and therefore Deist rather than Christian. The significance between the two being that a Deist is anti-dogmatic and distrustful of large religious institutions controlling the interpretation of scriptures. And it was a form of radicalism for traditionalist in the 1700s. I believe we like to simplify American history to narratives which fit our personal beliefs, and since American society is predominately Christian so are our history, founders, and laws. All stories exaggerate or condense the truth because this is the art of storytelling, and America is a great story to tell. In truth, history is not a fickle thing, just historians. The repeal of the D.O.M.A. was a political justice to the dignity of gay Americans citizens, because when the government enacts a law which hands rights to a certain group of citizens but denies them to another, they have created a disprivileged class and given an official sanction to subjugate them. These are the natural change that many religions undergo as their traditional beliefs create friction with modern ideals. We modify certain interpretations and change definition which no longer seem “Right” to better fit the mentality an ever-changing society. This should not be shocking, since Christianity is quite prone to these radical dogmatic shifts. Today there are over 30,000 different denomination of Christianity each with their own beliefs and interpretation of the Bible. And trust me, Mr. Arnold, you’re a member of radical denomination according to 10th century churches. My point is that we have not found (capital T) Truth. The slaves and fags of yesterday’s truth are the citizens of today’s. We are moving toward something, a pursuit of happiness, for justice and equality under law. And I consider the repeal a defining moment for Truth. - Christopher Thomas, majoring in English and philosophy Thomas may be reached at nnh185@utk.edu.


Tuesday, July 9, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 3

ARTS & CULTURE

Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan merdogan@utk.edu

Jay-Z earns hype for ‘Magna Carta’

• Photo courtesy of Jay-Z

Gabrielle O'Neal Staff Writer

Four years since the release of the album “The Blueprint 3” and two years since the collaborative album “Watch The Throne” with Kanye West, rapper Jay-Z is back and has not lost his touch. The owner of 17 Grammy Awards, Jay-Z released his 12th studio album, titled “Magna Carta… Holy Grail,” on

Independence Day. The album displays Jay-Z’s signature wit draped in abundant swagger that will get listeners nodding their heads along to every song. As a whole, the album is similar to Kanye West’s recent piece, “Yeezus.” That is, if Kanye were slightly less bombastic. The 43-year-old Brooklyn, New York native does not disappoint with “Magna Carta” which features a variety of special guests such as Justin Timberlake, Frank Ocean and wife Beyoncé Knowles. Bringing in a star-studded guest list for vocals adds to Jay’s signature style, only elevating the quality of the album as a whole. But unlike many rappers who depend on their peers to gain popularity, Jay invites his featuring artists to augment his creative effort through collaboration and production. “Magna Carta” also has a reflective tone and displays the rapper’s vulnerability when it comes to his marriage to Beyoncé and parenting daughter Blue Ivy. While Jay-Z and Beyonce’s relationship is normally kept private, it is refreshing to here him speak out on an emotional level, giving the album a more personable feel to a rather intimidating artist. The album features a number of standout songs such as the first track entitled “Holy Grail,” featuring his “Suit & Tie” cohort, Justin Timberlake. The track is bursting with Jay-Z’s signature style and wit: “Now I got tattoos on my body / Psycho [expletive] in my lobby / I got haters in the paper / Photo shoots with paparazzi / Can’t even take my daughter for a walk / See them by the corner store.” The song details Jay-Z’s love/hate relationship with wealth and fame while comparing himself to fallen celebrities such as Kurt Cobain and MC

Hammer. It begins with piano music and Timberlake’s falsetto, continuing with a banging beat that spotlights the Nirvana classic, “Smells Like Teen Sprit.” The track “Oceans,” featuring R&B singer Frank Ocean, is a reflective song about the past alluding to slave ships and the Ivory Coast. Ocean sings, “This water knows it all / Go ahead and spill some champagne in the water / Go ahead and watch the sun blaze / On the waves / Of the ocean” while Jay raps about his accomplishments and future goals. Jay raps, “Welcome to the Magna Carta / The best-selling author ‘Decoded’ / On the holiday playing ‘Strange Fruit’/ If I’mma make it to a billi I can’t take the same route.” Ocean’s smooth voice contrasts Jay’s rapping, making the song a stand-out on the collection. “Magna Carta” also features a number of samples and elements, borrowed from artists who only provided Jay with a good foundation. In addition to the “Smells Like Teen Spirit” sample, there is a sample from M.I.A.’s “Bad Girls” on the track titled “Tom Ford." Jay also uses “Losing My Religion” by R.E.M on the track “Heaven.” There is also an interesting combination of Faye Dunaway’s monologue from the 1981 film “Mommie Dearest” and “My Downfall” by Notorious B.I.G. Sampling popular non-rap songs broadened Jay-Z’s audience by creating a way for popular genre fans to sing along. “Magna Carta… Holy Grail” maintains Jay-Z’s signature rapping style while never getting boring, which will resonate with Jay-Z fans old and new. It is witty with impressive style that fits the album’s grandiose title, ellipses and all. In short, Jay-Z does Jay-Z.

Naturalist side influences singer’s stage performance which was released in 2003, allowing him to quit the bar concerts and focus on his musical and nature related endeavors. Rowe toured with indie band Noah and Many subjects often inspire musicians, the Whales in 2010, then went on and but nature? studied at the Hawk Circle Wilderness It's what Americana singer/songwriter Education, but not without completing a Sean Rowe uses to create honest music. 24 day survival quest alone. Within just a The Troy, New York native is headed year’s time, Rowe released his sophomore to Knoxville in a few weeks, packing with album entitled “Magic.” him a strong baritone voice that takes As a teenager, Rowe discovered various center stage in his music, which pos- different artists in the Blues genre, includsesses a distinctly natural feel. ing Muddy Waters and Ray Charles. “I began to Quickly learnapproach music ing the songs of eing a naturalist isn’t his favorite artwith an honest feel,” Rowe said ists, Rowe began in a phone inter- just going to a park, playing bars with view. “I guess that’s four hour long inspired by my funsets. and learning about damental vibe and “I draw from my passion with a lot of typical nature, trying to plants, it has to do with styles but my get down to what’s roots are in blues real and feel the everything that is real. and folk music,” layers, musically – Sean Rowe Rowe said. “I speaking. That’s take from a lot of certainly inspired styles and tradiby my love of wilderness and nature.” tions and make them my own.” Having read the book “The Tracker” In 2009, Rowe wrote for the Albany by Tom Brown at age 18, Rowe quick- Times Union as a nature blogger, coverly became passionate on the subject of ing topics like foresting and various wild nature, and continued to study wilder- foods. ness education in his home state for the “I didn’t feel limited with the matenext six years. When asked what it means rial, sometimes with the language I felt to be a naturalist, Rowe said, “it just limited and it is what it is,” Rowe said. “It means that you approach nature with an was a good experience; it was like work openness to learn about it.” for me for a way to put my ideas down.” “You are passionate about learning, His latest album, “The Salesman and advocating for the natural world,” Rowe the Shark,” released in August of last year. said. “Being a naturalist isn’t just going to Since then, Rowe has been promoting his a park and learning about plants, it has to music and touring nationally and outside do with everything that’s real. of domestic borders. This summer, he “Making music is part of that, music will be touring in the South, with a stop is a part of the natural world, and it is in Knoxville. something that is very universal that has Rowe will be performing a free concert always been around.” at Boyd’s Jig & Reel located in the Old “27” became Rowe’s debut album, City Wednesday, July 17, at 7 p.m.

Melodi Erdogan

Arts & Culture Editor

B

• Photo courtesy of Sean Rowe


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, July 9, 2013 Editor-in-Chief Victoria Wright

OPINIONS

vwright6@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Letter to The Editor Writer misses point on DOMA column I’

M WRITING in response to Gage Arnold’s July 2 column entitled “America abandons their Biblical roots.” Mr. Arnold paints a picture of a country whose moral foundation is crumbling beneath its feet in light of the Supreme Court’s ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act, so I offer a few questions on which I hope the columnist might be able to elaborate. Mr. Arnold explains that America was built on Biblical principles, that many of the Founders shared Bible-based educations. It’s important to remember that America was also built on the principles of slavery and a lack of women’s rights, but those are two pillars of a colonial society that drastically shifted as the nation progressed. Much later, interracial marriage was thought to bring about the destruction of society, and opponents of such unions often cited Biblical texts to support their views. I’m only in my mid-20s, so perhaps I missed the deterioration of America as a whole, but the country appears to have survived. I’m curious why Mr. Arnold believes the definition of marriage cannot deviate from founding principles, but slavery and a woman’s role in society can. I haven’t read every piece of Mr. Arnold’s writing, but I’d venture to say he hasn’t penned a similar column on the subject of divorce. The Bible says that divorce, like homosexuality, adultery and touching the skin of a dead pig, is a sin, and no sin is said to outweigh the other. In April the Center for Disease Control reported that 6.8 marriages took place for every 1,000 Americans in 2011, but there were also 3.6 divorces per those same 1,000 Americans. Around fifty percent of marriages in this country end in divorce, a number that has largely remained consistent for at least a decade, according to the CDC. If no sin outweighs the other, why isn’t Mr. Arnold harping on the proven effects of divorce, which is also lambasted as a sin in the Bible? Why does he choose to focus on gay marriage, which encourages unions, but ignore divorce, which tears them apart at an alarming rate? Mr. Arnold spends much of his column preaching the importance of religious freedom. What he appears to forget is that the Constitution – which guarantees such freedom under the First Amendment – also guarantees an American the right to forgo any religion, if he or she chooses, through freedom of speech. The Founders might have established standards in their own lives based on Biblical principles, but the Constitution which bears their names does no such thing. Christianity, among other things, might have been a large part of America’s birth and might remain a large part of its population, but the country boasts no national religion. That is why I offer a hypothetical: Suppose a male atheist wants to marry his male partner in America. Why should that individual be forced to adhere to policies based in Christian teachings when he does not believe in a religion, a belief he is guaranteed under our own law? Like the saying goes, the president puts his hand on the Bible and swears to uphold the Constitution; he does not put his hand on the Constitution and swear to uphold the Bible. I’d ask Mr. Arnold to consider that while many Americans share his beliefs on Christian teachings, there are those who do not, and they have just as many rights as he does. The religious beliefs of some should not be impressed on all in the United States. The DOMA decision might be viewed by Mr. Arnold as another point of decline for America, but those who see the world outside of a single religion might view it as a long overdue victory for equality and love in our country. -Zac Ellis (JEM ‘11)

Ellis is a college football blogger at Sports Illustrated and the former 2010-2011 editor-in-chief of The Daily Beacon. He can be reached at zac. ellis88@gmail.com or on Twitter at @ZacEllis.

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Rainfall may be more blessing than curse Gage-ing Your Interests by

Gage Arnold Go away, rain. This has been the summer battle cry from cooped up Knoxvillians, especially during a Fourth of July holiday that boasted road closings, fallen trees and backyard rivers. Instead of embarking on adventures to theme parks, baseball fields and farmer’s markets, residents have resorted to eating out, shopping and venturing to the movie theatre, a far cry from “fun in the sun.” But just how rainy has it been? As of July 8, Knoxville has recorded 45.72 inches of rainfall this year, according to the National Weather Service in Morristown. Now let me give that number perspective. Last year, the Knoxville area recorded 45.86 inches of rainfall for the entire year. Remember, we still have almost five full months of precipitation to go. Knoxville is already 19.29 inches of rainfall above the yearly average and could continue smash that the status quo. Through eight days, we’ve recorded 4.92 inches of rainfall, already 3.74 inches above the normal totals for the month… with 23 days

Searching for Serendipity by

Annie Blackwood It’s a familiar sound sizzling through the air—a boom slowly fading to a crackle when the centrifugal force is at its pinnacle. It’s the sound of a firework and it is the trademark of the recently celebrated holiday, Fourth of July. America’s day of independence can only be done correctly with the glow of fireworks country-wide, right? Sadly, some studies show a negative consequence of the holiday practice, as the use of fireworks in large quantities can have significant affects on human health and the environment. This combination of charcoal, sulfur fuel and most commonly used potassium nitrate create gunpowder, which is the chemical that allows the fireworks to move at such a rapid pace. Although seemingly harmless and entertaining, this montage of shots across the sky creates ash and debris that trickles down into our soil and water. Not only does it affect our surround-

Gage Arnold is a rising senior in journalism and electronic media. He can be reached at garnold@utk.edu.

ings, but as environmental writer Russell McLendon stated in an article on the Mother Nature Network, “The rockets’ red glare during a fireworks show can fill onlookers with patriotism and awe. Unfortunately, it can also fill them with particulates and aluminum.” Each color of firework uses different chemicals, some worse than others, but McLendon goes into detail in his article alluding to each color and its effects on the environment. For example, rubidium is the chemical to help fireworks burn a fluorescent purple color and is said to not have a large effect on the environment, claiming it is one of the more safe hues to use. On the other hand, strontium is used to help the fireworks burn red. This metal is said to be “extremely reactive with both water and air” and also has tendencies to be radioactive. If used in high doses it can be very dangerous to human health. Other elements used can damage certain parts of the body or environment such as the lungs with cadmium, a chemical which creates various colors, or copper that creates a blue shade of firework can cause skin issues when heavily used. Although firework shows are usually

only prevalent during Fourth of July, these chemicals and toxins that are sprayed over the soil, lakes, and bays around the country are hard to break down and decompose over long periods of time. Smaller amount of fireworks are said to still create pollution in the air, but it can dissipate over a shorter time frame and propose less of a problem than fireworks used in excess. The only major concern here would be someone with lung diseases, such as asthma, where breathing in large amounts of smoke can trigger a negative reaction. McLendon claims that this cloud of pollution can linger after a fireworks show for up to three hours before it fully disappears, restoring the air quality to normal again. In no way is this to put a damper on the fun and games involved in the celebration of large events such as America’s independence. However, we should think before we shoot a superfluous amount of fire, crackling rockets into the sky, in order to preserve a higher quality of everyday environmental health. Annie Blackwood is a rising junior in communication studies. She can be reached at ablackwo@utk.edu.

What the Duck • Aaron Johnson

ADVERTISING/PRODUCTION

Editor-in-Chief: Victoria Wright Managing Editor: RJ Vogt Chief Copy Editor: Gage Arnold News Editor: RJ Vogt Sports Editor: Steven Cook Arts & Culture Editor: Melodi Erdogan Online Editor: Samantha Smoak Design Editor: Melodi Erdogan Photo Editor: Hannah Cather

hoods of billions. Whether the barrier is drug lords or pollution or lack of infrasture, the problem remains equally as strong. While we beg for the rains to come to a close so we can walk our dog in the dry, others are begging for just a light shower so they don’t have to drink dirty, infected water that may, in fact, be quite dirty and infected (much thanks to chemical pollution). Thankfully though, there are folks that are working to eradicate this problem. Folks with BloodWater Missions, for instance, work to end the HIV/AIDS issues Africa faces but also work to provide and build wells so communities can receive replenishment of clean drinking water. Water scarcity is a very real issue and after all the perceived negativity, there is good news – this problem is solvable. And you can be a part of it. Check out BloodWater missions or The Water Project, which seeks to provide clean drinking water for Africa while striving to end to the impeccable poverty the continent has faced. The venture towards clean water begins with the first drop. Drip, drip.

Fireworks pose as health hazards

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • Hilary Price

EDITORIAL

to go. Seattle may be under the mantra of the soggiest city in America, but surprisingly enough, Knoxville is dominating their rain totals, and it’s not even comical. In fact, the Knoxville area ranks near the top of the nation in rainfall this year, falling just shy of the usual suspect – the Florida panhandle. But this isn’t just a column about rainfall. I chose this topic because oftentimes, we get greedy. Because we have to spend our summer days indoors and we have to make alterations to our preconceived plans, we get upset. We complain, and that’s not right. More than 1.1 billion people globally suffer from a lack of clean drinking water. Put simply, one in eight people in the world lacks access to clean drinking water – and that’s an issue that doesn’t need to be overlooked. The World Health Organization estimates that humans can live from three to five days without water. Because of that, those living without access to clean water must resort to drinking unsafe water to sustain themselves on a day-to-day basis. Unsafe water, in turn, can often lead to life-threatening diseases such as malaria, cholera, dysentery and typhoid fever. There’s been a barrier that’s been established in impoverished global regions and the lack of clean drinking water has financially and physically parched the liveli-

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Tuesday, July 9, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 5

ARTS & CULTURE

Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan merdogan@utk.edu

Racy videos downplay music Amid hiatus, band releases folk album Melodi Erdogan Arts & Culture Editor

and removed by YouTube shortly afterwards, only to resurface two days later. These artists, whether they’re hungry for attention or just like the drama, are creating a new foundation for what music videos should contain. Almost all music is written on the subject of love, if not all. But that love that the Beatles sang about back in the 60s has quickly diminished and became simply about sex. When was the last time a rap artist rhymed something sweet along the lines of “I ain’t got nothing but love girl, eight days a week?� Lately, the music industry has revolved around sex and drama, downplaying the creative element of singing and songwriting which should really be the main focus. If Bob Dylan were to release a song with a video on YouTube today, I doubt it would get very many plays. Plus, who wants to see a social critic shuffle through cards when you can get full-frontal,

“High School� video, featuring fellow Young Money rapper Lil Wayne. Yes the song is obviously about sex (some lyrics are very R-rated), but is a visual that necessary? When did popular artists take the creative aspect of music videos and turn them into borderline porn? Videos used to be a different creative platform for musicians, essentially allowing them to create a mini movie to accompany their music. YouTube is a perfect place to post videos, for any one with internet access can enjoy that. But some artists apparently took advantage of their creative freedom, infusing music with sex, quite literally. While there are some exceptions to this crazy sex/music video pattern, the main followers like Timberlake and Thicke remain in the popular music realm, which happens to be what most people listen to (hence the word “popular�).

The latest release from R&B artist Robin Thicke is his single “Blurred Lines.� Featuring rappers T.I. and Pharrell Williams, the song has a ridiculously catchy tune and its lyrics are promiscuous and somewhat inappropriate for a younger crowd. “You wanna hug me / what rhymes with hug me,� is just one line from the song that brings forth a sexy undertone, which was not anywhere near an undertone in the song’s music video. In fact, sex was the main idea. What begins with three models clad in clear, plas- “Lately, the music industry has revolved around tic underwear with barely any actual clothing on sex and drama, downplaying the creative their bodies becomes a element of singing and songwriting which strip show as they slowly but surely begin to lose should really be the main focus.� whatever clothing they were wearing to begin with. The models, all beautiful and quite bodacious, begin playfully jumping around and hanging onto the three artists, who seem to be having a little too much fun. “Blurred Lines� is only one example of how music videos have become blatant sex shows; artists are interpreting the saying “sex sells� quite literally, using nudity and sexy images to cash in millions of views on their videos. “We Don’t Stop� is the latAs evidenced by the hundreds est single by Tennessee native front row seat to nude ladies on of millions of views these artMiley Cyrus, and its video is basi- Timberlake’s channel? Racy music videos can raise ists get on their music videos, cally her twerking with interesting outfits that so obviously state questions with religious and it’s doubtful that they’ll tone societal values. Some may not down the sex and nudity in their ‘who is Hannah Montana?’ Even though Cyrus is working be appropriate for young fans. future releases. Although, I’ll be on creating a new image for her- Most explicit videos on YouTube appreciating any music video I self, Justin Timberlake has main- require an over 18-years of age watch where I don’t see a butt or tained his “sexy back� reputation. account, but it’s not like that can’t boobs, I will appreciate a whole Timberlake’s latest single “Tunnel be adjusted in a jiffy. And even ton more. Vision� had an accompanying beyond religion and society, don’t Melodi Erdogan is a sophovideo on YouTube, clearly labeled these artists respect themselves EXPLICIT due to the very naked and their work enough to not be more in journalism and electronic media. She can be reached at ladies dancing throughout the so blatant about sex? Nicki Minaj’s bottom side is merdogan@utk.edu. six minute 47 second song. The music video was released July 3, almost completely bare in her

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Associated Press There are still helium balloons clinging to the ceiling and new toys scattered across a table in the living room when Joy Williams answers the door. The Civil Wars singer recently found cream cheese icing in her hair, she notes with laughter, more remnants of her son Milesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; first birthday party the night before. It is one of the happiest times for Williams, but as is often the case with life, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also one of the most difficult. Over the next hour, Williams will laugh and cry and express a range of emotions from pride to fear and hope as she talks about the status of her Grammy Award-winning duo with John Paul White and their new self-titled second album. The group is officially on hiatus even as a single hits the airwaves and the album nears its Aug. 6 release date. She is fiercely proud of the new music and canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait for everyone to hear it. But she knows she has to tell the story of how things fell apart before she can expect anyone to pay attention to the music. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This album chronicles loss and regret and anger and victory and sweetness and loyalty and I hope that people get the chance to listen to it,â&#x20AC;? Williams says as she sits at her kitchen table. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve noticed is people may be curious about it, but once they listen to it, they are hooked. ... Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so honest and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so rich and, not to toot my own horn, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just really proud of what we created together. And we created it together â&#x20AC;&#x201D; we just happened to be in a bit of a civil war ourselves.â&#x20AC;? The last we heard from The Civil Wars, they were ending a European tour in abrupt and unexpected fashion, issuing an unusually honest news release that attributed the decision to â&#x20AC;&#x153;internal discord and irreconcilable differences of ambition.â&#x20AC;? Williams says eight months later she and White arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t speaking, but she hopes time will bring them back together to perform the new music live. There are currently no plans for them to tour together, however. In her first interview since the decision to come off the road, Williams says the hiatus is meant to be â&#x20AC;&#x153;a deep breath of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? and inhales in search of a momentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s serenity. She hopes in time there will be healing and friendship and collaboration again. White was not available for an interview

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD â&#x20AC;˘ Will Shortz

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and he did not respond to a message from The Associated Press. â&#x20AC;&#x153;John Paul and I arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t speaking right now but to me that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t determine the outcome of the band because if weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not speaking we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t determine the outcome of the band at this moment,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So the other elephant in the room is whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happening with the band? The reality is Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not even quite sure.â&#x20AC;? The added subtext increases the interest in the duoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new Charlie Peacock-produced album, with its cover photo of a column of smoke and intriguing first single, the electrified â&#x20AC;&#x153;The One That Got Away.â&#x20AC;? But there already would have been plenty of attention paid to â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Civil Wars.â&#x20AC;? The duoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s independently released first album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Barton Hollow,â&#x20AC;? rode White and Williamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; emotionladen boy-girl harmonies, vivid storytelling and the new interest in folk rock to gold status. They met after being randomly paired for songwriting sessions for a put-together mainstream country group in Nashville and their chemistry was immediate and undeniable. Fans thought they might be a couple. They were claimed by the country, folk and Americana worlds after their initial success. They won two Grammys in 2012 and in their only public appearance together this year, they took home another Grammy with Taylor Swift and T Bone Burnett for their contribution â&#x20AC;&#x153;Safe & Soundâ&#x20AC;? to â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Hunger Gamesâ&#x20AC;? soundtrack. Underneath all the success there was unseen tension, however, Williams says. She took some time away to have Miles last summer, but the weeks apart didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t solve their growing problems. The two met for writing sessions and though they were able to work together to create the songs that would make up â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Civil Wars,â&#x20AC;? the relationship continued to deteriorate. They left for Europe, but eventually they chose to retreat to their homes and families. They apologized and even offered to pay expenses and service charges for fans whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d already committed to traveling to their shows. As in many separations, explanations didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come easy. There was no band-ending argument. They didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t start fighting in Europe and then quit the road. Tensions built up over time and reached an impasse. Williams believes in retrospect canceling the tour was the right thing to do, though it made her sad. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was getting close to impossible for us to perform together on stage, and nobody wants to see a show like that,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to be on stage like that.â&#x20AC;? Nate Yetton, Williamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; husband and the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s manager, said everyone was so focused on the future, they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t notice when things went out of balance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think our marriages suffered,â&#x20AC;? Yetton said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t speak for John Paul, but I know Joy and my marriage suffered. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always been very close, but we had to really reconnect.â&#x20AC;?

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, July 9, 2013

SPORTS

Sports Editor Steven Cook scook21@utk.edu

Summer recruiting victories deserve fan appreciation

David Cobb Staff Writer The anticipation was killer. To which university would Dillon Bates make his verbal commitment? For the last several months, Bates - a highly touted linebacker prospect - has had Tennessee fans begging him to don orange and follow in the footsteps of his father Bill Bates, who’s something of a Tennessee legend himself. To many Vol diehards who follow recruiting, the high school senior’s live decision Wednesday on ESPNU might have been as important to watch as November’s presidential election. Then the anticipation got a little too killer. The ridiculous made-for-media 7-on-7 touch football games that were scheduled around the televised verbal commitments of teenagers drug on. Nobody cared if the Alpha Males beat the Land Sharks. Everyone just wanted to know which cap Dillon Bates was going to put on. In the process though, as I Twitter searched “Dillon Bates,” I began to savor the moment. Because in that moment the UT fan base had a battle to fight and they were fighting it with reasonable expectation of victory. “I have been to the OR and had open heart surgery

while waiting on ESPNU to show Dillon Bates. If they don’t hurry I’m going to flatline,” wrote one Twitter user. “Hellen Keller solved a rubix cube while waiting for the Dillon Bates announcement #DillonBatesDay,” tweeted another UT fan. In early July, Tennessee fans had something to legitimately be excited about. They went up against Alabama and Florida and actually won for a change as Bates finally made his verbal commitment to UT. No, nothing has been decided on the field yet. But that’s exactly my point. Tennessee fans should savor these next several weeks before the season, not count down until it kicks off like the rest of the nation is doing. Next week at SEC Media Days, the Vols will take a turn on the podium just like Nick Saban and Alabama, just like Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel and just like a team that has college football relevance. In fact, UT will get more attention than it should because it has a first-year head coach. Savor that. Eat up his every word. Go look at the national recruiting rankings every day for the class of 2014. Purchase all of the college football preview magazines out there, and read about how UT’s offensive line has been predestined to be one of the best in the nation. Don’t let that same frustration of waiting for Dillon Bates to make his decision prevail during July and August in anticipation of the upcoming season.

Tennessee won the Dillon Bates battle and it’ll get the same result from SEC Media Days that Florida and Alabama do. Cherish the essentially meaningless build-ups to the season. Because once the season actually starts on Sept. 14 at Oregon, or maybe even the week before that against Bobby Petrino’s Western Kentucky squad, the seemingly endless days of waiting for the return of football will culminate in a frightening way. The Vols will have to try and put an SEC-caliber team on the field with a new coaching staff, a new quarterback and a host of returning starters from one of the nation’s worst defenses. Certainly it’s okay to yearn to hear Rocky Top and to long for Saturday tailgates. But once that day arrives and the traditions and revelry give way to a real football game, Tennessee fans might find themselves wishing they were watching high school kids play 7-on-7. So, please. Don’t flatline with anticipation for the regular season. Just enjoy the fact that your team gets to be “one of the guys” for the next few weeks. And maybe a couple years down the road – once Dillon Bates and his classmates have arrived and adjusted – Tennessee fans can flatline in anticipation of nationally relevant football. David Cobb is a rising junior in journalism and electronic media. He may be reached at dcobb3@utk.edu.

Prized recruit withdraws from UT

• Photo courtesy of UT Athletics

Staff Report Highly-touted incoming freshman guard Jannah Tucker will not be joining the Tennessee Lady Volunteers basketball squad after all. Head coach Holly Warlick announced in a UT press release that Tucker won’t enroll at the University of Tennessee “due to personal reasons.” According to the Knoxville News Sentinel, Warlick isn’t sure what happened with Tucker, who is ranked as the eighth-best player in the 2013 class by ESPN. “I don’t know what’s going on with her; I don’t have an explanation,” Warlick told the News Sentinel. “She’s dealing with some personal issues and I don’t know what they’re about.” Lady Vols assistant coach Dean Lockwood also told the News Sentinel there hadn’t been any mention of other schools from Tucker. He also stated that she had been in contact with other assistant coaches in the last few weeks about attending summer school. Efforts made Sunday by the News Sentinel to reach Tucker and her father, Robert, were unsuccessful. Tucker rounded out a three-player class alongside 6-foot-6 forward Mercedes Russell and Jordan Reynolds. Both Russell and Reynolds are already

enrolled in the second session of summer classes, which began on Monday. The Lady Vols’ class was ranked by ESPN as the third-best in the nation behind Duke and North Carolina, numbers that are sure to be altered in the wake of Tucker’s decision to not enroll at the university. Tucker’s departure reduces the Lady Vols’ 201314 roster to just 10 players. The 6-foot guard is from Randallstown, Md., and played her high-school ball at New Town High School. After a stellar three years where she averaged nearly 30 points per game, Tucker became one of the most talked-about recruits nationally. As a sophomore, she nearly averaged a triple-double with 26.2 points, 12 rebounds and eight steals per game. However, she would miss her senior season with a knee injury. Tucker has competed internationally for the United States at both the U-16 and U-18 level. In 2011, she won gold at the 2011 FIBA Americas U-16 championship before doing the same in 2012 with the U-18 team. Sunday’s news is the second departure Warlick has seen since the end of the season. Guard Jasmine Phillips left UT in the hopes of securing more playing time at a different school.

Stokes nets another gold for US Staff Report Tennessee basketball player Jarnell Stokes is a FIBA gold medalist for the second straight summer, as his USA Basketball Men’s Junior National Team defeated a talented Serbia squad 82-68 Sunday at the 2013 FIBA U19 World Championship at O2 Arena in Prague, Czech Republic. The U.S. led by just six points at the end of the third quarter but exploded in the fourth, outscoring the Serbs 25-17 over the final 10 minutes. Just last summer, Stokes and several of his teammates from this current U.S. squad captured U18 gold at the 2012 FIBA Americas Championship in Brazil. “It’s surreal to be able to win

another gold knowing where I came from,” Stokes said. “I was blessed to be able to start for this team, and I’m honored to win the gold not only for the whole state of Tennessee but for the entire country.” Stokes is just the third Vol ever to capture multiple gold medals in sanctioned international competition. Former AllAmerican Ernie Grunfeld won gold at the 1975 Pan American Games and the 1976 Olympic Games. And UT’s all-time leading scorer, Allan Houston, earned three international gold medals: 1990 U18 FIBA Americas Championship, 1999 Tournament of the Americas, 2000 Olympic Games. “I’m really happy for Jarnell,” Tennessee head coach Cuonzo Martin said. “This makes two

straight years that he’s had the chance to compete against the best in the world in his age group. The experience he’s gained with USA Basketball has made him a better player, and he’s going to be one of the best returning big men in the college game. “I also want to congratulate the USA Basketball organization and (USA U19 head coach) Billy Donovan on a great tournament.” With Sunday’s victory, the United States is now the reigning FIBA world champion in every age classification (U17, U19, Senior); the Americans had previously failed to capture U19 gold since 1999. Stokes scored four points and hauled in four rebounds in 14 minutes played Sunday. The rising junior from Memphis, Tenn., started all nine game for undefeated Team USA at the championship. He averaged 7.2 points and 4.6 rebounds while playing 12.7 minutes per contest. Stokes also grabbed 2.1 offensive rebounds per game and totaled six steals. During their time in Prague, the Americans owned a 39.6point average margin of victory. They posted wins over Ivory Coast, China, Russia, Brazil, Australia, Serbia (twice), Canada and Lithuania. USA Basketball’s men’s teams are now 78-13 in the U19/Junior World Championships and have won five gold and three silver medals. Lithuania defeated Australia in Sunday’s bronze-medal game.


07 09 13  

The editorially independent student newspaper of the University of Tennessee.

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