Page 1

Issue 04, Volume 123

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

One Stop offers customer service for enrollment, registration, financial aid and payment needs. The high-tech express center is on the ground floor of John C. Hodges Library and is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

‘One Stop’ bundles student services to provide convenience R.J. Vogt Managing Editor UT opened One Stop Express Student Services Monday afternoon, bringing orange pillars of glowing light into Hodges Library to efficiently guide students on common campus problems. Located on the ground floor of Hodges, the newest addition to campus consolidates the Financial Aid Office, Bursar’s Office and Registrar into one central and especially well-lit location. Amidst four self-service kiosks, six modern chic desk locations and two flat screen televisions, cross-trained counselors like Taylor Shields hope to eradicate the infamous “Big Orange Screw.” “Instead of calling the bursar’s office and having to be transferred to the registrar’s office and finding out you were originally supposed

to be in the financial aid office, you can just come here and we’ll take care of you,” Shields said. The program has been in planning stages since the beginning of Chancellor Cheek’s Top 25 initiative and has been spreading from campus to campus across the nation. There are currently One Stop centers at Texas A&M University, the University of Minnesota, the University of Cincinnati and Abilene Christian University, among others. UT’s One Stop director, Darren Curry, came from ACU after seeing the job listed in January 2012. He said one of the priorities of One Stop is to head off problems before they start. “If we can identify those students who will need our services on payment due date, we can … begin helping them and encouraging them to complete some steps,” Curry said. “Whatever happens can happen more efficiently and quickly, and they don’t have to be

Victoria Wright

The Associated Press

He said increased use of pesticides is decreasing areas for wild honeybees roam, and chemicals inside the hive are affecting bees lives over the long term. “It’s just a whole raft of things that bees rather not deal with,” Stovall said. It’s the weather, too. Stovall said increased rain this spring has an affect on bee behavior. When flowers begin to bloom, bees emerge from their hive and begin making honey from the nectar and using the pollen for food. When it becomes cold inside the hive, bees begin to cluster to protect the queen, the only one who lays eggs. “At sometime around 55 degrees, if it gets warmer than that, they tend to break out of their cluster,” Stovall said. “Wind affects bees too by making it difficult to fly.” Bees are also susceptible to

Honeybees are dying, but scientists have yet to pinpoint why the insect population is decimating nationwide. According to a report by the United States Department of Agriculture regarding Colony– Collapse Disorder, about a third of the honeybee population has died from this past winter. Recreational beekeeper and journalism and electronic media professor Jim Stovall said that the reason behind the dying bees is not one culprit, but a myriad of possibilities. “We don’t have a good environment and we don’t treat bees very well,” Stovall said. He has been beekeeping since 2007 and said that this particular year, the loss has been especially detrimental for commercial beekeepers who keep the insects for profit by using them for agricultural purposes. See BEES on Page 2

See ONE STOP on Page 2

U.S. faces critics

Bee numbers fall, baffle experts Editor-in-Chief

stressed out on due date.” When campus activity ramps up near the start of the fall semester, both Shields and Curry predict a busy August for One Stop. But thanks to a technologically savvy queue system, Shields said students will barely have to wait. “You can actually check online on the One Stop website before you even come to the library to see how long the queue is,” Shields said. “Then, when you check in, you can go print a paper or do some edits and we’ll send you an email when it’s getting close to your turn so you don’t have to stand and wait. “We’re trying to make it not such a burden; all UT students know that the lines at the bursar and financial aid office when school starts are insane.”

• Photo courtesy of Jim Stovall

Germany’s chancellor will raise the issue of the U.S. National Security Agency’s eavesdropping on European communications when she meets President Barack Obama here next week — the latest sign of the international backlash over America’s sweeping electronic surveillance programs. Obama has defended the once-secret programs that sweep up to an estimated 3 billion phone calls a day and amass Internet data from U.S. providers, saying they are a necessary defense against terrorism. He assured Americans on Friday that “nobody is listening to your telephone calls.” That has given little assurance to Germans and other foreigners, who routinely use U.S.-based Internet sites for voice and data communications. European nations often have much stricter privacy laws than those in the U.S., and their citizens defend those privacy rights with more vigor. In Brussels, senior European See GERMANY on Page 2 Union officials said they would

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also question their American counterparts about the impact of such programs on the privacy of EU citizens during a transAtlantic ministerial meeting in Dublin starting Thursday. German government spokesman Steffen Seibert told reporters on Monday that Chancellor Angela Merkel would question Obama about the National Security Agency program when he’s in Berlin on June 18 for his first visit to the German capital as U.S. president. The issue could tarnish a visit that both sides had hoped would reaffirm strong German-American ties. Germany’s Interior Ministry said it had already been in contact with U.S. officials to determine whether there had been any infringement of German citizens’ privacy — considered an almost-sacred right in a country with a history of deep privacy infringements under Nazi and East German governments. In London, British Foreign Secretary William Hague sought to assure Parliament that allegations that the British

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Check out the Knoxville Watercolor Society on Page 5

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Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon


2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

CAMPUS NEWS

News Editor RJ Vogt

rvogt@utk.edu

Around Rocky Top

Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

The University of Tennessee Medical Center’s Mobile Mammography Unit has been offering breast cancer screenings since the late 1980s to women who may not otherwise have access.

GERMANY continued from Page 1 government had used information provided by the Americans to circumvent British laws were “baseless.” “Our agencies practice and uphold U.K. law at all times,” he said, “even when dealing with information from outside the U.K.” NSA’s capability to monitor a vast array of international communications is a product of the Cold War, when the agency used monitoring sites in Germany, Britain and other countries to spy on communications within the Soviet Union and its East European allies. Ironically, one of the most important sites was located on German soil. The site, known as Teufelsberg or “Devil’s Mountain,” sat atop an artificial hill in West Berlin until the facility was closed after the reunification of Germany. Since the end of the Cold War, questions about U.S. surveillance have been raised before, most notably in the late 1990s, when the European Parliament expressed concern that the U.S.-run ECHELON

surveillance program could be used for industrial espionage directed against Europe or other countries. The German Commercial Internet Exchange, located in Frankfurt, is the world’s largest data exchange point, processing information from around the world. Even before the latest revelations, the European Commission said EU Justice Commissioner Viviane Reding had raised privacy issues with her U.S. counterparts in April. “This case shows that a clear legal framework for the protection of personal data is not a luxury or constraint, but a fundamental right,” Reding said Monday in a reaction to the revelations. On Tuesday, the European Parliament will discuss the revelations with the European Commission, the 27-nation bloc’s executive arm. “We have always been firm on data protection within the EU and when negotiating with third countries, including the U.S.,” said caucus leader Guy Verhofstadt of the Alde group of liberal parties. “It would be unacceptable and would need swift action from the EU, if indeed the U.S. National

BEES continued from Page 1 pests, such as the varroa mite. These pest burrow inside the hive and deform the bees, and if the infestation is severe enough, the organisms can kill an entire hive. Stovall said beekeepers have to manage varroa, but almost every hive in America is infested with the pest to some extent. “It’s something every beekeeper has to keep in mind and has to manage for,” Stovall said. “It doesn’t mean every hive is going to die.” President of the Knoxville Beekeepers Association Ben Volk said illness plays a role as well. “(There are) all of these other diseases that can also decimate

Security Agency were processing European data without permission.” In Germany, privacy regulations are especially strict. Three years ago Germany’s top court overturned a law that would have required telecommunications providers to routinely store users’ connection data and provide it to the security services upon request. The court said that this would enable massive ‘fishing expeditions’ among innocent citizens’ private data. Parliament is now discussing a revision of the law. A panel of jurists must decide each time the German security services request a wiretap of an individual’s communications, making mass surveillance measures virtually impossible. Germany’s foreign intelligence service BND is allowed to do spot checks on foreign communications, which are then filtered using keywords. If a keyword appears, the call or email is recorded. A German court ruled that while the practice is constitutional, the individuals affected should be informed in a timely fashion that their messages had been intercepted.

ONE STEP continued from Page 1

Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

One Stop uses a interactive waiting queue to cut down on waiting time. Students can log in at the kiosk and leave, receiving an email to their student email address when a spot is almost available.

colonies,” Volk said. “It’s not just the mites themselves that can wipe out the colony; they also carry diseases with them.This year the average loss rate in Tennessee was 60 percent. Several beekeepers lost 100 percent of their colonies.” At Saturday’s Farmer’s Market in Market Square, Volk was offering his locally grown honey for $6 a jar. He said he lost about 10 percent of his bee population. “I consider myself extremely lucky,” he said. “One of the things that I think helped me is that all of my bees come from feral colonies that I captured either from swarms or they made a colony in somebody’s house... the hybrid genetics tend to be more vigorous than the purebred genetics.” The declining bee population is also affecting agriculture, particularly the cultivation of almonds. All almond trees are pollinated by honeybees, which are shipped to farms by commercial bees keepers and used to grow the nuts for a three-week period. At the

Shields also explained that the process is intended to teach students how to solve problems rather than simply solving them. Using swiveling computer screens and completely wireless keyboards, he demonstrated that the student sitting across from the counselor can bring up his or myUTK and point out the issues. “You can show me what you’re talking about, and I can show you how you need to get to where you need to be,” Shields said. “So that way, you’re getting help and you can go home and you don’t have to come back.” Although the program is available to all UT students, freshman may stand the most to gain from a program that simplifies the bewildering experience of college’s first semester. Curry and Shields indicated that they hear from many freshmen who say they don’t know where to start. “We just wanted a central location where students could have someone they could go to,” Shields said. One Stop is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. More information, including the length of the queue and important dates and deadlines, can be found at onestop.utk.edu.

end of this cycle, Stovall said the bees are left in an area without a food source, yet another reason that could be contributing to the dying bee population. Will Barbour, junior in biosystems engineering, said using bees as a means to produce a singular product is only hurting the environment further. “Pollination by bees is one of the principle means by which monoculture crops reproduce in an agricultural setting,” Barbour said. “This setting, however, is not conducive to the sustained bee population, especially at the concentration necessary for large-scale agriculture. This limitation on viable habitat, in conjunction with pesticide overuse and disease, is having a major impact on populations.” “All of this (CCD effects) is going to make beekeeping very difficult,” Stovall said. “It was a very different environment 20, 30 years ago. Compared to today, it was very easy to keep bees.”


Tuesday, June 11, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 3

ARTS & CULTURE

Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan merdogan@utk.edu

Series expresses identity with fashion

Samantha Coley Staff Writer

Last Thursday marked a milestone in television history. Thursday, June 6, was the 15th anniversary of the first airing of Sex and the City on HBO. The show has been an incredibly important series for all women. With it’s ease and comfort in discussing privy subjects, the show allowed for experimentation in a more creative stance: style. The style developed around each character for their particular qualities created a new dimension in which style, for females, became the most essential form of expression. The star of the show, Carrie Bradshaw, was made iconic by the one Sarah Jessica Parker. Her favorite style indulgence throughout the series remained shoes, as she was often seen walking around New York City in her Manolo Blahniks. Since that was her signature piece, Bradshaw inspired many women to follow suit and spend more time thinking about the form and appearance of shoes. Additionally, it made shoe designers like Christian Louboutin and Manolo Blahnik all the more well-known, with their pieces even more coveted than what they had been before. Yes, Bradshaw usually dressed in designer clothing that is beyond the budget of the majority of working-women, but she would sometimes wear a simple shirt with any type of bottom. Her ability to make any piece look great, in which she adapted it to her infamous style, is another reason why Carrie Bradshaw became a character that any one could relate to. Bradshaw always put together pieces that women would normally shy away from, as well, which made her unique and stand out as an individual, only establishing her personal style even more. Samantha Jones, the most scandalous character on the show, portrayed fashion as a way to display one’s sexuality and power. In early episodes of the series, she wore tailored suits that were structured and also dipped very low to show cleavage, which showed her un-shy nature while being a business woman in the public relations industry. Her suits would show

her powerful side, then the cleavage would show her comfort with her sexuality, another way she empowered herself. Jones insisted throughout the show that sex was power and exemplified this through the way she dresses. Charlotte York was the prim and proper character of the show, who’s only concern was hosting a perfect wedding to a perfect husband and thus creating a perfect family. Her fashion was that of a wasp; she dressed in clothing with clean lines and light colors, comparable to preppy 90s fashions. While she was not exactly innocent, her clothing portrayed an innocence that contrasted with the other women. Although it reflected her personality, like the other women, her style also portrayed what many people think of when they think of a typical housewife-to-be. A stereotypical housewife dresses simply, and does not put her sexuality out in the open, as did Samantha. York went against the argument that fashion can and should be an experiment. Miranda Hobbes, out of the four, was the most serious and cynical character. Her style tended to be all over the place, from men’s suits that weren’t tailored to sweatpants and t-shirts once she gave birth. Obviously fashion is not the first thing to come to mind when one has a baby, but she looked horrible through the first year her son was born, which showed how much the costume designers invested in detail towards the wear of each character. Miranda never seemed to care what she looked like through the series, which portrays many women nowadays. Women use excuses like they have a full time job or they have children to not look their best, when there’s always time to put an outfit together. Of course, just going to the grocery store is not time to put on the ball gown, but when going to the office or out for a play date with friends, there are plenty of easy looks that will make anyone feel their best, which Miranda may have benefited from. Sex and the City opened up many people’s eyes to life in New York City, where there are public conversations about sex and relationships and how to deal with both. With it’s narrative aside, the show proved to be an example of how fashion surrounds women’s lives and how it shapes who we are as people. Fashion is a form of expression which allows men and women to present themselves in a way that they chose and in turn, how they want to be seen. As evident through Sam, Miranda, Charlotte and Carrie, a person’s style can fluctuate while still representing who they are as individuals.

Clinton picks up followers after joining social media The Associated Press Twitter, meet @ HillaryClinton. Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton joined Twitter on Monday, describing herself with a dash of humor as a “pantsuit aficionado” and a “hair icon.” The former New York senator and first lady sent out her first tweet under the handle (at)HillaryClinton, thanking the creators of the popular online parodies called “Texts from Hillary.” Clinton’s initial tweet thanked Adam Smith and Stacy Lambe for their inspiration and said, “I’ll take it from here,” concluding with a hashtag (hash)tweetsfromhillary. The potential 2016 presidential candidate’s profile page on the microblogging service shows the memorable photo of a stern-looking Clinton wearing dark sunglasses and reading her Blackberry aboard a military plane while leading the

State Department during President Barack Obama’s first term. The photo was made popular by Smith and Lambe’s buzzworthy Tumblr, which won laughs and rave reviews by pairing the photo of the sunglasseswearing Clinton with other politicians and imaginary text messages between world leaders. Clinton’s biography section includes light-hearted descriptions such as “hair icon,” ‘’pantsuit aficionado,” and “glass ceiling cracker.” The bio ends with the letters “TBD,” meaning, “to be determined”_which could be a reference to her potential White House bid. After only a few hours, Clinton had racked up more than 100,000 followers. Twitter quickly opened up the cyber welcome mat for Clinton. Former President Bill Clinton, who joined Twitter in April after some nudging from comedian Stephen Colbert, welcomed his wife, asking, “Does (at) Twitter have a family share plan?” Daughter Chelsea Clinton retweeted her moth-

er’s first tweet and added, “Welcome Mom!” Supporters and opponents alike tweeted out messages to her handle, with some encouraging her to run for president. Well-wishers included several politicians, talk show host Larry King, Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey, country music star Chely Wright and actor Ben Affleck. Rocker Tommy Lee tweeted, “Welcome to Tweeeeeeeeter Hillary!” Obama’s Twitter account said the president was “happy” to welcome Clinton to Twitter. “Stay tuned for the real hashtag(hash) TweetsFromHillary,” the president told his 32 million followers. Twitter could become an effective medium for Clinton, who has kept a relatively low profile since departing the State Department earlier this year. Obama used Twitter throughout his re-election campaign to connect with his millions of followers and urge them to support his campaign.

• Photo courtesy of rottentomatoes.com

Smith family movie fails to find identity, developed plot Cortney Roark Contributor Take Will Smith, add the apple of his eye and throw in a little direction from M. Night Shyamalan. This should have given Hollywood a major blockbuster, but instead the audience was left with a less than nerve-wracking, sappy father-son story. “After Earth” could end up being the disappointment of the summer, so far. Will Smith and wife, Jada Pinkett Smith, were credited with writing the story, which could explain the cheesiness of it. It seems as though Jada wanted to make a less impressive version of The Pursuit of Happyness and Will wanted to make an action, sci-fi film to brag about his son almost reaching puberty. It’s hard to tell if “After Earth” is a sci-fi film with too much mush, or a nice, family film with too much blood. The issue with this film starts at the beginning where the already muddled plot was doomed to underdevelopment throughout. Jaden Smith, Will and Jada’s real son, plays Kitai Raige and begins the film with a short narration explaining why the human race evacuated Earth and now lives on another planet. It could have been the extreme rushed feeling of this narration, or the actor’s odd, misplaced southern accent, that left the audience even more confused than before. For the people who could not care less about a plot and simply want to see Will Smith killing aliens, circa his “Men in Black” days, that element was nonexistent. Will’s character, Cypher, is injured the entire film. Can Jaden save the movie and give the audience quality action scenes? If a quality action scene involves running away and telling CGI new-Earth animals

to leave him alone, then yes, he saves the movie. The underdevelopment of the plot, as well as the lack of face-to-face interaction between the two lead characters, makes it difficult to produce character development. It is clear that Kitai and Cypher have issues, but it is hard for the audience to see any depth to this since Kitai is constantly running and Cypher is half dead. An effort to develop the story is made through the use of flashbacks, but this also falls short. These flashbacks introduce an unnecessary sister, who is supposed to be the root of the family issues. With such short flashbacks, the audience does not have time to get to know the sister in order to understand the entire plot. The creative design of “After Earth” was also subpar. This film takes place on Earth hundreds of years after human evacuation; this had enormous creative potential. However, the only differences between Earth today and future Earth were pigs with stripes, bigger birds and every animal has, conveniently, evolved to kill humans. The fact that these animals have evolved so fast, but Earth’s landscape and plant life looks exactly the same makes the whole concept very unbelievable. There was an empty canvas of imaginative opportunity with this film, and the best thing to look at ended up being the magically color-changing costumes the actors wore. “After Earth” may be the film to bring M. Night Shyamalan’s once promising directing career down a few notches. As for Will Smith? Well, he’s still Will Smith. Jaden Smith is still the son of Will Smith. These two may have wasted a lot of promoting time, but at least they gained some good father-son time, which seems to be the point of “After Earth” as a whole. Jada should be well pleased with this one.


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, June 11, 2013 Editor-in-Chief Victoria Wright

OPINIONS

vwright6@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Editor’s Note

Student loans need reform now Victoria Wright Editor-in-Chief

It’s kind of funny, really, in a sad, cynical sort of way. The humorless joke I’m speaking about here is the ever-growing student loan reform argument that’s ironically heating up again after a new class of college graduates set off into the world. With the student loan debt hitting a monstrous $1.1 trillion and an interest rate set to increase from 3.4 to 6.8 percent on July 1 unless action is taken, it’s getting harder to see the image of a young, ambitious college graduate can have their world as their oyster. And student loan debt is hindering economic growth. With recent graduates withholding home purchases, business start-ups and investments, the economy is struggling to move forward. There’s no huge fix for it right now. Current talks surrounding the issue revolve only on preventing interest rates from rising, but there’s no bail out system for someone attempting to fund their higher education. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Massachusetts, did propose legislation that would give students a similar deal to the Wall Street honchos, which would surely have many young graduates shouting for joy. But there’s no guarantee that policy will pass through the combative House. Then there’s the bill proposed that would allow students to refinance their old loans through a bill titled the Student Loan Fairness Act. Under the bill, students would be able to make 10 years of payments at 10 percent of their discretionary income. After that term, all standing debt would be forgiven. The act would also allow graduates who are eligible to convert their private loans to federal direct loans. But let’s discuss how this all transpired in the first place. In a culture that nurtures the idea of

higher education to lead to a “dream” job and a better means of living, wouldn’t it go hand and hand with more support? There’s plenty of talk at various graduations advising young hopefuls to be ambitious and push through the trials to persevere and be the people they are told to emulate. Too much at one time? That’s okay. We are also a nation that fosters an idea of independence and personal resolve. A sort of selfrighteous attitude that supports people moving at their own pace and relinquishing any ideas they have about others. There’s no more trying to keep up with the Joneses—we’re too smart, too independent, too innovative for that, right? So we grow a generation of millennial over-achievers who are also brilliant individualists, but fail to support them in their goals. Who’s to blame here? Should our policies reflect our changing culture so that the needs of the public are properly met? That seems to make the best sense—no opposition here. Who would have a problem with bail outs or refinancing debts that we only brought upon ourselves? Would there really be an operation-Wall Street scandal brought upon the young millenials? Picture the baby boomers throwing up signs and standing outside of apartments in hip neighborhoods shouting “you should have been more responsible!” I’m not for a nation of withdrawing people’s hopes and dreams, but we also can’t create a certain ideal only to let people leap without any sort of trampoline under to catch them. If we are going to bail out individuals because of selfish spending habits, then we should be open to bailing out young graduates who were simply attempting to better themselves because we as a country told them so. If the interest rate does increase and there is no reform on the student loan crisis, please refrain from sharing stories at college graduation of keeping on those handy pair rose-colored glasses. It’s only more salt in the wound. Victoria Wright senior in journalism and may be reached at vwright6@utk.edu.

What the Duck • Aaron Johnson

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • Hilary Price

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Surveillence destroys national trust Gauging Your Interests by

Gage Arnold We’re being watched. Not to sound spooky, but with the interconnectivity of the world via the internet and cell phones galore, it’s not inconceivable that your tablet, smart phone or laptop will be documenting your viewing of this very column. Why did I start off with such a creepy point? Well, I’m glad you asked. The Washington Post reported this week that the National Security Agency and the FBI “are tapping directly into the central servers of nine leading U.S. Internet companies, extracting audio and video chats, photographs, emails, documents, and connection logs that enable analysts to track foreign targets.” If that’s not enough to get your cynicism against the U.S. government flowing then allow me to continue. Who are some of these “companies” listed in the report you may wonder? None other than AOL, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, YouTube and Yahoo. For some U.S. citizens, those sites above may service a vast majority of their internet usage. Point being, by looking at just these select few sites, you can probably tell a lot about a person. The Beacon ran a story in their last issue on June 7 about the importance of the video hub YouTube. According to one student in the article, “you can tell a lot about a person by what they watch on YouTube” according to one quote from a UT student.” There’s not a shadow of a doubt that internet histories of individuals can serve as a sans-biography of a person because of the openness that is delivered through the world wide web. But why are people being “spied on” and having their personal information available to unwanted eyes? According to government officials with knowledge of the situation, the goal of these sweeps is to clamp a tighter lock down on terrorism. Not to discount the goal of these sweeps

because I’m sure they are productive, but examples like this qualify as public relations nightmares for the U.S. government, which is already clawing and scratching for approval numbers. The issue is that many already have a struggle with trusting the U.S. government, and this seemingly compounds on those who already had distrust in the inner-workings of the government while pushing any fence riders solely over the edge to a stymied anti-government sentiment. In reality, the overall implications felt from these “research numbers” being taken will honestly not be seen, but that doesn’t mean others will soon forget about it the next time they log-on for a slightly embarrassing Google search or consider uploading a slew of risqué photos to Facebook. For example, let’s investigate the hypothetical story of Jimmy and Dr. Blake. Jimmy worked as an assistant to Dr. Blake in his small-town practice for years, learning Dr. Blake’s habits and perfecting exactly how Dr. Blake prefers his setup. Dr. Blake loved Jimmy as a son and likewise, Jimmy saw Dr. Blake as a father-type figure. But one day, as Jimmy was locking up the office, as he always does, Jimmy swiped a pen set from the doctors desk since it merely collected dust and Jimmy was short on cash for the month. After a week the doctor took notice, and upon realizing it could only be Jimmy, he stripped Jimmy of his freedom in the office. Multiple years of dedication are now gone and forgotten in an instant. This is where our point takes on reality. National Security takes precedence over a lot of things, but where is the line drawn? Will American’s be so scared of revealing information through a phone or laptop that face-to-face communication becomes the only safe way to converse without documentation? Probably not, but it’s not the craziest thought you’ve ever heard. Point being, trust takes years to build and seconds to tear down. If the government wants its people to follow them diligently, then a trip down to Home Depot with an effort made on reconstructing the shambled trust between its citizens might be a wise choice. Gage Arnold is a junior in journalism and may be reached at garnold@utk.edu

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The Daily Beacon is published by students at The University of Tennessee Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters and Tuesday and Friday during the summer semester. The offices are located at 1340 Circle Park Drive, 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The newspaper is free on campus and is available via mail subscription for $200/year, $100/semester or $70/summer only. It is also available online at: www.utdailybeacon.com. LETTERS POLICY: The Daily Beacon welcomes all letters to the editor and guest columns from students, faculty and staff. Each submission is considered for publication by the editor on the basis of space, timeliness and clarity. Contributions must include the author’s name and phone number for verification. Students must include their year in school and major. Letters to the editor and guest columns may be e-mailed to letters@utdailybeacon.com or sent to Blair Kuykendall, 1340 Circle Park Dr., 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The Beacon reserves the right to reject any submissions or edit all copy in compliance with available space, editorial policy and style. Any and all submissions to the above recipients are subject to publication.

Rising- Warm weather Yes, it is summer. And warmer weather means more opportunities to get out into the world and actually experience something in nature. Global climate change is creating unpredictable weather patterns -- okay, let’s be honest, weather patterns were always unpredictable -- but it’s still nice to enjoy what we haven’t destroyed of Mother Nature. Grab a frisbee or a puppy or a tree and your hammock and work on the Vitamin D. Pale is probably not the summer color you’ve been looking for. And besides, it’s not like you are very likely to get stung by a bee these days (see page one). Rising- iPhone satisfaction Apple announced their new iOS7 software Monday, jam-packed with new features ranging from Instagram inspired filters on the camera to sleeker, sharper typography and icons. Apple also announced that battery life has been improved for its newer models of MacBook Air laptops, which could make many commuters happy. The new update promises to make all the iPhone users in the land even more glad to read their iMessages in blue. Rising- Time between dentist visits That is, if you’re flossing and brushing your teeth sufficiently. A new study published Monday in The Journal of Dental Research found that the number of dental visits should reflect the current health of your teeth. So for those who aren’t having many issues such as bleeding gums, sore teeth, or other ailments, skipping out on the dreaded dental chair for a bit longer may not be a big deal. Those of you who notice a UT orange hue to your molars, though, might need to get that checked.

Falling- Every Throning heart “Game of Thrones,” the popular HBO show, adapted from George R.R. Martin’s legendary fantasy series “A Song of Ice and Fire,” has ended its raved-about third season, leaving many fans in tears and others in fits of rage. Regardless of the plot twists, the true spotlighted theme here is how the show transcended social groups and created a new cult classic that will continue to create conversation. Readers of the books know that next season promises more violence and nudity, the key ingredients to the HBO recipe of success (see: every other HBO series). Falling- iPhone satisfaction While the popularity of the new software will be fleeting, reality starts to set in when the technological errors start to pop-up. Calibration issues and configuration problems are the usual qualms echoed by those who download the new software. Be prepared for the inevitable overload when you Tap to Tweet and your screen goes black. That one friend with a flip phone will inevitably laugh at you, but remember, at least you don’t still have a flip phone. Falling- Our idea of privacy With the recent uproar surrounding government phone tapping and Internet surveillance, it might not be a good idea to tell So-and-So on Facebook about that hook-up last night. Chances are, John Brennan may not approve. Coupled with summer’s earlier revelation that a journalist’s phone records can be secretly seized by the Department of Justice, Uncle Sam is beginning to look a lot like Peeping Tom’s Big Brother. Keep your secret correspondence to carrier ravens and squires.


Tuesday, June 11, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 5

ARTS & CULTURE

Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan merdogan@utk.edu

Around Rocky Top

Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

Max Robinson’s painting hangs in UT’s Downtown Gallery as a part of the 50th Anniversary Watercolor show, which was organized by the Knoxville Watercolor Society.

Art society celebrates Golden Anniversary Melodi Erdogan Arts & Culture Editor

The Knoxville Watercolor Society celebrated its 50-year anniversary Friday, June 7, with a collection of pieces shown at UT’s Downtown Gallery. Fifty-one watercolor pieces hang on the walls of the South Gay Street gallery, including artwork from 12 original members of the society. The late Kermit “Buck� Ewing created the UT Art Department in 1955 and held the Head position at the time of the society’s birthing, more than 50 years ago. Ewing, of the Ewing gallery in the Art & Architecture building, held a watercolor painting reception for local artists and noticed a dearth of artistic groups in the community. Since there was an abundance of artists interested in the water-based form of painting, KWS emerged. “It (used to be) a much more informal group, but it was a group of really talented artists, whereas now we are mainly artists that are a part of the community,� said Max Robinson, current KWS president who joined the society three years ago. “The basis came from all the work that those people did and it has evolved to members doing things today which you see in this show.� Director of the gallery Mike C. Berry is part of the UT Art Faculty as model/exhibit curator. Familiar with Ewing’s work, Berry said he enjoyed the diversity of watercolor and abstract pieces in the show. “A lot of the charter members that started 50 years ago are long time professors that I am familiar with their work just because we have it in our collection at UT, so it’s neat to see it all,� Berry said, who is a fellow artist himself. “We have a couple of Buck Ewing’s . . . so it’s really neat to these old guys who are the founders of the society, and then I see some of my contemporaries and people that I paint with as an artists and their work around here. “For me, it’s a nice blend of all subject matters and different artistic visions coming together. You’ve got some realist, traditional watercolor and then some very expressive, abstract stuff that is very beautiful stuff. There’s something here for everybody’s taste.� Knoxville, along with many other cities across the nation, actively participates in the First Friday tradition. Local musicians and artists perform and/or show their work downtown, attracting locals to the city. “I hit this gallery up first because I know that

they have good snacks and I was really thirsty and really hungry,â€? said Sara Daniels, a rising senior in studio art and a regular First Friday participant. “I’ve seen really goods shows here before, and 1010 is across the street so I meandered over here. I’m going to every gallery I can tonight.â€? The Downtown Gallery normally holds exhibitions that have pieces within the 30-40 count range. As the director of the gallery, Berry also designed and hung the exhibition. “Really, with any show, you take in consideration color and subject, but a lot of the times I just like to create a good rhythm of dark and light framed things ‌ just to create a rhythm so it’s not a corner of big things and another corner of small things,â€? Berry said. “(The pieces are) usually on the floor and I spent two or three hours just crisscrossing the room and saying, ‘No, that doesn’t work.’ Most of it is intuitive, where I look for those patterns of dark and light size so this one was pretty easy but it took a lot of time.â€? Many of the pieces exhibited in the gallery featured Knoxville locations as their subjects, including the painting “Downtown Knoxvilleâ€? by original member Robert Birdwell, “Jackson Avenue Alleyâ€? by Ann Birdwell and “Rocky Top Sunriseâ€? by Kay Yadzi. “I think all experiences are subjective and that art is just a reflection of life and how we go through life and how we think about things and I think that artists like a continuation of invention and expression and creation,â€? Daniels said of the common theme among the paintings and of the subjective perspective on art. “It’s part of the reason that I love art so much is that it’s such an individualized experience that we can all share together ... it’s kind of paradoxical in a weird kind of way.â€? Goals of the society include educating the community on the saturated form of paint, encouraging participation all across East Tennessee and providing Knoxville artists with an opportunity and experience of creating and showing watercolor art. Robinson, who once was an architect and a member of the architectural faculty at UT, said he appreciates how KWS let him broaden his horizons in the art world. “I think it’s been a good opportunity for myself to grow,â€? he said. “I wasn’t an artist to start with, but I didn’t start painting to any extent until three years ago. It’s been an opportunity to build off what’s come before me.â€? Along with participating in watercolor societies across the nation, including Watercolor USA

Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

Harley Winchester utilizes the floral background at UT Gardens to photograph Brandi Winchester, her sister, who is seven months pregnant.

that has had all of these locally famous artists within the group over all the years.� The Knoxville Watercolor Society’s Golden Anniversary Exhibition will continue through June 29 at the UT Downtown Gallery at 106 South Gay St. The gallery is open Wednesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

and the National Watercolor Society, the group is philanthropic in the Knoxville community as well. The organization annually presents a UT watercolor student with a scholarship, donates to the Ewing Gallery and makes grants to the Arts and Culture Alliance of Greater Knoxville. “I’m quite honored to be a part of it,� Robinson said. “It’s great to be included in an organization

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, June 11, 2013 Sports Editor Steven Cook

SPORTS

scook21@utk.edu

Track struggles in NCAA tournament Javelin thrower Kyle Quinn finishes just short of final round Staff Report The Tennessee Volunteers track & field team finished tied for 77th at the NCAA Outdoor Track & Field Championships. The Lady Vols did not score at the meet for the first time since 2000 as a combined 12 student-athletes competed at the University of Oregon in the four-day event. Capping off an outstanding campaign for the Tennessee pole vaulters, sophomore Tyler Porter scored a lifetime best on Wednesday night, resulting in a tie for seventh place at historic Hayward Field. The Vols filled three of the 24 pole vaulting spots, more than any other school. Despite entering the meet with a personal record of 17-feet, 5-inches (5.31-meters), Porter cleared 16-8.75 (5.10m), 17-2.75 (5.25m) and 17-8.50 (5.40m) on his first attempts, before coming up shy at 18-0.50 (5.50m). On his second attempt at 5.50m, Porter actually snapped his pole into three pieces. Finishing in a four-way tie for seventh, the Jefferson, Ga., native earned .75 points for the Volunteers on the opening day of action. With teammate Chase Brannon finishing eighth a season ago, Porter becomes just the third UT vaulter to score at the NCAA Outdoor Championships since 2002. Freshman Jake Blankenship, who entered the meet with the No. 5 mark in the NCAA, cleared 5.10m and 5.25m on his first attempts, but fell

short of the 5.25m mark to end up in a tie for 15th. Tennessee was the only team to have three vaulters in the 24-man field. On the track, the Vol 4x100-meter relay entered the meet with the sixth-fastest time (39.58s) at NCAA Regionals, but had a hiccup in the first exchange in the semifinals on Wednesday. Leadoff leg Arnez Hardnick was off to a good start out of lane six for the Vols, but the baton hit the track during the exchange with Jarael Nelvis, resulting in disqualification. Hardnick, Nelvis, Reggie Juin and Jamol Jaames - the same foursome as this season - finished seventh at last season’s NCAA Outdoor Championships. All four return for the Vols next year. The Lady Vols were unable to advance any of their three participants on Wednesday. Coming off a UT freshman record performance of 52.33 seconds at the NCAA East Preliminary meet, Felicia Brown finished 15th in the 400m in a time of 53.05. In the women’s 800m, senior Nijgia Snapp crossed the line in 2 minutes, 9.07 seconds to finish 20th overall. After recording a lifetime best mark of 20-1 (6.12m) in the long jump at the NCAA East Prelims, senior Kia Jackson closed her Tennessee career with a 24th-place finish in the event. Jackson hit 18-3.25 (5.57m) on her first attempt and fouled on her final two jumps. Jackson had a great second leap which appeared to be over 20-feet, but her foot was inches over the board. The only Tennessee track & field performer on day three, sophomore thrower Tavis Bailey placed 19th in the men’s discus competition with a mark of 177-feet, 9-inches (54.18m) on Friday. Throwing ninth in the opening heat, Bailey fouled on his opening throw of the event, stepping just outside the circle. It was the Kannapolis, N.C., native’s second throw that earned him the mark, hitting 54.18-meters. Bailey, who came in with a lifetime best throw

Saban appearance enrages Vol faithful The Associated Press Alabama coach Nick Saban’s planned appearance at a benefit event Tuesday in Tennessee shows the Crimson Tide-Volunteers rivalry is alive and well, even if it’s been onesided lately. Saban’s speech at the seventh annual Athens Area Chamber of Commerce benefit dinner is expected to attract a sellout crowd of 1,500, the largest in the event’s history. Rob Preston, the Chamber of Commerce president, calls it a boon for the local economy and notes that “probably 90 percent” of the ticket buyers are from outside McMinn County. But the decision to invite Saban to an event less than 60 miles south of the University of Tennessee’s campus has caused hard feelings in some quarters. Saban’s Alabama team has won three of the last four national titles and has beaten the Vols six straight times by an average of 23.2 points. Preston said his office had received more than 100 complaints about the Saban appearance over the last several months. Security has been beefed up for the event as a precaution, he said. “We’ve gotten emails,” Preston said. “We’ve gotten phone calls. Most of the phone calls happen at 2 o’clock in the morning or when we’re not here. They leave it on the machine.” Preston, who considers himself a Tennessee fan, said the chamber hardly received any negative feedback when another rival coach — South

Carolina’s Steve Spurrier — spoke at its first benefit dinner. “We certainly did not do this to get people upset,” Preston said. “Some people say this is a combined effort to help Alabama’s recruiting. I know to you that sounds ridiculous — and it is very ridiculous — but (some) people think that’s what this is about.” Even with all the commotion, Preston said he never had any second thoughts about inviting Saban. Preston didn’t say how much the chamber was paying for Saban’s appearance but noted that the coach was donating the entire amount to Nick’s Kids Fund, a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting children, family, teacher and student causes. Preston said people have bought $50 tickets from as far away as Florida and North Carolina. The previous record holder was actor Kirk Cameron, whose appearance sold just over 1,200 tickets. “The positives have far outweighed the negatives,” Preston said. “This is by far the biggest event that we’ll probably ever have. To bring a coach the caliber of Nick Saban to our little town is just a great thing. What it’s going to do for our local economy, it’s a great thing.” Other previous speakers at the event have included actor Lou Ferrigno, former Tennessee men’s basketball coach Bruce Pearl and retired baseball player Pete Rose. Last year, ex-Tennessee football coach Phillip Fulmer spoke with former wide receiver Peerless Price and linebacker Al Wilson in a salute to the Volunteers’ 1998 national championship team.

Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon

Tyler Porter during the Men’s Pole Vault in the 47th annual Sea Ray Relays at LaPorte Stadium and the Tom Black Track on April 13, 2013. of 196-6 (59.91m) set earlier this season, also fouled on his third and final attempt. He was the last of 24 qualifiers at the NCAA Preliminary meets. Redshirt freshman Kyle Quinn posted a top10 finish in the men’s javelin throw on Saturday. Throwing seventh in the second and final flight, Quinn eclipsed 70-meters for just the second time of his career with a mark of 229feet, 8-inches (70.01m) on his opening throw. With the top nine overall performers advancing to the finals, that mark moved the rookie into eighth place overall and second in his heat at the time. Quinn was bumped to ninth when Texas A&M’s Sam Humphreys moved into the overall

lead with a toss of 253-7 (77.31m) later in the opening round. Quinn, who won the Florida Relays this season with a lifetime best throw of 231-7 (70.59m), was unable to improve his mark in his final two attempts, leaving him on the bubble in ninth. Just two throwers after Quinn, Oregon’s Sam Crouser - who stood in 10th - hauled the javelin to 239-8 (73.07m) on his third and final attempt to burst the UT freshman’s bubble and knock him out of the final round. The Somerset, Mass., native would place 10th overall, the best finish by a Vol javelin thrower since 2007 when Matt Maloney took eighth at the NCAA meet.

MLB athletes considered guilty till proven innocent

Troy ProvostHeron Staff Writer The other day I stated that the MLB’s Bud Selig was the best commissioner in major sports. Not because I think he’s done such a magnificent job, but because I feel that he hasn’t been as bad as all the others. That opinion changed on June 4, when Selig and Major League Baseball said that they were preparing to suspend Milwaukee Brewers outfielder Ryan Braun, New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez and as many as 20 other players for their connection to the Biogenesis clinic in Miami. Maybe the fact that I have Ryan Braun on my fantasy base-

ball team doesn’t help, but I don’t think I’ve ever had so many problems with one particular sports topic. First of all, none of these players have ever failed a drug test (with the exception of Braun, whose failed test was overturned in an appeal last year), so they will basically be suspended with no proof they actually took or did anything. Even if they did, the supposed PED they took wasn’t on MLB’s banned substances list. I understand that might not make it right, but if it isn’t illegal, how were they supposed to know not to take it? All competitors are trying to find something that pushes them ahead of their opponents. It’s their nature. But Selig obviously doesn’t like that these players found a loophole. You may wonder, “If they hadn’t failed a drug test, on what grounds are they suspended?” Good question. That brings me to problem No. 2. The MLB and Selig will be basing their decisions off of a client list given to them by the doctor who ran the Biogenesis clinic, Dr. Tony

Bosch. This is the same guy who has been ducking the MLB’s investigation for five months now. But apparently a guy with credibility issues putting names on a list is enough proof to suspend players these days. But that’s not even the worst of it. The fact that Bosch isn’t even a licensed physician should make him an unreliable source. Bosch even once told ESPN: “I don’t know anything about performance-enhancing drugs.” If that isn’t enough to question his credibility, then question the way the MLB is getting him to talk–by dropping the lawsuit they placed on him and his company for providing PED’s. So in

actuality, Selig is letting a criminal off the hook so he can finish his witch-hunt. For all we know, two weeks may come and go and Braun, A-Rod and the other accused players may not even be suspended. This all could blow over once again, but I just feel that all of this seems wrong, even if they did do it. The corruption of the steroid era on the diamond has caused the MLB to corrupt itself to find these players and punish them. You were in my good graces until this point, Bud Selig. Congrats, David Stern, you win Commissioner of the Year by default.

06 11 13  

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