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Thursday, April 24, 2014

Issue 69, Volume 125

Student coalitions unite to protest tuition increases Bradi Musil Staff Writer Money doesn’t grow on trees, even in Big Orange Country. On Tuesday, Robert Naylor, representing the Progressive Student Alliance, and Nickie Hackenbrack, representing the Tennessee Student Union, met in the HSS building to discuss a potential rise in tuition cost and implore their fellow students to

take a stand. “Since 1985, tuition has increased nationally over 500 percent,” Hackenbrack, junior in biochemistry and cellular and molecular biology, said. “That’s absurd.” Naylor’s and Hackenbrack’s ultimate goal is to create a multi-student organization and administrative coalition against raised tuition prices, a group they hope could halt budget

cuts at the university and the state level that cause tuition increases. “This issue affects everyone,” Hackenbrack said. UT has experienced an average annual tuition and mandatory fees increase of 8.3 percent, according to the 2012 Tennessee Higher Education Commission Fact Book. Tuition increased from $8,396 to $9,092 in 2012-2013. UT has experi-

enced an average increase of 124.2 percent during the past 10 years. UT may see a 4-6 percent tuition increase for 2015, to be voted on at the June meeting of the Board of Trustees. Hackenbrack credited tuition increases to budgeting issues which plague Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam annually. State revenue from the corporate franchise and excise tax

fell by $215 million this year. In order to support the cost of Tennessee higher education, the burden was placed on the students, Hackenbrack said. “We don’t think that’s fair,” she said. “We think that education should be the No. 1 priority of any state, especially Tennessee.” Haslam amended his fiscal year 2015 budget to cut all new funding to public post-second-

SEE

Mandatory meal plans expected for fall 2015 INSIDE

Grab your broom it’s Quidditch time in Tennessee NEWS >>pg. 2

Who will win a spot in Band Eat Band finals? You decide.

ARTS & CULTURE >>pg. 5

All undergraduate students will have a meal plan.* Here’s the plan: “All the things that students told us they wanted to see changed, we’ve changed. We listened, and here’s the result of that listening.” - Jeff Maples

On-campus first year students will be required to purchase a meal plan. Non first-year students will be required to purchase at least $300 Dining Dollars.

Changes aimed to support future dining facilities improvements With two new dining locations opening in fall 2014 and three more upgrades planned during the next five years, the UT administration knew it needed more students to buy more meal plans. But after students protested a proposed mandatory meal plan last fall, Dining Services and University Housing went back to the cutting board. Using the same student feedback that effectively killed the original plan, UT now hopes to enact a new meal policy proposal in Fall 2015 – and the mandatory $300 Dining Dollars remain a factor.

This last component was the cause of student chagrin in November, when the Coalition Against Mandatory Meal Plans gained more than 1,500 Facebook likes and an entire website was devoted to amplifying student feedback. Using the slogan “#DontForceFeedUS,” students expressed concerns over the proposal’s burden on non-traditional students, lack of flexibility and financial cost. But Jeff Maples, vice chancellor for finance and administration, and Frank Cuevas, executive director of university housing, think they’ve met student concerns in the new plan, which, pending Board of Trustees approval, will take effect in fall 2015.

Each semester, any unused Dining Dollars will roll into students’ All-Star accounts, where the money can then be either refunded or used on campus.

“All the things that students told us they wanted to see changed, we’ve changed,” Maples said. “We listened, and here’s the result of that listening.” The current policy requires all Presidential Courtyard residents to buy a meal plan; all other students are free to choose. In 2015, the new policy will require all first year undergraduates who live on campus to purchase a meal plan. “That’s really not much of a change,” Cuevas said. “Over 95 percent of on-campus freshman were living in those mandatory halls anyway.” For non-first year students enrolled in at least six credit hours, the policy requires the purchase of $300 Dining Dollars. UT will offer a meal plan that meets the bare minimum, but more expansive meal plans will also meet the $300 requirement. See MEAL PLAN on Page 2

*pending Board of Trustees approval

Former Tyndall player goes in depth about the intricacies of UT’s new men’s coach SPORTS >>pg. 8

Three UT basketball commits request release from LOIs Sports Editor

R.J. Vogt

SPORTS >>pg. 7

See TUITION on Page 2

Troy Provost-Heron

Editor-in-Chief

In one year, Aldrete has already become one of the Lady Vols’ top hitters

ary schools, resulting in a $30 million loss for higher education. Tennessee is one of many states receiving less state funding than in 2008, said Naylor, a junior in global studies. “Tuition increases don’t just happen,” Naylor said. “We are decreasing funding, but the price of education is going up.”

One day removed from announcing their new head coach, the Tennessee Volunteers men’s basketball 2014 recruiting class took a big hit on Wednesday, as three of UT’s signees were either released, or requested to be released, from their National Letter of Intent. Jordan Cornish and Larry Austin – both three-star recruits according to Rivals – were granted their release by Tennessee head coach Donnie Tyndall, who was announced as UT’s new men’s basketball coach on Tuesday, allowing both to re-open their recruitment. The third signee, CJ Turman – a 6-foot-8 center from Madison, Ga. – requested a release from his letter of intent, but was unable to have it granted before the close of business on Wednesday, per a UT spokesperson. Phil Cofer – a 6-foot-8 forward from Fayetteville, Ga. – is currently the only remaining signee for the Vols and did not respond after being contacted by The Daily Beacon on Wednesday regarding his status. “The four guys who were signed by Coach Martin in the early period are all really good players and they seem to be fine young men, but if guys don’t want to be here at Tennessee – for whatever reason, whether it’s no familiarity with me or the new coaching staff or they just want to explore their options – I’m OK with that,” Tyndall told 104.5 The Zone, a Nashville radio station, on Wednesday night. “I don’t want guys to feel like they have to be at Tennessee. It’s a privilege to be at Tennessee and no one’s more privileged than I am.” See SIGNEES on Page 8

UT’s Big Band helps kick off Jazz Appreciation Month Laura Darnell Contributor UT’s Jazz Big Band held its Spring Concert on April 8, just in time to celebrate Jazz Appreciation Month in Knoxville. Concert attendees were overwhelmed with excitement to hear the group perform. Nineteen of UT’s best jazz instrumentalists performed alongside director Keith Brown and guest trumpeter Vance Thompson in one of the more than 200

free concerts held by UT’s School of Music every year. Thompson, lecturer of studio music and jazz, was the featured guest at the big band concert and presented his composed piece “Shade Street” with a trumpet solo. He feels strongly about jazz and what it represents for the American people. “It’s not European music, it’s not African music,” Thompson said. “It could not have happened anywhere except here, because of the confluence of people and cultures that we have here, so it is kind of a celebra-

tion of American culture in a way.” Kyle Bothof, senior tenor saxophone player featured in the concert, will graduate this May after studying studio music and jazz performance. This was his last of 10 semesters in UT’s big band ensemble, and he said cannot imagine life without the confidence and ability jazz has given to him. “Just being able to be creative and free with it,” Bothof said. “That’s what made it appealing to me.” Having started his musical career in a

middle school band, he hopes to continue his professional music ambitions post-graduation. He believes jazz offers something for everyone. “Jazz is just the kind of music that you can feel when you’re listening to it,” Kelsey Keny, SGA president and junior in journalism and electronic media, said. “As I was watching the concert tonight, I couldn’t help tapping my foot and shaking my head along with the rhythm and beat.” See JAZZ on Page 6

INSIDE THE DAILY BEACON

@UTKDailyBeacon www.utdailybeacon.com

“UT is what you make of it, and that means people have a lot of different experiences here, some good and some bad.” OPINIONS >>pg. 4

News Opinions Arts & Culture Sports

Page 2-3 Page 4 Page 5-6 Page 7-8


2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, April 24, 2014 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS continued from Page 1 At the end of each semester, any remaining Dining Dollars will roll into students’ All-Star account, where they can then request a refund or use the money at participating All-Star locations. In response to students who have long requested that Dining Dollars be available on the Strip, Maples said he hopes to add Cumberland Avenue restaurants to the list of participating All-Star venues. Though Dining Dollars will remain specific to Aramark retailers, Dining Dollars that roll over into All-Star will become usable at restaurants that agree to work with UT. “We’re going to offer it to any restaurant that wants it,” Maples said. “But this gives Aramark the first chance to try to earn your dollars.” After the initial proposal, many students bemoaned the extra $300 they would be required to spend. In the amended plans, Cuevas pointed out that students who refuse to eat on campus can simply re-use the same payment each semester. “You’re only footing out the $300 one time,” Cuevas said. “If you don’t spend it in the fall semester, you could ask for the refund and apply it to the $300 in the spring. “And then you can ask for the refund again – it’s just managing your funds in a different way.” Changing the Dining Landscape Meal plans are just the start of what looks to be several years of change in Dining Services. Construction on the new Cumberland Avenue

facility is expected to finish by August 1 of this year; it contains a Panda Express and Raising Canes, as well as room for a third retailer in the future. The location will take meal equivalency. Also in the fall, the Fred D. Brown Jr. Residence Hall is expected to open, bringing a Tortilla Fresca and a new Subway to the west side of campus. The Subway currently in PCB will be moved so that the neighboring Chikfil-A can expand from its current, limited menu operation. Phase 1 of construction on the Student Union is slated for spring 2015 completion, a building that will include Qdoba, Salad Creations, Subway, Chik-fil-A, AFC Express and a Starbucks. Currently, the UC has a capacity of 425 in its eating areas; Phase 1 of the Student Union will have space for 1,200 students. And by fall of 2016, the residence hall formerly known as Gibbs will be rebuilt, and with it, a 650-seat dining location. Maples said this location will be a “fresh food concept” – everything prepared on sight in front of customers. Aramark has opened similar locations at schools such as Florida State University and the University of Virginia, and Maples expects the concept will be a huge hit. When construction begins on PCB in a few years, there are plans to install a second fresh food concept. Maples said they have “very little” faculty and staff participation in meal plans, but Cuevas said he thinks the fresh food will be more attractive. The way they see it, the mandatory meal plans and improved dining services will generate a “robust campus community.” “I would love to walk in and see faculty eating with students,” Maples said. “The way we have this laid out will be very conducive to that.”

elamb1@utk.edu

Brooms up! Quidditch lifts off at UT Emilee Lamb • The Daily Beacon

MEAL PLAN

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb

Kelsey Walton, right, a senior in linguistics and beater for the Time Turners, dodges Quidditch team captain Karissa Kirsch during practice in the HSS amphitheater on Monday.

Emilee Lamb Assistant News Editor On Monday and Thursday evenings, the HSS amphitheater transforms into an otherworldly sports arena. Quidditch, the fantastical sport made famous in J.K. Rowling’s “Harry Potter” novels, has come to UT. “The general reaction is, ‘You know you can’t fly, right?’” Kelsey Walton, senior in linguistics and beater for UT’s Quidditch team, the Time Turners, said. Since its inception in November 2013, Karissa Kirsch, junior in English, has led the fledgling orga-

nization. The idea to bring Quidditch to UT was sparked after viewing a documentary on the International Quidditch Association’s annual World Cup, the ultimate competition. Inspired, Kirsch said she used social media to spread the word. After two practice sessions she had assembled a squadron of 15 players dedicated to living out the magic of Rowling’s fantasy world on UT’s campus. Kayla Sanuita, junior in English and Time Turners chaser, said her love for the world of wizardry drew her to the group she now considers a highlight of her college experience.

“It was definitely the love of ‘Harry Potter,’” Sanuita said. “I don’t think I would have checked out Quidditch if it weren’t for ‘Harry Potter.’” Quidditch, a nationallyregulated, full-contact co-ed sport, is played on broomsticks – poles of wood or plastic between three and four feet in length – and each team fields seven players. The objective of the game is to move a “Quaffle” down the field and through one of three hoops standing on each end of the play area, thus scoring 10 points. See QUIDDITCH on Page 3


Thursday, April 24, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb elamb1@utk.edu

Music, business strike right chord as new minor option Jenna Butz Staff Writer UT is showing musicians how to achieve what many consider impossible — actually making money in music. Last fall, UT introduced a music business minor through the School of Music. While the minor is still relatively unknown, those who have found it have seen it supplement their current majors and expand their job prospects once they graduate. The minor mixes classes within the School of Music and the College of Business Administration. Courses range in topic from music theory and economics to a practicum in local arts management organizations. Barbara Murphy, associate professor of music theory, helped to create the minor. After seeing student interest grow in pursuing music business or arts management degrees, the School of Music curriculum committee presented the idea of introducing the minor to gauge student inter-

TUITION continued from Page 1 Naylor and Hackenbrack insisted they are not trying to attack university administration, but instead claim they seek the attention of Nashville politicians. “We are not trying to be at odds with administrators here,” Hackenbrack said. “It’s the state’s fault this is happening.” Christina Gore, freshman in environmental studies and representative for College Democrats at Tuesday’s meeting, commented on the wavering attitudes of the state capitol, saying current educational funding issues conflict with Haslam’s heavy emphasis on education during his State of the State address. The university budget will be finalized in June, and Naylor and Hackenbrack said they hope to continue networking and communicating between student

QUIDDITCH continued from Page 2 A Quidditch team involves players in a variety of roles: three chasers (offensive scorers), two beaters (defensive protectors of the Quaffle), one keeper (guardian of the goal posts) and the seeker (chaser of the elusive, game-ending Snitch). According to the IQA website, Quidditch can be described as a combination of dodgeball, tag and rugby. “I needed a sport that I was actually going to have an interest in because every time I started a sport, I stopped because I thought, ‘This is boring,’” Walton said. “This is not boring. These people are not boring.” Members of the UT Quidditch team participate in four required practice nights per week, working on both physical conditioning and gameplay. The time commitment is almost entirely up to the player. Some participants drop in for a practice or two while others dedicate their own time to improving their skills. “As much as you put into it, you’ll get back out of it,” Kirsch said. “So it’s rewarding on the level that you want it to be.” Still a developing organization on campus, the Time Turners have played few matches but continue to aim for more recognition both from the university and IQA as a competitive team. Kirsch said she has her eyes set on one

est in a major program. After planning the courses, Murphy met with Annette Ranft, associate dean for academic affairs and Reagan Professor of Business, to confirm the courses would be beneficial. Finally, the program went through the curricular process before being approved for the fall of 2013. “We wanted to use courses that already existed and reflect the various interests of the students who might be in the minor,” Murphy said. “We also wanted to make it easy for students to continue with a business minor if they chose to do this.” When the minor was introduced, Jonathan Brown, senior in business management, saw a chance to combine his musical skills with his major. Already playing a range of instruments and writing and recording his own music, Brown added the minor to “provide me with better insight on the industry I’m ultimately hoping to be a part of.” “I think it’s a great supplement to my management major,” Brown said. “Many of the guest speakers that I’ve

organizations and organize more events throughout the summer. Their first planned action is to participate in the Put the People First march on May 1 in Market Square. Marchers will trek from Market Square to Vine Middle School on MLK Boulevard to promote living wages, a halt on tuition increases and democracy. Next year, Naylor and Hackenbrack said they hope to see a SGA resolution passed concerning tuition increases. “The university is on our side on this one,” Naylor said. “[Chancellor Cheek’s] job is to fight for this money, and it’s really difficult, but we can actually work with the administration on this one. The administration here doesn’t have power to demand anything, but we do have that power. “He shouldn’t have to do it alone. And if we don’t demand it, when are we ever going to get it?” of seven southern region bids for next year’s World Cup. The presence of such a singular activity at UT has created an outlet for athletically aspiring individuals from “all walks of life,” Kirsch said. In addition to Potterphiles drawn to the sport’s fictional ties, Kirsch said Quidditch brings in players who “don’t feel safe or welcome” in traditional sporting environments. “You get people coming because they want the chance to express themselves athletically but don’t feel that any other sport really fits them,” she said, “because this is a really unique sport.” As a rule enforced by the IQA, all Quidditch teams must include a minimum of two players whose gender identification differs from at least two other members of the squad. Kirsch said this aim for diversity makes her organization a welcoming place for anyone interested in participating. A love for the game continues to fuel Kirsch’s involvement with Quidditch, but she said the development of an inclusive and open community is the driving force behind her dedication to the movement at UT. “The fact that we’ve been able to create a place for people who want to express themselves athletically that don’t fit into either men’s or women’s sports, I feel, is a really great accomplishment,” she said. “That’s probably the thing that I pride myself on most as far as this team is concerned.”

listened to over the past year in my music business classes claim that they really wish they had known more about the business world when they were first starting their music careers, so I’m very happy and confident in the pair of paths that I chose to take.” Isabel Tipton, junior in theater, started at UT as a music major before switching to theater her sophomore year. Wanting her music credits to count toward graduation, she found the music business minor and has since seen it complement her new major. “Music business and being in theater are very similar,” Tipton said. “Both require you to be independent and entrepreneurial. I figured it would combine my love of music and theater while providing me a lot of useful information for getting a job out of college.” Both Brown and Tipton say Music 305: Business of Music is their favorite class associated with the minor. Taught by Vance Thompson, the course includes a final project in which students must demonstrate understanding of the music business though real life

experience in the industry. Student projects range from organizing concerts and recording albums to Brown’s experience with creating a street team for local folk band Cereus Bright. The class also helps students network within the industry. “It gives you great experience because you are actually going out and doing things pretty much on the job,” Tipton said. “Plus, tons of amazing speakers came to class and covered a bunch of music-related jobs I didn’t even know existed. There is actually a really large thriving community of musicians and music business jobs in Knoxville.” While Murphy says the minor was created with music and business majors in mind, Brown believes it is “an awesome option for anyone with a genuine interest in music.” However, he also thinks students should consider the music theory and ear training classes before they begin the courses, as they can be difficult “if you don’t have any experience with an instrument.” However, Tipton said he sees it as

accepting for all majors. “I think this a great addition because non-music majors can really thrive in the minor,” Tipton said. “Some of the minors in the music department seems kind of inclusive to students accepted in the School of Music. There is a really big variety of people from different backgrounds and majors in my classes, which is really exciting.” While there are still students who would prefer a music business major, Murphy said this would involve introducing several new classes UT does not currently have the faculty to teach. However, the idea of a major has been discussed but not yet proposed, and Murphy is willing to hear student feedback on the addition of this program to the curriculum. “There seems to be some student interest in it, but we would need to know the extent of that interest before proposing a new degree,” Murphy said. “We would also have to decide, as a faculty, if this is a direction in which we want to go.”


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, April 24, 2014 Editor-in-Chief R.J. Vogt

OPINIONS

rvogt@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Bidding goodbye to my time on this hallowed hill Knight Errant by

Victoria Knight I had made a bucket list for my last week of undergraduate classes at UT. It wasn’t long, mostly involving the typical cliché things everyone tries to fit in – roasting marshmallows on the Torchbearer, eating in Morrill Cafeteria one last time and even spending one more all-nighter in Hodges. Then I realized scrambling to fit all of these things in before I graduate does not really matter. Yeah, I would like a final refresher, a last toast to my time here. But what really matters is the time I spent along the way. Think back on it – maybe it was the first time you found yourself yelling completely in unison with all of the other students as a football player sprinted to the end zone; the time you were struggling to carry a table down Pedestrian Walkway and a fellow student came up behind you, picked it up and walked with you; or the night you spent with your friends in the library laughing about godknows-what and not studying at all for your 8 a.m. test, but secretly loving it anyway. They are not always the extraordinarily spectacular times, but the everyday moments. The moments when you feel everything is in place, all is right in the world, you are exactly where you need to be and are perfectly happy. These last days of my last week of class have passed surreptitiously. And by the time this column is printed, there will only be two left. I’m not sure what I was expecting: perhaps a celebratory cry at the end, a throwing up of papers like they do in the movies, a jubilant running through the hallways screaming that we are, indeed, done – forever. But the whole process has been a little bit anticlimactic. Life is not the movies (no matter how much we’ve wished it was). Professors have said goodbye, we’ve zipped up our bags, walked out and just like that, it is over. It all feels surreal. But for the rest of you, it is just another week. You feel sad for your senior friends who are graduating and leaving, but it has not hit you because you’ll be back in the fall, pounding the pavement yet again. But the thing is, you don’t have as much time as you think, and I don’t want you to try and soak it all in your last week when you realize it’s suddenly all over. I want you to do it along the way. Imprint those moments – the ones where you feel that indescribable joy – keep them in your mind, pull them out and laugh to yourself every once in awhile. Because that’s what college, and life, is all about. So now, I guess it’s time to say goodbye. UT, I may leave you, but you’ll always be in my heart. Really, more like my soul. Once a lost freshman looking to find her way, now a found senior clinging to her roots. No matter where life takes me, or really us, seniors: let us always remember our time here, the good and bad, the tears and laughter, the failures and success, and hold it close to us. We’ve pledged our love and loyalty every day of our four years, we’ve had our time on this hallowed hill and between these stately walls, and now we must pass on the beacon shining bright. So from the bottom of our big orange hearts, let us say goodbye, to our alma mater true, goodbye. And now a brief shout-out to all the people who have pushed, pulled and walked beside me on this journey that is college: thank you to you all. To my wonderful assortment of roommates, to the lifelong friends I’ve made, to my first college boyfriend, to the student organizations I’ve loved being a part of, to the wonderful professors who have stretched my mind, to my lab who has been there for me through almost every day of my undergrad, to my parents who let me try out being who I want to be in the world while giving me a place to come back to. Without all of you, I would not be here, saying goodbye to the University of Tennessee. Go Vols. Victoria Knight is a senior in microbiology. She can be reached at vknight4@utk.edu.

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

College means life-long learning, not just memorization Dean’s List by

Katie Dean As a student in the College of Arts and Sciences, I often experience those panicked “What am I doing with my life?!” moments. When I began college I was a psychology major, and if I had a dollar for every eye roll I received when I told people that, I could probably pay for my education. While I used to have a chip on my shoulder about it, I quickly realized why people had this tendency. Psychology is not a hard major. Yes, it has its challenging moments, but there is just no way to compare it to majoring in accounting or chemical engineering. My decision to double major certainly increased my workload, but I am comfortable enough to admit the actual content of my classes is not unbelievably difficult. My intention is not to bash majoring in political science or psychology. On the contrary, I truly enjoy both subjects so much that I like going to class and doing my assigned reading. Sounds simple, but I believe having a genuine passion for what you are studying makes all the difference in an education. Throughout my time here I have per-

Editor-in-Chief: R.J. Vogt Managing Editor: Melodi Erdogan Chief Copy Editor: Gage Arnold News Editor: Hanna Lustig Asst. News Editor: Emilee Lamb Sports Editor: Troy Provost-Heron Asst. Sports Editor: Dargan Southard Arts & Culture Editor: Claire Dodson Asst. Arts & Culture Editor: Cortney Roark Online Editor: Samantha Smoak

days before the exam, but true learners are those that use their free time to seek new information about the world around them. Taking the time to read every day will make you smarter. Traveling and having new experiences will make you smarter. Holding a job or an internship will not only make you smarter, it will also give you practical experience in the professional world. All of these things require taking the initiative outside the classroom, and they are especially important for people in the humanities. People may tell you your degree is useless, or ask you sarcastically what you’re planning to do with that degree in psychology. But if you have learned how to take the initiative and grow outside of school, then you have taken away an important lesson. When I have those moments in which I question what I have actually learned in college, I try to remind myself it is not the university’s responsibility to make me smarter. It is my responsibility to take the tools educators give me and learn on my own. Making good grades on exams is a fraction of what school is truly about, and as long as you keep this in mind, your degree will serve you just fine in life. Katie Dean is a junior in political science and psychology. She can be reached at xvd541@utk.edu.

Get an education, not just a degree Uncommon Sense by

Evan Ford This is my last column as a University of Tennessee student, in my last week as a (full-time) student in my whole life. It’s always odd to be at the end of things, be it a project you’ve worked on for a long time or a relationship you know is fading. Things are almost exactly the same, except you have a moment where you look up and everything slows down and you think, “This may be the last time.” The last time I had this feeling was at high school graduation, where I had just made the decision to come to UT over the University of Chicago because of money. I remember feeling very cheap to make a decision as important as where you go to college based just on how much it would cost — a thought I now recognize as wrongheaded and extremely privileged. It doesn’t help that I went to Brentwood Academy, a silly private school where the tuition my senior year of high school was more than that of my freshman year at UT. My friends were off to places like Georgia Tech, Pepperdine, Vandy and Furman. These are places where you write a paper a week, have oral exams and people literally

Timtation Creations • Tim Brunson

EDITORIAL

fected time management, organization and how to survive for a least a week on peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. I have also learned how to get along with all kinds of people who are vastly different from me, all important skills I am sure will prove useful in my life. But as I get closer and closer to the end of my collegiate career, I just can’t help but wonder if college has actually made me any smarter. When I think back on all the random general education classes I had as a freshman and sophomore, I realize I remember very little from those courses. For most of the classes, I merely memorized the information before the test and then let it escape me in the following weeks. Although I always did well in my general education classes, if today you asked me anything about biology or biological anthropology, I would likely stand there staring at you dumbfounded. It’s not that I think this information is not important; I just do not believe the nature of college courses always encourages long-term retention of knowledge. We are rewarded with A’s on exams and we feel like we are learning something, but simply regurgitating information on a test does not prove we have had any real personal growth or development. Real growth and intellectual development comes on your own time. Anyone can sit down and memorize a study guide a few

go crazy from the intensity of the school work. And then there’s UT. For many of us who took AP classes and went to prep schools, UT can be a bit of a vacation, with a few tests, maybe a paper per class and (most shockingly) optional attendance. As a result, there’s a tendency to think the school is letting us down by not challenging us enough. But looking back on my time here, I think the opposite is true. There’s no doubt my very brilliant friends at top-notch universities are getting worldclass educations. But there’s no doubt my very brilliant friends here are also excelling academically. My friends here are also some of the most successful people I’ve ever met. Still, UT does not match the academic rigor of the universities it hopes to catch in the Top 25. For all the classes and hours and tests you have to take to get a degree at UT, you can still leave without having learned really anything. One hundred twenty-eight hours required; education optional. We can moan and complain we’re getting a second-rate education, but we’ve only got four years at this place. It would be hard in that time to convince our administrators to start caring about our education instead of politics and to convince our politicians to believe higher education is a worthy investment. What we can do in the meantime, though, is take advantage of the freedom UT offers us, even if this is just a side effect of budget cuts and bureaucracy.

In my case, that’s allowed me to pursue a career in music while still being a full-time student. As I write this, I’m in a van headed to play a show in Nashville. Tomorrow I have my last four classes, and then the next two days I play in Chattanooga and Athens, Ga. For some, this freedom is used to treat UT like an amusement park with a degree as a souvenir. It can be hard to be motivated to care about school when you can get through without exerting any decent amount of effort. In this way, our school often fails those who have no idea what they want to do or no motivation to do it. But for others, freedom meant that some of my friends could spend hours on research, starting companies or getting incredibly involved in jobs, campus organizations or volunteer organizations. As I sappily look back on my time at UT, that’s what stands out the most. If I had gone to Chicago, sure, my degree would have been worth more money, and I may have been a better philosopher or economist. But I’m sure I wouldn’t have been able to pursue such a variety of interests and meet people who are doing the same. UT is what you make of it, and that means people have a lot of different experiences here, some good and some bad. It’s up to us which one we get. Evan Ford is a junior in philosophy. He can be reached at eford6@utk.edu.

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Thursday, April 24, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

Local bands go head-to-head in Market Square competition Cortney Roark

Tree Tops

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor

Scruffy City Hall’s Band Eat Band Competition is narrowing down the competitors. The semifinals begin Friday, May 2 with the first of four rounds of bands. One band from each round, plus a wild card band, will be selected for the finals. The bands will compete for the $3,000 prize in Market Square on June 7. “All the semifinalists had to beat other worthy bands to get past the first round,� Bernadette West, co-owner of Scruffy City Hall and Preservation Pub, said. “Just getting invited to compete in the first round means that a band was considered a really good band with promise.� The first round will feature the Deadbeat Scoundrels, Tree Tops, Echoes and the CrumbSnatchers. These bands took some time to talk with The Daily Beacon about their musical styles and thoughts on the competition.

This band falls into the category of jam rock, and guitarist and pianist Chris Burgess called it “good old rock and roll� music. Burgess said one of the best shows the Tree Tops has played was the first round of the Band Eat Band Competition. He credits this to the band’s excitement to move further in the competition.

CrumbSnatchers

“We’re anxious to get up and play,� Burgess said. “We know our competition. We’ve been to our competitors’ shows, and we’re good friends with the CrumbSnatchers. “It’s really going to be a band eat band competition. We have great competition, and we’re going to have to step up our game and deliver.�

The CrumbSnatchers are an indie punk rock band that initially began around 13 years ago when guitar/keyboard player and singer Guetts and guitarist Philip Mosteller played together in high school. However, it wasn’t until Guetts and Mosteller were finished with college that they formed the CrumbSnatchers with drummer Rylan Bledsoe and bass player Sam Burchfield. Guetts said with a laugh that the guys “made� Mosteller join. “I love it now,� Mosteller said. “I wasn’t really

prepared to get back into bands, but when I came over and started playing with them it was really good. From then on, I was happy about it.� Guetts said the CrumbSnatchers will play as loud and crazy as possible and give a “killer show.� As for the Band Eat Band competition, the CrumbSnatchers agree it’s more than a competition. “It brings fans together,� Guetts said. “It’s a little competition, but it’s more about the music community and meeting other bands.�

Echoes The band members of Echoes come from different backgrounds, but drummer Gene Priest said they bring together a unique sound described as indie rock that “tends to get a little bit dancey.� As a band, the Echoes have been together a little more than a year. Priest hopes this competition opens more doors for the band. “I think the reason we did (Band Eat Band) wasn’t necessarily for the competition, because none of us are generally into the idea of battle of the band-type scenarios,� Priest said. “We feel like bands should be more of a community, but we also look at it as a way that not only our band,

but other bands can broaden their fanbase. “We’ll be playing with other bands with fans that wouldn’t normally come to our shows. We also get to play with other bands that we otherwise wouldn’t be able to play with.� Priest said the Echoes’ main hope is to bring awareness to the local music scene. He added the group’s strategy is to have a good time. “We really enjoy playing music,� Priest said, “and we hope to go and have as much fun as we can and hopefully gain some new fans and hear some great new bands that are right here in our hometown.�

Deadbeat Scoundrels This band draws influence from bluegrass to alternative to heavy metal, drummer Brandon Sharp said. Members of the Deadbeat Scoundrels have known each other their entire life, but Sharp said they just recently decided to officially form a band and “it just clicked.� Since forming, they consider their first major accomplishment to be the opportunity to play at Preservation Pub. “That was a big deal for us, coming from a small town,� Sharps said. “We’ve seen a lot of

bands that we look up to play there, so that was huge.� Going into the semifinals, the Deadbeat Scoundrels hope to have fun more than anything else. “It’s one of those things where if you take it too seriously, you’re not going to have any fun, so we just try to play like we do at home,� Sharp said. “Our energy seems to transfer on stage really well. “If we win, then that’s great, and if not, we had fun doing it.�

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, April 24, 2014 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

Blood: Water benefit raises $200K for HIV/AIDS, water crisis Marina Waters Contributor In order to float a pontoon, water is a vital ingredient. And that’s a necessity the Grammy and CMA award-winning group, Little Big Town, understands all too well. Water is also vital to the millions in Africa who aren’t in clean supply of it — but Little Big Town and the Blood: Water Mission hope to change all that. The “Pontoon” singers teamed up with the Blood: Water Mission to headline the Hope in the Dark benefit Wednesday night at the Knoxville Convention Center. By the end of the night, the event raised more than $200,000.

Blood: Water is an organization designed to assist victims of HIV/AIDS and also to aid the water crisis throughout Africa. Hosting the event was Mike Hamilton, a Blood: Water campaign member and former UT athletic director. Though he resigned from his athletic director position in 2011, Hamilton has found some surprising similarities in his endeavors with the campaign. “In athletics it’s really about the transformation of lives, the transformation of lives of young people coming to college and taking them into adulthood,” Hamilton said. “In this case, we’re talking about the transformation of people’s lives and in some cases, actually saving their lives in some

pretty difficult circumstances in Africa.” Hamilton not only explained these transformations, but he also explained why Blood: Water was originally formed. “The organization was originally started by the band Jars of Clay,” he said. “While they were visiting Africa, they saw that if you have a diminished immune system and you had dirty water, it’s a recipe for death. “So it’s really important for people that are HIV positive to have access to have clean water and to avoid disease.” But Blood: Water is unlike most mission campaigns in that while they are working to better Africa’s water supply, they’re also partnering with African natives to assist them

in the fight against the water and HIV/AIDS crises. “Our work is all done through African-led, localized partnerships in Africa on the ground,” Hamilton said. “So we’re not a relief organization. We’re actually working in the communities, in the villages in Africa, to help them determine the best solutions for their community. It’s more about partnership rather than charity. We’ve seen that that’s a sustainable model that makes sense in the long run.” Though changing and assisting lives is the focus of Blood: Water, they’re also aiming to simply get the word out, as their youngest adopted daughter’s name beckons. “Our youngest child is Kalu,” Hamilton said. “We found out that her name means ‘get the word out’ and was given to her by her birth mom — her birth mom passed away from complications with HIV/AIDS.” Hamilton shared this along with stories from other members of the campaign who have seen firsthand what it is like to work with the campaign in Africa. A panel of three Blood: Water members joined Hamilton on stage to talk about their stories.

One campaign member, Susan Cunningham, shared the biggest lesson she learned from her trip to Africa with the crowd. “I was really struck with how warm and loving these people are,” Cunningham said. “I learned from the trip the true meaning of gratitude. Without gratitude, you really can’t be happy, because if you’re not grateful then there is no happiness. They were very happy people and they were grateful for what they had.” The night not only gave a vivid depiction of the work the campaign has done in Africa, but it was also a night to raise money for the organization and to enjoy the headlining guests of the evening, Little Big Town. The band voiced admiration for what the campaign is doing to better the lives of those suffering in Africa. “You’re changing lives, you’re saving lives and you’re saving generations of lives, so dig deep — it’s important,” band member Kimberly Schlapman said. To further support the campaign, cards were placed on each table with the option for guests to donate a one-time or monthly amount to the cam-

paign. The generous help and funds donated by the attendees of the event were evident Wednesday night, and the members of Little Big Town were among the many witness to the campaign’s work. “It’s our pleasure to be here tonight and to do a real small part in the big picture of what you guys are doing,” band member Karen Fairchild said. “One of the ways we get to matter, I think, for people is finding songs that mean something to them and that moves them the way that songs can.” And Little Big Town did just that, with a combination of smooth, vocally-amazing, and meaningful ballads, as well as some boot-stomping, upbeat tunes like their hit summertime anthem, “Pontoon.” Rounding out their repertoire with a soulful cover of the classic song “Elvira,” Little Big Town delivered entertainment and a night the crowd will hardly forget. To end the evening, Hamilton gave his thanks and left the crowd with one last request. “And guys — go to Africa with us. Go to Africa with us. It will change your life, I promise.”

JAZZ

really happy to hear that there’s an entire month dedicated to it, because it’s a really stellar genre of music.” The Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History established Jazz Appreciation Month in 2001. It is an initiative to develop programs through schools and other organizations to honor jazz as a national treasure and promote cultural exploration through jazz. Because of the success of this pursuit, UNESCO officially designated April 30 as International Jazz Day to celebrate jazz as a

tool for international cooperation and communication. The International Jazz Day Global Concert 2014 will be held in Osaka, Japan, a city that played a major part in keeping the genre alive after its glory days in America. Although the Global Concert is close to 7,000 miles away, there are many ways to celebrate the music. One can view the concert online or simply find ways to appreciate jazz in Knoxville. For information on upcoming concerts and events with the Knoxville Jazz Orchestra, visit www.knoxjazz.org.

continued from Page 1 She, like many UT students, had no idea the concert was available until last minute, but Keny couldn’t pass up the opportunity to hear a “stellar saxophone solo.” “I love setting aside time to come to events like this where you can just kind of chill and listen to some music that you enjoy,” Keny said. “It kind of takes your stress away from school, being able to be there and enjoy music … and now I’m


Thursday, April 24, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 7 Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron

SPORTS

tprovost@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Dargan Southard msoutha1@utk.edu

SOFTBALL

Youth not a hindrance for Tennessee freshman Aldrete Taylor White Staff Writer For Annie Aldrete, there was never any doubt as to where she would play her college softball, but nobody expected her to make the impact she has at this point in her freshman season. It took Aldrete no time at all to fall in love with the University of Tennessee. It took the Monterey, Calif., native even less time to establish herself as one of the top freshmen in the nation. “As soon I walked on campus, I thought, ‘This is where I want to go,’” Aldrete said. “Then when they offered me,

I called my dad and he said, ‘If you want to, go ahead,’ so I committed.” Aldrete did not begin her softball career until the age of 14, but it was not long before she had drawn the interest of many top-level softball programs. When she committed to Tennessee as a sophomore in high school, she was drawing interest from schools such as Washington, Florida and Oklahoma. Co-head coaches Ralph and Karen Weekly have developed a strong recruiting base in California, and are able to consistently get some of the state’s top talent. Exactly half of Tennessee’s current roster is from the

Golden State. With so many California girls on the team, the transition across the country was made a little easier for Aldrete, along with the close-knit feeling the Weeklys create. “Tennessee is a very big family atmosphere,” Aldrete said. “I really like how Ralph and Karen are married, and they do act as sort of our parents out here. It’s our home away from home, and they just really make you feel comfortable. If you feel home sick Karen is the first person to be there for you.” It’s rare for a true freshman to make a huge impact, especially in the SEC, which has become one of the nation’s premier softball conferences. However,

Lady Vols search for pitching consistency Taylor White Staff Writer Senior Ellen Renfroe has proven she is among the nation’s elite pitchers, but with only two series’ remaining, the No.8 Tennessee Lady Volunteer softball team is still finding itself struggling with consistency from the rest of its young pitchers. Renfroe has started 26 of Tennessee’s 45 games so far this year, and has compiled a dominant 23-5 record to go along with her 1.95 ERA. When Renfroe isn’t in the circle, though, the Lady Vols have struggled with getting outs. Sophomore Erin Gabriel was a highly-touted recruit coming out of high school, but injury issues forced her to miss most of her freshman season, as well as fall practice. She has pitched in 19 games this year and achieved a 5-0 record, but has not quite been the same since her injury. “We had counted on Erin

Gabriel being the Erin Gabriel of old,” co-head coach Ralph Weekly said at Wednesday’s media availability. “She missed the whole fall because of surgery, and when you miss the fall in this game it really hurts you in the spring.” Sophomore Rainey Gaffin and junior Cheyanne Tarango have also given Tennessee solid innings this year, but neither has been able to separate themselves and grab the No. 2 role. “One game, one of them is really good, and we have not identified that for-sure No. 2 yet,” Weekly said. “But all three of them have thrown really good innings in the last week and a half.” Lady Vols flex their muscles While the Tennessee offense has been inconsistent at times this year, the Lady Vols have the potential to put runs on the board in a hurry thanks to their ability to hit the long ball. In last weekend’s series with Mississippi State, Tennessee hit five home runs in a game for the second consecutive weekend.

This gave UT 62 total home runs on the season, while they have given up only 29. “We don’t try (to hit home runs),” outfielder Melissa Davin said. “Definitely we want them, but if we make perfect contact then the ball is going to go. We just can’t try too hard on some things.” The problem for the Lady Vols this year has been consistency. Tennessee hit five home runs in Saturday’s game, but in Friday’s game one of the series they recorded only three hits and failed to get on the board. With a team that is built on a youthful foundation, inconsistency is bound to happen, but it has been up to the three seniors on this squad to be leaders when the bats are struggling. “I know for myself, I need to be more consistent for the underclassmen to look up to me,” Davin said. “I work on that daily, but I feel our freshman are no longer freshman, and they have stepped up and are acting as veterans.”

with the regular season winding down, Aldrete finds herself atop of the Tennessee stat book. She has recorded a .381 average, which is good for second on the team behind AllAmerican shortstop Madison Shipman. She is second on the team with 11 home runs, and is tied for first with 45 RBI. “You never expect freshmen to make that kind of an impact,” Ralph Weekly said. “I knew when I saw her play in the National Championship top level summer game, she got the game winning hit in the bottom of the 7th, and I knew she was a quality kid right from the start.” Even Aldrete didn’t expect

to play this big a role in the Tennessee lineup her freshman year, but she credited her coaches and teammates with her pushing her to be successful. “I think it has a lot to do with Karen,” Aldrete said. “She pushes me and all the other freshmen every day to not feel like a freshman. We do not get treated like freshmen, there’s no ‘I’m a freshman’ excuse. Everybody’s equal and comes out and plays there hardest every day.” Her impressive freshman campaign has not gone unnoticed, as Aldrete was named a top 25 finalist for the NCAA freshman player of the year award which will be announced

later in the year. Making the transition from high school to college is never easy, especially in the SEC where you could be facing an All-American pitcher on any given night. Mentally it can be hard to prepare to face these pitchers, but Aldrete said her teammates have helped build her confidence this year. “As a freshman to be doing what I’m doing, I give all the credit to my teammates and coaches,” Aldrete said. “Coming in here I did not have the confidence I would do that. I just thought I would go pinch hit every now and then, but my teammates and my coaches have pushed me to that level where I’m comfortable.”


8 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, April 24, 2014 Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron

SPORTS

tprovost@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Dargan Southard msoutha1@utk.edu

Former Morehead St. forward offers glowing endorsement of Tyndall Dargan Southard Assistant Sports Editor Just one semester into what was supposed to be a smooth transition to the collegiate ranks, Drew Kelly already needed a new home. Despite cruising through his senior season at Centennial High School on the way to being named Tennessee’s 2009 Mr. Basketball, the Franklin, Tenn., native was transferring from Miami University. So in swooped an individual, who despite having no knowledge of Kelly or his situation, was more than willing to lend a helping hand. That man was Donnie Tyndall. “It was pretty much just a shot in the dark,” Kelly told The Daily Beacon by phone on Wednesday.

“I kind of just asked him if he would let me walk on for a semester and try to earn a Drew Kelly scholarship. Basically he didn’t really recruit me out of high school. “He ended up giving me a scholarship after that spring semester of my freshman year, taking me in, teaching me his defense, teaching me how to become a better person, a better man and a better basketball player. He just really kind of took me under his wing.” That was in 2009, when Tyndall was the head coach at Morehead State — a position he manned from 2006-12.

On Tuesday afternoon, the 43-year-old Michigan native was introduced as Tennessee’s 19th head basketball coach in front of a packed house at Pratt Pavilion — a crowd that included a hoard of UT donors, boosters and alums. “Knoxville is a much bigger town than Morehead is, so there’s a lot more people to get in touch with,” Kelly said. “But I fell like he’s going to be great fit. I feel like he’s going to do well. It’s going to be tough and he knows that, and I think he’s prepared.” Many view that task as an excruciating one. The lack of unity among UT’s fan base developed into a hotbed for discussion both during and after the tenure of former Vols head coach Cuonzo Martin. A belabored petition begging for the return of ex-UT head man Bruce Pearl swirled through Knoxville, racking up more than

36,000 signatures along the way. The petition, along with countless other negative aspects of those donning orange, only gained momentum after Martin bolted for the University of California on April 15. Based on past experiences though, Kelly sees that problem coming to an end. “He wins (over) the community wherever he goes,” said Kelly, who in two years under Tyndall started 47 of the Eagles’ 68 contests, averaging 10.2 points as a redshirt sophomore. “He’s always doing community service events. He’s always meeting big time vendors and supporters of the program.” The extensive to-do list, however, extends well beyond trying to mend a wounded fan base. With Jeronne Maymon graduating in May and Jarnell Stokes already departed for the NBA draft, the Vols will undoubtedly have a gaping hole to fill on the

interior as Tyndall’s inaugural season swiftly approaches. Kelly, whose time at Morehead State was spent as a low-post presence at the forward position, had a firm message for those looking to replace the UT duo often referred to as the “Bruise Brothers.” “You have to be physically able to guard on the perimeter,” Kelly said. “He runs that 2-3 matchup zone, but it really has a lot of manto man principles. “You have to be able to move your feet, but you also have to be able to bang with the biggest guys in the country.” In order to reach that level of extreme level of physicality, Tyndall feverishly scours the country, recruiting players who “aren’t prima donnas” and “don’t think other people owe them something because they’re playing basketball.” Much of that successful development has already come

within the state of Tennessee as Kelly – along with Nashvillearea products Arthur McMillian and Demonte Harper as well as Knoxville’s own Deandre Mathieu – heavily contributed to the Eagles’ 43-25 record during Kelly’s two years under Tyndall. Out of that “Volunteer State” quartet, half began their Morehead State careers as walkons. “That’s one of the key things that I think he’ll really impress people with when he gets down there and actually gets starting to work,” Kelly said. “He can just go get someone off the street and get him to work for you and get him to work that much harder than everybody else around him. “I’ve played for 20-something different coaches in my college career, including assistants, and coach Tyndall is probably the hardest, most demanding coach I’ve ever played for.”

SIGNEES

we’re not going to not scholarship them. They are not not wanted, in fact, they are desperately wanted. We want them to be part of the program. “I told them our goals and visions for the program and told them I hope they’ll be a part of that.” And while Rew-Cornish said their conversation with Tyndall went “well,” it proved to be not enough. Due to an SEC rule, a player released of his letter of intent isn’t able to receive a scholarship from another school within the conference until he has been there for two years, all but guaranteeing that neither of the departing players will play in the SEC. With Austin, Cornish and Turman moving on, the Vols are now left with five open scholarships on the roster and have until the May 21 deadline to sign any available recruits. “I won’t sign a guy just to fill a spot,” Tyndall told 104.5 The Zone. “We are at a great place where we are going to get really great players, especially as we

move forward into our first full recruiting class next fall and next spring. “I’m not going to take a guy just to take a guy. And while Tyndall stated “he hasn’t given up on any of the four previous signees showing up,” he has already began preparing to bring in a couple of players to fill some of the spots left void by the three signees’ departures. “I don’t know that we would fill all six spots if we did have six spots to give, it’s probably too late to do that,” said Tyndall when asked about the possibility of having to replace all four scholarships in the case that Cofer decides to leave as well. “ We are in the hunt for some really good players here. “For as late as it is in the season, I’m a little surprised that there are still as many good players out there as there are – not a ton of them – but there are eight to 12 guys that we feel are good enough and we are right there on all of them and hope to bring a couple guys to campus in the next couple of weeks.”

continued from Page 1 Austin, a 6-foot-1 point guard from Springfield, Ill., who was UT’s top-ranked commit, was the first to announce his departure and was quickly followed out the door by Jordan Cornish – a 6-foot4 guard from New Orleans, La. “After the coach (Tyndall) was announced, we explored our options and just decided that we wanted to go in a different direction,” Monique Rew-Cornish, Jordan’s mother, told The Daily Beacon. Prior to his introduction as Tennessee’s new coach, Tyndall reached out to Cornish, Austin and Turman to express his desire of the trio to stay committed to the Vols. “(Tennessee’s signees) all seemed to be excited,” Tyndall said during his introductory press conference. “I told them how I excited I was to be their coach. I wanted to put their minds at ease with the fact that they are


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