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Thursday, April 17, 2014

Issue 65, Volume125

THE FINAL STRIKE

After 60 years on campus, Down Under prepares to close its doors for good Savannah Gilman Staff Writer

The UC Down Under is on its last strike. During the 2014-2015 academic year, the recreation center will close its doors for good. For Margy Wirtz-Henry, director of the Physical Education Activity Program, the end of Down Under will be a loss for students and academic departments alike. “Our billiards and bowling classes in Down Under are popular and fill up every time they are offered,” WirtzHenry said. “With this change, we may

INSIDE

KVERS: English students are helping them help others NEWS >>pg. 3

Where will you be on Record Store Day? ARTS & CULTURE >>pg. 6

Butch Jones sits down with the Beacon, reflects on year two at UT

routine, and I wouldn’t give that up for anything. “So I’m pretty sad it’s closing because I wish I could come back in 10 years to show my kids some of my favorite memories of college.” Amy Anderson, recreation coordinator for Down Under, said recreational offerings are under consideration as construction of the new Student Union goes forward. However, there is no expectation to recreate the Down Under, which currently features a 12-lane bowling alley, pool tables, video game consoles, ping-pong sets and student lounge areas. See LAST STRIKE on Page 2

Couple’s romantic, creative mix fuels Tim Lee 3

Vols fend off Catamounts, 6-2 Dargan Southard Assistant Sports Editor Despite having a final-hour wrinkle tossed into his non-conference plan, Tennessee head coach Dave Serrano refused to accept a bare week. “I don’t like not playing midweek games,” he said. “I think it gets your team out of rhythm. Sometimes you need it for rest, but I’m glad we were able to find a game.” After inclement weather postponed the Vols’ Tuesday night showdown with Virginia Tech, UT successfully reached out to Western Carolina last-minute, securing the matchup a mere hours after the cancellation. That initial excitement only grew Wednesday evening as the No. 29 Vols capped off the eventful two day-stretch with a 6-2 victory over the Catamounts at Lindsey-Nelson Stadium. “It worked out best for us,” Serrano said. “We were lucky to get Western Carolina — which I think is a good opponent too — to come in here, and (we) come out on top. The matchup with the Hokies was scheduled to take place in Salem, Va., as part of the 2014 Hokie-Smokey Classic, but continuous rain and harsh temperatures all cross the Southeast halted the Vols (24-11) before they could even depart from Knoxville. Fortunately for UT, who had been considering adding WCU (24-12) to the schedule ever since the opening weekend eliminated one of the Vols’ 55 allotted contests for 2014, they had the Catamounts on speed dial. “(WCU head coach) Bobby Miranda

Jenna Butz Staff Writer

join the ranks. In addition, UT is presently home to three of the four most recent Tennessee State FFA presidents, seven former state officers and one current national officer.

While most middle-aged couples are contemplating retirement and anticipating grandchildren, Tim and Susan Bauer Lee write songs and book their next rock shows. Two-thirds of the rock trio Tim Lee 3, the couple, along with drummer Chris Bratta, have established themselves as a rock staple within Knoxville. Playing for what he says has been “forever,” Tim has always been in bands and playing music by himself and with friends. However, an epiphany from Susan propelled the couple into the creation of making music together and eventually starting the Tim Lee 3 with Bratta. “I had a band, like right after reptiles walked on land, and Susan and I have been together for a really long time,” Tim said. “One day about 12 years ago, Susan woke up and decided she wanted to play bass. Literally woke up Saturday morning and went, ‘I want to learn how to play bass.’ So I went to the pawn shop like a beautiful husband and bought a bass and brought it home. Six months later, she was on stage, and we had a band. Then after a while — it was late 2006, I think — we narrowed it down to a three-piece band. Really, it’s just a natural progression of things.”

See FFA on Page 3

See TIM LEE 3 on Page 5

Sophomore outfielder Christin Stewart swings at a pitch in the Vols’ 6-2 victory over the Western Carolina Catamounts in Lindsey Nelson Stadium on April 16. and I go way back, and we actually talked about this a couple weeks ago,” Serrano said. “But as soon as Virginia Tech called me yesterday morning early and said, ‘We’re going to have to cancel the game,’ I got on the phone with Bobby, and we were able to secure (the game) quite quickly.” A rapid pace illustrated the game’s offense early on as well, with both squads producing runs in the opening frame. After the Catamounts initially struck in

the first off UT starter Bret Marks, the Vols quickly responded in the bottom half, stringing together three consecutive hits with two outs. Sophomore Christin Stewart and freshman Nick Senzel each singled in front of first baseman Scott Price, who proceeded to bring home the duo with a booming RBI double to left-center. See BASEBALL on Page 8

College of Ag welcomes 4 new FFA officers fall. FFA promotes premiere leadership, personal growth and career success through agriculUT will welcome four of the ture education to create leaders eight 2014-2015 Tennessee for the future of the agriculture State Future Farmers of America industry. Officer Team as students next The College of Agriculture

Sarah Best

Contributor

SPORTS >>pg. 7

bowling students come to our Western Avenue location regularly and would like to continue that relationship.” Hannah Herrin, junior in global studies and political science, has worked as a student employee in the UC for almost three years. The loss of Down Under, she said, is a personal blow. For her, the UC has become a “second home.” “Being a student worker at Down Under has been the highlight of my undergrad, and I’m sad that more people won’t get to experience that,” Herrin said. “Staff unity within the building as a whole is incredible. I’m able to be friends with people I would have never met in my normal campus

Andrew Bruckse • Tennessee Athletics

SEE

have to drop billiards, and for bowling we may have to look at off-campus options and may look at local businesses having us during the day. “... From the perspective of someone in exercise and science perspective, I hope that we don’t have to lose a space for leisure and exercise on campus.” In the opinion of Wendy Cox, general manager of Strike & Spare’s Western Avenue and Fountain Lanes locations, the closing of Down Under could potentially affect the local Knoxville community in addition to campus. “We may see a positive impact on business from students and organizations hosting birthday parties and events,” Cox said. “We have had UT

boasts a tradition of hosting State FFA officers, which will continue as Elena Smith, West Tennessee State vice president; Victoria Utsman, East Tennessee State vice president; Nick Baker, State secretary; and Amy Morgan, State treasurer,

INSIDE THE DAILY BEACON

@UTKDailyBeacon www.utdailybeacon.com

“I believe we can think of the heterosexual male gaze on females in two ways - one where it is oppresive and one where it is empowering.” OPINIONS >>pg. 4

News Opinions Arts & Culture Sports

Page 2-3 Page 4 Page 5-6 Page 7-8


2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, April 17, 2014 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS LAST STRIKE continued from Page 1 Down Under first opened for business in 1954 and has since become a fixture on campus. The recreation center began with only four lanes and a separate billiards area before expanding to its current size in 1967. Student demand has shaped the recreational activities of Down Under throughout its more than half-century of operation. The center previously offered air hockey tables

and camping equipment rental. Bowling, billiards, darts, foosball and table tennis have maintained a constant presence, but as technology has advanced, the center’s digital entertainment has shifted as well. Outdated gaming consoles have been replaced by the Xbox 360. In addition, Down Under runs annual leagues and tournaments for several activities and sponsors students to participate in the Association of College Unions International Recreation Tournaments. Anderson said the center has worked to provide quality entertainment and recreation for

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb

elamb1@utk.edu

university students, faculty and guests since its early days, but Down Under’s most important contribution to student life, in her opinion, is the opportunity to get involved with the life of campus. “As an undergraduate here in the 1990s, I made many of my first friends on campus in the bowling league,” Anderson said in an email. “Now, as a staff member, I’ve seen many of the same friendships forged among both students and staff/ faculty over a little competitive bowling, and many of our other recreational offerings.”

All photos by Hayley Brundige • The Daily Beacon

The billiards class may have to be dropped when the Down Under is closed down next year.

Along with pool tables, the UC Down Under currently offers a 12-lane bowling alley, ping pong tables, a lounge area and gaming consoles.

The UC Down Under has been open since 1954 ,but will be closing its doors during the upcoming academic year.

During the 2014-2015 academic year, the UC Down Under will close. Plans for a future recreation center in the new Student Union are uncertain.


Thursday, April 17, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb

elamb1@utk.edu

Chris West Contributor Change is coming. Effective May 19, students will see their Volmail login address change from “NetID@ utk.edu” to “NetID@vols.utk. edu.” The shift is part of a transition that will allow students to choose between Google and Microsoft as their email provider. Despite this change, students will still receive messages sent to “@utk.edu” and “@tennessee.edu” email addresses. Mail sent to these accounts will be automatically forwarded to the new address system. Joel Reeves, assistant vice chancellor and chief information officer, explained the change in usernames was necessary in order to provide students access to both Gmail and Microsoft Outlook capabilities. “It simplifies the management of the whole infrastructure and in building the transition between the two [services],” Reeves said. Under the new system, students will be able to access a single email thread on either web format. Regardless of which provider they choose, students will still retain their current Office 365 features from Microsoft, along with access to Google Apps. The choice

FFA continued from Page 1 State FFA officers must endure a competitive application process which includes a knowledge test, leadership interview, agricultural issues interview, a letter writing exercise and a group interview with other candidates. The entire process takes place over two days. Morgan, soon to graduate from Cookeville High School, said the road to attaining her position was a difficult but rewarding one. “It was an incredible experience to go through the process and really grow as an individual,” Morgan said. “I enjoyed my preparation greatly because of the amount of knowledge and awareness I received about agriculture throughout my experience. “The selection process is extremely valuable to the Tennessee FFA Association and does the best at finding the eight most qualified individuals to serve our association for the year.” Baker is a senior at Upperman High School in Baxter, Tenn. Raised a Volunteers fan, Baker said one of his many draws to UT was the strength of the agriculture program, a career field he plans to invest himself in.

between Gmail and Outlook is not a permanent one; while a student may select a default provider, he or she can switch at any time. In addition to the email provider flexibility, students will be able to retain their new “@ vols.utk.edu” email account “for life.” Current university email accounts are set to expire one year after a student leaves UT. When crafting the transition, university administrators relied on representatives from SGA and the Technology Advisory Board in addition to a recent campus-wide survey. Jake Baker, former SGA president, said although he was not directly involved in discussions about the email transition, he is confident in its enactment. “I think that any time students have a choice in what they do, it’s always a benefit,” he said. “You can choose which one you prefer or which one is easier for you to use.” Both Baker and Reeves noted the journey to allowing on-campus access to Google services was one that has taken several years, garnering much student demand along the way. As Reeves explained, the delay in implementing university-provided Google accounts was a matter of legal assurance. “I would rather have the university be protected by having an

official agreement with Google and be able to give [access] to students this way,” Reeves said. When news of the transition to new email addresses was announced March 10, some students expressed concerns about the unexpected change. Luke LeBeuf, junior in psychology and cinema studies, said he feels the decision to change email systems and usernames may prove to be an inconvenience. “It’s a bit aggravating to have to acquaint myself with a third email system since I’ve been attending UT,” LeBeuf said, “on top of my personal email.” Baker, after receiving a handful of emails from students worried about the conversion, wants ease any of students’ concerns. “It’s not a huge change, it’s really just about logging in with a different username,” Baker said. “You’re not going to lose former contacts.” Although the change seemed to blindside many UT students, Reeves asserted his department doesn’t take such transitions lightly and is confident in this decision. “This change is better off for all of us in the long run.” For more information on the switch, visit https://oit.utk.edu/ accounts/email/Pages/VolmailChanges.aspx.

Baker will also be following in the footsteps of his older brother, currently on leave from UT in order to serve as National FFA Secretary. “I love the City of Knoxville, not to mention the tradition of excellence that our school upholds, but most importantly the Agriculture Communications, Education and Leadership programs at UT are superior to any programs I’ve seen in the universities I’ve toured over the course of this year,” Baker said. “I plan to work for the National FFA Organization one day, and I think that UT is the greatest outlet for my development of potential for career success.” For Utsman, familiarity with the agriculture campus and family ties to UT contributed to her decision to continue her academic career in Knoxville. Her cousin, Caroline Conley, is president of UT’s Collegiate FFA chapter. “All three of my older cousins have attended UT,” Utsman said. “I remember going to Knoxville to visit them and the wonder the campus held for me then; we visited them all so often, Knoxville feels like my second home at times.” In regard to the duties required of state officers, Morgan said she is looking forward to the coming year and her chance to give back to the Tennessee FFA.

“Serving the Tennessee FFA Association as a state officer is an opportunity and experience that I could not be more ecstatic about,” Morgan said. “It means a lot to me that I have been chosen to serve the over 13,000 members across the state over the next year. I want to impact, to grow and to serve. “I want to impact our members by encouraging them to look past their limits and reach new goals.” Baker, Utsman, Smith and Morgan will be traveling across Tennessee throughout the school year, visiting FFA chapters to present leadership workshops and conferences for some of the state’s 13,644 FFA members. The officers will spend the summer facilitating six weeks of leadership training camp in Doyle, Tenn., traveling to Arkansas to meet with state officers from Kentucky, Arkansas and Michigan, and traveling to Washington D.C. to meet with members of Congress. Other highlights include a summer of leadership training at locations across the country and a week of meetings in Louisville, Ky., alongside nearly 60,000 fellow FFA members. The state officers will conclude their terms of service in March of 2015 at the 87th Tennessee State FFA Convention in Gatlinburg, Tenn.

Around Rocky Top Matt Cikovic • The Daily Beacon

UT modifies student email system

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia gives the annual Rose Lecture in the Alumni Memorial Building’s Cox Auditorium on Tuesday.

English students aims to raise $1.5K for local rescue squad Cara Sanders Contributor The Rescue Squad needs rescuing. As a part of the course ENGL 255, a class on public writing, lecturer Erin Smith challenged her students to raise $1,500 for a nonprofit organization though social media. In response to the assignment, Garret Wells, freshman in business, and Caitlin Boone, freshman in supply chain management, have dedicated their project to raising funds for the Knoxville Volunteer Emergency Rescue Squad. “After doing research on the organization, we learned about all of the different services they provide to the Knoxville community without being compensated,” Boone said. “When we learned that they wanted the help in raising money, our group was inspired to help them.” Wells said a visit to the KVERS station and personal meetings with some of the squad’s volunteers solidified the organization as a group they wanted to partner with. “I noticed how truly kind and dedicated they were,” he said, “and it made me want to help out in any way I can.” The group is hoping to raise $1,500 for KVERS by Thursday, April 24. Funds raised by Boone and Wells will aid the KVERS effort to digitize all records, increasing effectiveness and efficiency.

“The digitization of the files will allow them to file paper work faster and also will allow them to communicate to the state heads in a more efficient way,” Wells said. KVERS has been serving the Knox County community for more than 50 years. Due to the efforts of 160 volunteers, KVERS provides primary and secondary vehicle rescue, primary technical rescue, emergency medical first response, medical standby, animal rescue and removal and water rescue and recovery to the Knoxville community 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. The organization’s services carry no cost and save Knoxville residents an estimated $800,000 per year in tax dollars. “They never close because accidents never stop happening,” Boone said. In addition, KVERS also manages six specialty rescue teams concentrating on cave, vertical and confined space operations, water rescue, heavy and technical rescue, land-based search operations, support services and disaster and medical operations. For Wells, the work of the KVERS is an important resource for Knoxville, although the group’s efforts are undervalued in his opinion. “Most likely, you’ve seen them at UT football games or helping someone out on the side of the road and never knew who they were,” Wells said. “We are trying to bring awareness to their impact on the community.”


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, April 17, 2014 Editor-in-Chief R.J. Vogt

OPINIONS

rvogt@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Scalia lecture highlights originalism’s importance Dean’s List by

Katie Dean The past few years have been filled with big developments for the Supreme Court: they ruled the Affordable Care Act constitutional, overturned the Defense of Marriage Act and decided against an overall spending cap to federal campaign contributions. Because of the ongoing debates over marriage equality, marijuana legalization and abortion laws, it is likely we will see more drastic changes in the coming years. The McCutcheon v. Federal Election Committee ruling is of particular interest to me because it will likely alter the way PAC’s and Super PAC’s function. Given all the important elections coming up, a major ruling on campaign finance could have a very significant impact on who we will see in office. The decision has sparked questions about an extremely fundamental aspect of campaigning in the United States: how big of a role should money play in the process? The justices were fairly divided in their decision, with Chief Justice John Roberts, Associate Justices Antonin Scalia, Samuel Alito, Anthony Kennedy and Clarence Thomas holding the majority opinion. “Money in politics may at times seem repugnant to some, but so, too, does much of what the First Amendment vigorously protects,” wrote Roberts. “If the First Amendment protects flag burning, funeral protests and Nazi parades — despite the profound offense such spectacles cause — it surely protects political campaign speech despite popular opposition.” Associate Justices Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Elena Kagan dissented, warning of the dangers this type of ruling could have. “Where enough money calls the tune,” wrote Breyer, “the general public will not be heard.” Clearly, this case has highlighted some of the deep differences in the ideals of the nine justices. This ruling is one of the reasons I was so curious to see Justice Scalia speak here at UT on Tuesday. I was really hoping he would address the McCutcheon case, and given his colorful personality, I figured it would also be pretty entertaining. Appointed to the bench in 1986 by President Ronald Reagan, Antonin Scalia has been on the court longer than any other justice. He has a reputation for being aggressive and outspoken during arguments and is considered to be in the conservative block of justices. Although I have a different political orientation than he does, I can’t help but be fascinated by his extensive involvement with the court. I tend to like people with a considerable amount of sass, and Justice Scalia certainly fits that bill. Speaking to a full house in the Cox Auditorium, Scalia started off the lecture by explaining his tendency to be an “originalist,” whether he is “examining a statute or the Constitution.” He went on to discuss how important this concept is to him when considering Constitutional questions. “The usual argument used in its favor is flexibility,” Scalia said in regards to the notion of a “living constitution.” “The Constitution is not a living organism,” he said. “It is a law … it should bring rigidity, not flexibility.” This theme of keeping the Constitution’s original form prevailed throughout his speech, and it was evident how passionate he is about preserving this ideal. One of my favorite moments was when he pointed out “there are a lot of stupid things out there, but that does not mean they are all unconstitutional.” It turns out Justice Scalia is actually incredibly funny, and although I don’t agree with everything he said, he was a lively, passionate speaker. While I was disappointed he did not talk about McCutcheon, the speech was provocative nonetheless. The most impactful thing Justice Scalia touched on in his lecture was that Constitutional issues should not be viewed as a fight to the death between liberals and conservatives. The court was not meant to be a battleground, but a place to appreciate the original doctrine handed down by our Founding Fathers so it can be preserved as much as possible. In the words of Justice Scalia, “The Constitution is not an empty bottle left to be filled and refilled by every generation.” Katie Dean is a junior in political science. She can be reached at xvd541@utk.edu.

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Male gaze can both objectify, empower modern women Knight Errant by

Victoria Knight I am worn out, and yet I am still not finished with my thesis. Part of it is my own Hamlet-esque procrastination, part of it is the overwhelming amount of work every one of our professors piles on us at the end of the semester, and part of it is probably the subconscious realization that when I finish this, it is going to be just about time to leave this university. And, gosh, I have mixed feelings about that. But I digress. This thesis, though – it’s not hard because I don’t enjoy what I’m writing about. That’s not the problem at all; really, it has taught me a lot. Especially because I did a thesis focused on English literature, despite being a microbiology major. So I’m going to share with you what I’ve learned along the way. Partly because its been the only thing on my mind for weeks, and partly because I love my topic. But mostly, I’m going to share some of it with you because there are things in it which need to be shared. Sorry, not sorry, in advance.

Editor-in-Chief: R.J. Vogt Managing Editor: Melodi Erdogan Chief Copy Editor: Gage Arnold News Editor: Hanna Lustig Asst. News Editor: Emilee Lamb Sports Editor: Troy Provost-Heron Asst. Sports Editor: Dargan Southard Arts & Culture Editor: Claire Dodson Asst. Arts & Culture Editor: Cortney Roark Online Editor: Samantha Smoak

makes us look skinny, our hair is looking fabulous today and we are overall presenting ourselves in a positive manner. Even if we are dressed in our more scanty, going-out wear, we want to be complimented, just as long as it is done respectfully. So feeling ourselves to be under the gaze of others, looked at, appreciated and even possibly desired has a kind of heady power of its own over us. Knowing the way we look can attract others to us is, dare I say it, actually empowering. We have sexual agency. We have control over our own bodies, in whatever or whichever way we want to use them. And that is indeed a wonderful thing. Of course, depending on the context it is in, and the way it is done, the gaze can be degrading – but it does not always have to be. The male gaze may look upon us, but we have control over the power it can or cannot have. So some final words of wisdom: do what you want with your body. Dress for others if you so desire, or dress for yourself, or both. Compliment others sincerely and often. And think about the way you address others’ appearances, whether male or female, and most importantly, how you may talk about it. Plus fellas, don’t forget – there’s always a chance the females could gaze back. Victoria Knight is a senior in microbiology. She can be reached at vknight4@utk.edu.

How you can help mend America’s broken democracy Uncommon Sense by

Evan Ford I’d wager to guess a lot of students feel the same way about the U.S. elections as they do about our own student government — our vote doesn’t matter. After all, if we were to vote, we’d be one in the 126 million people who voted in 2012. A drop in the bucket. It’s hard to get over those overwhelming numbers. But it’s even harder given the way our politics work in America. The truth is, American democracy is broken. See, democracy is supposed to work so each person’s vote has equal power. This means each person is treated equally in the political sphere, and every person has equal power to control how our country works through voting. As we know, things haven’t exactly gone this way in our country. For the first 90 years, the only people who could vote were white men. But the story didn’t end with the 15th and 19th Amendments, as administrators were using high poll taxes to deny African Americans and the poor the ability to vote up until 1964, when states ratified the 24th Amendment.

Yet even in 2014, democracy in America is still not well. The right of each person to equal political power, and therefore the right to democracy, is under ongoing and intentional attack by radical conservatives. This is a strong statement, but it is backed by the facts. Consider the biggest myth — voter fraud. After the 2012 election, 37 states have shown they are concerned some voters may be voting twice. In response, several states have passed voter ID bills, requiring voters to present a photo ID at the booth. In every state with the strictest voter ID laws, Republicans have passed the bill. In several, Democratic governors have vetoed these laws. First, let’s just establish the fact there is no voter fraud problem in the U.S. According to Slate, the “rate [of fraud] is infinitesimal” at 600 incidences in the last six elections (a rate of 1 in 15 million). Forbes calls voter fraud “A Massive, AntiDemocratic Deception.” According to the ACLU, Texas has seen zero incidences of voter fraud in the last five years, and they still passed the strictest laws to date. It may not seem that big a deal to require voters to have a photo ID, but these laws disproportionately affect those who have to work for a living and have no time to track down a birth certificate. For those without a car, living in a metro area and working two jobs, going to a DMV for a whole afternoon is prohibitively costly. Republicans, who tend to be white and wealthy,often

don’t have these problems. In addition, the Supreme Court recently made it possible for the wealthy to give as much money as they want to political elections. This money has massive power in influencing the way people vote — both senators and everyday people. And Republicans are using that power — 60 percent of political funding came from 159 Republican donors, giving more than $1 million each. This type of money wins elections, and we know it. We also know we don’t have that type of money, so what’s the point? Our national democracy is broken, and it’s clear the people breaking it are also the people winning. So as students, what can we do? There’s a lot of work to do to fix our national democracy, and you can do your best to support organizations that fight for liberty and stay informed. As silly as it sounds, you can vote — for people who fight for real democracy and freedom from corruption. We can also have a huge impact in our local elections. This November, we will have a clear opportunity for us to show the power of democracy. We’ll have a chance to remove Stacey Campfield for his failure to represent us by voting against him, or to affirm his actions by either voting for him or being too apathetic to vote at all. Evan Ford is a junior in philosophy. He can be reached at eford6@utk.edu.

Get Fuzzy • Darby Conley

Timtation Creations • Tim Brunson

EDITORIAL

Most of us have heard of Jane Austen, the English female author who produced perhaps one of the greatest novels of all time, “Pride and Prejudice,” as well as five other completed novels which don’t garner quite as much attention. The whole premise of my thesis is the concept of the “male gaze” and how it plays a role in the interactions between male and female characters in Austen’s novels. To clarify, the male gaze is a film theory that is aptly applied to literature as well, and it states that movies and commercials are shot primarily from a heterosexual male perspective. Think about the way a woman’s body is portrayed in many films, especially in recent Hardee’s commercials: the camera will pan down a woman, focusing on certain body parts and objectifying her. Now, as a modern woman, I believe we can think of the heterosexual male gaze on females in two ways – one where it is oppressive and one where it is empowering. Most would agree we do not want to be objectified – we do not want men to look at us just for our bodies, but for the other things about us, as well. No one enjoys the catcalls on the street, side comments as we walk by groups, yells from cars or even creepers at the bar. And yet, we do want to look good. We want to be told we are pretty, that our dress

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Classifieds: (865) 974-4931 orderad@utdailybeacon.com Editor-in-Chief: (865) 974-2348 editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com Main Newsroom: (865) 974-3226 editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com The Daily Beacon is published by students at The University of Tennessee Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters and Tuesday and Friday during the summer semester. The offices are located at 1340 Circle Park Drive, 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The newspaper is free on campus and is available via mail subscription for $200/year, $100/semester or $70/summer only. It is also available online at: www.utdailybeacon.com LETTERS POLICY: The Daily Beacon welcomes all letters to the editor and guest columns from students, faculty and staff. Each submission is considered for pub-

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Thursday, April 17, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

Kelsi Walker Contributor South Carolinabased Southern rockers Needtobreathe released the group’s fifth studio album, entitled “Rivers in the Wasteland,� this week. “Wasteland� came on the heels of the group’s recent tour announcement: the band will spend two nights at the Tennessee Theatre on Aug. 20 and 21. Although the album has a slightly different sound to it, the band did not disappoint with this effort, the group’s first since 2011’s “The Reckoning.� When the rock tracks on the album, such as “State I’m In� and “Feet, Don’t Fail Me Now,� are mixed with lyricallyraw songs like “Wasteland� and “Difference Maker,� the record shapes out to be another accomplished album for Needtobreathe fans to enjoy. “Wasteland� is the follow-up to a film produced by the band on its YouTube account called “Prove the Poets Wrong.� This film followed the band through touring this past year and records discourse between members of the band. The YouTube film was provided before the record was released to give insight to fans about where the band was at and how far they have come.

Lyrically, the album seems to capture the journey the band has been on since releasing “The Reckoning.� The album starts out with a song called “Wasteland.� This song paints pictures of trials but also the hope seen within them in a verse that says, “In this wasteland where I’m living, there is a crack in the door filled with light, and it’s all that I need to get by.� This song is a perfect opening track that sounds like the Needtobreathe fans have come to know, but it also leaves room for the band to bend. Bending is exactly what happens in the next track, “State I’m In.� The beginning of the song starts off as though it were a Beach Boys song before jumping into a rock song with a solid beat, while it continues the band’s lyrical journey with, “I don’t know what state I’m in, but we’ve got a ways to go.� This is followed by another rock track, “Feet, Don’t Fail Me Now,� and then the album slips into a Needtobreathe nostalgia with a song called “Oh, Carolina� — about missing home. This song displays the folksy tones mixed with Southern rock Needtobreathe fans have fallen in love with. See NEEDTOBREATHE on Page 6

croark4@utk.edu

TIM LEE 3

• Photo Courtesy of Bill Foster

Needtobreathe’s latest album takes listeners on figurative, lyrical journey

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

continued from Page 1 Tim and Susan met at a fraternity party at a college neither one of them attended. Tim’s then-band was invited to play the party, while Susan was there at the invitation of her brother. “I ended up at the party because my parents were worried that I wasn’t dating anybody, and they thought that my brother needed to introduce me to some of his ‘nice’ frat-boy brothers,� Susan said. “It was a well-laid plan, but I liked boys in bands. I was more partial to music than fraternity life.� Married for 32 years, some couples may cringe at the idea of working so closely together. However, the self-described “goofballs� swear to have never had an argument stem from their close work together. Susan attributes their success now to avoiding such a venture at the beginning of their relationship. She has since seen many of their friends who played music together earlier on split up. “Maybe that’s why it’s totally appropriate that I didn’t start playing until we’d been married 20-something years,� Susan said. Now, the only disagreement they have is over songwriting. Susan has a tendency to put off finishing a song for a couple months, while Tim claims he “can’t sit on a song for two or three hours.� Yet Tim’s encouragement has kept their musical relationship steady. “He’s not critical at all really,� Susan said. “He’ll make suggestions about things for me, but he’s not like mean critical or anything like that. He’s been, the entire time, so encouraging. I think that has really helped me get better more than anything.� The band can often be found at Barley’s Taproom and Pizzeria or the Pilot Light. However, their connection with Pilot Light runs a little deeper, as

Tim, right, and Susan Bauer Lee perform with drummer Chris Bratta as the band Tim Lee 3. Susan believes “the philosophy of the Pilot Light is a lot like our own.� Every October, Tim Lee 3 plays what they call a 4x4, where they take up a residency at the venue every Thursday at 7:30 p.m. for the month. “The Pilot Light is probably our favorite place just because it’s just a music place only,� Tim said. “There are plenty of other places in town that we like to play. It’s not the only one we like. But Jason Boardman that owns it is all about having stuff go on.� When they aren’t playing, Tim and Susan have “day jobs� working from home in magazine production. They also do work with basset hounds. Yet, Tim Lee 3 never takes a backseat for long, as they are always working on new material. According to Tim, the band doesn’t “get caught up in that genre game.� Instead, he believes the group’s sound is distinctly rock ‘n’ roll. Recently, a band contacted Tim Lee 3 wanting to play a show together and voiced concern their outlaw, country sound wouldn’t mix with Tim Lee 3’s, to which Tim explained they

“just play with people we like, and we don’t care if it supposedly goes together.� “My pat explanation is that it’s rock ‘n’ roll, and rock ‘n’ roll is that melting pot of everything,� Tim said. “Of folk and blues and country, jazz and creole and everything. Anything that can be distilled down to three chords and a cloud of dust.� Even their songwriting reflects the sense of variety both Tim and Susan see in their music. Despite being a three-piece band, they still write what they want and avoid lingering on whether they can pull it off with what they have. They “just do,� Tim said. “That’s kind of the beauty of rock ‘n’ roll, too; that there are no rules,� Tim said. “People get caught up in it and go, ‘There’s this rule and that rule, and there are certain things, like drummers should keep their shirt on.’ But it’s not like we enforce that or write tickets if a drummer loses his shirt, that’s just common sense. “Our definition of it all is pretty loose. It’s all just music. We’re all playing the same three chords. Why worry about what you call it?�

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, April 17, 2014 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE Vinyl collecting puts spin on scavenging

Jenna Butz Staff Writer

an LP. Yet, that’s half the fun. Record collecting has led me to the tiniest neighborhoods in St. Louis and Milwaukee where I searched for Father John Misty’s album for months last summer. Record stores were a large part of how I discovered Knoxville when I started school here in August. They also helped me realize my deep love for Nashville. This Saturday, I will return to Nashville for the extended weekend. There, I will jump between Grimey’s and Jack White’s Third Man Records to indulge in some much needed vinyl crate digging. I will also have the pleasure of hearing local artists celebrate with us and eat some foods I’ve been craving since I left home after Spring Break. There is nothing specific I am looking to purchase. I’m in more of a browsing mood. I want to enjoy the sounds and people and the hunt. Often, I feel like we can forget the wonder that comes from searching for something new. Record Store Day is where we remind ourselves and each other to enjoy the scavenger hunt for that album you always wanted to know if it was good or not or stumble upon that gem you forgot how much you wanted. Most importantly though, Record Store Day is the chance to converse with fellow collectors. Chances are we will compliment each other on our musical tastes and discuss how good that band is live. These are always the conversation topics I have when I enter record stores. Seriously, almost every single time. Record Store Day is when a million of these conversations happen at once. And I can’t wait for Saturday.

I’m not really sure what got me into vinyl. My father has always had a decently impressive collection spread between his closet and my grandparents’ basement back in Wisconsin. I think my cousin had a few albums he never found on CD before the age of digital downloads. And I’ve had a few friends and boyfriends with small collections they cherished. Whatever it was, I asked for my own record player two Christmases ago and have slowly been building my personal vinyl library ever since. From Death Cab for Cutie’s anniversary release of “Transatlanticism” to a copy of The Doors’ single “Touch Me,” I have searched everywhere I go for favorites new and old. Now, this is not to say records are convenient. Honestly, paying $25 for music seems virtually horrific since iTunes and Amazon started letting us purchase digitally for $1. Also, when I’m cozy in bed, getting up to flip the record over sometimes annoys me so much I instead stare at my ceiling in silence. However, there is something so appealing about collecting something that isn’t stamps or state quarters. There is a weird hunt to this one. While records are gaining in popularity as a music medium, they still haven’t reached stardom Jenna Butz is a freshman in where everyone is producing vinyl. journalism and electronic media. There are plenty of albums we She can be reached at jkw546@ have yet to even imagine touching utk.edu.

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

Record Store Day brings musical throwback to fans Jenna Butz Staff Writer

For music lovers and collectors everywhere, Record Store Day is a party, and a big one at that. Throughout Tennessee, record stores will supply patrons with food and music along with exclusive releases this Saturday. Not going to be in Knoxville to celebrate? We’ve got you covered at home, too.

Nashville Knoxville Memphis Goner Records (Memphis, Tenn.): At 2:30 p.m., the gazebo outside the store will host Mark Edgar Stuart followed by Robby Grant and Tyler Keith. Also, Goner will host a “cheapo” sidewalk sale to help those of us without much money to spend on the coveted new releases and find something a little more in our price range. Ex-Cult will release an exclusive release just for the store on limited edition red vinyl.

Chattanooga Grimey’s New and Preloved Music (Nashville, Tenn.): The vinyl store staple has jam-packed its day with food, meet and greets and performances. The store will have food from Jeni’s Splendid Ice Cream, Street Provisions, Smoke Et Al, Crankees Pizzeria and Olive & Sinclair Chocolate Co., along with the selection of craft beers available at the Basement. Also, live shows and DJ sets will alternate in the parking lot starting with The Lower Caves and ending with Apache Relay. Also, if you purchase NEEDTOBREATHE’s record there, you get to go meet them, too.

NEEDTOBREATHE continued from Page 5 The fifth track on the album is called “Difference Maker,” and it beautifully twists honesty and sarcasm into a song that leaks humility in every line. It is not a musically complicated song, but rather it points to the raw and pained lyrics of the “difference maker.” The journey of the album continues with “Rise Again,” shifting the tone of the album from “a crack in the door filled with light” to “singing farewell king

Mayfield’s All Killer No Filler (Chatt anooga, Tenn.): The small store mostly caters to fans of punk, metal and indie rock, but that’s no reason to skip the festivities. Bragging there will be “lots of records, live music and friends” on its Facebook event, the store will be packed with performances from Ashley Krey, Keith Crisp, Anna Banana, Joshua Songs and Stoop Kids.

Lost & Found Records (Knoxville, Tenn.): Once, Tim Lee 3 called Lost & Found the group’s favorite record store. Now, the Knoxville-based rock band will play at the store as part of the Record Store Day celebration. Maybe you can even get the band members to eat a Good Golly Tamale with you after their set. Also, don’t miss Dick Wagner’s set right before them. The guitarist and songwriter has worked with Alice Cooper, Lou Reed and Kiss, just to name a few.

of the broken, so long my friend.” The mood of the record turns from burdened to filled with light, and this lightness and peace can be heard in the joyful sound of “The Heart.” The song creates a theme of thankfulness in the first line, “Ain’t no gift like the present tense,” shifting from singing for hope in the future to hope in the present. This thankfulness is displayed in the most unique and fresh song on the album, “Multiplied.” This track has a different sound to it than the rest of the album, with the opening of the track being a guitar riff and lead vocalist Bear

Disc Exchange (Knoxville, Tenn.): The popular music supplier will begin its celebration at noon with a performance by local alternative country band Brandon Fulson and the Realbillys. During that time, feel free to hang out with WUTK 90.3 The Rock and chow down on the food provided by vendors such as Savory and Sweet Truck, Bull’s BBQ Food Truck and Farm-toGriddles Crepes while shuffling through the hundreds of exclusive releases that will be for sale. Live music will play all day with the party ending with rapper Lil’ Iffy at 8 p.m.

Rinehart’s voice, then a drum beat and choir coming in on the second verse along with the use of a synthesizer to create a very unique sound. The track “Brother” tends to put perspective on the discourse of the band in 2013, with the chorus saying, “Brother, let me be your shelter.” The album wraps up with “More Heart, Less Attack,” an acoustic, folk ballad making a statement of peace at the end of a high-energy rock album and allowing the listener to take in what they’ve just heard and process the journey.


Thursday, April 17, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 7 Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron

SPORTS

tprovost@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Dargan Southard Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon

msoutha1@utk.edu

Tennessee head coach Butch Jones runs out of the “T” prior to the Vols’ 23-21 victory over the South Carolina Gamecocks on Oct. 19, 2013, in Neyland Stadium.

Q&A: Butch Jones reflects, hones in on year two at Tennessee Troy Provost-Heron Sports Editor

Dargan Southard Assistant Sports Editor Sports Editor Troy ProvostHeron and Assistant Sports Editor Dargan Southard sat down with Tennessee head football coach Butch Jones for an exclusive interview about a multitude of subjects within the Tennessee football program, as well as college football at-large on Wednesday afternoon. Troy Provost-Heron: When you first took the job in December of 2012, did you expect the program to be as far along as it is now going into year two? Butch Jones: We have made monumental strides in a relatively short period of time, but we are nowhere where we need to be. But I continue to see progress on the field, off the field, in our culture and in our environment day-to-day. We have made significant strides in moving forward and we will continue to do that, and it’s great to see. Sometimes those steps in moving forward maybe aren’t measured in wins, but they are measured in everything else and eventually those will lead to wins. That’s why we need everyone to continue to help us go through this maturation phase of our football program and support it. Dargan Southard: Over the last 10 years, UT has had big non-conference games against “Power Six” schools, but as of late they’ve been even more prominent – going to Oregon, Oklahoma, Battle at Bristol, the 2015 opener at LP Field. What do those big out-of-conference games do in terms of returning Tennessee back to where it has been? BJ: First of all, it’s a great challenge, especially when you are trying to build – and rebuild – a football program. So much comes with winning. Your morale, how individuals perceive things, so it makes our schedule a great challenge, and then you couple that with playing in the toughest football conference in the country, which is the SEC, makes it even more challenging. But there’s also benefits that go along with it. Exposing your players. Playing against really good competition before you enter the SEC schedule. Also, going and competing in different venues. You look at the philosophy we are having now of playing neutral sight games and the ability to go into our backyard in Nashville and play in LP Field to open the 2015 season has really helped us from a recruiting standpoint, but it is also a way of rewarding our fan base. And then of course in 2016, being able to break the world

record for fan attendance in all of football. All of that prepares your team in so many ways throughout the course of training camp, but also for a bowl game. What it’s like to prepare and go play in a neutral-site environment. With that said, we fully anticipate even though LP Field is a quote-onquote neutral site and Bristol is a neutral site, we expect those to be a Tennessee fan base. DS: With the surprising news that came out of the basketball department Tuesday, by the time they hire the new head coach, there will be seven coaches in seven years between the football and basketball departments. How important is it to regain that stability inside the athletic department? BJ: We’re going through that right now from a football standpoint. You win with stability, and you win with continuity. Every situation is different. Every situation has its reasons for why it has happened. All I can speak on is behalf of football. We have to get stability and continuity in our football program. That’s what we are building here, and that’s what we now have. That’s what we have for the future. When you look at that, you see the advantages of having continuity and stability. You see a topfive ranked recruiting class. You see a program making tremendous strides in the classroom, on the field, off the field, the culture, the environment that’s in place, and that all comes with stability. That comes with having the same language each and every day. They are not learning new people because at the end of the day, every great family, every great organization is bonded upon trust. We talk about trust is earned over time, and when you have continuity and stability you are able to build that trust, and what we have within our football family is that trust and that love that’s critical in terms of developing and implementing your program. TP: A college football game hasn’t been played in three months and yet college football continues to make headlines throughout the country with the unionization at Northwestern and the NCAA’s announcement on Tuesday that they will provide players with unlimited meals. What are your thoughts about everything going on in college football right now? BJ: I think it’s a great illustration of the ever-changing landscape that is college football – that is athletics in general. It’s society, it’s the world that we live in, and it’s always about being able to adapt and adjust and to make the most out of changes. It’s how you embrace change. And that cuts back to the stability and continuity conversation we just talked about. But I like the meals. Everything in our program is

based on the total development of the student-athlete. And so much of it is the rehabilitation of injuries. It’s the importance of nutrition. It’s about developing and meeting your fullest potential. Everything is about recovery as well, because we ask so much from our student-athletes. So now to have the ability to give them three solid meals and to be able to gauge them from a nutritional standpoint, I think that really helps in their overall development. I think you’ll see gains off the field, but I also think you’ll see gains from it in the classroom from the nutrition end of it – the ability to recover each and every day. So I think that is extremely healthy for the game of football.

Read more online For the full conversation with Coach Jones, visit utdailybeacon.com.

Lady Vols look to fend off streaking Bulldogs Taylor White Staff Writer Coming off a hard-fought series win at Texas A&M, the No. 4 Tennessee Lady Vols softball team will host an up-and-coming Mississippi State squad for a three-game weekend series starting on Friday. Mississippi State has struggled thus far in SEC play but seems to be righting the ship coming into the series. Last weekend, the Bulldogs took two out of three games from SEC-leader Alabama, marking the first time the Crimson Tide have dropped a series all season. “It’s never hard to pay attention to anybody in the SEC,” co-head coach Karen Weekly said at Wednesday’s media availability. “Even the teams that might not have .500 records at this point in the season are very good.” Mississippi State has already matched their win total from last year with 33 victories and has continued to improve each year since head coach Vann Stuedeman took over the program. Stuedeman is in his third season in Starkville and has drastically turned the program around. He has the Bulldogs on pace to reach their third consecutive post-season appearance. “Mississippi State has more wins at this point in the season than at any time since Vann Stuedeman has been there,” Weekly said. “They are a very good team, and they are on their way to making Regionals for the third straight year. Taking two out of three from Alabama should give them a whole lot of confidence.” Unlike most programs, the Bulldogs don’t possess an established ace, preferring to take a pitcher by committee approach. They split their starts between three different pitchers, and opposing

hitters are never certain who they will be facing. “Our coaches are really rigorous with our film,” sophomore Hailey Tobler said. “We’ve seen what the pitchers can do, but it’s not different than any other team we face. Just see the ball, hit the ball.” Alison Owen has been the most consistent pitcher for the Bulldogs this year, posting a 16-8 record with an ERA of 2.00. She has struck out 193 batters in only 146.2 innings pitched. Alexsis Silkwood and Jacey Punches round out the Mississippi State staff, posting records of 10-5 and 7-1, respectively. Throwing three pitchers can make the Bulldogs a difficult team to prepare for at the plate, Weekly said. “It does make it difficult (to prepare),” she said. “It also makes it more difficult that we didn’t have them on our schedule last year. We’re looking at video from two years ago when we played them, but none of those pitchers were there.” Mississippi State has struggled to hit the ball at times this year, with only one player batting over .300. Caroline Seitz has been the Bulldogs top hitter this year, leading the team in average. She is hitting .340 with 29 RBI and seven home runs. Sam Lenahan is one of Mississippi’s most dangerous hitters, hitting a team-high eight homeruns to go along with 35 RBI on the year. She has struggled with consistency, though, hitting only .248 so far this season. While the Bulldogs struggle to hit for average, they have several players who are capable of hitting the ball out of the park, which is a stark contrast to the small ball teams that have been on the Vols schedule recently. “I don’t think it really matters to us,” Weekly said. “We face different kinds of offenses all the time. “You like to keep the ball in the park for sure and let your defense have a chance to make plays.”


8 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, April 17, 2014 Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron

SPORTS

tprovost@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Dargan Southard

msoutha1@utk.edu

2 Western Carolina 2 0 0

3 0 2

W: Bret Marks (3-0) L: Bryan Sammons (6-2)

4 1 2

5 0 0

6 0 0

Tennessee B. Marks D. Owenby T. Bettencourt P. Lenstrohm J. Peterson A. Lee

Tennessee

N. Senzel T. Smart S. Price

BASEBALL continued from Page 1 Price, who came into Wednesday’s contest hitting a dismal .125 (3-for-24) in his last seven games, fell behind 1-2 before fouling off three straight pitches that eventually led to the run-scoring two-bagger. “We need Scott to be in character,” Serrano said. “It’s never about one guy on this team, but I know how good of a hitter Scott Price is and has been throughout most of his career. If he could just get close to that it’s going to help our lineup tremendously because he’s a guy we look to help our offense succeed.” More cushion came just a few frames later as Serrano’s squad pushed across a pair of runs in both the third and fourth — each scoring spurt aided by one of the Catamounts’ 10 free passes. Derek Lance and Taylor

9 0 X

R 2 6

H 8 12

E 2 0

Renewed mentality helps Tobler settle into big role with Lady Vols Garrett Ahmad Staff Writer

B. Sammons D. Bray A. Barr J. Waszak B. Danielson N. Williams

A. Martin B. Strong J. Long

8 0 0

Save: None

PITCHING STATS Western Carolina

BATTING LEADERS Western Carolina

7 0 0

SOFTBALL

Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon

QU Tenn

1 1 2

Tennessee 6

AB 3 3 3 AB 2 4 4

IP 1.0 0.2 2.0 1.1 2.0 1.0

H 3 2 3 2 1 1

R 2 0 4 0 0 0

ER 2 0 3 0 0 0

BB 2 2 2 2 2 0

K 0 0 1 1 0 0

IP 2.0 2.0 2.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

H 3 5 0 0 0 0

R 1 1 0 0 0 0

ER 1 1 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0

K 2 4 2 2 0 2

R 0 1 0 R 2 1 0

H 1 1 1 H 2 1 1

RBI 1 0 1 RBI 0 1 2

BB 0 0 0 BB 3 1 0

SO 0 2 0 SO 0 0 1

HR 0 0 0 HR 0 0 0

Schultz opened the third with a single and a walk respectively, moved up 90 feet on a fielding miscue by WCU third baseman Dylan Prevatte and later both touched the plate without the benefit on a hit. In the ensuing frame, it was Senzel who drew a walk — one of three on the night — and eventually raced around the diamond on Taylor Smart’s RBI triple. The Vols’ senior third baseman ultimately scored as well, crossing home on a wild pitch for UT’s sixth run of the night. “These weekday games are games we really look forward to after the weekend series because we carry our momentum or fix things that we didn’t do right in the past series,” said Stewart, who ended the night with four hits. “We’re just really happy we got a game in since we couldn’t go to Virginia.” Making his second start in nine days, Marks (3-0, 4.82 ERA) went only two innings, allowing

just three hits, one run and no walks with a pair of strikeouts. The Roswell, Ga., native kicked off a six-pitcher outing in which every UT hurler tossed less than three innings — a common theme for almost all of UT’s midweek contests this season. But while a bullpen-heavy evening can sometimes deliver unpredictable and high-scoring affairs, the Vols’ relief corps was rather sharp Wednesday night. UT pitchers retired the final 17 Catamounts, didn’t surrender a hit after the fourth inning and finished the contest without issuing a single walk. “That’s better than a shutout,” Serrano said of his pitching staff’s zero free passes. “That’s what we strive to do each and every game, and I think that was the difference in the game. “We gave up some hits — that’s a good hitting team — but the difference was they had a lot of free passes and we didn’t.”

While some players on the Tennessee Lady Volunteers softball team have deservedly received national and SEC recognition for their performances so far this season, one player has quietly been playing as well as any of them. In just her second season, sophomore Haley Tobler has become a consistent starter for the Lady Vols and leads the team in batting average during conference play (.448). Tobler got her start at Winters High School in Winters, Calif., where she was a multi-sport athlete playing basketball, soccer and volleyball in addition to softball while trying to compete with her two older brothers, who also played multiple sports. Ultimately, she chose softball, because at 5-foot-6 she said she was too short for volleyball and was not fond of all the sprinting involved in basketball. Softball’s variety appealed to her the most, as she played all over the field, including pitcher, during her time in high school. In her four years as a Winters Warrior, Tobler hit .503 at the plate with 73 total RBI, which garnered the attention of Tennessee, her father’s hometown school. “If I really wanted to go somewhere, it would have been Tennessee,” Tobler said. “Once the opportunity presented itself, I was like ‘OK, I gotta take it,’ because obviously Tennessee softball is huge – anywhere in the nation, they know Tennessee softball.” In 2012, Tobler joined the long list of Californians to play softball at Tennessee, including eight fellow current team members. However, she came to Knoxville without knowing anyone but her stepsister, who also attends UT.

Sophomore Haley Tobler watches the ball after making contact in the Lady Vols’ 7-6 victory over the Florida Gators at Sheri Parker Lee Stadium on March 30. It was during preseason her first year that Tobler said she had her favorite moment of her career. “We were in Western Kentucky – just a little fall game that didn’t really mean much – (co-head coach Ralph Weekly) put me in left field, and I ended up throwing a runner out at the plate, and that memory has just stuck in my head this whole time. “Our coach might have forgot about it, but those are the plays that I love to be in the position to make.” After playing only a bit-part role (18 at-bats for two hits, 0 starts) in her freshman season, Tobler was determined to work on her hitting in the offseason to gain a starting role. “I was coming in with the mentality that I was going to start,” Tobler said. “I needed to start because I needed to help out my team, and with all the freshmen coming with the same mentality and pushing even harder because there are kids younger than me working to get my spot. “So I had to beat them out because you can’t let a kid younger than you beat you out.” The coaching staff took

note of her improved hitting at the plate and have rewarded her with 22 starts so far this season “Haley is the most improved hitter on the team,” co-head coach Karen Weekly said. “Haley’s done a really nice job at the bat and that’s what has been keeping her in the lineup.” Tobler played much of the season at center field until the coaching staff changed the defensive scheme last week and put freshman Megan Geer at center field and Tobler at second base. It turned out to be a seamless transition for Tobler as she led the team with a .750 batting average against Texas A&M this past weekend. “I just felt like any other person on this team would have been trying to get the job done,” Tobler said, “so it was my job to get it done for my team.” In her second season, Tobler has finally earned the opportunity to be a consistent starter and has taken full advantage. “It’s awesome,” Tobler said. “All my hard work is finally paying off. It feels really good to be out there with my teammates, just ready for any ball that comes to me.”


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