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Issue 62, Volume 122

Monday, April 15, 2013

Students support cancer research R.J. Vogt

News Editor UT students raised more than $68,000 to fund cancer research and support cancer survivors in Friday night’s “Relay for Life.” The official total of $68,589 – which may continue to rise — outstretched last year’s total of $65,000 and puts UT ahead of the current SEC fundraising leader, Auburn University. As president of Relay for Life at UT, Drew Nash was proud of the Volunteer effort. “I’m pleased this year because we were able to raise more money than last year and we had more participants,” Nash, a junior in computer science, said. “I thought the involvement was phenomenal this year, I certainly hope to see it grow next year.” The announced goal of $75,000 was not reached, but Nash admitted that the Relay committee’s actual goal was $70,000. Fundraising technically continues until September, and Nash is confident that more money will roll in. The American Cancer Society began holding “Relay for Life” in some form or another in 1985. It symbolizes the fight of cancer patients against the deadly disease; volunteers continuously walk around a track all night in honor of the patients who fight a disease that never sleeps. Instead of slumber, participants are encouraged to practice solidarity with those they support. See RELAY on Page 3

‘Sex Week’ successful despite controversy Justin Joo

Staff Writer UT’s now infamous “Sex Week” has come to a close. The week-long series of events coordinated primarily by the student group Sexual Empowerment and Awareness at Tennessee (SEAT) made both local and national headlines when it came under fire from state Senator Stacey Campfield and Representative Bill Dunn, who publicly ridiculed the event and demanded that state funding for the event be pulled. Soon after, Chancellor Jimmy Cheek, with support from System President Joe DiPietro, pulled $11,145 in state funds from “Sex Week’s” budget; $6,700 from student fees were allowed to remain with SEAT. Fortunately for “Sex Week,” the lost funds were soon made up in the form of private donations from students, alumni and other supporters. Earlier this month at a Faculty Senate meeting, Cheek briefly addressed “Sex Week” and its financial controversy, saying that pulling the funds was a very difficult and much debated choice. While having to pull the funds, Cheek said that he still supported the students and their right to hold the event. “I think, number one, you got to remember, we completely defended the idea that the students and the student organization can invite whomever they would like to, whomever they want to, to speak at these events,” Cheek said. “As long as it’s not obscene or indecent behavior, and that’s defined by the Supreme Court, then they can continue that discussion.” Cheek also pointed out that it wasn’t just complaints coming from Nashville that reached his office but also calls from concerned alumni who expressed qualms about “Sex Week.” But to all “Sex Week’s” detractors, Brianna Rader, co-founder of SEAT, had a positive and hopeful response to them. “I would say, please don’t just trust what you hear,” the junior College Scholar said. “Don’t just see the words ‘Sex Week’ and assume the worst. Look at our materials, read our

Jalynn Baker • The Daily Beacon

Lynn Stacco talks to the audience during the lecture ‘From Rocky Bottom to a Rocky Top’ on Tuesday as a part of ‘Sex Week.’ online ‘About’ section … I promise it’s not some salacious, outrageous event.” And for many, “Sex Week” was just that. SEAT estimated that more than 4,000 students attended the week’s events, with none of them leaving in disgust. Jacob Clark, the other co-founder of SEAT, was very pleased with that number, as SEAT had expected only 2,000 attendees. For him, the best part was seeing those 4,000 students enjoying the events. “I’m relieved but really, really happy with the way things turned out,” the junior College Scholar said. “... The best thing about all of it was getting to see the audience response. When you program, your biggest fear is that no one will show up and then your second biggest fear is that people who do show up won’t participate, and that definitely wasn’t a problem.” Rader was also satisfied with the way “Sex Week” turned out. “I am extremely pleased with how everything went,” she said. “From the fact that everyone on campus knows about us to the fact that we raised so much money by ourselves and then to the fact that people actually showed up to the events. All of that makes me very happy.” But although “Sex Week” is over for now, Rader, Clark and the rest of SEAT’s executive board will soon

be planning for next year’s events. In what is estimated to be a nine-to-ten month endeavor, SEAT will now be looking into scheduling, event topics and, most importantly, funding. “We want state funding for next year,” Rader said. “It’s not sustainable for us to have to fund-raise everything privately every year. The university will probably be better equipped to deal with any sort of questions from outside the university because it already happened one year. “However the big issue is whether we’ll be able to use state funding or not.” Rader also said that part of the future “Sex Week” planning involves choosing what topics will be discussed. Some potential new topics that might be included in future “Sex Week” events could be media and sexuality, pornography and intercultural takes on sexuality. Another concern that SEAT will soon be looking into is when to schedule “Sex Week” for next year. Planning one event can be difficult enough, but trying to work a week-long series with several events happening each day is an entirely different beast. “It’s hard because you don’t want it around SGA week and you don’t want it … right before Spring Break,” Rader said. “I think this week was OK, but then again a lot of people had tests and projects because it’s later

in the semester, so we need to think about timing for that.” Despite the difficulties ahead, Clark is optimistic. Having one “Sex Week” under his and SEAT’s belt, some of the early unknowns and logistics will already be prepared for in the future, making “Sex Week” planning a little easier. “The hard part of this year was laying out the format for a week,” Clark said. “Figuring out where to book things and how stuff works. But it’s got to be much easier now since we’ve kind of got all of that figured out. The logistics of the program will not take as much time or work as it did this year for next year.” But no matter what difficulties have been surpassed and what lies ahead, Clark and Rader are both looking forward to working on “Sex Week” again. The experience, while daunting, has been one that SEAT believes in and thinks is necessary for UT. “I have never been more proud of anything,” Rader said. “I’ve never worked so hard on anything in my life or worked with a group of people so intricately … I feel like, one, I’ve developed a lot of skills and learned a lot out of this. But two, because we were forced to work together so closely through so many controversies, I feel like I’ve developed a new very close group of friends.”

OIT workshop focuses on iPads Samantha Smoak Copy Editor Thirteen faculty members practiced taking their best “selfies” during an exercise intended to teach the use of the front-facing camera on the iPad during an OIT workshop at the Commons in Hodges Library last Thursday. The session, titled “How to use your iPad,” was designed to help interested professors become more confident in using their iPads. Christina Goode, an IT specialist and development and training instructor, said that many professors are interested in the latest technology but struggle to find the time to learn how to use it.

“Carving out the time to make sure that (they) have that particular device or technique down pat so that it will flow smoothly in classrooms (can be a challenge),” Goode said. “(Faculty) really are interested in how they can better classes, it’s just maybe more of a time commitment for some faculty … especially if they have a heavy course load.” Thursday was the eighth introductory iPad class offered by OIT. It served as the precursor to the workshop, “Mobile Technologies in the Classroom,” where professors learned about integrating technology in their classes. See IPAD on Page 3

Danielle Dyer • The Daily Beacon

Students mingle in Circle Park during ‘Relay for Life’ on Friday night.

INSIDE THE DAILY BEACON: Page Page Page Page Page Page Page Page Page

2 . . . . . . . In Short 3 . . . . . . . . . News 4 . . . . . . . Opinions 5 . . . .Arts & Culture 6 . . . .Arts & Culture 7 . . . .Arts & Culture 8 . . . . . . . . Sports 9 . . . . . . . . Sports 10 . . . . . . . . Sports

Manning looks forward to football season page 8

Drag Show lights up UC Auditorium page 7

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2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Monday, April 15, 2013 Associate Editor Preston Peeden

IN SHORT

ppeeden@utk.edu

Managing Editor Emily DeLanzo edelanzo@utk.edu

Around Rocky Top

Tia Patron • The Daily Beacon

A student from the SEU Art Troupe performs during the ‘Confucius Institute Gala Stage Show: East Meets West’ on Friday.

THIS DAY IN

HISTORY

1865 — President Lincoln General Ulysses S. Grant, the overall Union commander. dies. Perhaps no group was more President Abraham grief stricken than the freed Lincoln, the 16th president of slaves. Although abolitionthe United States, dies from ists considered Lincoln slow an assassin’s bullet. Shot by in moving against slavery, John Wilkes Booth at Ford’s many freedmen saw “Father Theater in Washington the Abraham” as their savior. night before, Lincoln lived They faced an uncertain for nine hours before suc- world, and now had lost their cumbing to the severe head most powerful proponent. Lincoln’s funeral was held wound he sustained. Lincoln’s death came on April 19, before a funeral just after the surrender of train carried his body back to Confederate General Robert his hometown of Springfield, E. Lee’s army at Appomattox Illinois. During the two-week Court House, Virginia. journey, hundreds of thouLincoln had just served the sands gathered along the most difficult presidency in railroad tracks to pay their history, successfully leading respects, and the casket was the country through civil war. unloaded for public viewing His job was exhausting and at several stops. He and his overwhelming at times. He son, Willie, who died in the had to manage a tremendous White House of typhoid fever military effort, deal with in 1862, were interred on diverse opinions in his own May 4. Republican party, counter his Democratic critics, maintain 1947 — Jackie Robinson morale on the northern home breaks color barrier front, and keep foreign counOn this day in 1947, Jackie tries such as France and Great Britain from recognizing the Robinson, age 28, becomes Confederacy. He did all of the first African-American this, and changed American player in Major League history when he issued the Baseball when he steps onto Emancipation Proclamation, Ebbets Field in Brooklyn to converting the war goal from compete for the Brooklyn reunion of the nation to a Dodgers. Robinson broke the color barrier in a sport that crusade to end slavery. Now, the great man was had been segregated for more dead. Secretary of War than 50 years. Exactly 50 Edwin Stanton said, “Now, years later, on April 15, 1997, he belongs to the ages.” Robinson’s groundbreaking Word spread quickly across career was honored and his the nation, stunning a people uniform number, 42, was who were still celebrating retired from Major League the Union victory. Troops Baseball by Commissioner in the field wept, as did Bud Selig in a ceremony

attended by over 50,000 fans at New York City’s Shea Stadium. Robinson’s was the first-ever number retired by all teams in the league. Jack Roosevelt Robinson was born January 31, 1919, in Cairo, Georgia, to a family of sharecroppers. Growing up, he excelled at sports and attended the University of California at Los Angeles, where he was the first athlete to letter in four varsity sports: baseball, basketball, football and track. After financial difficulties forced Robinson to drop out of UCLA, he joined the army in 1942 and was commissioned as a second lieutenant. After protesting instances of racial discrimination during his military service, Robinson was court-martialed in 1944. Ultimately, though, he was honorably discharged. After the army, Robinson played for a season in the Negro American League. In 1945, Branch Rickey, general manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers, recruited Robinson, who was known for his integrity and intelligence as well as his talent, to join one of the club’s farm teams. In 1947, Robinson was called up to the Majors and soon became a star infielder and outfielder for the Dodgers, as well as the National League’s Rookie of the Year. In 1949, the right-hander was named the National League’s Most Valuable Player and league batting champ. Robinson played on the National League All-Star team from 1949 through 1954 and led the Dodgers to six National League pennants and one World Series, in 1955. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1962, his first year of eligibility. Despite his talent and success as a player, Robinson faced tremendous racial discrimination throughout his career, from baseball fans and some fellow players. Additionally, Jim Crow laws prevented Robinson from using the same hotels and restaurants as his teammates while playing in the South. After retiring from baseball in 1957, Robinson became a businessman and civil rights activist. He died October 24, 1972, at age 53, in Stamford, Connecticut. — This Day in History is courtesy of History.com.


Monday, April 15, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 News Editor RJ Vogt

CAMPUS NEWS RELAY

IPAD

continued from Page 1

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“We also had teams that were walking all night, I think the idea of each team having a spirit stick and actually carrying it around the track meant something,” Nash said. “We had a lot of those still going at four in the morning.” Scattered throughout Circle Park, the participants who were not walking the track perused booths from nearly 35 different student organizations. Each booth offered activities and snacks to continue raising money. “We sold muffins,” Elizabeth Stanfield, a sister of Alpha Chi Omega who attended this year’s “Relay,” said. Although Stanfield said the muffin sales did not raise much, the Alpha Chi chapter alone raised nearly $11,000. Stanfield, a freshman in anthropology, geography, and ecology and evolutionary biology, was in charge of their chapter’s “Relay” team. “A lot of it came down to me and my co-captain (Kellan Pearson) just reminding people and pushing them to call their friends, call their parents,” she said. “I called my parents and my parents’ friends and my aunts and uncles and grandparents. Most people … are pretty willing to donate to a cause like ‘Relay for Life.’” The Alpha Chi chapter was bested by UT’s Pi Beta Phi chapter, which raised nearly $13,000, but Stanfield said the fundraising was enjoyable no matter which student organization had the most success. “I think a lot of people also had fun fundraising. I know for me it was a good chance to catch up with some people I hadn’t talked to in a while,” she said, adding that one of her sisters, Sarah Weinstein-Bacal, raised more than $1,000 on her own. “I know she really enjoyed it,” Stanfield said. Those interested in helping with next year’s “Relay for Life” should email relay@utk.edu.

As Jonathan Jackson, the Student Government Association senate liaison on the Technology Services Committee and a sophomore in computer science, said he believes that iPads and other technologies have great potential in the classroom. “iPads, could, and somewhat already do, have the capacity to expand the possibilities they offer for educational uses,” Jackson said. “With the Blackboard App, everyone can have easy access to everything they can find on the online version of Blackboard. Textbooks are slowly becoming available for mobile devices and could help reduce the cost of hardback books. With support from OIT, classroom instruction

rvogt@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor David Cobb dcobb3@utk.edu

could be enhanced with tablets.” Goode, who led the workshop last Thursday, emphasized that many faculty members take advantage of workshops offered by OIT in order to learn about new technologies. “We have a lot of workshops (for faculty) to go with … online at UT software and also Blackboard Collaborate and … how to use the smart classroom and also why you would use it,” Goode said. “Then the research computing source group (has) a suite of workshops on different research software that’s offered here … there are online offerings too.” OIT offers workshops and classes for students in addition to the faculty-focused classes. “OIT offers numerous workshops for students,” Jackson said, “from web design workshops that feature

Dreamweaver, JavaScript and HTML to classes in using Microsoft Office products like Word and Excel. OIT has numerous workshops that can help students learn valuable skills that could be applied in careers outside of UT. There are even classes on learning about the numerous features of Google (named ‘Google It’) and Adobe Creative Suite products.” Jackson also emphasized that taking advantage of training from OIT can give students an advantage in their careers. “By being experienced in Microsoft Office products, students will have a step up from job candidates who have not had much experience with these heavily used products,” he said. A full schedule of workshops and training offered by OIT can be accessed online at oit.utk.edu/training.

Around Rocky Top

Students protest ‘Sex Week’ defunding Justin Joo Staff Writer While “Sex Week” was finishing its final events, a protest in its honor was also being conducted. Called “March In, Sit Out,” the march and protest were held to condemn the way Chancellor Jimmy Cheek and President Joe DiPietro have handled the funding of “Sex Week.” Likewise, the canceling of UT Memphis’ “Saving Ourselves” symposium was also part of the protest’s motivation. “Saving Ourselves” focused on HIV/STI in the African-American LGBTQ community. Pulling resources from the event has since been declared “a mistake” by the UT Health Science Center, who first rescinded the invitation to host the symposium. The protest was coordinated by Kayla Frye, freshman in global studies. What started out as shock upon hearing of “Sex Week’s” defunding only festered during Spring Break. It then transformed into action once she heard about other sexual health events getting defunded. “I started asking around, ‘Who would want to do a small protest?’” Frye recalled, “and then, well, I’ll make a (Facebook) page about it. We’ll be really dramatic about it. … It was supposed to be about 30 to 40 people.”

Word spread on the Internet, and soon more than 2,000 students had been invited. A little more than 150 confirmed that they would attend, although in the end around 40 showed up. When it appeared that so many people were going to be participating, Frye reached out to others for assistance. She soon learned that anger about “Sex Week” was not limited to UT Knoxville alone, and found support from areas such as UT Chattanooga, UT Memphis, MTSU and ETSU. Some students from UT Chattanooga even attended the protest. Frye said that the two main goals are getting apologies and a new commitment to sex education from the UT administration. “Ideally,” Frye said, “we’d want them to come out with a public apology to the Red Door Foundation (coordinators of the “Saving Ourselves” event) … to the ‘Sex Week’ organizers … and we want them to come out with a renewed and a very strong and very active commitment to bringing more sex education and sexual health events to campus. Starting at 4 p.m. on Friday, the protest consisted of a march from the Alumni Memorial Building Amphitheater and then going from Volunteer Boulevard to Cumberland Avenue, to Melrose Place and Circle Park. After the march, the protesters returned to the

amphitheater for speeches and statements from the individual protesters. Chants and protest signs were present throughout the march, including signs saying, “Chancellor Cheek, pulling out doesn’t work,” and “Stacey Campfield: Public (education) Enemy No. 1.” One of the protesters was a UT alumna, Tory Mills. She said that she joined the protest to show support in promoting sexual education on campus. “I think that for so long around the campus you see these hush-hush conversations about sex and a lot of people have misinformation,” Mills said. “So the ability to have open conversations and realize that this is about pubic health and not just about intercourse … there’s a lot more to it.” And for Frye, even though the protest came to an end, the dialogue about sexual health at the university is not over. She hopes that more discussions with the administration will continue so that what happened to “Sex Week” won’t happen again in the future. “We don’t want them back down on this and think just because the march is over, ‘Sex Week’ is over, it’s not an issue anymore,” Frye said. “Because this happened once, maybe we don’t get ‘Sex Week’ next year. … Maybe we don’t get any sex education events because it’s too controversial.”

Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon

Austin Whitelaw runs the Men’s 4x1500 Meter Relay during the 47th annual Sea Ray Relays.


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Monday, April 15, 2013 Editor-in-Chief Blair Kuykendall

OPINIONS

bkuykend@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Letters Editor to the

Humanities degree relevant for students Ron Walters’ column on April 9 concerning the value of the arts and sciences education made some very good points about the skills that can come from a humanities background. This semester I have researched how the humanities degree is viewed and what relevance it has today. As a graduating English major with a minor in music and a few hours short of a political science minor, I wanted to better understand how I can sell my degree to future employers in addition to being able to explain to others why my degree is still relevant. I concluded that the biggest issue with the humanities is how they are perceived today. The university is now seen not only as a place to learn but where careers begin. College is no longer four carefree years, but four to six years of finding internships and becoming involved with organizations, all for the purpose of getting a career kickstarted. Thus, students look to major in areas that clearly prescribe careers; an accountant will become an accountant, an engineer an engineer. This train of thought is the source of that dreaded, ubiquitous question all humanities majors face: “So what are you going to do with that?” The humanities are more abstract in that they teach many skills, but they may not be directly spelled out like an accounting or engineering degree. A religious studies student may write a paper on Rastafarianism, but how would that be of value in a job interview? To write that paper, the student had to sit down and thoroughly research the topic and then compile the information into a cohesive paper. In the workplace, an employee who can research something complex and explain it well to others would be invaluable. An interviewer may not care about Rastafarianism, but he or she should look at the process and skills it took to write the

paper. Walters’ column focused on the humanities in the job market, and while it is important to cover that aspect, the humanities go far beyond that, too. Some wonder why the humanities departments should continue to be funded. If they do not clearly train students for profitable careers, then what use are they? Anyone who thinks this should reconsider their beliefs. The humanities are a part of everyone’s life. Think of “Titanic” without “My Heart Will Go On,” or “Rocky” without “Eye of the Tiger.” Imagine “Saving Private Ryan” or “Forrest Gump” without its wellresearched scenes. J.R.R. Tolkien was both a writer and historian — without him we would not have “The Lord of the Rings” or “The Hobbit,” the books as well as the movies. What would a church service be like without rhetoric, music and liturgy? Effective branding calls upon the use of emotional language, which is taught in the humanities. Apple would be another computer company if it were not for its branding. All of this is not to say that we do not need business or engineering majors — of course we do. However, more need to realize the worth and relevance of the humanities. They do in fact teach job skills and are still relevant to life today. While college students should be concerned with what comes after graduation, they should not discount what could be a meaningful education because of the public’s misconception. The humanities can produce a graduate who can bring a lot to the interview, and in some way they hold a very important place in everyone’s life. Thus, the humanities, like all majors, should be regarded as a commendable education path that can produce an employable graduate. — Hughes Miller is a senior in English. He can be reached at mmill105@utk.edu.

SCRAMBLED EGGS • Alex Cline

DOTTY... • Katie Dyson-Smith

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Brunch helps students welcome spring Go & Go by

Julia Ross If you missed a chance to enjoy a moment outside last weekend, I feel truly sorry for you. If you had a moment to spend some time in Market Square for the Dogwood Arts Festival, I’m rather jealous. Because we can reasonably expect to have more than a few nice days between now and the end of the semester, I think this now is the perfect time to remember not only to get outside, but also to support local businesses in Knoxville before we take our leave for the summer. Further, with exams looming, I think it is important to take a break from scholastic endeavors to discuss something a little more savory — brunch. In October, I recommended to you two brunch options, well-suited to accommodate cold weather cravings. As I said then, I think we can all acknowledge that breakfast is often a little known luxury during the school week, because no matter how many times we pin Nutella-stuffed-pumpkin-fat-freegreek-yogurt-whole grain-honey-whatevers on Pinterest, our capacity to make them in our little apartment kitchens or residence hall basements is minimal. Finally, it’s gorgeous outside and as just about any book on Southern traditions will tell you, porches were made for spring days. Clearing the final hurdles of the academic year is something to celebrate, and what better way to reward oneself than with a lovely mid-morning meal outdoors? In Knoxville, there are a few standard outdoor eating options. Today, I offer you Gourmet’s Market on Kingston Pike and Crowne and Goose in the Old City. Both offer sweet and savory options for brunch. At Crown and Goose, many claim that the traditional Belgian waffles or the Danish ebelskivers (spiced apple filled pancakes) are not to miss. As a fan of fried green tomatoes, I prefer their Eggs Chesapeake dish, which does a southern take on eggs benedict. The beer

garden is pleasantly sunny in the morning, and their all-day happy hour makes it a lovely place to linger. Gourmet’s Market’s price point fits more comfortably in a college budget, and they do not serve alcohol. Their coffee is excellent and their covered patio is very comfortable. On the sweet side, they offer a variety of well crafted and high quality pancakes and french toast, including the popular Nutella stuffed option. However, it is the savory side of their breakfast menu that really stands out. Characterized by excellent cheese, fresh breads and specialty sausages, these options are neatly served in proper portions to satisfy mid-morning hunger, or even mid-afternoon hunger, as they serve breakfast all day. Alongside the breakfast options are equally delicious hot and cold sandwiches and soups, which will please anyone in your party who had already eaten breakfast when she or he was invited to a late brunch. Since the next few weeks are sure to be hectic and stressful, I hope that this short and less than scientific survey of brunch options will brighten your day with thoughts of the weekend. However, I must confess something of an ulterior motive in this column. I don’t really mind what meal you choose to eat out, but I do very much care about where you choose to go. In Knoxville, many of our locally owned and sourced restaurants serve brunch. It is a convenient common denominator that I like to use to bring up the idea of supporting local small businesses and local farms without making it sound like you should be eating your next door neighbor’s kale three times a day. (However, if your next door neighbor does provide you with kale, I think you should do that!) Be it coffee shops or breweries or grocery stores, in neighborhood associations or school boards, spending time and money in local operations helps local people to help one another. There is no need to construe this as being isolationist or inwardly focused. Instead, I think that it is more about taking pride in the place where we live, protecting its character, and helping it to thrive ... or bloom, if you will. — Julia Ross is a sophomore in microbiology and political science. She can be reaced at jross26@utk.edu.

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orderad@utdailybeacon.com The Daily Beacon is published by students at The University of Tennessee Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters and Tuesday and Friday during the summer semester. The offices are located at 1340 Circle Park Drive, 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The newspaper is free on campus and is available via mail subscription for $200/year, $100/semester or $70/summer only. It is also available online at: www.utdailybeacon.com. LETTERS POLICY: The Daily Beacon welcomes all letters to the editor and guest columns from students, faculty and staff. Each submission is considered for publication by the editor on the basis of space, timeliness and clarity. Contributions must include the author’s name and phone number for verification. Students must include their year in school and major. Letters to the editor and guest columns may be e-mailed to letters@utdailybeacon.com or sent to Blair Kuykendall, 1340 Circle Park Dr., 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The Beacon reserves the right to reject any submissions or edit all copy in compliance with available space, editorial policy and style. Any and all submissions to the above recipients are subject to publication.

As a generation, we don’t like to talk about things, at least not on the scale that our parents did. This past week, only one student protest took place over the “Sex Week” defunding, and turnout was under 50. Once again our university took on national shame, and student outrage was limited. Not only is it embarrassing that we are apparently not mature enough to talk at length about such a huge issue, but we also let the higher-ups get away with things like this. How in the world is UT ever going to become a Top 25 university when it fears smite from this state’s politicians? I would fear losing the trust and faith of current students, chasing away future students and causing more and more alumni to be embarrassed by the actions that continually keep happening on our campus. In this past year alone, we’ve made it to the public stage for defunding “Sex Week,” denying same-sex partners equal benefits, butt-chugging and fracking for “research.” Each of these issues has made me sit back and scratch my head. What? Do I really go to school here? We apparently don’t like to step on toes, open our mouths or be movers or shakers around these parts. My understanding of college, precollege, was that this would be a place where people pushed boundaries. We weren’t supposed to be held or confined by the rest of the world’s expectations. Our pursuits of higher learning meant learning everything we possibly could in a culture that nurtured the opportunity for all of use to live, learn and function as equally as possible. Clearly, within the first week or so, these

expectations were blown out of the water, and I laughed because I was ridiculous to ever think such a utopic world could exist this far south of the Mason-Dixon Line. As I prepare to graduate in less than four weeks, I am taking my future as an alumnus into consideration. When will I begin giving back to this university that has helped so many of my dreams come true? When will I be able to talk about my university without feeling some lingering amount of embarrassment in the back of my mind because of whatever has gone in the national media lately? More importantly, when will those in charge of the public image of this university start stepping up and taking charge of that image? We should not be the laughing stock of public institutions. There are a thousand reasons to be proud of being a Volunteer. There are countless ways that this university has helped shape this area, this state and this country. We have made impacts worldwide, but now, at the present, it seems that we are more of a blemish upon the face of public institutions of learning. We are not and should not be bound by religion, cultural stereotypes, politics or any of these other things that keep running us out of town. We need people at our helm who aren’t afraid of being brave. Treat our professors, our TAs, our staff and our students fairly. Give each of them everything they deserve, and that includes a pay raise while taking a pay cut yourself, because you get paid more than enough. In fact, don’t take a pay raise until something substantial has been done, and I don’t mean knocking down a couple of old buildings and decorating our campus with more orange cones and fences. Be brave. Be loud. Be true Volunteers for the future. — Kayla Graham is a senior in English literature. She can be reached at kgraham7@ utk.edu.


Monday, April 15, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Arts & Culture Editor Victoria Wright

ARTS & CULTURE

vwright6@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan

merdogan@utk.edu

• Photo courtesy of The David Mayfield Parade

David Mayfield Parade entertains Barley’s crowd Sarah Bradsher Contributor Despite the wet weather, fans and new listeners alike were not deterred from coming out to see The David Mayfield Parade. The five piece band, including a violinist, keyboardist, stand-up bassist, drummer and guitarist, took to Barley’s Taproom and Pizzeria’s stage Thursday evening a little past 11 p.m. and played well past 1 a.m. The Americana/ bluegrass influenced band is known for their humor and intensity during live shows, and the rumors

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turned out to be true. Frontman David Mayfield is the younger brother of established artist Jessica Lea Mayfield and spent his youth playing with the family band. His presence as a front man became increasingly evident as he began touring with his sister’s band, and his enthusiasm on stage is undeniable. From the very beginning he was cracking jokes at the audience. “Alright everybody, it’s couple’s skate. Grab the person next to you and dance cheek to cheek,” David Mayfield said after the third song.

“If they don’t like that, then turn them around.” The band members made use of every last square foot of the small venue stage. They danced and swayed, and Mayfield was not afraid to jump up onto any nearby flat surface. At one point they left the stage altogether. Mayfield and the keyboardist wandered out and sang an impromptu a capella song atop a couple of tables. The songs they sang varied from upbeat tracks, including a cover of AC/DC’s “You Shook Me All Night Long,” to slower, more bluesy ones. A highlight of the evening was a heated

solo performed by Mayfield and the young violinist. While Mayfield was definitely the show’s main attraction, the other band members held their own against his charming stage demeanor. The keyboardist recently had an album of her own come out, and she definitely had the voice to lead her very own solo project. The violinist was the other half of the female component of this group. She is the youngest member of the group, which was proudly announced by Mayfield halfway through the set. See DAVID MAYFIELD on Page 6

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NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD • Will Shortz ACROSS 1 Noggin 5 Sturdy walking stick 10 Bug 14 Folklore villain 15 Part of the eye 16 Rest ___ (roadside stop) 17 Prankish activity 19 Not quite all 20 No-tell motel gettogethers 21 Attic accumulation 22 Before, in verse 23 Double-whammy economic condition 28 Lose 30 The “A” of Chester A. Arthur 31 Sought-after rock 32 ___ no good 33 Did some figuring 35 Without a stitch on 39 Again 42 Farm unit

46 Hi-___ graphics 47 Came down on a branch, say 48 Men’s grooming scent 50 Impromptu, wide-ranging conversation 53 Stomach muscles, informally 54 Oolong and Earl Grey 55 “Ain’t gonna happen” 57 Church seats 58 Shoddy and unsturdy 62 Part of the eye 63 “___ a Nightingale” 64 Slithery fish 65 Bygone U.S. gas brand 66 “Untrue!” 67 “Dang!” DOWN 1 On a streak 2 Display of selfimportance

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3 What two theatergoers may share 4 Boldly resist 5 Hit-or-miss 6 Oklahoma oil city 7 Go ___ (flip out) 8 Tree with needles 9 Go by plane 10 Full range 11 Wearing away of soil 12 Put back in good condition 13 Wrestling surface 18 Greek peak 21 “___ schön” (“Thank you very much”: Ger.)

22 Relative of an ostrich 24 Red gems 25 One nipping Nipper, maybe 26 Be short of 27 Flanders of “The Simpsons” 29 Brain section 34 Jazz chanteuse Anita 36 Amherst school, informally 37 ___ slaw 38 ___ Kringle 39 Big ball in space 40 Spays, e.g. 41 “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” writer

43 “Polly want a ___?” 44 German measles 45 Letters on an ambulance 48 “Gee, that’s really too bad” 49 Forever ___ day 51 Catch, as a calf at a rodeo 52 Research facilities: Abbr. 56 Treated, as a sprained ankle 57 ___ à la mode 58 Song syllable repeated after “Da Doo” 59 Big fuss 60 Encountered 61 D.C. winter hrs.


6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Monday, April 15, 2013

ARTS & CULTURE MAYFIELD continued from Page 5 The other two members were two men who play the stand-up bass and the drums. Each member was engaged and seemed genuinely excited. They were not the only ones who were having a good time. Throughout the twohour performance onlookers danced, swayed, clapped and laughed. Kara Lawson, concert attendee and fan of the band, said she has been listening to The David Mayfield Parade for a while after being an avid fan of his sister and The Avett Brothers.

Arts & Culture Editor Victoria Wright

vwright6@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan

merdogan@utk.edu

“I just kind of branched off from there and found this band,” she said. Despite her devoted love for the band, the concert was her first time seeing them live and her experience did not disappoint. “I think I’m in love,” she said. Some other faces in the crowd were not so familiar with The David Mayfield Parade. Knoxvillian Dustin Woods had never even heard of them before, but given that he was already at the venue, he said he decided to give them a shot. Their talent and enthusiasm gained them an extra fan. “I’m surprised to say this, but I really like them,” Woods said.

Around Rocky Top

• Photo courtesy of Kate Nash

Pop artist partially transitions to punk Samantha Coley

and “My Best Friend Is You,” have more of a pop sound, but her third album shows a tranWith two albums already sition to a more punk side. under her belt, Kate Nash This different style shows her does not disappoint her versatility as an artist, as well indie fan base with her third as her tendency to rebel. album, “Girl Talk,” which was The opening track, “Part released March 4. Heart,” immediately shows While Nash wrote the songs her fans how she has changed in 2011, “Girl Talk” was not from previous albums. The recorded for quite some time music itself is much different, because of tension between stressing her punk image. In Nash and her record label at her first two albums, Nash’s the time, Fiction Records. voice is softer, fitting the Nash left the record company generic pop artist sound. and teamed up with Have 10p However in “Part Heart,” she Records to release the album. sings rougher and deeper to “Girl Talk” is a bit different show fans a new side of herthan her previous albums. Her self. first two, “Made of Bricks” “Death Proof” is one of the Staff Writer

Tia Patron • The Daily Beacon

Students from the SEU Art Troupe perform during the ‘Confucius Institute Gala Stage Show: East Meets West’ on Friday.

stand-out songs on the album. The emphasis on the guitar and drums reflects the punk vibe. The way she sings the song is also characteristic of the punk-rock style; from softly and whispery to screaming, her range shows how she can stretch her voice. Nash keeps true to her pop roots with songs like “3AM.” The track will keep fans happy with another song that is perfect to listen to with the windows rolled down on a beautiful day. This song gives the album a nice shift from all the rough, punk music that comprises most of the album. Similar to her past two albums, Nash doesn’t hold

back with the risqué lyrics, cursing in many of the songs. She sings about subjects such as sex and drugs, which comes as no surprise since she is trying to become more of an edgy artist. Nash continues to show fans that she is not afraid to push boundaries to further her unique image. The new persona Nash is creating may not be widely accepted just yet. “Girl Talk” was placed at No. 85 on the UK Albums Chart, which is much lower than where her previous albums were on the charts. Kate Nash may need to fight for her new image until her fans get on board.


Monday, April 15, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 7

ARTS & CULTURE

Arts & Culture Editor Victoria Wright

vwright6@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan

merdogan@utk.edu

Students dress in drag, support Lambda Lacy Hayes Staff Writer It was clear the show would be a success before it even began with a line of people weaving through the hallway 15 minutes before the UC Auditorium opened for seating Thursday night. The Lambda Student Union Annual Drag Show pulled around 500 people into the auditorium, and Cat Miller’s hopes of nearly filling the venue were satisfied. Miller, Lambda president and senior in kinesiology, said the show allowed for open expression and a chance to break boundaries. “I, personally, decided to keep the drag show around because I believe it brings a unique culture to UT, that many students are afraid to take part in or appreciate,” Miller said. “A drag show allows performers to explore and play around with their gender expression, whether that be only in their drag persona or in their daily lives. “Our culture is often really negative to those people that don’t conform to the accepted forms of femininity or masculinity, as you can tell by the negative comments surrounding ‘Sex Week.’ If

people don’t fit the typical ‘cisgender heterosexual’ profile, they are seen as a perversion and dismissed. That is the attitude we have to get away from. Variance and diversity in gender and sexuality need to be accepted and celebrated, not neglected and misunderstood.” The event was co-sponsored by the organizers of UT’s “Sex Week” and sex toys were donated to be auctioned off, with proceeds going toward Lambda, as do all tips and other donations. Performers from The Edge bar on Kingston Pike, Xena and Vanity showcased their talents alongside guest Anastasia Alexander, who performs three nights a week at the Carousel II, the infamous gay night club located just behind the UT College of Law. Alexander said she came out to support the cause after being invited by her friend and fellow performer, Victoria Frost. Alexander seemed to have the crowd’s heart with her seductive moves and risqué tricks, even jumping off the stage at one point during her performance. She has performed drag for the past three years, and her experience was well rewarded. At

one point, people lined up and waited for Alexander to retrieve their tips — some tucked in their shirts or between their lips — with her mouth. Although Anastasia seemed to be the crowd favorite, the other performers had no trouble earning big tips as well. Frost was another crowd pleaser. While she lip-synced to Carrie Underwood’s song “Before He Cheats,” she was showered in tips. The crowd showed her no less love when she performed to “Jump” by Rihanna. A few duets were also among the crowd’s favorites. For one set, performing to a remix of songs, the couples shocked and awed the audience with their synchronized dance moves and seductive stage grinding. The other outstanding couJanie Prathammavong • The Daily Beacon ple had the audience’s atten- Students perform at the Lambda Student Union’s Annual Drag Show on Thursday tion with their performance night. of “Dick in a Box,” the hit song from The Lonely Island featuring Justin Timberlake. Prospective UT student Jacob Proffitt said he enjoyed the event and the generosity of the crowd. “I thought it was great how the set ended,” he said. “(The audience) blew their loads … of ones.”


8 • THE DAILY BEACON

Monday, April 15, 2013 Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell

SPORTS

lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Manning hopeful for future of Volunteer football

Parker Eidson • The Daily Beacon

Peyton Manning addresses the crowd during the dedication of Peyton Manning Pass in October.

Lauren Kittrell Sports Editor UT holds a history and a legend that can be found only in Tennessee football. Over the years, the program has hosted remarkable individuals, from General Robert Neyland to Phillip Fulmer. But in recent history, there is one name that has not only touched fans and athletes at UT, but people across the nation. First-year UT head coach Butch Jones said he is a gentleman who needs no introduction. He’s a Tennessee legend and lives the life of a true Volunteer. He is Peyton Manning.

“I just want to publicly thank Peyton. We love him, and we are very proud of him,” Jones said. Manning visited Knoxville this weekend, meeting with Jones and high school coaches around the area, and taking time to talk with the football team and answer their questions. Seizing an opportunity to invest in the future of Tennessee football, Manning communicated his support for Jones’ future at UT. After speaking with Jones a little more about his vision for the future of the program, Manning said he has great confidence in Jones’ qualifications for the job.

“I was impressed. I think he has a plan; he has a mission. There is no question,” Manning said. “He has a short-term plan and a longterm plan. It made a lot of sense to me. Then getting with his staff, I can tell he selected these coaches very carefully and for a specific reason. They all bring something to the table.” Manning encouraged UT fans to get excited about the program, support Jones’ efforts to revamp it and get ready to see some success in the future. That said, he also thinks the process will take time and patience from coaches, players and fans. “I think it is an exciting

time for Tennessee football. I think people need to stay committed to it and stay patient with it,” Manning said. “It doesn’t happen overnight. I sure liked what I heard these past two days.” During his time with the team on Friday, Manning, who is currently a quarterback for the Denver Broncos, said he was encouraged by the players’ enthusiasm to succeed in the future. He said he has faith that Jones has what it takes to take the program back to its glory days. “The players this year just have a great opportunity to kind of create their own legacy and to be part of a turnaround here at Tennessee,” Manning said. “We all know the past few years haven’t been the most fun for the Tennessee football family and Coach Jones is determined to turn that around. “It was a really impressive group of men that I got the chance to address, like Coach Jones said, they had some great questions about what they can do to be better and how they can create their own legacy and be part of a turnaround here in Knoxville. So I really enjoyed the time.” As a Tennessee legend, Vol for Life and role model to young people around the world, Manning’s effect on UT didn’t end with his last game at Neyland Stadium or his graduation from the university. He said the university had a huge impact on his life and he enjoys coming back again and again. “I had a wonderful four years here at (UT),” he said. “A big reason why I stayed here my senior year is I really wanted one more year of college experience … Obviously there’s been a lot of changes from the time since I’ve been gone. But it’s still (UT) and it’s still Volunteer pride and I’m a huge fan of those.”

Lady Vols keep rolling, sweep Tigers

Tia Patron • The Daily Beacon

Whitney Hammond throws the ball back to the infield after a pop up to the outfield against Tennessee Tech on Wednesday.

Austin Bornheim Assistant Sports Editor In front of crowds of over 1,700 each day this weekend, the No. 3 Lady Vols swept the Auburn Tigers to improve to 38-6 and 12-3 in conference play, even though they had to endure some defensive struggles. In what was Tennessee’s most complete game of the series, things got heated between Auburn head coach Tina Deese and Tennessee co-head coaches Ralph and Karen Weekly after Sunday’s outcome had already been decided. With the score 6-0 in UT’s favor — in part due to a

four-run third inning where Cheyanne Tarango and Melissa Davin hit back-to-back home runs — a pitch from Ivy Renfroe ran high and inside, hitting Auburn first baseman Morgan Estell in the head. Estell laid motionless on the dirt for a few moments before eventually being helped off the field by medical personnel. The Auburn coaches did not take lightly to the errant pitch. “I could just sense there was some anxiety on the other side of the field,” Karen Weekly said. “That maybe that was more than just a ball that got away. See SOFTBALL on Page 9


Monday, April 15, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 9

SPORTS

Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Tennis succeeds in time for tournament

Around Rocky Top

Cristina Hodge Staff Writer

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Erin Champion jumps during the pole vault heat at the Sea Ray Relays on Friday.

SOFTBALL continued from Page 8 “There is a little bit of history that goes years back. We buried the hatchet a long time ago, and I just told her I don’t want to go back there. It was a tough series and frustrating series for Auburn. At the end of a series like that and your best player gets hit in the head, emotions can get high.” At the beginning of the weekend, Tennessee jumped on top of the Tigers early in Friday night’s matchup, building a comfortable 5-0 lead before Auburn woke up. The Tigers scored three in the sixth off Ellen Renfroe, forcing UT to go to the bullpen. In the seventh, All-American

Raven Chavanne had an uncharacteristic mental lapse in deciding on where to go with the ball which put Auburn in a position to tie or go ahead. “The second baseman (Lauren Gibson) yelled two at the last second and I should have just ignored it and gone one,” Chavanne said of the play. “It was my fault, I should have just kept going (to first).” Luckily for Chavanne, senior Ivy Renfroe got a strikeout with the bases loaded to preserve the 5-3 win. “Ivy did a great job of coming back and getting the out for us,” Chavanne said. “She picked me up there after my mistake.” On Saturday morning four of the six Tennessee seniors — Lauren Gibson, Kat Dotson,

Ivy Renfroe and Melissa Brown — were honored for Senior Day before the game. And the seniors delivered on their day. Gibson and Dotson each had an RBI in the third inning to give UT the lead, and Renfroe went all seven to notch her 15th win of the season. “It’s always nice to knock runs in and it’s especially nice to do it with my family here,” Gibson said. Center fielder Tory Lewis made the play of the game, though, gunning out Branndi Melero at home plate to preserver the then 2-1 Lady Vols lead in the fourth inning. “Tory Lewis is a big time performer defensively,” Ralph Weekly said Saturday. “That’s why she is out there.” The three-game sweep of

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the Tigers gives Tennessee its third straight SEC series sweep, extends its win streak from 12 to 15 games and with some help from Kentucky over the weekend gives the Lady Vols lone possession of first place in the conference. But Karen Weekly doesn’t want the success to be a distraction for her team. “If we start thinking about that (being in first) or win streaks than we get away from the little things, and the little things are the reasons we are winning ballgames,” Karen Weekly said. Madison Shipman had a very strong weekend for Tennessee, going 5-for-9 from the dish with four RBIs, two runs scored and drew two walks.

The No. 10 Tennessee Vols ended their SEC regular season with an exciting 4-0 win against No. 18 Auburn Tigers Sunday in Barksdale Stadium. The Vols started off strong, clinching the doubles’ point with wins from doubles’ teams Taylor Patrick and Jarryd Chaplin, and Edward Jones and John Collins. “It was very exciting,” senior Taylor Patrick said. “Auburn’s a good team. We came out in doubles on all three courts and we jumped on them. We had great energy.” The Vols carried that strong momentum into the singles’ matches as five of the players won their first set. “It’s Senior Day, and everyone’s playing with a little more energy. So I feel like that really helped us,” Patrick said. “We took care of doubles and we came out with that same energy in singles and we won five first sets. We didn’t let that (long) break in between hurt us.” Patrick came away with the first singles’ point with a 6-4, 7-5 win against Auburn’s Joseph Van Dooren. “I have the tendency to get pretty negative on myself,” Patrick said about his match. “There’s a lot of emotion involved, so for me to be able to win today was huge.” No. 6 ranked Mikelis Libietis earned the third win for Tennessee in his match against No. 28 Andreas Mies with a 6-4, 7-6 clinch. In his second set, Libietis was down 5-1, looking at the possibility of a third set. “I told him to just relax,” head coach Sam Winterbotham said. “He’s been carrying a lot of stress on his shoulders. It’s hard when you win all the time, you feel like people expect you to win. When you’re playing one,

you’re playing every team’s best player. You could tell he was so frustrated and he was carrying the emotions from one point to the next.” After an incredible comeback, Libietis was able to take Mies into tie-breaker and earn the win, bringing Tennessee’s score to 3-0. “It’s only 5-1,” Winterbotham noted. “I told him to just play and have some fun. All of a sudden, that got him back into the match. It may be one of our best teaching moments since we’ve been here.” Edward Jones earned Tennessee’s fourth and final point with his 6-4, 7-5 win over Auburn’s Lucas Lopasso. Patrick said he was very proud to be a part of the Tennessee Vols tennis team even if he didn’t get to play in every match. “We moved here when I was nine and since then I’ve been bleeding orange,” Patrick said. “I could’ve gone to a smaller school for sure and gotten a scholarship somewhere and played all four years, but I came here and Sam thankfully gave me the opportunity. I put in the work and I got my turn.” The Vols will take this win with them as they enter SEC championships this coming week. “I feel like our team is peaking at the right time” Winterbotham said. “We’re going into the tournament and this is where the fun starts. The SEC (championship) is coming up and we’ve secured a bye so we play Friday. “We’re not going down quickly, we’re not getting frustrated. Emotionally, we all have the same heartbeat. I thought today was the best thing we pulled out all year. It was incredible.” The Vols have a clinched a first round bye in the SEC tournament and will return to action on Friday, April 19 in Oxford, Miss.


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SPORTS

Monday, April 15, 2013 Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Vols prepare for Orange and White game Thomas Duggins Staff Writer For the third time this spring, the Tennessee Volunteers took to Neyland Stadium for their Saturday practice. It was the twelfth of 15 spring practices for the Vols and was the last practice in Neyland before the Orange and White game on April 20. “The spring game is going to be critical when we actually get bodies in the stands and see how they perform,” Tennessee head coach Butch Jones said. “I really liked the way our players approached today. I could feel the energy. “I could feel the intensity right from the get-go in our meetings, to warm-ups and that’s a step in the right direction. We’re going to be a football team that our fan base is going to be proud of the way we play, the way we represent this institution and this state.” The Tennessee offense struggled with turnovers early on during the practice, which featured many different situational scrimmage scenarios, but was able to find a consistent rhythm in the last half of practice against the defense, tallying multiple touchdowns on a variety of plays. “We had a couple too many turnovers in the red zone,” junior quarterback Justin Worley said. “I thought after those drives we responded well, and we came out and executed different situations. Basically just came out and responded to adverse situations, and I think all the offensive coaches were happy to see that.” A standout performer from Saturday’s scrimmage was redshirt freshman running back Alden Hill. Hill found his way into the endzone via powerful runs and catching the ball out of the backfield. His development through these spring

practices is a good sign for the Vols’ rushing attack that does not have a go-to running back yet. “Without a doubt, Alden Hill has showed up huge this spring,” Vols redshirt freshman quarterback Nathan Peterman said. “I was on scout team with him last year and to see his improvement from last year to this year is unreal, and I think it really comes down to his work ethic in the weight room. He’s there every night doing extra steps. “I’m really proud of Alden and really happy for him.” Hill feels that his biggest improvements this spring have come with his work on the “little things.” “I’m playing smart, physical,” Hill said. “I’ve always worked on little things, being physical, but I think just coming out here and being a little more comfortable. I have the talent, but I know last year I was a little nervous on the scheme of things, but I’ve been repping a lot, getting practice and working on the little things. “Guys will tell you I’ve been working since I was on scout team. I’m hungry for the position whether it’s five guys in front of me or one.” At the very least, the Vols will need Hill for depth behind senior Rajion Neal, who is coming off a 2012 campaign in which he ran for 708 yards and five touchdowns. Junior Marlin Lane had been splitting reps with Neal with the first-team offense, but Lane has not been with the team since Tuesday’s practice. “Marlin continues to be out for disciplinary reasons,” Jones said. “We hold our players to a very high standard of accountability here at Tennessee no matter what it is — the way we play, the way we win off the field, the way we go to class, it’s just a high level of accountAlden Hill bursts through a hole in the line during spring practice on March 19. ability in all aspects.”

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