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Friday, April 11, 2014

Issue 61, Volume 125

UT tuition sees 4-6 percent increase for 2015 McCord Pagan Copy Editor Tuition for UT-Knoxville will increase between 4 and 6 percent for fiscal year 2015, according to Chris Cimino, vice-chancellor for finance and administration. For students who entered UT under the new 15-in-4 tuition model, the increase will remain locked at 3 percent. The tuition rise stems from

the state government’s approximately $200 million drop in revenue. In response to underperformance by both the corporate franchise and excise tax, which collected less than expected, Gov. Bill Haslam amended his 2015 budget. The subsequent April 1 revision cut all additional funding to public post-secondary schools via the 2010 Complete College Tennessee Act. As a result, $30 million will

disappear. UT-Knoxville was slated to absorb at least one third of that money. The CCTA tied state funding to university performance, creating a cash reward for schools succeeding in categories like retention and six-year graduation. Prior to CCTA, funds were allocated solely according to the size of a school’s student population. “Because of that then, retention, progression and gradu-

ation became key things that all of our campuses have really focused on,” said Butch Peccolo, chief financial officer for the UT System. Because UT-Knoxville outperformed many community colleges and state universities, the campus was slated to receive a new $6 million for next year, in addition to a nearly-$4 million renewal from the current fiscal year. In fact, Knoxville’s performance merited an increase more

than double that of any other school. Instead, UT-Knoxville and improving schools will not receive any new money. The 2014 funding will continue only for those schools that saw marked improvement. Lower performing schools will see all funding from the CCTA disappear. Current losses only compound the lasting effects of The Great Recession, which forced the state to cut $60

Wade Rackley • Tennessee Athletics

SEE INSIDE

Undergrads gear up for fifth annual Research Symposium

ARTS & CULTURE >>pg. 5

Smart city program selects Cleveland as first partner Emilee Lamb

Senior defensive lineman Jordan Williams fights through blockers during UT’s spring football practice at Haslam Field on Thursday.

Vols looking for ‘growth’ in O&W game Troy Provost-Heron Sports Editor

The ‘Crux’ of the issue: Student film premieres Saturday at Downtown West

See FUNDING on Page 2

Assistant News Editor

NEWS >>pg. 3

Book, line and sinker: Throw out the textbooks and pick up some E.E. Cummings

million from UT’s budget in the late 2000s – money that Cimino said will likely never return. Even if state revenue comes back next year, Peccolo said he does not expect the state will return funds lost in the meantime. The state budget office declined to comment on the appropriations bill until it is finalized by the State Assembly.

It was nearly a month ago that the Tennessee Volunteers broke out their pads for the first time this spring. With today’s 14th spring practice being solely a helmet-only practice that will be “more mental than physical,” according to UT head coach Butch Jones, the Vols practiced in full pads for the final time this spring on Thursday in preparation for Saturday’s Orange and White game. “We went out there and compet-

ed as a team,” senior linebacker A.J. Johnson said. “Today was individual day, and so it was self-motivation, pushing yourself to do what you need to do on the field. “It was my last spring practice as a Vol, so I had to go out there and have fun and make the best of it.” Now with spring practice being over, the Vols turn their attention to the Orange and White game. In Saturday’s contest, the defense will don the coveted orange jerseys, while the offense will be wearing white. The first two periods will each be 12 minutes long, while the second half will feature two 10-minute quar-

ters with a running clock. Individual drills will take place in between series in both halves. For Jones, he expects the spring game to provide an opportunity for the Vols to showcase their improvement as a team. “(I want them to show) the habits that we’ve been trying to form our identity throughout the course of spring – great effort, being a physical football team, making plays and being a team that plays disciplined football,” Jones said. “A lot of times you just want to get through the spring games. See FOOTBALL on Page 8

Cleveland, Tenn., has now been selected as the first partner city to participate in the pilot term of UT’s new Smart Communities Initiative interdisciplinary program, which begins next fall. Through SCI, UT upperclassmen, graduate students and faculty will partner with Cleveland for one year to work collaboratively toward community development and positive change. Modeled on the University of Oregon’s “Sustainable City Year Program,” each host city identifies several projects specific to their unique communal needs. These proposed projects are then matched to classrooms of students studying a relevant field. Once paired with a compatible project, the class then collaboratively channels their academic work toward the project. Cleveland’s application to become an SCI partner city was evaluated based on several metrics, including the compatibility of the city’s proposed projects with the vision of the initiative. “There are sort of three pillars to that vision: environmental sustainability, economic viability and social integrity,” said Kelly Ellenburg, campus coordinator for service learning and manager of the Smart Communities Initiative. See COMMUNITIES on Page 3

ARTS & CULTURE>>pg. 6

In matchup of ranked foes, Lady Vols look to learn from last week’s mistakes at A&M SPORTS >>pg. 8

@UTKDailyBeacon www.utdailybeacon.com

Liv McConnell Copy Editor When Chris Poland, manager of the West Coast band California Celts, received the Cultural Attractions Committee’s request for his band to play at UT, he was simultaneously pleased and confused. “At first, I was like, ‘Wow, that’s great they want us,’” Poland said. “Then I was thinking, ‘Wait, how is it that they want us?’” For those unfamiliar with the musical style and story of California Celts, Poland’s puzzlement might seem justified. Most simply described as “Celtic-Ska,” the band is influenced by a wide and seemingly disparate range of styles, including Reggae, Bluegrass, Mexicano and Appalachian hymns. Calling southern California home, most of the band members have never been to Tennessee before. So, why UT? “I made the connection in my

head, ‘They probably want to hear how Californians interpret Appalachian music as a Celtic band,’” Poland said. Victoria Knight, vice chair of CAC, validated his logic. “It is significant for California Celts to play here in East Tennessee, especially, because our roots are so closely tied in the Appalachian areas with the Scotch-Irish,” Knight said. “About one in five native Tennesseans can trace their ancestry to the Scotch-Irish. … It is evident through the rich bluegrass and country music scene that much of that history and connection is still present today in Tennessee.” It is this theme of heritage that makes the group’s trip to UT, as well as their eclectic combination of musical influences, all the more sensible. “Basically, (our sound) is the whole Scotch-Irish trek from the Old World, from the British Isles, to the New World,” Poland said. “A lot of

our songs – our fundamental sound – has a Caribbean under-beat with bass guitar and the drums, and then on the top beats are the scales and the melodies from the British Isles.” The band’s songwriting reflects this original voyage of the Celtic people to the Americas and their continued journeys from then on, Poland said. “The Scotch-Irish didn’t stop in Appalachia, they kept going west to Washington state, Idaho and California, mainly,” he said, “and then a lot of them also went to Oklahoma and were there for the Dust Bowl.” Intent on forging a full representation of the reality of Celtic people’s experiences in America through their music, the band drew its Reggae and nautical influences from what Poland recalls as the oftforgotten historical alliance between Bringing a subtle hint of reggae, bluegrass and Celts and Mexicans. rock, the California Celts will be performing See CELT on Page 6 on Friday in the UC.

“Reverse racism is a construct of the white patriarchy, a backlash reactionary spitfire in the wake of slowly improving racial equality.” OPINIONS >>pg. 4

• Photo Courtesy of California Celts

California Celts to put new spin on Appalachian tunes

INSIDE THE DAILY BEACON News Opinions Arts & Culture Sports

Page 2, 3 Page 4 Page 5-6 Page 7-8


2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Friday, April 11, 2014 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb

elamb1@utk.edu

CRIME LOG April 2 6:00 p.m.: An officer was assisting with a fire drill at Andy Holt Apartments when a member of the ARH staff said he saw illegal contraband in a student’s room in plain view. All confiscated items were placed in UTPD evidence. All parties were given a UTPD case card. April 3 12:42 p.m.: An officer was dispatched to a report of a vehicle fire on the top level of the administration garage. The Knoxville Fire Department arrived on the scene and was able to extinguish the fire. There was no reported damage to other vehicles. A UTPD case card was issued to the victim.

April 4 1:50 p.m.: An officer was dispatched to meet a victim at the second floor circulation desk at Hodges library. The victim stated that someone stole her cellphone after she left it unattended for around 10 minutes while she went to the restroom. When she returned, her cell phone was gone. 6:47 p.m.: An officer was dispatched to Reese Hall for a report of theft. A strong odor of marijuana was noticed about the defendant’s person and unlawful drug paraphernalia was in plain view. The defendant was issued a misdemeanor citation for simple possession. April 6 12:30 p.m.: An officer re-

ceived a call in reference to a theft of a bicycle at Hess Hall. The victim was issued at UTPD case card. April 7 3:02 p.m.: An officer received a report from the Deputy Chief Servers in reference to an identity theft. Crime logs are compiled from records of the University of Tennessee and Knoxville Police departments. People with names similar or identical to those listed may not be those identified in reports. All persons arrested are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

STATE FUNDING continued from Page 1 The increased funding from the CCTA would have been used to raise salaries for faculty and staff, Cimino said – a crucial element of the Top 25 initiative. A 2011 study found UT was consistently underpaying its employees in comparison to what those employees could receive at similar institutions elsewhere. To correct the wage gap, UT enacted consistent percentage pay increases over the last three years, though Cimino said employee evaluations provided flexibility in awarding the rais-

es. However, an additional $150 million is still needed to align employee compensation at UT with compensation at its peer universities. “(Chancellor Jimmy Cheek) is very concerned with everything from advising, to tutoring, to the recruitment and admissions aspect of the university,” Cimino said. “Those are all top priorities, equally as important as making sure those that are here have adequate compensation.” Lack of state funding, Peccolo said, has been the central force behind tuition hikes. Because the state has shown increasingly less financial support to UT, he said students have been forced

to shoulder a greater portion of costly projects. “Conversely,” Peccolo said, “if the state stands up and starts doing their share, fully funding these things, the commitment from our side is, we’ll mitigate what we increase.” To protect students and their families, Cimino noted that financial support from the state remains critically important. “So in order to keep improving, to be able to hire the faculty back, to build and retain the faculty, to pay them and have the right compensation, and all of the other infrastructure needed for a university,” Cimino said, “we’ve got to have that support from the state.”

Lawmakers approve $32.4B spending plan The House approved the measure 68-27 and the Senate voted 28-3 a few hours later in favor of Tennessee lawmakers on the plan, which removes previThursday approved the state’s ously planned salary increases for $32.4 billion spending plan for teachers and state employees to the budget year beginning in July make up for flagging state revenue after failed attempts to increase collections. the pay of teachers and state The measure now goes to the employees. governor’s desk. Lawmakers hope to adjourn early next week. Both Democrats and Republicans in the House presented proposals to give teachers and state employees one-time bonuses and contingency pay increases, but all those amendments failed. In particular, Republican Rep. Matthew Hill of Jonesborough sought to give a $500 bonus to all teachers and state employees who have at least three years of service, and a 1 percent pay increase for all teachers and state employees next year, contingent upon state revenue figures. Gov. Bill Haslam had planned to give a 1 percent pay increase to state employees and 2 percent to teachers, but said he won’t be able to because of the poor revenue collections. After failing to gain support in a Republican caucus meeting before the full House met, Hill decided to withdraw the proposal on the House floor, but he vowed to continue looking for ways to give teachers and state employees pay raises.

Associated Press

“We’re going to roll our sleeves up and try to find working reasonable solutions for teachers and for our employees,” he said. House Democratic Leader Craig Fitzhugh of Ripley, who presented the amendments for the Democrats, criticized Hill’s Republican colleagues, who hold majorities in both chambers. “Republicans sent a message that keeping their promise to teachers isn’t a priority,” he said. “They’d rather hoard money in reserve funds than pay teachers for the hard work they do each day.” Last year, Haslam pledged to improve the salaries of the state’s teachers. He said he regrets not being able to give them raises next year, but also remains committed to increasing their pay. “I think it’s really important that they understand that this is the last thing we want to do,” Haslam told reporters last week. “We’re dealing with a very difficult budget reality.” House Finance Chairman Charles Sargent conveyed that sentiment Thursday before the vote on the budget, expected to have a shortfall of about $277 million. “It’s been a tough year,” said the Franklin Republican. “But ...I think we’ve come up with a good conservative budget, working within our means.”


Friday, April 11, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb

elamb1@utk.edu

COMMUNITIES

Around Rocky Top Janie Prathammavong • The Daily Beacon

continued from Page 1

Smokey receives his driver license with Deputy Commissioner Larry Godwin at the new campus kiosk on Thursday. The Tennessee Department of Safety and Homeland Security has installed a driver license self-service kiosk at the Thompson-Boling Arena, which allows students, faculty and staff to easily renew or replace their expired driver license.

Research Symposium to feature undergrad’s work R.J. Vogt Editor-in-Chief For decades, university research was the work of graduate students. Saturday, however, UT undergraduates will show how that paradigm has shifted. Featuring the work of 71 students, the fifth annual Undergraduate Research Symposium will begin at 9 a.m. in the Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy, concluding at 5 p.m. “If you’re already in research, it’s an opportunity for you to practice communicating your research to a general audience, forcing you to think more about the bigger picture and why what you do matters,” said Melissa Lee, a senior in College Scholars who helped organize the event. “Whether you’re already in research or not, it’s also a great opportunity to learn about the other research going on at UT.” Student presentations will vary across six different sessions; research on hybrid car design will be followed by research on an animal model for post-traumatic stress disorder. The intricacies

of philosophy of science will be explained alongside the necessity of food safety. Lee co-founded the symposium’s parent organization, Undergraduate Research Student’s Association, in 2010 with fellow College Scholar senior Mark Remec. The two, who are Haslam Scholars as well, saw a need to address the “lacking” undergraduate research community at UT. As grad schools and job markets have become increasingly selective, Lee said research experience is invaluable. “Things like the symposium showcase how productive our students are and how the things that we do as undergraduates matter,” she said, “not just within the microcosm of the university, but for the whole world.” Patrick McKenzie, a freshman in biochemistry and cellular and molecular biology, is one such student who’s been rather productive. He will present “An Investigation of the Gypsy Insulator Complex and its Effects on Cell-Cycle Progression,” research on DNA replication he’s conducted in the lab of Mariano Labrador.

“The symposium is a fantastic opportunity to practice presentation skills, which are vital for a career in any area of research,” McKenzie said. “Since research is something I plan to be involved in for the rest of my life, I’m looking forward to this weekend. “It will be my first real engagement with the presentation and peer interaction processes of research.” During lunch, Karen Rommelfanger, Ph.D. and director of the Emory Neuroethics Program, will deliver a keynote presentation entitled “Better than Well? Neuroenhancement and Beyond.” As attendees munch on Jai Dee Thai & Japanese Cuisine, they’ll also gain insight into the ethics of the use of cognitive enhancers such as Adderall. More information can be found on the URSA newly launched website at http://www. ursautk.org/. Other sponsors for the symposium are the Office of Undergraduate Research, the Student Success Center, the Chancellor’s Honors Program, UTK Neuroscience and Pursuit: The Journal of Undergraduate Research.

A total of 19 projects have been put forth by the city officials of Cleveland, including actions like a survey of housing conditions in low-income areas of the city, planning for sidewalk and roadway upgrades in various parts of the community, creation of a digital collection system for citizen input and designing a community park. Tricia Stuth, associate professor in the School of Architecture, is a member of the SCI’s planning team for its first semester and is currently in the process of finding connections between Cleveland’s needs and academic courses at UT. “They’ve put together proposed projects that we’re now trying to match up with professors’ courses,” Stuth said, “and how they could use those projects as vehicles for exploring the course work with their students.”

Regarding her own discipline’s involvement, Stuth said architecture courses would focus on serving Cleveland’s cultural and economic needs through the “built environment.” “Their projected growth is pretty incredible over the next 40 years,” Stuth said, “and our goal would be to help find ways for them to grow within their existing city boundaries, understanding how that affects transportation, environmental resources and fosters a stronger sense of community.” In addition to architecture, potential academic partners are found in the departments of engineering, sociology, political science, earth and planetary science, geology and graphic design. Ellenburg said Cleveland has readily embraced the partnership, citing the energy and enthusiasm of Cleveland city officials. “I think they’re going to be a great partner,” she said. “They’re going to have a lot to bring to this program, and it seems to

be very much in line with their vision of what they want the city to achieve in the long-term.” Although the SCI participant courses are still being deliberated, Stuth said she hopes students will eagerly engage the opportunity. “We just had a recent accreditation visit … and it was pretty clear when they left that we’re doing this kind of applied learning in the community with 10 percent, or so, of our students,” she said, “but about 90 percent of them would like to be learning this way.” The partnership is projected to last through the summer term of 2015, allowing multiple crops of students to offer fresh ideas for Cleveland’s development. “It’s a focused experience,” Ellenburg said. “It’s intended to have a big impact and ideally be something that’s really transformative for the city.” For more information on the SCI, visit http://servicelearning. utk.edu/smart-communitiesinitiative/.

Senate OKs ‘In God We Trust’ bill Haslam’s desk. complained off the microphone Campfield was visibly upset that one GOP colleague was The Senate has voted to over- by the chamber’s action, and “messing” with his bill. rule the sponsor of a bill that originally sought to require the phrase “In God We Trust” to be painted behind the speaker’s podiums in the state Capitol. Republican Sen. Stacey Campfield of Knoxville urged the chamber to reject House changes to the bill that would instead instruct the State Capitol Commission to study having the phrase painted in the tunnel connecting the building to the Legislative Plaza. But the Republicancontrolled chamber voted 19-8 against Campfield’s motion, which had the effect of agreeing to the House version of the bill and sending it to Gov. Bill

Associated Press


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Friday, April 11, 2014 Editor-in-Chief R.J. Vogt

OPINIONS

rvogt@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Reverse racism does not exist Fifty Shades of Wade by

Wade Scofield

The most important debate so far in 2014 between public intellectuals is currently blazing between Ta-Nehisi Coates of The Atlantic and Jonathan Chait of New York Magazine surrounding Paul Ryan, Barack Obama and the expected emanation of African-American poverty. I was reading their dialogue, which you may find online and is so very worth your time, and I began to think about how in my own life, in my own university community, we advance notions of racism, racial inequality and reverse racism. Let me begin by being indisputably clear: reverse racism does not exist. It is arbitrary. It is ineffective. It does not have a pedestal from which to change or impose any substantive discourse. Reverse racism is a construct of the white patriarchy, a backlash, reactionary spitfire in the wake of slowly improving racial equality. Prejudice is assuming something about someone. Racism is a function of power. It seems white people tend to ascribe racism to prejudice. The assumption of someone’s characteristics based on a racial stereotype is no different than those surrounding stereotypes of male hair length, for example. Or wardrobe. Or height. When a person of a minority race assumes something about a white person because they’re white, this is not racism. This is prejudice. Prejudice is a two-way street. Racism, on the other hand, is not. In what ways may minorities exercise deep-rooted institutional power over white people? Sure, maybe stringent undergrad admissions favor racial minorities. And sure, affirmative action doesn’t work. But the minority college student who took your admissions spot? The deck was stacked against them from the beginning. It was more difficult for them to even get on the same playing field as you. Simply, on average, minority children have less resources available to them than white children. It’s that simple. In contrast are some ways that whites may exercise institutional power over minorities. The most prominent one that comes to mind is the wealth of overwhelmingly white state legislatures passing voter identification laws. Tennessee itself enforces a strict photo identification law. And it’s no shock that this voter identification law was intended to – and successfully does – disenfranchise AfricanAmericans. It might be valuable for us to stop saying we live in a post-racial society. Maybe our president identifies as African-American. Maybe we are slowly bridging the gap between disproportionate income based on race – except probably not. Maybe the percentage of race-related violence in the United States is continuously decreasing. Stephen Colbert posits this opinion regularly. “I didn’t know you were African-American,” he says to a guest, “because I don’t see color.” Even if Colbert’s character is most often smart and satirically helpful, this is a major flaw for his brand, because Colbert himself, as a white male, was afforded the best possible opportunities in the community in which he grew up. What we should strive for is not to live in a postracial America, but a post-racist America. To perpetuate the idea that we either live in a post-racial society or that we should live in a post-racial society is to completely discount all historical factors that have constructed racial inequality in the first place. What white people, especially those of us born after about 1980, sometimes forget is that even though it is second nature for us to have friends, classmates, or co-workers – our peers – who are minorities, that doesn’t mean everything is equal now. The remnants of Jim Crow and segregation resound through urban centers, where white businesspeople and government officials contribute crime rates, poverty and education inequality to a black-culture-induced breakdown of the family unit. They, like many of us, again neglect the historical cultural and economic factors that have dug urban minorities into a deeper and deeper hole. Wade Scofield is a senior in Latin and religious studies. He can be reached at wade@utk.edu.

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Speak your mind – for your sake and that of others Crossing Cues by

Marianela D’April One time – I must have been 6 or 7 years old – a semi-truck driver cut my mom off before the line into a highway toll booth. The front of the truck almost hit the side of the car, where I was sitting with my two siblings, ages 2 and 5. Luckily, no one got hurt, but the driver still showed no remorse. So, once we were safely stopped behind him in line, my mom got out of the car, stood by the open driver’s-side door, and proceeded to let the driver know exactly what she thought of his thoughtless, selfish, dangerous attempt to get ahead by a single car in a toll booth line. The episode quickly became family folklore – a hilarious tale to tell because, well, can you imagine a 5-foot-4-inch woman getting out of a car in the middle of the highway to yell at a truck driver? It seems unlikely, even if she was defending her children in the backseat. The image of my mom yelling at this stranger who had put our lives in danger stayed with me, though, mostly because it did seem like such an unlikely act, and eventually it became representative of the kind of person

Editor-in-Chief: R.J. Vogt Managing Editor: Melodi Erdogan Chief Copy Editor: Gage Arnold News Editor: Hanna Lustig Asst. News Editor: Emilee Lamb Sports Editor: Troy Provost-Heron Asst. Sports Editor: Dargan Southard Arts & Culture Editor: Claire Dodson Asst. Arts & Culture Editor: Cortney Roark Online Editor: Samantha Smoak

and it seems that it’s perceived as particularly emotional when it comes from a woman. For a while, I tried to quiet my voice, agreeing politely when professors brought up points that I disagreed with, not defending my design work when it was unjustly criticized during a final review, taking others’ opinions at face value without challenging them lest my dissent be mistaken for disdain. I still do this more often than I would like, but I have become particularly wary of allowing myself to be dismissed. Here’s the thing: if we continue to suppress our opinions because we are afraid of offending, all we are doing is perpetuating the idea that disagreement cannot be fruitful. If we continue to silence ourselves, we deprive ourselves of the opportunity to have our ideas challenged, and of the opportunity to challenge others’ ideas. We have to believe that our ideas are valid enough to be expressed, and if we need proof, what better way to test their validity than through discussion? Maybe getting out of your car in the middle of the highway isn’t the smartest idea, but next time you have something to say in class, go ahead and raise your hand. You’ll learn from it, and hopefully, someone else will, too. Marianela D’Aprile is a fourth-year in architecture. She can be reached at mdaprile@utk.edu.

Why nature is just so beautiful to your brain Working Out Happiness by

Andrew Fleming The summer sun is slowly making the crawl out from its winter slumber; shorts are getting shorter again; the most blessed of all scholastic recesses is rapidly approaching. With the warm weather comes so much more sun for activities. Why is it, however, that being outdoors is good for us? No, not some Avatar-style bonding with the tree spirits, but on a real, grounded, physiological level, why are the outdoors commonly prescribed for rest and relaxation? While the pleasantness of fresh air, warm sun and fragrant plants could obviously have soothing effects on this biochemistry-worn soul, it goes even deeper – all the way to your wonderful brain. When we are still being formulated outside of the womb, we endure a wondrous period of what’s known a neuroplasticity. This is not a misnomer, as our brains are quite literally malleable to the shaping powers of the stimuli we are surrounded by. Interestingly enough, with the advances of mathematics, came order. With order came order of structure. With order of structure came straight line. Look at the shape of the newspaper or computer screen you are reading this column on. Look at the horizontal arrangement of the let-

ters. Now look at your walls, and your doors, and your windows, and your posters, and your furniture and your floorboards. Human beings are wonderfully adapt at creating structures out of straight lines. Consequentially, our brains, from a very (very) young age, become programmed to fire systematically upon the presentation of these vertical and horizontally-oriented stimuli. Additionally, our brains respond the most to change. We crave change – new stimuli, new sounds, new things to see. Not only does this make sense from a survival stand point (as extraneous data is filtered out so we can focus on life-altering events), but it is also how we are entertained. Do you know why you get bored? It’s because you’ve seen that thing before. It’s because we are normalized to the vertical and horizontal stimuli that we see day in and day out – exams, pencils, windshields, menus, roadways, street posts, etc. So, we have a brain that is tried and true in the realm of straight lines. Now take that brain and put it in the middle of the Appalachian Forest. The first thing it loves to notice is the lack of straight lines. It’s not so good with these stimuli. There’s winding kudzu vines and exposed root systems and birds’ nests. There’s quite an incredible amount of disorder. Suddenly, you’re not in your element. You’re being cupped in the wild hands of a new environment – and your brain responds accordingly. Not only do you see things (really see things), but you become hyper-aware of

what’s surrounding you. It’s beautiful, because you are suddenly subconsciously exposed to the world’s natural entropy, its disorder, its less-evolved mechanisms of life-sustaining. It’s much more difficult to tune out a world you aren’t used to. There’s no crunching leaves in your apartment, or weird animal noises, or true, deep, silence. What people don’t truly realize is that order, in terms of physics, is incredibly unnatural, and takes loads of energy to accomplish. It’s much more energy-efficient for an organism to die and decompose than to stay put together so neatly. The universe’s entropy is actually increasing in response to organisms’ order to the point that, in billions of years, our biochemical building could very well end in the heat death of everything in known existence. Riveting stuff. Existential end-of-the-universe aside, learn to appreciate simplicity and natural disorder. It’s what the modern world was born from, but not something our brains are entirely used to. If you’re looking for true stimulation and entertainment, look for something that mankind did not create. If you’re looking for surprise, look somewhere where only surprises exist. This summer, the mountains are calling you, and now you must go. Just remember to leave them as beautiful as you found them. Andrew Fleming is a junior in neuroscience. He can be reached at aflemin8@utk. edu.

Get Fuzzy • Darby Conley

Non Sequitur • Wiley

EDITORIAL

I wanted to become. Growing up, I often found myself referencing this event every time I didn’t feel brave enough to do something. But my mom stood out in a highway to defend my siblings and me, and if she can do that, I can give a book report in front of class. Honestly, I was lucky to grow up with such an example. That one time in the toll booth wasn’t the only time my mom set an example for standing up for myself and what I believe, and both she and my dad have always encouraged me and my siblings to express our opinions (so much so that I have this column). Being the only Hispanic person in my year in high school only exacerbated my penchant for expressing myself – I was already visibly and audibly different, it only seemed to follow that I would have opinions different from the rest and that I would make them heard. So, I was surprised when I came to college almost four years ago and found that my honesty put people off. Things that seemed really simple to me, like answering with the truth when someone asked me how I was, were shocking to others. I found that the people around me were used to something else. And while it was easy for them to become accustomed to hearing me tell them exactly how I was that day, it hasn’t been easy for them to get used to me disagreeing with them about an issue in class. It seems that disagreement implies resentment or dislike,

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Friday, April 11, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE UT Opera to put nuanced spin on famous Mozart production Victoria Brown Staff Writer UT Opera will perform “Cosi Fan Tutte,â€? an opera by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart based around love and romance, this upcoming weekend. Sydney Gabbard, a second-year master’s of music student, is a member of the cast and a well-seasoned opera performer, with “Cosi Fan Tutteâ€? being her 10th show. Gabbard is also one of the head marketing representatives for the event. Gabbard said that the opera revolves around a bet that two men make on whether their female fiancĂŠes would ever cheat on them or whether they would always remain faithful. The men disguise themselves and try to seduce the two sisters. “My character brings wit and stability to this plot,â€? Gabbard said. “She knows what is going on and is in on part of the bet because she was paid to help as someone closest to the women, to encourage them to seek these new lovers while their men are supposedly ‘off at war.’â€? Gabbard said that the opera, which they have rehearsed since February, will bring laughs, singing, live theater and beautiful, catchy music. “It is bold, fresh art that questions the ever-present concepts of gender and fidelity, what is love and what is betrayal, can you have love with betrayal?â€? Gabbard said. “It is an amazing production with relentless humor and wit.â€? Emily Hagens, a first-year graduate student, is also involved with the opera. Hagens said “Cosi Fan Tutteâ€? is a refreshing reinvention that plays on Mozart’s subtitle for the work: “La scuola degli

amanti,� which means “The school for lovers.� “Expect the unexpected,� Hagens said. “Our technical staff has created a setting and atmosphere that is certain to thrill.� Hagens said that the actors tell a story filled with hilarity, sensuality and heart. “If you’ve never been to an opera before, this will defy all expectations and stereotypes,� she said. “Plus, the intimate nature of the Carousel Theatre brings the audience into the action.� Hagens said the production of the show has been highly physical, with lots of movement, action and dance. “The pairing of physicality with classical singing,� she said, “has been an exciting challenge.� James Marvel, the director of the UT Opera Theatre, said he is excited to direct the opera for a second time, as he first directed it at the age of 24. “Getting to know the opera again has been an interesting journey,� Marvel said. “With any comedy, timing is extremely important, so it takes many hours to perfect that kind of thing.� Marvel said the show is hilarious, but it also has a heart. “The situations in the comedy are pretty racy and hot, and this production embraces that quality,� Marvel said. “This is not a stuffy, boring opera. It’s an amazing night in the theater. “Watching all of my students grow as artists in the process is tremendously gratifying for me.� Performances for “Cosi Fan Tutte� will be held this upcoming weekend, with a matinee show being held on Saturday. Tickets are available at the Clarence Brown Theatre box office, or online at Knoxvilletickets.com.

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pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

Five books to dive into this spring Jenna Butz

For the poetry lover: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Selected Poemsâ&#x20AC;? by E.E. Cummings

Staff Writer Ah, spring. The dogwoods burst into color, the temperature rises and students crack open good books simply for the pleasure of leisure reading. OK, maybe not. But if you do find yourself with a bit of spare time, check out one of these titles to embrace all the springtime atmosphere that literature has to offer.

Sure, we have all likely read an E.E. Cummings poem or two in our lives, in particular â&#x20AC;&#x153;i carry your heart with me.â&#x20AC;? However, the poet has more up his sleeve. Often dealing with imagery of nature, Cummingsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; poems are the ideal way to lie

back and enjoy the warming weather in a thoughtful, introspective manner. From poems titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spring is a perhaps handâ&#x20AC;? to â&#x20AC;&#x153;life is more true than reason will deceive,â&#x20AC;? this collection of poems is full of opportunities to rethink rebirth in the season.

For the psycho-analytic: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Set This House in Order: A Romance of Soulsâ&#x20AC;? by Matt Ruff In his novel, Ruff explores the mind of Andy Gage, a young man whose tortuous past has led him to develop multiple personality disorder. The book explores the structure of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;houseâ&#x20AC;? inside Andyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mind that keeps his everyday life running smoothly

until he meets a young woman with the same disorder, though not all of her personalities are aware of their situation. Though fictional, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Set This House in Orderâ&#x20AC;? delves into the disorder in a probing yet thoughtful manner.

For the music lover: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just Kidsâ&#x20AC;? by Patti Smith This book has been raved about as one of the greatest music memoirs to be written in the last decade; however, Smith writes about more than just her music career. In fact, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hardly a part of it. Instead, she discusses her relationship with artist Robert Mapplethorpe, her poetry and how to

live in New York City as a struggling artist. Despite her lack of music talk, reading â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just Kidsâ&#x20AC;? allows fans to understand where Smith came from that inspired her own music as well as other musicians and artists who came out of 1960s New York.

For the traveler: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Into the Wildâ&#x20AC;? by John Krakauer You may have seen the movie or already heard how it ends. Reading the full story though, along with Krakauerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commentary, could tap into you wanderlust. While the ending is not the happily ever after many of us may hope for,

Chris McCandlessâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story of giving up everything to travel Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wilderness is sure to spark that need to travel, helping you daydream of the roadtrips or hikes you can take as soon as you finish that last exam.

For the pop culture fanatic: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Orange is the New Black: My Year in a Womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Prisonâ&#x20AC;? by Piper Kerman As those of us that are boiling over with excitement as we as the constant conflict in the show, reading the memoir is a wait for Netflixâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second season of the hit show, we can get chance to be shown what a year in a womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prison is really ahead of the curve. Kermanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s memoir shows a less drama- like as well as helping us cope with the long wait. tized, realistic version of the show. While maybe not as â&#x20AC;&#x153;funâ&#x20AC;?

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NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD â&#x20AC;˘ Will Shortz ACROSS 1 Cause for squirming 9 Container for Rip Van Winkle 15 TV show that debuted on 11/3/93 (and start of a parentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s distressed cry?) 16 Furnishing in many a tearoom 17 Officerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;giftâ&#x20AC;? 18 Lemony, for example 19 Roles, metaphorically 20 ___â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pea 22 â&#x20AC;&#x153;The king of terrors,â&#x20AC;? per Job 18 23 Anklebones 25 In the company of 27 Guilty pleasure? 31 Poetic member of a Greek nonet 32 Having a gaping hole, say 33 Org. in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Breaking Badâ&#x20AC;? 36 Setting for â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Shiningâ&#x20AC;?

37 Bogart role 39 TV show that debuted on 9/22/04 (middle of the cry) 40 Corporate giant co-founded by Thomas Watson 41 Jackie with acting chops 42 Sit on it 43 TV show that debuted on 1/5/70 (end of the cry) 47 Greek hunter trained by Chiron 49 Language that gave us â&#x20AC;&#x153;slogan,â&#x20AC;? originally meaning â&#x20AC;&#x153;battle cryâ&#x20AC;? 50 Dreaded sort? 51 Outside: Prefix 53 Noted septet 57 Trojan rivals 59 Transfer, as wine 61 Merino, Suffolk and Dorset 62 Like Christmas candles, typically 63 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Says who?,â&#x20AC;? e.g. 64 So-so

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Friday, April 11, 2014 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

Student brings short film to Regal’s big screen Kendall Thompson Contributor Clinton Elmore is not your average student. Yes, he attends classes and has spent many a day dedicated to studying and finishing homework, but how many students wandering around campus can say they’ve created their own curriculum and, on top of that, have made a 20-minute short film to be shown at Regal Cinemas Downtown West? “When I came back to UT, my first intention was to finish out my English degree,” Elmore, a returning student, said. “I took a cinematography class as art and ended up taking Cinema Studies with Dr. Maland. “I was hooked, so I began changing all the classes I was taking in order to mimic a film degree.” However, Elmore was faced with a dilemma: in order to pursue his newfound dream,

he would need to graduate with three majors and two minors. Luckily, his advisor pointed him towards the College Scholars program, the oldest honors program at UT. “[College Scholars] was designed for students who were talented, motivated and whose educational interests and goals do not fit comfortably into a conventional major,” said Jeffrey Kovac, director of College Scholars. Elmore fell under this category. “I was set on getting the education I wanted, not just to get a diploma,” he said, “but when I walk out of here to have the best education to accomplish my goals.” With that thought in mind, he launched himself headfirst into the program he dubbed “Cinema Studies and Moving Image Production,” taking classes in the college of journalism, theater, cinema studies and 4D art. “He has a fine grade record, he works hard, he followed

his dream,” Kovac said. “He’s found all the people he needs to find and all the courses to build this package for himself for the craft of filmmaking.” Despite several hardships, including being in a wheelchair for a semester after a back injury, Elmore found himself beginning his senior project. He decided to make his own short film, deviating away from the typical senior project. “I’ve worked on film projects before, but nothing quite to this scale,” he said. “I was directing, I was working the camera, I was taking care of lighting and costumes. It was quite the undertaking.” Elmore credits his actors with several creative contributions to the film. “Each person has their own idea of what the project is,” Elmore said. “If you are the only one making the creative decisions, you’re only going to see your vision. “The others see not only your vision, but your vision interpreted through their own.” Elmore also said that his actors went above and

CELTS continued from Page 1 “A lot of people on their way out to California bumped into Mexican populations, and there’s this sidebar of history where a lot of the Catholics in the army defected to Mexico,” Poland said. “The Celts and the Mexicans, we’re rebels, man. We want to get away from the government and do our own thing.” California Celts will certainly do its own thing on stage tonight, with a lineup of instruments as diverse as the group’s inspiration sources. Tin whistle, tenor saxophone, traditional Scottish bagpipes, trumpet and Celtic harp are

beyond while playing his characters, suggesting various ideas in regards to blocking or how to perform his or her lines. After a semester of writing, casting and editing, Elmore is finally ready to show his film to the world. “It was educational, [and] it was uplifting,” he said of the experience. “I got to work with some of the best actors I’ve ever worked with, and it was an honor to share that with them.” After graduating from the College Scholars program in May, Elmore plans to enter graduate school in the Journalism and Electronic Media department. His longterm goal is to write and direct feature-length films and eventually own his own production company. The film, entitled “Crux,” is about a man recovering from back problems and his wife, who both become victims of a home invasion. It will premiere Saturday at 10 a.m. at the Downtown West Regal Cinemas. The viewing is free to the public.

among those to be featured. Knight said she believes the diversity and unconventionality of California Celts, which is evident in both the group’s musical and historical inspirations, is representative of CAC’s overarching mission. “We want to expose students to something completely new they may have never seen or heard of before and may not even know exists,” she said. “It’s always illuminating to listen to something new in the music world, and you may find yourself liking a whole new genre of music you’ve never heard before.” California Celts will play tonight in the UC Auditorium beginning at 7 p.m. Admission for students is free.

William Wild preps for album release at The Square Room Claire Dodson Arts & Culture Editor Breaking into the music business is tough. It’s even tougher when you’re balancing class schedules and essays along with writing, producing, engineering and promoting an album by yourself. Yet over the past year and a half, that’s what senior in business management Garrett Sale and his band William Wild have been doing. “I don’t balance it all that well,” Sale laughed. “I’ve always kept a really good GPA, but this semester, it’s kind of been the first year where I knew I was gonna go into music, so it was harder to focus on school.” The band, composed of Sale on vocals and guitar, John Knight on electric guitar and Aaron Hill on drums, just released its self-titled first album on iTunes on Tuesday. William Wild will host an official release show tonight at The Square Room at 8 p.m. with opener The Band Concord. Sale began playing guitar in elementary school and formed a band in high school before spending the first two years of college away from making music. Slowly, he began writing more songs and making demos in his bedroom – the process soon turned into the creation of William Wild. During the past year and a half, Sale has been busy opening for upand-comers in the Knoxville music scene, including fellow UT student band Cereus Bright, as well as Nashville-based Judah & The Lion, at venues like The Square Room and Remedy Coffee. Tonight’s show will be Sale’s first headlining performance at The Square Room, a fact he said he is excited about. “We haven’t fleshed out all the songs with everybody only but a few times,” Sale said. “So this’ll be the first time that a huge amount

of people get to hear these songs performed the way they were recorded.” Tuesday’s release is representative of what the band’s Facebook page calls “psychedelic folk.” According to Sale, the music has heavy 60s and 70s folk influences, as well as rock elements reminiscent of bands like Local Natives and The Black Keys. Though Sale said he has focused on music more than school this year, his collateral in entrepreneurship has helped in practical ways when working on the album. “Starting a band and selling a product,” Sale said, “is really similar to starting a business.” Many college-aged folk bands often decide that post-graduation is the time to move to a larger city, most often Nashville. Sale said that not only is this not in the plans for William Wild, but that he hopes to build out a studio in his house this summer to help keep the group Knoxville-based. “Lately we’ve kind of realized that Knoxville can get behind a band in a different way than Nashville can,” Sale said. “Nashville is kinda desensitized to that. So I think we’re probably gonna stay in Knoxville.” Sale cited his folky sound as a result of growing up in Knoxville, a city he hopes will continue to support artistic and cultural pursuits. “I think Knoxville has the potential to be a really cool music place,” Sale said. “We need people who like music to support local musicians and local arts. “Because it’s there and it’s thriving, but it’s not as big as it could be.” William Wild hopes to tour as much as possible this year and play as many shows as they can, starting with tonight’s release concert. Doors open at The Square Room at 7 p.m. Tickets are $13 at the door.


Friday, April 11, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 7 Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron

SPORTS

tprovost@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Dargan Southard

msoutha1@utk.edu

MEN’S TENNIS

Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon

No. 21 Vols gearing up for SEC road trip against Bama, Auburn

Junior Hunter Reese slides to hit a return during a match against Auburn at Barksdale Stadium on April 14, 2013. UT will play No. 29 Auburn on Friday and then will head to No. 33 Alabama on Sunday.

Wes Tripp Contributor It is crunch time for the Tennessee men’s tennis team as UT enters its final weekend of regular season play. Tennessee (15-9), ranked 21st in the country, travels to No. 29 Auburn on Friday and then will head to No. 33 Alabama on Sunday. Tennessee sits, along with four other teams, at 4-6 in the SEC, and with the standings being so tight, the Vols could find themselves anywhere from sixth to eleventh in the league at the conclusion of the season. “From the start of the season, we’ve been talking about getting better every week,” Tennessee head coach Sam Winterbotham said. “Obviously, we would have preferred to not be 4-6 in the league right now. We’ve had some matches that we wish we could have back, but I feel like we’re in a really good frame of mind right now to go into this weekend and play better and get ready for the SEC tournament. “I feel like our team is building right now and it has a great energy to it. So I’m excited about that.”

WOMEN’S TENNIS

Weekend sweep serves as motivator for Lady Vols Jessica Koralewski Contributor The Tennessee Lady Volunteer women’s tennis team is on a roll following its first weekend sweep of the season, with road victories against the LSU Tigers (4-3) and the Arkansas Lady Razorbacks (4-0). “We played doubles really well last weekend,” freshman Eve Repic said. “If we continue

to do what we were doing last weekend, at home, I think we should be pretty good.” The past weekend’s wins have generated excitement in the program and serve as a motivator for this weekend’s upcoming matches. “It’s been awhile,” co-head coach Sonia Hahn-Patrick said. “I don’t remember the last weekend we actually swept, so that on the road I think is a big confidence booster going into this weekend.” The Lady Vols take on

Auburn this Friday and will play a doubleheader against MTSU and Alabama on Sunday. “We always have a good, healthy rivalry with those schools,” Patrick said of inconference rivals Alabama and Auburn. “It’s always difficult to play there, and it’s always difficult to play them when they come to our place, but we go back and forth, and we’re just going to compete as hard as we can.” The addition of junior Caitlyn Williams to the lineup, Patrick

said, is a huge plus for the Lady Vols. Williams missed much of the season due to an injury, but upon her return, the junior went undefeated in doubles this weekend, leading the Vols to the sweep. Her performance helped Williams to be named co-SEC player of the week. “It’s always exciting,” Patrick said. “It’s a great reward, one that she deserves. In turn, I think that helps our whole team, because that just boosts the morale, and she’s a big contributor for us.”

The team is riding the high of a two-match winning streak and can point to a change in doubles pairing as a catalyst for that success. Senior Jarryd Chaplin and junior Andrew Dromsky became the team’s second doubles pairing behind Hunter Reese and Mikelis Libietis, the No. 1 doubles duo in the country. “We didn’t have the energy we needed in doubles,” Winterbotham said about the change in pairings. “I felt like a couple of teams got stagnant and they had some hard matches. It’s not that they lost confidence, it was just that the team was losing confidence and that’s often the case. You’ve got to change things up once in a while, and what I’ve really been impressed with is Andrew and Jarryd have played really well together. “It’s been really good, and that has been a shot in the arm for us because we have a great No. 1 team and to have a really strong two and three is also good.” The upcoming matches pres-

ent another challenge for the Vols. “Auburn and Alabama are two very good teams,” said Winterbotham. “Both of them have top-20, top-25 talent. It’s going to be a real battle in both places. Last time we played a night match in Auburn, it was a pretty hostile crowd and a lot of fun. It was an exciting venue.” Tennessee fans carry a deep disdain for the rival-Crimson Tide, and that translates to the tennis court as well. “The casual fan wants Tennessee to beat Alabama in everything and we obviously understand that,” said Winterbotham. “I think there is that natural rivalry regardless of if the teams have been close, but I feel like it’s going to be a really good match. I have a lot of respect for their coach and that program. “We know it will be fun on the day, but for now they’re the second match of the weekend, so we’re focusing all our energies on Auburn.”


8 • THE DAILY BEACON

Friday, April 11, 2014 Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron

SPORTS

tprovost@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Dargan Southard

msoutha1@utk.edu

BASEBALL

SOFTBALL

Staff Report The No. 21 Tennessee Volunteers opened its threegame series against Georgia with a 5-3 win over the Bulldogs Thursday night at Foley Field in Athens, Ga. UT (23-9, 6-7 SEC) banged out 11 hits and extended its winning streak to four games, including three straight victories inside the conference. The third inning proved to be the pivotal frame for Dave Serrano’s squad as the Vols scored all five runs off Bulldog starter Jared Cheek (5-4), sending eight men to the plate in the inning. Third baseman Will Maddox, shortstop A.J. Simcox and right fielder Scott opened

FOOTBALL continued from Page 1 “For us – being as young as we are and the growth and development that needs to occur – Saturday is a big, big day for us and it’s very important in continuing the evolution of this football team and our football program.” Williams embracing D-tackle role For defensive lineman Jordan Williams, this spring has been a transitional one. Throughout his career, the senior has been a pass rusher, either as an outside linebacker or a defensive end, but this spring he has found himself on the inside as a defensive tackle. With his change in position, Williams has beefed up to 275 pounds and is still looking to add an additional 10 pounds to be able to deal with increased physicality that comes with the interior line. “It’s all the same, playing

the frame with three consecutive singles to load the bases with nobody out. Back-to-back RBI hits followed for the Vols as Nick Senzel plated one with a single, and Christin Stewart brought home two more with a runscoring double to right. One batter later, Senzel scored on a Taylor Smart RBI groundout, and Stewart crossed home as well on a sacrifice fly from Nathaniel Maggio. That offensive showing proved enough for UT starter Nick Williams (4-3, 2.60 ERA), who tossed five innings, allowing four hits and three runs (one earned) with two walks and five strikeouts. Williams’ only blemish came in the fifth inning, when UGA (19-14-1, 5-7-1) scored all

three of its runs. The Bulldogs pushed across its first run with a sacrifice fly and its second via a throwing error. UGA’s final run of the night came two batters later on an RBI single. After Williams exited, the Vols’ bullpen again answered the call, surrendering only one hit over the final four innings. Sophomore workhorse Andy Cox delivered three shutout frames of middle relief, and righty Andrew Lee produced a scoreless ninth for his first save of his UT career. The Vols return to action tonight at 7 p.m. in Game Two of the series against the Bulldogs. UT will send freshman Hunter Martin (2-1, 2.33) to the hill opposite UGA starter Ryan Lawlor (2-2, 3.95).

the three (technique), playing the five, it’s all the same. The only difference is that power,” Williams said. “When you get the guard and tackle coming at you, it’s different.” One player that the Gainesville, Fla., native has been studying throughout his position change is former Vol and Denver Broncos defensive lineman Malik Jackson, who played a similar position to what Williams will play in 2014. “The person I always think about is Malik Jackson,” Williams said. “He was a taller guy, but he wasn’t one of those 300-pound power guys in there. He was about my size, and just watching him on film, (it was all about) his hands. He was a technician.” Williams, however, is still looking to remain versatile through his change in case the situation arises where he needs to move back outside. “I just want to have flexibility,” Williams said. “When Curt (Maggitt) was out one

weekend, I just played end the whole time, and I was comfortable out there too. So that’s been good.” Disappointed under center The Vols’ final spring practice left much to be desired at the signal caller position. In the midst of their quarterback battle, the four competitors failed to impress Jones, but the only quarterback who hasn’t played a snap for UT was the one who may have separated himself, even if just a little bit. “I was really disappointed today in the overall position,” Jones said. “I didn’t think one quarterback really stood out. Again, we are looking for the alpha male. Playing quarterback at Tennessee is not a sometime thing, it’s an all the time thing. “I thought Riley (Ferguson) had more leadership than any of them, but not to our standard by which we are going to play quarterback here at Tennessee.”

Matthew Osborne • Tennessee Athletics

Vols sneak by Georgia, 5-3

Senior Madison Shipman locks in on a pitch against the Texas A&M Aggies on March 24, 2013, at Lee Stadium. The Lady Vols will face Texas A&M beginning Friday at 8 p.m. The weekend series will continue on Saturday at 5 p.m. and conclude on Sunday at 1 p.m.

No. 4 Lady Vols hit road to take on Texas A&M Garrett Ahmad Staff Writer For the first time this season, the No. 4 Tennessee Lady Volunteer softball team (33-5, 9-3 SEC) will face a ranked team in a true road game when they take on No. 21 Texas A&M (27-12, 8-7) this weekend in a three-game series. The Aggies will return home after playing seven straight games on the road with a 4-3 record, including a sweep of fellow SEC foe Arkansas. The Lady Vols’ greatest concern is Aggie senior Emily Albus, who is batting .450 with 63 hits in 140 at-bats, all teamhighs. “Emily Albus, at the top of their order, is one of the best leadoff hitters in the conference, and she brings a lot of speed to the table,” Tennessee co-head coach Karen Weekly said on Wednesday. “She’s going to bunt and have great success with that. She’s going to slap the ball, and we’ve got to do a good job of defending that.” Past Albus in the lineup, the Aggies have three others hitting better than .300 for the

season, including senior Nicole Morgan, who is hitting .371 with team-highs in home runs (10) and RBI (43). Last weekend, Tennessee dropped two of three on the road against an LSU team with a similar style to that of Albus. After struggling to defend the Tigers’ hit-and-run style of play, senior shortstop Madison Shipman said the team used those games as “a learning experience,” which the coaching staff took as a positive out of the series. “I think that’s all that you’re concerned with as a coach with a young team and with the grind that a season like this presents for young players,” Weekly said, “but hopefully we only need to learn that lesson one time, and it won’t bite us at the end of the season.” The Lady Vols’ coaching staff have made some changes in the lineup this week for their trip down to College Station, Texas, in response to the team’s defensive performances in last few weeks. “We came out Monday and made some defensive changes that we think will help solidify our defense,” Weekly said, “make for a more consistent

lineup, but also get Rainey Gaffin’s bat into the lineup on a consistent basis in the (designated player) slot.” Among those changes were putting freshman Megan Geer, who started at second base in the each of the Lady Vols previous 37 contests, into center field for Gaffin, and slotting in sophomore Hannah Akamine at second against Tennessee Tech on Tuesday. The switches seemed to be successful as Tennessee crushed the Golden Eagles in five innings, 13-5. The series against Texas A&M will begin Friday at 8 p.m., continue on Saturday at 5 p.m. and will conclude on Sunday at 1 p.m. ESPNU will broadcast both games on Friday and Sunday, which will be the Lady Vols’ third and fourth games on TV this season. However, Shipman said the team does its best not to get caught up in the cameras. “I think we do really good not even trying to think that the cameras are out there watching us or anything like that,” Shipman said. “We just go out there and play Tennessee ball.”

04 11 14  

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