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Issue 60 , Volume 122

Thursday, April 11, 2013

UT microbiologist tackles science in Antarctica Blair Kuykendall Editor-in-Chief Students often shy away from the hard sciences, fearing life spent as a cloistered lab rat. Professor Jill Mikucki shattered that stereotype, venturing onto the ice sheets of Antarctica to study microbiology. She says she loves her work, but it can get a bit chilly. “The extreme weather presents a variety of safety concerns and so we must take special training on how to survive in the cold,” Mikucki wrote to the Daily Beacon. “There is also the challenge of being so far away from family and friends for long periods of time. A typical field season is about three months.” Practicing microbiology is no small feat stateside, and Antarctica adds its own complications. “There is the challenge of fieldwork — while we may be doing something fairly

straightforward like collecting a water sample, when you add the half a mile of glacier ice that covers your sample … well, that’s a whole different game,” Mikucki said. Mikucki works cooperatively with other specialists in her field to better understand the microorganisms of frigid climates. “I study sub-glacial ecosystems,” she said. “I am interested in how microorganisms survive and thrive in icy environments … It also allows me to place my work in a broader framework; there are many scientist studying glacial systems from various perspectives — for example there are glaciologists, chemists, climatologists, etc. (Collaborating) makes you think more broadly about your problem, it can lead to new insights.” Michelle Chua, a graduate student in microbiology, said that when Mikucki talks about the research, her eyes light up. See ANTARCTICA on Page 3

Around Rocky Top

‘Good Samaritan’ policy continues quest for amnesty David Cobb Assistant News Editor

Justin Ruffin • The Daily Beacon

Megan Andelloux, a Certified Sexuality Educator, discusses various techniques during the ‘How Many Licks Does it Take...’ open discussion on Monday.

In the Bible, Jesus told the parable of the Good Samaritan, a traveler who stopped to help an injured stranger without seeking personal benefit. A policy referencing that deed could find its way to UT in the upcoming year, although state laws won’t be changing anytime soon. All three of the recent Student Government Association campaigns pitched an idea – or at least a variation of it – during the recent campaign season that would grant amnesty to students who seek medical help for dangerously intoxicated peers, even if they themselves have been drinking alcohol. The idea has already landed on the desk of Vice Chancellor for Student Life Timothy Rogers after the recent Greek

Life Task Force recommended the adoption of the policy in its final report. The task force included students, alumni and UTPD Chief Troy Lane, among others. Lane clarified in a statement on Monday that if a “Good Samaritan” policy came to fruition, it would only apply to disciplinary action handed out by the university. “UT simply cannot pass an internal policy that changes criminal law in the state,” Lane said. “Therefore, any amnesty would relate only to student judicial sanctions and not criminal charges, which are separate. “However, this has never stopped the police from exercising discretion when necessary or prudent in dealing with a situation. In these cases our first priority and concern is with the safety and physical well-being of the student, despite their age.” Though such a policy would

reach beyond the Greek community, it would only apply to on-campus incidents, in which students are subjected to university-based sanctions beyond public law. Numerous other universities have adopted a policy that pardons students of such additional punishment in the event they are seeking help for a peer in danger. “That is definitely a policy that we care deeply about,” said newly elected SGA president Jake Baker. Baker’s term in office hasn’t begun yet, but he’s optimistic for the future of a “Good Samaritan” policy, at least within the SGA realm. “All three campaigns agree on that point,” he said. “There’s a lot of things we disagree on. But all three of us agree on that.” Though a statute protecting “Good Samaritans” would likely meet the approval of the SGA Senate, no guarantee

exists that it would be implemented, even with the backing of the Greek Task Force. “I will mention that we (the Greek Task Force) were asked to recommend changes to address issues,” Lane said. “This was only one of many changes we proposed. Also, keep in mind that we had no authority to say that any of these changes had to be made. We were simply proposing ideas that might have an effect.” Baker said the current campus climate and unison within SGA makes it a proposal that students seem to be squarely behind. “I think it is definitely relevant to the student body,” he said. “I know several people that have gotten in trouble for trying to do the right thing, and that’s unacceptable. Because what example is that setting? Do you not want students to seek help for their friends?”

Religion, sex panel pushes past stereotypes Claire Dodson Copy Editor In a culture where religion is either too vocal about sex or too silent, the students and faculty that filled up the UC Auditorium on Tuesday night for the “Sex Week” Religion and Sexuality panel wanted more than answers — they wanted discussion. “They just want to see you all talking about these things,” professor Tina Shepardson, moderator of the panel, said as questions flooded in via text message from students in the UC Auditorium.

The panel was comprised of six representative members of various religions and denominations — James Conant, UT math professor and Buddhist; Father Charlie Donahue, Catholic priest at Blessed John XXIII; Abdel Rahman Murphy, Muslim representative; Heather Godsey, pastor at Wesley Foundation and representative of mainline Christianity; Rabbi Alon Ferency, rabbi at Heska Amuna; and Britton Sharp, Director of CRU (Campus Crusade for Christ). Together, these panelists took on a wide array of questions: at what point does your religion say that sex happens?

What is you religion’s perspective on LGBTQ marriage and relationships? What kinds of sex are permissible within a marriage? In their answers, the panelists referenced their scripture and tradition as well as talked on a more personal level about these issues. Father Donahue discussed the LGBTQ topic from a Catholic perspective but included a personal example from his own life. “My sister and her partner wanted me to be the godfather of their child,” Donahue said. “I was in Rome studying at the time, and I was like ‘yeah, but

let me kind of check.’ So I consulted a cardinal about the situation. He said, ‘Of course you can’t, but of course you must.’ “So I have great pictures of myself at the christening, and it’s awesome … and it’s wonderful because it’s who we are and how we support each other.” As the night went on, the questions and panelists continued to reflect the complexity of the relationship between sex and religion. The panelists were asked questions about the authority of their scripture and how religion adapts to culture over time. For these questions, the answers were less clear-cut and more interpretive.

Rabbi Ferency emphasized that he is not comfortable with everything in his religious tradition and encouraged the audience to struggle with their beliefs. “It’s good to flinch at it,” Ferency said. “Be challenged by it, grapple with what your tradition says and then reinterpret and reject. Say it with gritted teeth. Always find something to wrestle with.” At the end of the panel, each person was allowed to address one misconception they thought others had about their religion or denomination. The responses provided insight into the contrast between the

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reality of these ideas and the stereotypes people project onto religions. From the Islamic perspective, Murphy’s misconception dealt with tradition and gender roles. “People think that a man and a woman have relative value,” Murphy said. “I’ll ask my congregation, ‘What’s a man’s job?’ and they’ll say, ‘to earn a living, to be a man.” So I’ll ask what a woman’s job is and they’ll say, ‘to make children and food.’ “And it’s sad, because our job is to serve God and serve humanity.” See ‘SEX WEEK’ on Page 3

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2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, April 11, 2013 Associate Editor Preston Peeden

IN SHORT Around Rocky Top

ppeeden@utk.edu

Managing Editor Emily DeLanzo edelanzo@utk.edu

THIS DAY IN

1814 — Napoleon exiled to Elba On this day in 1814, Napoleon Bonaparte, emperor of France and one of the greatest military leaders in history, abdicates the throne, and, in the Treaty of Fontainebleau, is banished to the Mediterranean island of Elba. The future emperor was born in Ajaccio, Corsica, on August 15, 1769. After attending military school, he fought during the French Revolution of 1789 and rapidly rose through the military ranks, leading French troops in a number of successful campaigns throughout Europe in the late 1700s. By 1799, he had established himself at the top of a military dictatorship. In 1804, he became emperor of France and continued to consolidate power through his military campaigns, so that by 1810 Tara Sripunvoraskul • The Daily Beacon much of Europe came under Students enjoy the warm sunny weather at Sorority Village on April 1. Sorority Village his rule. Although Napoleon is expected to be complete in the summer and will welcome new students in the fall. developed a reputation for being power-hungry and insecure, he is also credited with enacting a series of important political and social reforms that had a lasting impact on European society, including judiciary systems, constitutions, voting rights for all men and the end of feudalism. Additionally, he supported education, science and literature. His Code Napoleon, which codified key freedoms gained during the French Revolution, such as religious tolerance, remains the foundation of French civil law. In 1812, thinking that Russia was plotting an alliance with England, Napoleon launched an invasion against the Russians that eventually ended with his troops retreating from Moscow and much of Europe uniting against him. In 1814, Napoleon’s broken forces gave up and Napoleon offered to step down in favor of his son. When this offer was rejected, he abdicated and was sent to Elba. In March 1815, he escaped his island exile and returned to Paris, where

HISTORY

he regained supporters and reclaimed his emperor title, Napoleon I, in a period known as the Hundred Days. However, in June 1815, he was defeated at the bloody Battle of Waterloo. Napoleon’s defeat ultimately signaled the end of France’s domination of Europe. He abdicated for a second time and was exiled to the remote island of Saint Helena, in the southern Atlantic Ocean, where he lived out the rest of his days. He died at age 52 on May 5, 1821, possibly from stomach cancer, although some theories contend he was poisoned.

provinces began to make friends very quickly in New York, all the while continuing, as he has since he was ten, to assimilate musical ideas from everyone he met, every record he heard.” Dylan befriended not only his idol Woody Guthrie—whose hospitalization in New Jersey had been the initial impetus for Dylan to come east from Minnesota—but also some of the significant figures on the burgeoning Downtown folk scene, like Jack Elliot and Dave Van Ronk. Dylan would write about this period in “Talkin’ New York” (1962), which included a verse about his breakthrough gig at Gerde’s: “After weeks and weeks of hanging around/ I finally got a job in New York town/ In a bigger place, bigger money too/ Even joined the Union and paid my dues.” Gerde’s was probably the most important folk-music venue in New York City at the time—the club that every folk act with a national profile played when they were in town. Dylan had previously joined other unknowns like himself onstage at Gerde’s during the club’s Monday “Hootenanny Night,” but the invitation to appear on a regular bill presented a bit of an administrative problem. At just 19 years old, Bob Dylan was too young to obtain the necessary union card and cabaret license. One of the clubs owners, Mike Porco, was interested enough in getting the young man on the bill, though, that he signed on as Dylan’s guardian—”the Sicilian father I never knew I had,” as Dylan put it. A number of major developments in the year that followed would set Bob Dylan on his road toward stardom, but the very first of those was his appearance at Gerde’s Folk City on this day in 1961.

1961 — Bob Dylan plays his first major gig in New York City Who knows how many other young men arrived in New York City in the winter of 1961 looking like James Dean and talking like Jack Kerouac? It would have been difficult to pick Bob Dylan out of the crowd at first, considering how much he had in common with the other Bohemian kids kicking around Greenwich Village. Artistic ambition? Check. Antipathy toward mainstream culture? Yes. A desire to put his middle-class identity behind him? Definitely. But the singular creative vision that would separate Dylan from the rest of his peers and change the face of popular music wasn’t really in evidence yet. What Bob Dylan did have, though, in addition to his guitar and harmonica, was a unique stage presence and a vast library of American folk songs in his repertoire. On April 11, 1961, he got his first real chance to put those on display with his first major gig in New York City, opening for bluesman John Lee Hooker at Gerde’s Folk City. Bob Dylan had just arrived in town a few months earlier, but as the prominent producer/ talent scout John Hammond would write in the liner notes of his debut album one year — This Day in History is courlater, “The young man from the tesy of History.com.


Thursday, April 11, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 News Editor RJ Vogt

CAMPUS NEWS ANTARCTICA continued from Page 1 “Not only is she dedicated to her work, but she is also very passionate about it,” Chua said. “Despite her busy schedule, she makes time for me and the other graduate student in the lab … she stops whatever she’s doing to help. In addition, she’s extremely knowledgeable and easygoing, and she challenges us to find answers on our own, which helps me learn more than if she had just given me the answer.” Mikucki and Chua are looking at sub-glacial microbiological diversity, the microscopic organisms thriving under Antarctic ice layers. This hostile environment could hold clues to the survival of other organisms in our

universe. Researchers learn more by examining the outflow, or the discharge coming from under the glacier. “The outflow is indicative of what the environment is like beneath the glacier … there’s no oxygen or light, and obviously, temperatures are low,” Chua said. “This extreme environment presents the possibility of microbial life on other planets.” Mikucki returned to UT at the end of February and plans to head out again next November. “I believe there is a sense of urgency in understanding polar environments,” she said. “I enjoy the hard work and long hours and I feel fortunate to get to work with so many talented, motivated people who also believe studying Antarctica is important.”

• Photo courtesy of Jill Mikucki

‘SEX WEEK’ continued from Page 1 Both Godsey and Father Donahue talked about how a common misconception for them concerned how their religion thinks about sex and the importance of virginity. “The biggest thing people think is that I care about your sex life,” Father Donahue said, eliciting laughter from the crowd. “Even more, that I care about your sex life more than anything else about you.” For the students in attendance, the event was a way for honest, respectful dialogue to be opened up about the role that sex plays in religion. Mary Ann Willis,

a junior in history, liked the diversity of opinions the panel had. “I liked hearing different outlooks, even within the Christian church,” Willis said. “I feel like most UT students grew up in a faith that didn’t explain and now they are dealing with all these questions and they don’t know how to reconcile their beliefs. That’s why events like these are so helpful.” The event ended on a light note when it came time for Rabbi Ferency to address misconceptions about Judaism. “A lot of people think that Jewish men and women are sexual dynamos,” Ferency said, trying to keep a straight face. “It’s not all of us, but it’s definitely a majority.”

rvogt@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor David Cobb dcobb3@utk.edu

Lecturer discusses Egyptian turmoil Rebecca Butcher Staff Writer UT professor Brian Barber has found himself in the wake of Egyptian protests and social unrest. As the director and founder of the Center for the Study of Youth and Political Violence on campus, Barber shared his research and accounts Tuesday night in the International House Great Room. “From Rally to Revolution: Inside the Minds of Egyptian Youth Activists” was sponsored with the Middle Eastern Student Association and the Issues Committee, drawing a diverse crowd. “It was the collective whole of thousands of people together that … bound me to the experience of this moment that uplifted the entire nation and united them across all sectors of society,” Barber said. Barber, who arrived in Egypt in February 2011, had followed news reports from the nation prior to his arrival, but said experiencing the tur-

moil first-hand was incomparable. “Being on the ground that first evening in the square with hundreds of thousands of people and seeing their joy was indescribable,” he said. Barber was referencing the moment on Feb. 18 when former president Hosni Mubarak departed from his position. Barber now travels to Egypt every few months. “To us it’s important to get past the dramatic moments and see what day to day life is like and how it progresses over the long haul,” Barber said. “And in this case, unfortunately, it’s a very painful one.” Barber’s research focuses on protesters he interviewed while visiting Tahrir Square. One particular woman named Kholoud was highlighted, explaining how she was a timid woman, but now finds herself shouting on the streets in protest. Kholoud also saw herself as a reformer, not a revolutionary. In his lecture, Barber pointed out the difference between the two. A

reformer is one that wants to tweak the current government structure, while a revolutionary believes the structure of the government must be dismantled. Kholoud now views herself as a revolutionary after seeing the brutality of Egyptian policemen. A few demonstration videos that Barber shared included a protest from November 2011, which showed toxic cans thrown by the Egyptian policemen. Barber explained that the policemen were former allies of the youth but are now enemies alongside the Egyptian military. The police released an invisible gas that was more harmful than the cans, Barber said. “I’d never want to experience that pain again,” he explained. Amira Sakella, a freshman and logistics major and member of the Middle Eastern Student Association, enjoyed the event. “I like how Dr. Barber’s studies are so personal with the youth there, and I’m Palestinian and have cousins

that seem so similar to the kids he was talking about,” Sakalla said. “It makes me want to learn more about it because even though I’m Middle Eastern,” she said. “I haven’t studied the revolution.” Sakalla also said that in order to get to Palestine — where her family lives — it’s necessary to enter through Egypt and knowing what’s happening there is important. Other topics that Barber brought up differentiated between layers of identity of those in the region. He said unity that is resulting from a shared cause is unfolding. Barber is also a technical adviser to the World Health Organization and UNICEF. His trips are funded by the Rockefeller Foundation, the Jerusalem Fund and the U.S. National Institute for Mental Health. In addition, he teaches child and family studies and psychology at UT. He currently has published two books on political violence. The event was free and available to all students.


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, April 11, 2013 Editor-in-Chief Blair Kuykendall

OPINIONS

bkuykend@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Going

Somewhere...Hopefully

Internet comments risky for job seekers

Preston Peeden Associate Editor Be careful what you put on the Internet. That’s the advice my sister gave me when I first got a Facebook profile my freshman year of high school. Knowing me all too well (especially my proclivity for stupid jokes and my passion for Corgi pictures), my sister laid out the warnings over what I should and shouldn’t put up on the very first day I had the opportunity to share my views with a mass audience. She told me that what I put on there could hurt me in my not-so-distant future as I went on a job search. I never really heeded my sister’s advice until two years ago, which isn’t to say that I was ever a risqué tweeter, but rather I just didn’t find it important. I wasn’t faced with graduation, job searching and interviews; I was simply communicating whatever came to my mind, without much preconceived editing. But now things are different. This may make me sound like a stuffy old man, but I truly am worried about how I am represented by not only myself, but also by other people on the Internet. For all those that feel like I’m rehashing the same old tired advice that no one listens to (nor is affected by), heed the story of Paris Brown. For those who don’t know this British youth, a 17-year-old, who was hired as a youth commissioner by Kent’s police department in April, was expected to use her position to bridge the gap between the youth of the area and the police that protected them. Brown was viewed as a strong, confident, self-aware girl. Unfortunately, her Twitter didn’t represent her as such. Instead, many of Brown’s tweets, which were reprinted by the Daily Mail in a piece last week, portray-

ing the teenager as being a self-proclaimed racist, who had a love of underage drinking and hash brownies. Needless to say, this was not the behavior that the police department wanted to share with the youth of Kent. Brown, who was under incredible media fire, stepped down as a result two days ago. Brown’s story is certainly atypical at points. I don’t have a feeling that KPD is going to call me up and put me on a pedestal to communicate with Knoxvillian teens, but besides the circumstances of her job, her story isn’t unique; we all say stupid things on the Internet. I think we live in a unique generation in this regard. We were born in the midst of the social media boom. It was made for people our age, and we’re only just now starting to see the negative outcomes it can have. Instead of showing caution about how we represent ourselves, we’re now just a couple keystrokes away from completely changing people’s perceptions of us for the sole purpose of getting a couple likes on a status. We are a slave to notifications and retweets. With the instantaneous nature of Facebook and Twitter, the lag that used to shape what we put in writing is gone. It’s a straight process of thought to status, with no checks in between. And that’s scary. I know I’m sounding preachy here, but I’m not standing on a high horse when I say this. I, like everyone, have my share of things I wish I hadn’t put up, such as my belief in 2007 that Switchfoot was the Band of the Century (which I still say was a Facebook hack) or my love/hate Twitter relationship with John Stamos. I am a member of the ADD/Facebookaddict generation. I just wish I knew how to show more restraint, because you really do need to be careful about what you put up on the Internet. — Preston Peeden is a senior in history. He can be reached at ppeeden@utk.edu.

SCRAMBLED EGGS • Alex Cline

SOUTHERN GLAMOUR • Jacob Hobson

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Proposed gun reform misses target Commitee of Infractions by

Greg Bearringer Once, when I was younger, I stubbed my toe. My sister laughed and said, “Well, I guess we better amputate at the neck.” Sometimes, like my sister, Congress completely fails to assign a relevant solution to one of the nation’s problems. Instead, they attempt to solve crises that don’t even exist. The problem that has bugged me about this discussion, which was inflamed by the Newtown school shootings, only recently coalesced into a real thought. A few days after it happened, I watched David Letterman, who made a plea for Congress to “do something” because there had been what he called “too many.” While it is hard to disagree with him on this point, what bugged me was that he thought that the government should “do something.” Across a large enough sample size, people look really violent. There are hundreds of millions of people in the United States. Some of them are going to be violent, and some of this violence will be inflicted on school children — often by other children. Here’s the thing. Gun violence isn’t getting worse. In fact, crime rates around the country have been in something of a decline for the past few decades. Even in a place such as Chicago, where gang violence remains relatively high, homicide rates are falling. The easy narrative here is that gun control laws have worked; the truth is that rape and theft are down, too. That’s right. We are less likely to be murdered or have something stolen from us than ever before. Now, I should mention that not all gun control laws are bad. Making people wait a few weeks to buy a gun has probably saved quite a few lives. I also do not agree

with the National Rifle Association, which would have me believe that gun ownership is the most important of rights. I can’t help but think that there is a danger when the rhetoric is this vague and this emotional. There is a context in which a conversation about gun control can take place. There is a context where people might try to figure out why violence has fallen in general and why it has fallen more in some areas than others. This is not that context. The worst thing that can be done right now is being done right now. The debate has centered around how many bullets can be in a clip and what kinds of semi-automatic weapons should be legal. Certainly, any “gun” regulation will have to consider things like how guns function. But what isn’t being said is where the danger lies. People think that the imminent danger comes from a heavily armed insane person. Far more people are getting shot because of inner-city gang violence. For every maniac that will get stopped by a psychologist there will be hundreds of future killers who go unnoticed because they are the kinds of kids who are always unnoticed by politicians. Why are these kids going unnoticed? Is it because “gang violence” comes far too close to racism and economic stratification for politicians to be comfortable? The smart money says yes. The best thing that could happen would be for these communities to invest in the education of their neighborhood kids, for activists to pay more attention to whether or not innercity kids have a fighting chance. And that is what bothers me so much about what Mr. Letterman said. However many lives are saved by keeping a few bullets out of guns, I can’t but help believe that people should do something instead of Congress. Not only would lives be saved but then even more would be improved. — Greg Bearringer is a graduate student in history. He may be reached at gbearrin@utk.edu.

Worker-owned cooperatives benefit economy Urban Landscapes by

Lindsay Lee

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Blair Kuykendall

editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com

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It is no secret that today in the United States the richest people in the nation are better off than they have ever been in our history. The richest 1 percent in our nation owns 40 percent of our nation’s wealth, while the bottom 80 percent has about 7 percent of the wealth. Today the average CEO makes 380 times his (or her, but usually his) average worker’s pay. That’s not 380 times the lowest worker’s pay in the company, but the average worker. Despite these record prosperous times for the richest of the rich, the rest of us are experiencing a 7.7 percent unemployment rate. That number is probably significantly higher in real life when you account for people who have given up looking for a job and people on disability benefits. Clearly, our nation’s distribution of wealth is much too top heavy. This is a widespread belief among Americans, as demonstrated in multiple surveys. But the most important problem that arises from this insanely unequal wealth distribution is an insanely unequal distribution of power, which perpetuates economic, political and social inequality. One possible solution to this unequal distribution of power in business is the workerowned cooperative company. Worker-owned co-ops go back as far as the 19th century, but their popularity resurged again in the 1960s. The basic idea of a worker-owned cooperative is in the name: workers own a share in the company, and hence have a say in how it operates. This is completely opposite to how most companies are run, where a few wealthy shareholders own the entire stake in the company and decide how it operates. The quintessential example of a successful

worker-owned cooperative is the Mondragón Corporation in the Basque region of Spain. Mondragón is a federation of more than 250 worker cooperatives, employing more than 83,000 people. It was founded in 1956 in the town of Mondragón and has only grown since in popularity and wealth. In a time when Spanish unemployment is around 20 percent, unemployment in the Basque region is only around nine percent. Unemployment remains low because these sort of cooperatives put labor above capital, community above profit. These companies do not pick up and leave when economic times are difficult because they are democratic and invest in the community where they are located. This humanist ideology is demonstrated in Mondragón’s own motto: “Humanity at Work.” Mondragón works for Spain, but it sounds like a dirty socialist paradise, right? It could never work here, right? Wrong. Not only can it work here; it already does. There are more than 300 co-ops in the U.S. right now in nearly every sector of the economy, employing more than 3,500 people and generating $400 million in annual revenue. These numbers are growing all the time. While we Americans often extol the value of big business, you cannot deny that big business’s fundamental belief in profit over people has hurt us over and over throughout history. Our current economy and the top 1 percent who run it recklessly have created physical, mental, social and economic suffering. The worker-owned cooperative is an alternative to the mess we are in now. Fundamental American values are actively demonstrated through these businesses: democracy, community, family, independence and freedom. Can you say the same about Exxon-Mobil, General Motors, Goldman Sachs or Bank of America? — Lindsay Lee is a junior in mathematics. She can be reached at llee26@utk.edu.


Thursday, April 11, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Arts & Culture Editor Victoria Wright

ARTS & CULTURE

vwright6@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan

merdogan@utk.edu

Bugg brings special sound to debut album Spencer Hall Staff Writer With critical acclaim and comparisons to Bob Dylan, it is almost hard to believe British newcomer Jake Bugg is only 19. Most kids his age spend their time worrying about homework and finals, but not Bugg. The singer has already topped the British pop charts and is looking to bring his folksy sound across the pond to the U.S. with his self-titled debut album. Bugg, a Nottingham native, has shot to stardom over the past year after opening for iconic British acts such as Noel Gallagher (of Oasis) and The Stone Roses. He’s slowly but surely making a name for himself over in the states as well, with his aptly named single “Lightning Boltâ€? being used in a nationally aired Gatorade commercial. Although the Dylan comparison is as clichĂŠd and overused as any for a young folk singer/ songwriter, there is no doubt Bugg has a talent rarely seen in someone his age, and he’ll be the first one to say so. Bugg has made headlines for his criticism of the British boy band One Direction and for publicly slamming the show “The X Factorâ€? for creating manufactured pop music. Bugg doesn’t seem to mind the attention though, as he often says, “I’m just a guy playing a few songs.â€? That statement shows in his debut record. Most of the

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album’s tracks are short and average out at around twoand-a-half minutes, but somehow manage to leave a lasting impression on the listener. The album’s introductory tune is the aforementioned “Lightning Bolt.� Perhaps the most Dylan-esque track on the entire record, Bugg’s rapid and crunchy vocal delivery meshes well over the quick guitar strumming. It’s easy to hear Bugg’s musical influences on this track. One of the record’s standout tracks is “Two Fingers.� Bugg sings, “I drink to remember, I smoke to forget / Some things to be proud of, some stuff to regret,� showing that even if some of his past is troubling, he’s able to leave it behind and “hold two fingers up to yesterday.� The track is reminiscent to the rhythms of Buddy Holly while Bugg’s voice has the gritty cadence and casualness of Miles Kane and Alex Turner (of Arctic Monkeys). Bugg proves that his range isn’t limited to catchy, toe-tapping songs. There’s a side to his songwriting that demonstrates his emotions in a more personal arrangement. On “Country Song� you can almost picture Bugg sitting in his room alone with nothing but a guitar in hand picking away a quick, little love song while no one’s around. The short song has a basic old style structure to it, but it leaves a lasting imprint with each listen. “Ballad Of Mr. Jones� is

another song that manages to move away from the folksy sound that the majority of the album is comprised of. The use of the slide guitar plays a big part in the identity of this song, creating a dark desert feeling. Even though Bugg often scores when he tries to venture outside of the folk songs in which he’s more accustomed to with heavier rock ‘n’ roll tunes, it’s the soft acoustic tracks that make the album really shine. One song that really proves his ability as a folk singer is “Simple as This,� a track that could have been found on an old Donovan record 50 years ago. The pleasant strumming of the guitar mixed with Bugg’s harmonies make for a memorable track about a young man searching for his place in life. Throughout the song, it is evident that Bugg has tried different experiences in his life but as the track comes to a close, we can tell he has finally found whatever “it� is. Jake Bugg may look like your everyday teenager, but with one listen to this selftitled debut album, it’s clear that this kid is special. It’s easy to hear Bugg’s musical influences on each of his tracks, but it’s the way he approaches each tune that makes Bugg one of a kind. As he sings on “Two Fingers,� “something is changing,� and with this young artist leading the way, all we have to do is listen and enjoy the music.

• Photo courtesy of Wavves

New album receives mixed reviews Jessica Traughber Staff Writer Indie rock group Wavves released its fourth studio album,“Afraid of Heights,� on March 26. Suffice it to say, the album mashes a surf-rock vibe with a ‘90s alternative rock sound synonymous with Green Day, Weezer and particularly, Nirvana. Now comprised of members Nathan Williams, Stephen Pope and Jacob Cooper, the band has experienced some changes with its lineup since their last studio album, “King of The Beach,� in 2010. Wavves burst in with the opening track “Sail to the Sun,� one of the album’s highlights and one of only few songs that sounds like the material from “King of the Beach.� If listeners pay attention, they may notice that lead singer Nathan Williams sounds eerily similar to Green Day’s Billie Joe Armstrong. Stay tuned. That’s a theme. The second single, “Demon to Lean On,� is where the ‘90s rock homage begins in earnest. Everything from the guitar-drenched sounds in the verses, to the over-driven guitar tone in the chorus all sound familiar. That’s not to say it’s a bad song, but it’s a little disconcerting how much the song sounds like a throwback. On tracks like “Demon to Lean On,� it doesn’t hurt the enjoyment of the song, but on other tracks such as “Lunge Forward,� which genuinely sounds like it should be on Green Day’s “Insomniac,� it is too similar in an unpleasant way. “Lunge Forward� is preceded by the noisier yet ironically forgettable “Mystic,� and is followed by

“Dog,� which is an acoustic number with bells and cellos that is — for lack of a better word — terrible. Williams belts, “Still I’ll be your dog� repeatedly. And that’s about it. However, Williams redeems himself on the title track, arguably one of his best written songs to date. Listeners will hum the lyrics for days, and the guitar work sticks to the typical pop-punk fare. It’s executed perfectly. The last track, on the other hand, drags on far too long and never gains momentum. Williams tries different things with his voice to spice up the number, but the song gets old pretty quick. The biggest issue on “Afraid of Heights� are the lyrics. Williams may not be a poetic soul full of wondrous ballads, but his lyrics on the album are lacking to say the least. He echoes themes of isolation, loneliness and occasionally introspection throughout the album, but his approach is tired, played out and borderline mediocre. “Afraid of Heights� sits on the fine line between good and great. It is well-produced, and listeners will be able to tell. The album includes plenty of memorable hooks and guitar parts (though basic) that get the job done well. Williams seems to have ditched his beach motif and surf vibes for straight ‘90s alternative rock. Usually this works for him, but on songs such as “Dog,� “Everything Is My Fault� and “I Can’t Dream,� this approach falls flat. Regardless, “Afraid of Heights� is a fun summer album that’s perfect to play with the volume up and the windows down, or even at the first grill out of the year. It may not be groundbreaking, but hey. It’s Wavves.

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NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD â&#x20AC;˘ Will Shortz ACROSS 1 Difficult political situation 7 Chili 13 Tennis world since 1968 15 Dan who drew â&#x20AC;&#x153;Archieâ&#x20AC;? 16 Movable property 17 Good news on the economy 18 Plop preceder 19 Digital dough 21 So-called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wheat Capital of Oklahomaâ&#x20AC;? 22 One â&#x20AC;&#x153;comingâ&#x20AC;? in a Three Dog Night hit 23 Big maker of power tools 24 European capital thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s majorityMuslim 26 Ex-Yankee Martinez 28 Eisnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s successor at Disney 30 Western Sahara neighbor: Abbr.

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, April 11, 2013

ARTS & CULTURE

Arts & Culture Editor Victoria Wright

vwright6@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan

merdogan@utk.edu

Thursday, April 11

Saturday, April 13

Who/What: “Weird Al” Yankovic When: 8 p.m. Where: Tennessee Theatre Price: $39.50 to $49.50 Melodi’s Take: This comedian/musical joker certainly has an

Who/What: Generationals with Splashh When: 10 p.m. Where: Pilot Light (ages 18+) Price: $8 Melodi’s Take: Quality indie music is hard to find in small, southern towns like Knoxville, but New

interesting résumé. Thirteen albums, three EPs and various amounts of nominations and awards, “Weird Al” Yankovic has done almost everything and anything to put his name out there, and his stop at the Tennessee Theatre will without a doubt entertain the Knoxville crowd. His interesting sartorial choices and his crazy, wild curly hair will be adorning the historic theater’s stage this Thursday night. If you’ve got a few extra dollars to spend before the semester is over, enjoy the best “Weird Al” has to offer at this performance. If there’s anything it will guarantee to be, it will be, in a word, weird.

Orleans-based band, Generationals, is gracing its talent this Saturday at Pilot Light. Their music is quirky, compelling and easy to listen to; comparable to fellow indie genre bands like Of Montreal and Vampire Weekend, Generationals sound fantastic in their recordings and are sure to impress on stage. Their opening band for the night will be Splashh, and English band from London who fuse garage and punk music into one. These two bands produce amazing music and it would be a shame if any indie fan would miss out on this concert. And for eight bucks, it’s a no brainer.

• Photo courtesy of Weird Al

Friday, April 12 Who/What: Monophonics When: 10 p.m. Where: Barley’s Taproom and Pizzeria Price: N/A. Ages 21 and over Victoria’s Take: Bow-chicka-wow-wow. That’s the phrase you’ll be saying (or slurring) with the funk jam band Monophonics. These guys know soul, and there’s never a bad time to get your groove on to some good funk music. Check them out on YouTube and preview the band for yourself.

• Photo courtesy of Generationals

Sunday, April 14 Who/What: Esperanza Spalding When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Tennessee Theatre Price: $5 for UT students, $39.50 for general public Victoria’s Take: Grammy award winning cello extraordinaire Esperanza Spalding is a force to be • Photo courtesy of Monophonics

reckoned with (and her hair is really awesome). I mean, the girl started playing professionally at 5 years old. What were you doing with your life? Don’t miss this awesome opportunity to attend the show. Seriously, you’ll be mad if you don’t.


Thursday, April 11, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 7

SPORTS

Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Vols prepare for first, last home meet Lauren Kittrell Sports Editor

Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon

Lady Vols head basketball coach Holly Warlick flashes a quick smile against Kentucky in Lexington, KY. on March 3, 2013.

The Tennessee Volunteers’ track and field teams are set for their first and last home meet of the season. Their seniors are hoping to enjoy the weekend, finish strong and show Knoxville what makes the Vols one of the best track and field teams in the nation. Last week, the Lady Volunteers didn’t just return victorious from their meet; they excelled. Their time of eight minutes, 28.81 seconds gave the Lady Vols the seventh-fastest 4x800-meter mark in program history, breaking the Pepsi Florida Relays and Percy Beard Track records and former 2009 Lady Vol record of 8:28.99. Winning both the 4x800meter and distance medley relay races set the perfect goal for this weekend at the 47th annual Sea

Ray Relays. Fifth year senior and Knoxville’s West High School graduate Kesley Kane said that while the possibility of graduation hasn’t hit home for her just yet, the significance of this next meet for her personally and for the team is not lost on her. “This weekend — since this is my hometown — means a lot to me,” she said. “Being in Knoxville and being on Tom Black, I grew up on this track. I’m really excited about it. I think everyone else is excited about it as well.” Kane’s experience over the last five years has not been the story of a typical UT athlete. She suffered from compartment syndrome — a physical condition involving pressure buildup within one’s muscles — which caused her to miss two entire seasons. See TRACK on Page 8

Warlick readies for upcoming season Austin Bornheim Assistant Sports Editor With UCONN’s drubbing of Louisville on Tuesday night in the Women’s National Championship college basketball is officially over, and Holly Warlick is already itching for the next season to begin. “I can’t wait,” Warlick said. “I wish we were starting tomorrow with practice and starting a new season.” The Lady Vols’ season came to an end at the hand of the Louisville Cardinals at the Elite Eight, but the season wasn’t a disappointment to the first-year head coach. “We did a lot of things well this year, but obviously we have to get better,” Warlick said. She expects more from her team. “We need to get better defensively and be more consistent

scoring the ball on offense,” she said. “We are going to use the time to work on some things defensively and ball handling. Fundamental skills that we need to tighten up and work on before we get into team stuff.” Warlick and the Lady Vols immediately turn their focus to the 2013-14 season and their goal of returning to the Final Four — something that is unfamiliar territory for the players on the current roster. Motivation beyond the obvious goal to win a national championship is that next year’s Final Four will be held in Nashville, giving Tennessee somewhat of a home court advantage if it is to make it back to the promised land. “I think not being in the Final Four is incentive enough,” Warlick said. “But it would be tremendous to get to play in a Final Four in our state. It would be great for the program.”

To help in that endeavor will be the crop of highly touted incoming freshman. Mercedes Russell, the consensus No. 1 recruit in this year’s recruiting class; Jordan Reynolds, the No. 10 ranked guard in the class; and Jannah Tucker, the No. 8 overall player in the 2013 class will all contribute next year, according to Warlick. “I think all three of them are going to be huge for us,” she said. “Mercedes Russell is going to be huge for us and is just a tremendous inside along with what we have. I think Jordan Reynolds is going to give us some needed help at the point position and I look forward to her there.” Warlick is especially excited about Jannah Tucker, who she feels has been overlooked due to her recent knee problems. Tucker missed her senior season because of a knee injury and did not receive as much publicity as other players.

“Nobody knows about Jannah right now,” Warlick said. “She got her start during USA Basketball, she’s been on the radar forever, she’s been one of the top eight players in the country as a junior. She didn’t make any of the AllStar teams because she sat out the year to rehab her knee. But I think all three of them will have a major impact for us and give us depth.” The Lady Vols will get in one week of practice next week and are allowed to put players through two-hour workouts during the summer months, where all returning Lady Vols have elected to stay in Knoxville. “We’ll start next week with workouts, then they will go home and we have a new rule where we can work them out in the summer,” Warlick said. “That’s why they are all staying. We can work out with them two hours a week and they are going to see us quite a bit this summer.”

Tara Sripunvoraskul • The Daily Beacon

Kianna Ruff runs the 800m during the Sea Ray Relays last season.


8 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, April 11, 2013 Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell

SPORTS

lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

TRACK continued from Page 7

Tia Patron • The Daily Beacon

Cheyenne Tarango smiles after a double to left field in the 5th inning against Tennessee Tech on Wednesday.

Lady Vols bash Tennessee Tech Andrew Vaughn Staff Writer The Lady Volunteers ended Wednesday night with a bang against in-state rival Tennessee Tech. After letting the Golden Eagles (16-18) hang around for the first four and half innings, No. 3 Tennessee (35-6) stepped on the gas in the bottom of the fifth, scoring six runs that included a game-ending three-run home run by senior second baseman Lauren Gibson to give the Lady Vols the 12-3 victory. “When I get up there, I don’t really have a pitch, I mean if I like it I just swing and hope it goes far,” Gibson said laughing. And go far it did, a no-doubter that sailed well over the center field wall and ended the game on a run rule. The Lady Vols took a break

from a grueling SEC schedule and even though this win marks the 12th straight for Tennessee, the third ranked team in the nation wasn’t about to overlook in-state rival Tennessee Tech. “Whenever we come out we just focus and think that’s the number one team on the field, we don’t care what the name is across their chest, we just play them like they’re the best,” Gibson said. Tennessee opened up the scoring with three runs in the bottom of the second inning, including a solo home run by sophomore starting pitcher Cheyanne Tarango. They added another run in the bottom of the third after a leadoff double by junior shortstop Madison Shipman led to a one-out sacrifice bunt by senior Melissa Brown to make it a 4-0 game. But the Golden Eagles were able to keep the game close. Tech shortstop Hannah Eldridge

cranked a solo home run to lead off the fourth. The blast made it a 4-1 game and after Tennessee got two runs in the fourth, Tech answered with two runs of their own in the top of the fifth to cut the Tennessee back to three. “They are a great in-state opponent and whenever we play an in-state team they always bring their A-game against us,” senior Raven Chavanne said. But it was the bottom of the fifth when the Lady Vols exerted their dominance on the in-state rival. They tallied six runs on three hits, including the gameender by Gibson. This marks the 78th consecutive win against instate opponents and makes the Lady Vols 107-3 all-time against teams from Tennessee. Chavanne had a solid game out of the leadoff spot, getting on base three times on two hits and scoring two runs with one stolen base. She also earned an RBI on a

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bases-loaded walk in the bottom of the fifth inning. “I was just trying to reach base any way I can, I don’t care if it’s by error, walk, hit, whatever they give me I’ll take,” Chavanne said. After another good Chavanne performance, Tennessee co-head coach Ralph Weekly took the time to praise the senior third baseman’s versatility and talent. “Raven can beat you in a lot of ways,” he said. “There won’t be another Raven.” The Lady Vols will be back at it this weekend, as they host SEC rival Auburn for a three game series at Lee Stadium in Knoxville.

The distance runner had been running since her sophomore year of high school. Having to stop training and let her body heal was one of the most difficult seasons of her life, but over the past few years she’s seen tremendous success and growth in her career. “It was hard watching home meets go on and sitting in the stands with all my friends and family here and not competing or doing as well as I thought I would like to, but this means more than ever now that I’m doing well,” she said. “It puts on a display where I grew up and how much I’ve been through with the surgery. “It just means a lot. I really want to put on a good show out here because it does symbolize how much I’ve gone through and how much I’ve accomplished and how far I’ve come from that.” For Kane, overall success of the team as a whole comes first. But if she had to succeed personally in one area, she’d choose the 800meter event. “I’m usually a distance specialist, and after last weekend I got my 800 down a lot … I’m kind of focusing on getting my 800 down,” she said. She said sitting back, enjoying events and not focusing on time have helped her bring that time down. “I think this season more than ever I’ve just enjoyed it and I haven’t thought about times,” she said. “I haven’t put a lot of pressure on myself honestly, which is kind of surprising being a senior, but I think once you let go of all the expectations you kind of let go and the times drop. But I think more of what I think about is just I’m going to miss the team and being around them so I’m just taking it day by day and soaking it all in and enjoying being around them.” She will be competing in the 800-meter on Friday, but said she’s

also looking forward to the team’s distance medley relay on Saturday. Head coach and director of the men’s and women’s track and field, J.J. Clark, said the Sea Ray Relays mean a lot to the team and each individual athlete’s career, but it’s also important to them as a way to show their hometown a competitive and successful meet. “This weekend we’re looking to continue getting sharper for down the road,” Clark said. “We’re also looking to perform well at home meet.” He said he’s excited to see Kane not just overcoming physical adversities but succeeding in her performances. “We’re looking forward to her coming here and having a great show and having a great time here,” he said. He said he would like to see both the men and the women sharpen up their marks and think with the SEC Championships in mind. He’s especially looking forward to the team’s one hour Showcase on Saturday. It will include both men’s and women’s heats and sections for seven different events, including the 200-meter, 1500-meter, 800-meter, 400-meter, 100-meter, distance medley and 4x100-meter relays. The men’s and women’s invitational discus, men’s and women’s long jump and men’s high jump will also be a part of the Showcase, followed by a time to honor UT seniors. “It’s just a couple of events that are exciting, but overall that one hour block is where we’re hoping to have a lot of success and victories,” he said. For seniors like Kane, Clark said it’s a bittersweet moment, but he’s excited to see how the team responds and the seniors strive to make their last home meet their best. “We’re going to hope that they have a great send off on their home track,” he said. The Sea Ray Relays will be held this Thursday, Friday and Saturday.

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