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Thursday, April 10, 2014

Issue 60, Volume 125

UT PA announcer Bobby Denton, 73, dies Sports Editor Bobby Denton, the voice of Neyland Stadium since 1967, passed away Wednesday morning from his battle with cancer at 73. During his 47 years on the job, the longest tenure for a public address announcer in college football, Denton became known for many catch-

SEE

with Neyland phrases, but his iconic Stadium as the “It’s football time in checkerboard Tennessee” was easily end zones, and the most recognizable. everyone in “Bobby Denton the Tennessee is a true treasure of family will Tennessee football,” miss him UT head coach Butch greatly.” Jones said in a univerBorn and sity release. “Hearing Bobby Denton raised in him say, `It’s football time in Tennessee,’ is one of Knoxville, Denton started the greatest traditions in the out as a radio disc jockey for WIVK, where he would work history of college football. “His voice is as synonymous for 36 years and reach the

position of vice president and general manager, building the station into one of the most successful country music stations in the nation and helping to win four Country Music Association Awards for Radio Station of the Year. In 1967, Denton was hired by Gus Manning to replace then-PA announcer and longtime friend John Ward, who had left to become the “Voice of the Vols” on the Vol Network. “Bobby Denton was a true

radio professional in every way,” Ward said in the release. “He had a great hobby like I had, and his was the PA at Neyland Stadium. But he was first and foremost a true professional radio man. He was an on-the-air radio personality before getting into management and sales, and he understood what you had to do to answer to the audience.”

Chancellor answers questions

INSIDE

Getting Cheeky: The push to divest from fossil fuels heats up

Kendall Thompson Contributor The glitz and glamour of the Roaring ‘20s has faded, appearing only as a ghost in our Gatsby-themed parties and period films. However, the past can be relived with the same emotion, excitement and energy through jazz music. This genre, which has spanned generations, lived on through the UT Jazz Big Band Tuesday night. The concert was the 184th program of the 2013-2014 concert season, according to the program, and attracted an audience that included students and adults alike at the Natalie L. Haslam Music Center. The jazz band is comprised of five saxophones, four trombones, five trumpets and five “rhythm” players, whose roles varied from guitar to drum set to piano. Six of the nine pieces performed were new compositions collected from a contest with the College Music Society, band director and senior percussion lecturer Keith Brown said.

See DENTON on Page 8

Melodi Erdogan • The Daily Beacon

Troy Provost-Heron

Jazz band bids its lone senior musician goodbye

NEWS >>pg. 3

See BIG BAND on Page 5

Chinese bubble tea? Russian dance groups? UT goes global ARTS & CULTURE >>pg. 5

Eyes on LaFollette: Photojournalism class captures small town living

Annual Relay for Life campaign returns to Knoxville

Chancellor Jimmy Cheek speaks to students in the James A. Haslam II Business Building Wednesday evening to present the latest statistics on student graduation and retention and open the floor to students’ questions.

Hanna Lustig News Editor To Chancellor Jimmy Cheek, students are not the university’s customers– they are its “products.” And he is committed to making sure UT produces an “extremely high quality” product. Before every student senate meeting, the Student Government Association allows for a “town hall,” permitting any student to present an idea or concern. But, on Wednesday night, Chancellor Cheek appeared for SGA’s town hall in the Haslam Business Building, a gesture he typi-

cally extends once a semester. Kicking off SGA’s annual “Orange ad White Week,” an event series leading up to the Orange and White game, Cheek discussed UT’s growth over the last year and answered questions from students present. As the 2013/2014 academic year draws to a close, Cheek cited significant progress among the Volvision’s criteria for lifting UT into the ranks of America’s “Top 25” public research universities. Of the twelve metrics identified, UT has demonstrated progress toward ten of those goals, with only one area showing no improvement. The freshman to sophomore retention rate, Cheek said, is “stuck”

at 86 percent, just beneath the Volvision’s 90 percent goal. However, one criterion has been met– UT already attracts students with standardized scores equivalent to those of Top 25 students. “You are in the Top 25 as far as your academic profile is concerned,” Cheek said to the small audience. Despite the eleven residual goals, Cheek remained optimistic about UT’s continued efforts, reminding students that “the journey is more important than the destination.” Following his opening address, Cheek took questions from the student audience.

Victoria Brown Staff Writer

See TOWN HALL on Page 2

ARTS & CULTURE >>pg. 6

Renfroe, Shipman: Will a UT softball star claim Player of the Year? SPORTS >>pg. 8

@UTKDailyBeacon www.utdailybeacon.com

Samantha Smoak Online Editor Blake Roller, a junior in political science, was sitting in a pizza shop on New Year’s Eve when he decided to run for Sullivan County Commissioner. “And I thought, you know, I should do it,” he said. “So I walked across the parking lot and went in and said, ‘I am looking into running for office.’” At a Christmas party earlier that month, Roller’s former fifth grade teacher had mentioned the lack of young state and local representatives, encouraging Roller to launch his own campaign. After years of involvement with Key Club and Tennessee 4-H during high school, Roller already held his county officials in great esteem. “I got to go and meet all the

politicians and sit in the Senate and really learn how our state government works,” he said. “And I got to meet the mayor and meet the commissioners and go to the jail and learn the public services of our county. “... I really grew to respect our county government because everyone is really concerned with national government and less concerned with state government.” By the end of the month, Roller was standing in the election office. In response to the commission’s surprise at meeting such a young candidate, Roller recalls having to verify his eligibility, being only 20. While many criticize local officials, Roller believes these positions offer an enormous opportunity to better the lives of constituents.

photo courtesy of Blake Roller

20-year-old UT student running for Sullivan County Commissioner

Blake Roller, junior in political science, is running for Sullivan County Commissioner at the age of 20.

Relay for Life, an annual fundraising walk held by the American Cancer Society, will arrive in Knoxville on Friday, April 11, at World’s Fair Park. The walk, which first began in 1985, has grown to involve thousands of people who walk as individuals and teams to raise money and donations for the fight against cancer. Grant Smith, junior in communication studies with a minor in psychology, is this year’s director of communications for Knoxville’s Relay for Life event. “The money that is raised by the relay goes to the American Cancer Society, in which they use the money to fund groundbreaking research for all types of cancer,” Smith said. “They also use this money to provide free services and information to cancer patients and their caregivers.” Smith said participants can expect a night of games, live trivia, a live band and karaoke. “This year’s relay theme is ‘When You Wish Upon a Cure,’” Smith said, “in which teams that have signed up will be able to decorate their booths and dress up like characters from their chosen Disney movie.” See RELAY on Page 3

See ROLLER on Page 2

“Their education is teaching them to change the world. Ours is teaching us to keep our heads down and not cause problems.” OPINIONS >>pg. 4

INSIDE THE DAILY BEACON News Opinions Arts & Culture Eyes on LaFollette Sports

Page 2, 3 Page 4 Page 5, 7 Page 6 Page 8


2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, April 10, 2014 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS continued from Page 1 “That’s something that I value,” Roller said. “It’s me taking my community service and my volunteering and helping people in another level and a higher level that is way longer lasting than me just going out and serving at the food bank.” Roller has his hand in just about everything on campus, ranging from The Volunteer Channel, Student Government Association and Student Alumni Associates. He remains a member of Tennessee 4-H, now at the collegiate level, and Key Club’s collegiate edition,

Circle K. SGA President-elect and TVC Executive Producer Kelsey Keny described Roller as one of the “most dedicated” people she knows. “Ever since meeting him in class freshman year, I’ve always been around him through different organizations throughout the years,” Keny, a junior in journalism and electronic media, said. “I don’t know many people who know more about UT than Blake, he’s so invested in his commitments and in UT.” Roller encouraged other students to capitalize on the small window of opportunity to run for office during college. “If you want to run for office

elamb1@utk.edu

in college, you really only have three years,” he said. “And those three years are critical because you never have those three years again. “...Do (it) now and know that you did your best and you don’t have to look back on them in the future and wish you did something.” Keny said Roller applies this mentality to all areas of his life. “He’s a fun guy who does everything he can to make the most of his four years here,” Keny said. “Everything from touring old buildings before they get torn down, singing in the men’s chorus, leading through several different organizations, meeting alumni and doing community service.”

Open carry bill presents Haslam campaign flashback Associated Press MURFREESBORO, Tenn. — Gov. Bill Haslam said Wednesday that his administration is carefully examining the ramifications of a bill passed by the Senate that would allow Tennesseans to openly carry guns without state-issued permits. The Senate a day earlier voted 25-2 in favor of a bill sponsored by Republican Sen. Mae Beavers of Mt. Juliet that would remove the permitting requirement to for people to carry their weapons openly. The measure would keep the current training and background check requirements to carry concealed firearms. For Haslam, the bill presents a flashback to the 2010 governor’s race. The final days of that campaign were dominated by the furor created by candidate Haslam after he told the Tennessee Firearms Association that he would sign legislation into

law to eliminate Tennessee’s requirements for carrying handguns in public. Haslam quickly went into damage control over those comments, stressing in campaign appearances around the state that he wouldn’t introduce any such measure and noting that a governor’s veto can easily be overridden by the Legislature. Haslam at the time stressed that he was “in favor of leaving the handgun permit requirements the way they are now.” Haslam’s stance on the measure was heavily criticized by then-Gov. Phil Bredesen, a Democrat, who argued that such a law could hurt the state’s ability to attract business. “Just because the Legislature does something stupid doesn’t mean the governor has to go along with it,” Bredesen said at the time. Haslam, who faces no serious opposition for his reelection bid this year, told reporters on Wednesday that he had no major concerns

that the open carry law would do harm to the state’s image. “I think there’s 12 states that have that now, and another 12 that have some form of that, so it’s actually not that unusual,” he said. “But from our standpoint, it’s more of let’s talk through safety and security concerns and see where that takes us.” The House version is awaiting a vote in a subcommittee of the House Finance Committee. The 2010 question to Haslam was posed by a gun rights advocate who identified himself in an audio recording of the meeting as Leonard Embody. Embody has had a series of run-ins with law enforcement over carrying firearms in public. He was arrested last year for walking around downtown wearing a bulletproof vest and carrying an assault rifle. That case has been bound over to the grand jury.

Around Rocky Top Hayley Brundige • The Daily Beacon

BLAKE ROLLER

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb

Ukrainian journalist and filmmaker Alexandra Sviridova, far left, answers a question from an audience member during the UT Forum on the Ukrainian Crisis and Russian Expansionism in Hodges Auditorium on Tuesday.

TOWN HALL continued from Page 1 Q: Our state funding has been rapidly decreasing over the past few years. Why and what does this mean for the state’s flagship university? A: The reason why is that the state revenue is insufficient to support all the things the state needs to do…And if you’ve watched Tenncare, it’s moved from about 12 percent of the budget to about 25 percent of the budget. That has caused higher education to be less competitive to get resources from the state. The governor is completely committed to higher education…but the governor’s had to pull back all the new resources he was going to allocate to higher education except for some construction projects… so what that means is more of the cost of higher education is shifted toward students. Q: What is the value of invest-

ing in infrastructure as opposed to expanding our faculty or purchasing educational materials? A: We have some places on our campus that if we took you to you’d say it almost looks like a third world country…If you’re going to have state of the art education, if your going to have state of the art professors, we’ve got to have state of the art facilities. Q: Can you speak to the financial solvency of athletic department compared to other schools in the SEC? A: Our athletic department is an auxiliary so it has to stand on its own… We’ve had a lot of turnover in coaches and it’s cost the athletic department a lot of money. They are financially solvent. They are not in a deficit situation. We will also have additional revenue coming in a year and a half from the SEC contract and that will help them immensely…We also think that as we enter this next year, athletic revenue will increase. But it’s a very tight

budget situation right now. Q: Do you support same-sex partner benefits for university employees? A: Makes no difference whether I support that or not. The question is, will the state support it? We’re in a situation where I see no path forward to move that agenda forward under the current confines that we work in. I do think there some court cases that are pending that will have a major impact on that. *** Other highlights included Cheek’s statement of support for the student’s right to invite speakers and distribute student fees, as well as the Greek community. The divestment campaign, however, did not receive Cheek’s support. Cheek also rejected the premise of the Living Wage Campaign’s crusade for minimum $12.50 hourly wages, saying that the living wage calculation does not accurately represent the needs of a single Knoxville resident.


Thursday, April 10, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb

elamb1@utk.edu

Divestment movement not dissuaded by past rejections Jenna Butz Staff Writer Chancellor Jimmy Cheek: the divestment campaign is headed your way. Since the divestment campaign arrived at UT in fall 2012, its members have spent hours petitioning, presenting and protesting across campus to convince administration to divest the university’s endowment from fossil fuels. Students Jake Rainey, David Hayes, Jessica Murphy and Kristen Collins brought the idea of divesting back as a souvenir from an Atlanta trip. They had gone to see author and environmental journalist Bill McKibben speak on climate change as part of his “Do the Math” tour, during which McKibben proposed that college students should return to their schools and work toward divestment. Since then, Rainey, a senior in journalism and electronic media, said that “this movement has been building pretty quickly.” After Hayes, Collins and fellow student Daniel Lawhon found the “right people” to talk to about UT’s endowment, they developed a referendum stating the student body supported the mission to divest from fossil fuels. The referendum was passed on the 2013 SGA election ballots and the same referendum was later approved in SGA Senate. Erica Davis, sophomore in sociology, first became interested in the campaign around the time the referendum passed and became significantly involved last fall. “I’m involved with the divestment campaign in order to use my discontent and anger with the current system, as well as my optimism about the potential of climate justice, to motivate positive change,” Davis said. “I want to be able to honestly tell my grandchildren one day that I did every-

thing in my power to try to secure a better world for them, and that I didn’t let opposition from those with the most power deter me in my efforts. “This Earth is something worth fighting for, and the battle starts right here at UT.” Despite support from the student body, the campaign received a letter from the Board of Trustees in December 2013 rejecting divestment. In response, the group presented a letter to Charles “Butch” Peccolo, UT’s chief financial officer, rejecting the administration’s dismissal and asking for further consideration. This presentation was followed by a “study-in” where more than 30 students occupied the CFO’s office lobby. The protesters sat quietly and did homework for over an hour, a demonstration Rainey called the campaign’s most effective action yet. Davis said she believes the administration’s rejection has been the largest effect on the campaign, helping the students to learn how to structure and implement their next plan of action. Recently, Davis attended a conference in San Francisco where she learned that when universities reject students’ divestment proposals, they are actually “fueling students’ passion for this movement and encouraging them to work together in an alliance against climate change and the fossil fuel industry,” she said. However, Peccolo responded to the campaign’s second letter with another rejection, telling the campaign if they intended to push their mission further, they would need to speak to Cheek himself. In their next act of protest, campaign members will paint the Rock tonight before meeting with Cheek next Wednesday, April 16, to present their case. “We intend to show Cheek how much our students support this movement,” Rainey

said. “We want to show him that students actually do care where our money is being spent, and that we don’t want it destroying the one and only planet that we inhabit.” Davis said she has seen the campaign grow and is “beyond excited” to see what action the group might go on to create. “It is entirely antithetical to the values of higher education for our university to actively fund the destruction of the planet that we, as students, will inherit — and we are morally obliged to fight this destruction,” Davis said. “Divestment is a significant step toward climate justice. “Additionally, the fossil fuel industry destroys local communities in the Knoxville area, making the issue relevant to UT students.” Davis said she has researched the local impacts of these damages personally. “I’ve spent time researching the effects of social values and mountaintop removal coal mining in Campbell and Claiborne Counties, within a short drive from campus,” she said. “It destroys the local residents’ livelihoods. “No one is untouched by the effects of climate change, and so everyone should care about it.” In Rainey’s opinion, if UT does not divest, it could appear as an “inferior” institution in hindsight. “Look at the civil rights movement,” he said.” Do we want to be like the University of Georgia or Ole Miss that had to be forced by federal courts to desegregate? Do we want to be an institution that supports backwards thinking of any type? In my opinion, the answer is no.”

RELAY continued from Page 1 The American Cancer Society, the largest provider of non-governmental funds for cancer research in the U.S., offers a number of services to cancer patients, including the “Hope Lodge,” housing for patients forced to travel for treatment and the “Look Good, Feel Better” program, which provides women with beauty techniques to manage the side effects of chemotherapy and radiation treatments. In addition, every dollar raised by the relay funds cancer research and grants for new and innovative cancer treatments, said Danielle Cappel,

senior in sociology. Cappel has been involved with the Relay for Life program all four years of college. Currently serving as director of production for Knoxville’s relay, she oversees all the night’s ceremonies in addition to planning cancer advocacy and awareness events throughout the semester. “I think UT students should attend Relay for Life because cancer is an illness that affects everyone in some way,” Cappel said. “Relay allows UT students to come together, be united and show our Volunteer pride in support of something other than a football game.” For Cappel, the event is personal. Both her younger brother and grandfather suffered from cancer.

“My little brother is now in remission, but my grandpa lost his battle, so I’ve seen both sides of the coin — a survivor and someone who wasn’t able to overcome this illness,” Cappel said. “Relay gives me an opportunity to honor both of them, and it is incredibly humbling when you look out in Circle Park and you see all of these students gathered together for the same cause.” Smith said he hopes students will join the effort and asserted that the relay is about more than competition. “We really hope to see students involved in such a wonderful event, and we want them to know that the Relay for Life is not a race,” Smith said. “It’s about Vols fighting to cure cancer.”

Students create desk barricade Some 375 empty desks blocked a downtown street, stopping traffic for several LOS ANGELES — Los hours Tuesday outside the Angeles students protesting Los Angeles Unified School neglect of poorer schools District’s offices. Organizers say the numtook to the streets, and they brought their desks with ber represents how many students drop out of the district’s them.

Associated Press

schools each week. Protesters want a student voice on the school board, and more funding for English language learners, foster children and low-income students. District officials declined to comment on the protest.


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, April 10, 2014 Editor-in-Chief R.J. Vogt

OPINIONS

rvogt@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

The real reason nobody voted for SGA Uncommon Sense by

Evan Ford In case you haven’t heard, almost no one voted in the Student Government Association elections this year. Which is almost news, considering almost no one voted for SGA elections last year. In classic SEC fashion, though, let’s compare ourselves to other similar schools. Two months ago, the University of Alabama wrote about “low participation in SGA elections” and UGA’s elections barely had 10 percent of students come out. It’s not just the SEC, though. Florida State saw its voter turnout drop from 8,276 to 2,828 last year and Michigan only had about 15 percent of their student body vote, and Central Michigan saw 8.7 percent of students voting. Our 13 percent is starting to look good. Everyone who’s older than us likes to blame this apparent apathy on our generation — millennials are lazy or don’t care. But that’s false. We’re being taught not to care. Let’s compare our university to some more posh schools: Brown is complaining about its 28 percent voter turnout. Last year, Yale had 56 percent of students vote, Dartmouth 53 percent and Harvard 54 percent. This is a significant difference. These millennials seem to care enough to stand up for their opinions as students. The only difference between them and us is where they go to school (and all of the differences that come with that). There are other students who care, too. UCLA’s SGA oversees a $90 million budget every year and has the power to raise fees on all students. This results in a healthy 37 percent turnout every year LSU and UF have placed substantially more power in the hands of their student governments, and both have more than a quarter of students vote each year. In these cases, students who know their opinion matters are willing to get up and vote. Go figure. The Tennessee legislature has shown they don’t trust UT students and SGA, and our administration seems to agree with them. Chancellor Jimmy Cheek, who makes nearly $400,000 a year, has repeatedly made concessions to the Board of Trustees and our state legislature, but he has compromised little with the demands of students. But how could he concede to our demands when we don’t demand anything? Universities of the past were political hotbeds pushing free love, liberation and peace. The civil rights movement, anti-war movements, and second-wave feminism were all intense and alive at the university level — especially at state universities. What’s changed? Let’s take the California system as an example. In 1965, the tuition at UC Berkeley was $220 a year (this was generally common.) That same year, up to 5,000 students organized at Berkeley to protest for their free speech. Then, Ronald Reagan stepped in. According to an excellent article in Dissent Magazine, “Reagan vowed to ‘clean up that mess in Berkeley,’ warned audiences of ‘sexual orgies so vile that I cannot describe them to you,’ complained that outside agitators were bringing leftwing subversion into the university, and railed against spoiled children of privilege skipping their classes to go to protests.” Sound familiar, Sir Campfield? The apathy of University of Tennessee students is not a symptom of our generation. It’s exactly what our institution and the state of Tennessee want from us. When students make demands, it comes out of the pockets of Chancellor Cheek, and it forces those who like the status quo (Campfield) to leave their comfort zone. That’s why students at Ivy League schools are so active — they know they can make a difference. They are walking the halls of past presidents and taking courses from world-changers. Their education is teaching them to change the world. Ours is teaching us to keep our heads down and not cause problems. Education is more than just economic training. It is meant to turn kids into citizens, to strengthen the power of democracy. But Tennessee, led by Gov. Bill Haslam’s technical education program, just wants to spit out kids with job skills, not citizens. No surprise we’re not voting. I’ll end with this quote from Richard Russo: “Sending kids off to college is a lot like putting them in the witness protection program. If the person who comes out is easily recognizable as the same person who went in, something has gone terribly, dangerously wrong.” Evan Ford is a junior in philosophy. He can be reached at eford6@utk.edu.

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

The 4 variations and meanings of Throwback Thursdays Knight Errant by

Victoria Knight Today is the day we are inundated on all of our social media platforms with sets of pictures known as Throwback Thursdays — though if you’re really cool, it’s shortened to just #tbt. I tried researching the origin of how exactly Throwback Thursdays came about, but to no avail. The Internet failed me yet again. But, no worries, we will press on without historical context and instead explore the various reasons someone may post a #tbt picture and what that really means. 1) The Repeat: You really wanted to post a picture of whatever fun/interesting thing happened to you not that long ago, but when it happened, you did not want to explode social media with a million pictures at once. So, you saved a couple of the good ones to strategically post on #tbt. No judgment; we’ve all been there. What this says: The event that happened is important, OK? So important that it obviously needs to be shared across social media multiple weeks in a row (side note: I still have yet to decide whether posting about something that happened a

Editor-in-Chief: R.J. Vogt Managing Editor: Melodi Erdogan Chief Copy Editor: Gage Arnold News Editor: Hanna Lustig Asst. News Editor: Emilee Lamb Sports Editor: Troy Provost-Heron Asst. Sports Editor: Dargan Southard Arts & Culture Editor: Claire Dodson Asst. Arts & Culture Editor: Cortney Roark Online Editor: Samantha Smoak

camera roll and pick a picture. 4) The Sentimental: Maybe it was the day you graduated high school, or the summer you spent tanning on the beach, or even just the time you had a really good day hanging out with your friends. It is likely a visual glimpse at what you’ve been thinking about lately. But since throwback pictures have been relegated to Thursdays, you’ve just had to wait it out and put it up then. What this says: You really just want to re-live the moment of the throwback picture you posted. Nostalgia is probably hitting you hard right now. Whether you post a #tbt every week or only on occasion, we’ve all seen them, laughed at them and liked them – they’re a part of our social world. Perhaps the reason we do them is because we are beings who love rituals and are subject to traditions. No matter what new developments and innovations enter into our realm, we need something to make them familiar and comforting, and a day that is known for one thing is just that. Plus, with the way that our platforms are constantly getting updated and changed, this is one constant we can count on. Victoria Knight is a senior in microbiology. She can be reached at vknight4@ utk.edu.

SGA election reflects small-minded college life Dean’s List by

Katie Dean Being in college can often lead to living in a very tiny bubble; a bubble which makes it seem like formals and midterms and Friday nights at Rumorz are the most crucial things going on in our lives. You may scoff at this, but I see it every single day. Enslaved to an endless stream of activities and organizations, we often forget just how minute and insignificant these obligations truly are. I’m not trying to demonize rewarding yourself for hard work. College is both difficult and time consuming, and I know that I would lose my mind if I didn’t have some outlets for my frustration. But one of the things that irritates me most about the collegiate years is how small some people make their world. If you can’t look around and recognize that yes, this is fun, but there are vastly more important things happening in the world right now besides planning a trip to the cesspool known as PCB, you have missed the point of going to college. Take the recent SGA election for example. On a campus of more than 27,000

Non Sequitur • Wiley

EDITORIAL

couple of days or even a week ago counts more accurately as a #tbt or a #latergram. A problem that keeps me up at night.). 2) The Baby: You spent a lot of time browsing through the really, really old pictures of you to find an adorable shot of yourself when you were a small child and, of course, cute beyond words. You are probably doing something almost all small children do (pose with their families, sleep, pet a dog), but it doesn’t matter because it is you, and it is novel. What this says: You’re not too cool to expose yourself to the social media world and show you were not always as goodlooking as you are now. It means you can laugh at your baby stage while also knowing your friends will, too. It may also even help to convey how much of a family person you are. 3) The Needy: You haven’t posted a picture in awhile just because it didn’t feel right, or maybe because nothing of note has happened in your life. Neither of those matters now though, because it is Thursday and you can post a picture that happened at literally any point in your life. Even a picture taken five minutes ago is fair game. All the possibilities are open, meaning you really have no excuse not to post something. What this says: You are in want of some Instagram hearts or Facebook likes. And this is an easy way to get them. Plus, it only requires you to scroll through your

students, only 3,686 took the time out of their day to vote for their own student body president. There’s no pretending I am a whiz with numbers, but I am pretty sure this is a fairly shameful statistic. I suppose everyone was too busy planning their free beer Fridays and having LIT’s at Cool Beans. But meanwhile, in other parts of the world, people are losing their lives just to have the opportunity to cast a vote. This past weekend in Afghanistan, a majority of the population waited in hellishly long lines to elect a successor to President Hamid Karzai, in office since 2001. You may be thinking there is no way this applies to you, but you might think again when you recall the lives and resources we have invested in that country. These people should serve as an example to us. Throughout the buildup to this important election, the Taliban have been actively targeting election sites, election officials, reporters and even civilians. Just last week, world-renowned photographer Anja Niedringhaus was shot and killed while traveling with a convoy of Afghan military personnel. She never photographed the election she came to cover. Last month, two suicide bombers set off their devices in front of an election commission in Kabul, and the week before that, several teenagers snuck into a hotel and murdered an Afghan reporter, his two

children and a foreign election official. It might seem a little inconvenient to go vote under these conditions, yet 60 percent of the population managed to make it happen. Similarly, the race for prime minister in India has drawn out an electorate with a strong appreciation for simply being able to vote. While many of us cannot find the time to do it even when the message is so inconveniently sent right to our wireless devices, some of the electorate in India had their ballots delivered to them by camel or goat. No, “camel or goat” is not a new voting app – an actual camel brought some of these people their ballots. Voting for a student body president is not comparable to voting for a president or a prime minister. But recognizing how fortunate we are to exercise what power we have is vital; if you don’t make participating a habit now, it will likely never become one. The next time you think you don’t have time to vote between dress shopping for formal and attending Zumba, remember that some people die for this type of opportunity. Let’s try to be citizens of the world, not just citizens of UT. Katie Dean is a junior in political science. She can be reached at xvd541@ utk.edu.

Get Fuzzy • Darby Conley

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Thursday, April 10, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

International Festival to deliver global take on food, dance, fun

Hayley Brundige • The Daily Beacon

Around Rocky Top

Hannah Moulton Contributor Cultural organizations across campus will come together this Friday for the International Festival. The annual event, which is hosted by the I-House, will be held on Pedestrian Walkway. The festival gives students a chance to showcase their traditions with food, dance and music while raising money for their clubs. Officials say the International Festival is the I-House’s biggest event. Fourteen booths will be set up by the various cultural clubs on campus. A tent will have tables set up by charities and offices focusing on international subjects. Programs Abroad will also be present to inform students about the program’s study abroad options. Mariana Garciagodoy, graduate teaching assistant for the I-House, helps direct the event. She said she believes this year’s festival will be as fun as the last. The only difference, she hopes, is that the weather holds up. Last year’s festival nearly got ruined by the rain, Garciagodoy said, but event organizers were able to bring everything indoors to continue the festivities. Rain or shine, this event will go on. “It’s a great opportunity for students to get involved,� Garciagodoy said. “Maybe learn a little bit about different cultures and meet people from areas of the world that they’re not usually encountering.� The event, she said, is also a chance for international students to express their traditions. “A lot of students might have some of the international students in their classes,� Garciagodoy said, “so it’s nice for our students to be able to come and experience and just see

Sean Scolnick, center left, better known by his stage name Langhorne Slim, gives advice to audience members at Boyd’s Jig & Reel during a free songwriting workshop on April 5. Langhorne Slim was joined by other artists performing at the Rhythm N’ Blooms music festival, including Cruz Contreras, David Mayfield and Shonna Tucker.

BIG BAND continued from Page 1 “Composers from around the country were invited to create pieces that would be judged by a panel,� Brown said. “Eventually, (the pieces) were sent back to the school and we would decide which pieces we wanted to play.� The concert kicked off with “Nasty Blues,� a piece composed by one of the contest winners, Pete McGuinness, featuring a piano, sax and trombone solo. The next song, “Gato Rayado� by Michael Kocour, brought more of a “cha-cha� take on jazz. Anna Chaloux, sophomore in kinesiology, said “Gato Rayado� was her favorite piece. “I liked the tribal-sounding one, ‘Gato Rayatdo,’� said Chaloux, who is enrolled in Brown’s jazz history class. “It just had a different style than all the other ones.� The night continued with “Shade Street,� written by Knoxville Jazz Orchestra Director Vance Thompson. The composer himself made an appearance, playing one of the trumpet solos halfway through the song. As the concert continued, one soloist

was featured more than others: Kyle Bothof, senior in studio music and jazz performance. He performed solos in four pieces: “Boogaloo� by Clarence Hines, “Category 4� by Jeff Jarvis, “the Mild, Mild Midwest� by Mike Conrad and “The Driver� by Matt Harns. He also was given the lead part in “Goodbye Porkpie Hat,� a soulful song by Charles Mingus that provided a change of pace to the continually upbeat concert. Bothof said the style’s unique elements, including “not having to worry about what was on the page,� first attracted him to jazz. “A major part of jazz is improvisation, and so to be able to just have a set of changes in front of me that I can be creative and free with,� Bothof said. “That’s what made it appealing to me, that it isn’t all set in stone like classical music. “It’s all in the moment, and what everyone else is doing and how they’re interacting.� The tenor-sax player has gotten quite a bit of practice perfecting the art of improvisation; he’s been in the jazz band for 10 semesters, letting the music shape his UT experience. “It’s been everything; I knew when I came here that I wanted to audition for it,� Bothof said. “It just means every-

thing to me here, because it’s different than what we normally do. It’s especially neat because it’s extracurricular, out of the classroom. This is just fun for us to do.� Chaloux and fellow attendee Lindsey Wilde, freshman in child and family studies, appreciated the passion behind the art. “It’s more interesting than I thought before,� Chaloux said after her experiences in class and at the concert. “If you like music, then it’s good to broaden your scope on music styles, because not a lot of people listen to jazz that are our age.� “If you like jazz, you should definitely come see them,� Wilde added. While the audience’s feet tapped in time to the beat, Bothof considered what he would miss about the ensemble that has been such an integral part of his UT experience. “I’m going to miss everything,� he said. “I will miss being with all these guys. I’ll miss being around Keith Brown, the faculty, being in a big band. “Really, I’m going to miss the people more than anything.� More information on the UT music program as well as a schedule of events can be found on its website, http:// www.music.utk.edu/.

that there are other types of dancing and food and learn about different cultures.� The festival will give students a chance to taste some cultural dishes, as well. Each of the 14 booths will feature traditional dishes from their home countries. A Chinese group called The Ladies of Inspiration will also be serving bubble tea in the tent. The booths will partake in a competition which will be judged by randomly-selected students from campus. There will also be free giveaways, like T-shirts and food vouchers for the booths. Students can receive these giveaways by stopping at booths and answering trivia questions. Cultural music and dances will also be performed at the festival. There will be Japanese, Indian and Russian dance groups sporting traditional dress while performing. There will also be a group breakdancing and an African drum group. The festival is a learning opportunity for UT students, organizers say, as well as a teaching opportunity for members of the international clubs. Brittany Wright, sophomore in linguistics, is the treasurer of the Russian Language and Culture Club. Wright said she believes sharing their culture with people who have a limited understanding of it is especially important this year due to the rising political tension between the U.S. and Russia. “Besides sharing our culture with other students, it also gives us a chance to celebrate our similarities and differences as humans,� Wright said. “This is really important for many of the Russians that I interact with.� The International Festival will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday. The performances will run in rotations beginning at 11 a.m. and ending at 1:30 pm.

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, April 10, 2014 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

pdodson@utk.edu

Managing Editor Cortney Roark

• Photo Courtesy of Ben Murphy

“I like to say that it is life as it is lived in this very small town.” This is how professor Robert Heller describes Lafollette, Tenn., the subject of the project he has continuously assigned to his advanced photojournalism class for the past 21 years. Since 1993, Heller has taken his Journalism and Electronic Media 490 classes to the small town north of Knoxville. What started as an every-other-year project in conjunction with adjunct faculty members from the town became an annual project for students to photograph life in LaFollette for the town’s newspaper, the LaFollette Press. This year provides students with a unique opportunity to be selected for a special upcoming exhibit at the Tennessee State Museum in Nashville. The exhibit, scheduled to open in October, will feature the best 150-200 photographs over the 21 years of the project. “It’s a wonderful chance for students to see what life is like in a small community, if some of them aren’t from a community that size,” said Heller, who also teaches the introductory photojournalism course, “and to see what a small newspaper is like. “And to see what it’s like being a professional with time constraints trying to tell an interesting story in a small amount of time,” he added, “at a place where nothing big really necessarily is happening.”

On Friday, April 4, Heller and the 14 students drove to LaFollette and explored the town until the following afternoon. The project, Heller said, is a simulation for the students to feel the pressures of a deadline while still spending time capturing the idiosyncrasies and uniqueness of the small Tennessee town. The work continues for the following days when the class sorts through more than 5,000 photographs and edits them down to the final 60 shots that are then sent to the LaFollette Press. Chelsea Raschke, senior in journalism and electronic media, prepared for the trip by researching different interesting places in LaFollette. Once she arrived, she teamed up with a few other students and approached random people in hopes of taking their photos. She cited Ralph’s Donut Shop as one place she visited, describing how she took photos of the owners. “Learning all these little stories about the people in LaFollette was so interesting because it’s such a small place,” Raschke said. “You don’t really expect much, but that’s usually because you’re not used to having such intimate conversations with people and learning about where they live every single day.” Also citing a florist and a beekeeper as photo subjects, Raschke said the project was much more than just homework. “It was so beyond photography,” she said. “It was having an experience with people.”

• Photo Courtesy of Alexandra Harper

Melodi Erdogan Managing Editor

• Photo Courtesy of Laura Moore

• Photo Courtesy of Natasha Zalewski

• Photo Courtesy of Parker Eidson

Eyes on LaFollette

• Photo Courtesy of Hua Wang

• Photo Courtesy of Chelsea Raschke

croark4@utk.edu


Thursday, April 10, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 7 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

• Photo Courtesy of Logan Brill

Knoxville native settling into country music scene “I think about all the people I am speaking to when I am singing and try to imagine how they feel.”

Contributor At age 22, her songs have been featured on the VH1 network, she has appeared in the “debut spotlight” of CMA Close Up Magazine, and her album “Walking Wires” was ranked in the top 10 albums for 2013 That Nashville Sound magazine. Knoxville native Logan Brill moved to Nashville four years ago to attend Belmont University, which led to the release of her first album, “Walking Wires,” at age 20. “I fell in love with Nashville’s vibe of music being all around,” Brill said. The album’s success instantly sky-rocketed. CMT Edge, Country Weekly, Billboard, Pollstar and CMA Close Up Magazine took notice of the Americana style album. Stars like Josh Turner, Sara Evans and Carbon Leaf have given Brill opening spots. When asked about her

reaction to her album being named No. 6 on That Nashville Sound’s Top Albums of 2013 list, she said, “I so respect the other artists on the list. It was so cool to see myself on that list, too.” Brill explained she has the utmost respect for the artists that work extremely hard to get where they are. With that in mind, she said she understands that in order to be successful, she will need to put in just as much effort. Brill also said she aims to create songs containing outpourings of emotion directed toward those in the audience. “Walking Wires” is an album made up of stories ranging from failed marriages to bad relationships, Brill said. She explained that even though she has not experienced many of the situations she sings about, she has been inspired by the way artists pour passion into the stories they sing about as if they have lived them.

Chelsea Faulkner Staff Writer

“Hanginaround” by Counting Crows Not only does this tune have a super groovy beat, it also resonates with that trapped feeling we all get during spring finals knowing summer is right around the corner. Plus, anything by Counting Crows is just pure awesome.

“Son’s Gonna Rise” by Citizen Cope Clarence Greenwood (Citizen Cope) started his own record company a few years ago because he didn’t want to answer to the major labels he was signed to anymore (RCA, Capitol and Dreamworks just to name a few). This song makes you want to put your sunglasses on, roll the car windows down and stick it to the man for a few minutes.

“Happy” by Pharrell Williams This is everybody’s favorite song right now because, honestly, it just makes people feel happy. Listen to it while watching the music video for extra good feels.

-Logan Brill

Grace Ann Sanderson

Put a ‘spring’ in your step

“Down on the Corner” by Creedence Clearwater Revival Spring comes with a renewed sense of community spirit. Written in 1969, a few short months after CCR’s historic Woodstock performance, this tune is reminiscent of warm, magical downtown evenings where fireflies illuminate the happy faces of the jam bands on the corners.

“This is How We Do” by Katy Perry The seventh song off her newest album “PRISM,” it is even more dance-worthy than 2010’s “Last Friday Night.” With its nonchalant subject matter, this song just may become the anthem for wild nights out this spring.

“Thinkin’ Bout Something” by Hanson Yes, Hanson exists outside of the MMMBop craze, and the group’s music is actually pretty good. Turn this song on anytime you need an extra pep in your step. Knoxville native Logan Brill has cut her teeth on the Nashville music scene after releasing her debut album, “Walking Wires,” last year. “I enjoy getting into the story of the song,” Brill said. “I think about all the people I am speaking to when I am singing and try to imagine how they feel.” Brill’s electric personality and exceptional storytelling has made her one of Nashville’s most sought-after artists. However, while she said she loves the Nashville music scene, performing in Knoxville brings a comfort no other venue can provide. “Looking into the audi-

ence, I see so many people I know from so many stages of my life,” she said. “I am playing for my friend, instead of strangers.” In terms of her feelings towards Knoxville, Brill said she’s just as grateful for her time growing up in the city as she is for every other part of her life. “Being tied to Knoxville,” she said, “has really impacted me on my choice to go into music.”

“Dancin’ in the Moonlight” by Toploader This song is a fun, fresh remake of King Harvest’s 1973 hit single and, appropriately, touts that dancing, like spring, will make you “feel warm and bright.”

“Sir Duke” by Stevie Wonder This tune evokes waves of happiness and hand clapping. Celebrating the magic of music, “Sir Duke” is more than appropriate to blast on a beautiful spring day.

“Ain’t It Fun” by Paramore As usual, lead singer Hayley Williams manages to create another chart-topping hit with her wacky sense of humor and satirical libretto. Released as a single in February, this fun tune is out just in time to accompany the excitingly warmer days ahead.

“For the Longest Time” by Billy Joel Ah, spring. We “haven’t been there for the longest time.” Grab your friends, throw on your boat shoes, and snap along to this serotonin-inducing pseudo-oldie.

Honorable Mentions “Sittin’ on the Dock of the Bay” by Otis Redding “The Way You Make Me Feel” by Michael Jackson


8 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, April 10, 2014 Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron

SPORTS

tprovost@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Dargan Southard

msoutha1@utk.edu

Donald Page • Tennessee Athletics

SOFTBALL

Senior shortstop Madison Shipman gets in position to field an infield fly in the Lady Vols’ 13-5 victory over Tennessee Tech at Sheri Parker Lee Stadium on Tuesday.

Renfroe, Shipman named finalists for POY honors Taylor White Staff Writer Ellen Renfroe and Madison Shipman have won award after award this season, and Wednesday morning the two Tennessee Lady Volunteer softball players got one step closer to winning the most prestigious award in softball. The two seniors were named top 25 finalists for the USA Softball Collegiate Player of the Year Award. This award is given to the top college softball player in the country each year. “It was really exciting,” Shipman said at Wednesday’s media availability. “It’s just really exciting, and it’s a huge honor.” Shipman has been one of the most dominant hitters in the country so far, batting .422 with a team-leading 11 home runs, tying her career-high for home runs in a season with 14 regular season games remaining. “I’m actually trying not to hit home runs,” Shipman said. “If I try to not hit home runs, then they happen, but when I try too hard is when I start popping things up.” Renfroe is coming off a national player of the week honor and has been one of the nation’s top pitchers all year long, wielding

a record of 22-2 and an ERA of 1.54. She struggled at LSU last weekend, picking up her first two losses of the season, but bounced back strong on Sunday, throwing a shutout while only allowing three hits. The announcement marked the third time Renfroe has been a top 25 finalist in her career. “They are very deserving,” co-head coach Karen Weekly said. “Both of those girls have worked extremely hard since they have been at Tennessee. They have been great role models and great leaders for our team. “I couldn’t be more proud of both of them.” This is the 11th consecutive year Tennessee has had a player named in the top 25, with Monica Abbot winning the award in 2007. Last year, Tennessee had two players named to the list, with Raven Chavanne making the top three. “I think that says that Tennessee softball is about a lot more than just one player,” Weekly said. “That we have a great tradition here. We have high standards and high expectations for this program, and we are committed to excellence.” Defensive rebound The Lady Vols dropped their first series of the season this past weekend at LSU and are now hoping to put that behind them as

they travel to Texas A&M this weekend. For the first time this season, Tennessee struggled both on the field and at the plate and lost two out of three games to a scrappy LSU squad. “I think that what happened at LSU was a culmination of some things we hadn’t been doing well for probably three or four weeks,” Weekly said. “You get their attention when you lose, and sometimes when you’re winning they aren’t really paying close attention. I think that really got their attention when we dropped those games.” Defense has been an aspect Tennessee has been able to hang its hat on this year, but Weekly said the Lady Vols lost focus during critical moments, committing seven errors against the Tigers over the weekend. “We worked a lot on defense this week,” Weekly said. “It’s just about really focusing on us and playing our game. You’re not going to slow a runner down by looking at them. You just got to see the ball into your glove and make a play.” Now, the Lady Vols are focusing on righting the ship moving forward. “We used (the losses) as learning experience,” Shipman said. “We try to just put that in the past and move forward from that.”

DENTON continued from Page 1 “His PA effectiveness came in measure from the fact that he had been a radio on-the-air personality, and he could anticipate what people in the stadium wanted to hear,” Ward continued. “His timing was done so that he would set the stadium crowd up, and then when they were collectively saying, `He’s going to say it,’ he said it, and they reacted. He was very, very effective, no question.” His public address career began at a Maryville dragstrip after the regular announcer continually failed to show up. He went on to climb the ranks in the motorsports industry, eventually making it to the highest level as an announcer at Talladega Superspeedway for over 15 years. In his time at Tennessee, however, Denton became a friend to many. He now leaves a glaring absence not only in the booth, but also in the hearts of those who had the pleasure of befriending him. “My interaction with Bobby was always very positive and enlightening for me, and I didn’t view him as just an announcer or a media guy,” former UT quarterback and current assistant athletic director Condredge Holloway said in the release. “The way we had conversations were more on a personal level about everything that was going on in the world, and maybe football occasionally. I got to know him a little better when I did some sideline commentating for UT. “It was always fun interviewing the players and getting tips from Bobby about what to ask and how to make the player feel the most comfortable. He always wanted to be player-friendly.” That player-friendly approach couldn’t be any more apparent. With Denton’s voice resonating throughout Neyland Stadium for more than four decades, many players have heard his iconic introduction and catchphrases and have those

moments as memories of their playing careers. “Thinking back to those Saturday games and you could hear Bobby’s voice echo throughout Neyland Stadium,” former quarterback Heath Shuler said in the release. “Not only are we going to miss how he announced the game, but we are going to miss his character. I consider him a close and dear friend. I got to know Bobby in a personal relationship, and he would always do that game introduction voice when I entered the room. “That would put a smile on your face and he would give you a big hug. It would just give you chill bumps.” Vol legend Peyton Manning added: “A couple of things I could always count on a Tennessee football Saturday as a player were the Vol Walk to the stadium, running out through the T, the band singing Rocky Top, and Bobby Denton right during pre-game warm-ups coming on the loudspeaker and saying ‘It’s football time in Tennessee.’ “Every time I heard that, I knew kickoff was near, and it was always kind of an exciting moment. The crowd and the players would get excited, and of course, he would go on to echo his other famous expression, `Pay these prices and please pay no more.’” His reference to the concession stand prices came into play as a reminder to fans to not overpay for stadium food when enterprising concession stand managers were looking to make an extra profit based on demand in the 1970s. And while the issue has long been dealt with, the phrase remains a part of Tennessee tradition. So will Denton. “Bobby Denton’s voice echoing throughout our iconic stadium will be forever etched in our fans’ minds,” athletic director Dave Hart added. “For decades, he was a key component of the tradition within Neyland Stadium. He will be greatly missed by all.”


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