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Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Issue 59, Volume XX

Students to celebrate culture, sport through Mini World Cup “Sport is, per se, a universal language.” These words from Renée D’Elia-Zunino, senior lecturer in Italian studies, accurately summarize the purpose for the second annual Modern Foreign Languages and Literatures Soccer Mini World Cup: to celebrate individual cultures while bridging the gaps between them. The tournament will be held

today at 4 p.m. in the Regal Soccer Stadium. It will include eight student-led teams from UT’s foreign language offerings, with each language having its own team except for French and Arabic, which will be joined together because of logistical reasons. Last year’s inaugural tournament was organized by the UTK Italian Club and included representative teams from Italian, French, German, Russian, Portuguese, Spanish, Chinese and Japanese language classes. Club officials thought the event lined up with UT’s “Ready for

the World” initiative, and thus the tournament was born. This year’s tournament is organized by Laurent Zunino, lecturer in French, and will feature a similar format, with an introductory ceremony of National Anthems as players walk onto the field and a few languages offering brief performances representative of their culture; the games will follow, with eliminations, semifinals and a final. “Sport is played and watched by people from a variety of social backgrounds,” Zunino said, “and it has a socializing

and educational effect that makes it an ideal vehicle for intercultural dialogue and social integration. “It’s not only about the sport: it’s about getting together and sharing a passion for the culture.” The teams hold tryouts to select players and then have practices to prepare for the tournament. All of this preparation work is done by students enrolled in foreign language classes at UT. Matt Warren, captain of the Portuguese team, volunteered during a class with Wanessa

Martin, Portuguese lecturer, because he said he saw a need and knew his own experience with soccer could fill it. Warren, senior in geography, has played soccer for 18 years, refereed for six and coached for three. “I love the sport of soccer,” Warren said. “ I also have a family with Portuguese background and have visited Brazil myself. I believe (the tournament) gives us a better grasp of feeling as a part of the Portuguese department and representing them.” The event also gives students a chance to participate in a sport

they might not have played since high school, organizers said. Kathryn Pepperman, freshman in Portuguese and Economics with an international business collateral, will be the goalkeeper for the Portuguese team in today’s tournament. “(The best part is) getting to put on a ‘uniform’ again,” Pepperman said. “It is an absolute honor to be able to represent an organization. I am also so excited to bond with my fellow classmates and take down the other departments.” See SOCCER on Page 3

Hayley Brundige • The Daily Beacon

Claire Dodson Arts & Culture Editor

SEE INSIDE

UT students aim to raise 14000 for meal-based charity NEWS >>pg. 2

ARTS & CULTURE >>pg. 3

High quality indredients, BYOB wine and “mouthwatering Bruschetta”-all this and more at Savelli’s Italian restaurant

SGA vice president Connor Dugosh of Keny-Dugosh speaks about policy points for the Keny-Dugosh campaign during a debate on April 1.

Get to know UT’s new SGA Vice President: Connor Dugosh Bradi Musil Staff Writer

Of the six states Connor Dugosh has lived in (Kentucky, Alabama, Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio and Tennessee), he chose the “Volunteer State” to call home. A junior in English and UT’s new Student Government Association vice president, Dugosh knows the students of UT well. Since arriving on campus, he has been a member of Delta Tau Delta fraternity, a UT Ambassador, an Orientation Leader, a former Student

Sports Editor

Vols looking for more consistency from QB’s as position battle rages on SPORTS >>pg. 5

freshman year and says the two clicked immediately. Having met through an SGA campaign, the two never considered running for office until it was casually suggested by a group of friends. Shrugging off the suggestion at first, Dugosh became increasingly interested after looking into the SGA Constitution. “I just checked off everything, and I knew I could do vice president,” he said. “Kelsey and I were immediately drawn to these two because we were the best fit for them.” Having been a member of the Student Senate for four semesters, Dugosh feels ready to serve as president of the

senate under VP expectations. His experiences as a Freshman Council co-advisor, an Orientation Leader and ambassador have equipped him, he says, with a list of concerns for improving the freshman experience. “One problem that I have found is that I don’t feel like there is one time where we come together as a student body outside of Neyland Stadium,” he said. “We need to be providing ways to be inclusive of all students and endorse programs that not everyone is aware of and help students find a place on campus. “... They need more support in those first few months.”

See DUGOSH on Page 2

The University of Tennessee officially announced Tuesday afternoon that the Volunteers’ football season opener against Utah State has been moved to Sunday, Aug. 31, and will be televised on the SEC Network. The contest was originally slated to be played on Saturday, Aug. 30. The move to Sunday means the annual Boomsday event held in Knoxville will move to Saturday evening. “This will be a unique and exciting weekend for our city and our state,” said Tennessee head football coach Butch Jones in a university release. “With Boomsday on Saturday and our season opener on Sunday, the atmosphere and energy in Knoxville will be

unrivaled. “We’re also excited about being one of the schools featured on the first weekend of SEC Network football telecasts, and we are looking forward to this tremendous opportunity.” With the schedule change, Tennessee’s contest against Utah State will mark the seventh time the Vols have played on Sunday, the last time being the season opener on Sept. 5, 2004, when the Vols defeated UNLV, 42-17, in the only Sunday game ever to be played in Neyland Stadium. The Vols are 3-2-1 all-time in their six Sunday contests. The matchup between Tennessee and the Aggies will be one of at least six contests featured on the opening weekend of the SEC Network, which officially launches on Aug. 14. UT’s football season opener against Utah State has been moved to Sunday, Aug. 31, and will be televised on the SEC Network. Boomsday will now take place on Saturday, Aug. 30. See SCHEDULE on Page 5

“We all like to complain about walking those hills, but you don’t know hills until you’ve had to conquer them on crutches.” @UTKDailyBeacon www.utdailybeacon.com

Dugosh calls attending UT the best decision of his life. Although he didn’t know much about UT before his arrival, he fondly remembers his first UT football game and singing Rocky Top at the top of his lungs surrounded by orange and the pouring rain. “The spirit here at UT is hard to match anywhere else,” Dugosh said. Keny and Dugosh have already begun designing ways to budget in scantrons for students during finals and midterm weeks free of charge. They would also like to begin the All Vol tailgate as soon as possible.

UT’s season opener, Boomsday swap places Troy Provost-Heron

ARTS & CULTURE>>pg. 3

Senate representative, and a Freshman Council co-advisor. Moving to Knoxville from Murfreesboro, Tenn., Dugosh served as vice president of his local high school. “I like the purpose of a student government,” he said. “It’s different from real government, and you can actually see an impact of handling real problems for real students.” Not a fan of big-world politics, Dugosh does not intend to pursue government after his graduation from UT. He just wants to be a voice for the students while he can. “My goal is to make students love UT more,” he said. Dugosh met Kelsey Keny, SGA’s new president, his

Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon

Bright lights, big city: expectations never match reality, and that can be good

OPINIONS >>pg. 4

INSIDE THE DAILY BEACON News Arts & Culture Opinions Sports

Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5-6


2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Wednesday, April 9, 2014 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb

elamb1@utk.edu

• Photo Courtesy of the Love Kitchen

‘Love is Cool’ campaign aims to raise $14K for local non-profit

incredibly inefficient, disorganized and cramped process. This new cooler would be over twice the size of the current one and would allow them to serve around five to six thousand meals to the Knoxville community.” To solve this problem, Foust and fellow students began the “Love is Cool” campaign on Mar. 25. Matt McCarty, sophomore

in supply chain management and a campaign founder, said the group originally set a $1,500 goal on Indiegogo. This goal was accomplished in only 24 hours. “We reached our minimum goal so quickly we decided to take it even further and attempt to raise the entire $14,000 for the new cooler system,” McCarty said. “The Love Kitchen

is an important part of the Knoxville community; they’ve given so much to the people of this city, it’s time for us to give back.” Now, the group is looking to students to continue the movement. “We know they can’t donate much, but we know they’re all on Facebook,” Foust said. “... We’re trying to drive home the point that

small donations are the most important; if one person donates $100, that’s great. But if 1,000 people donate just $1? That’s incredible.” While “Love is Cool” began as a project for class, each of the members have taken the movement to heart. “Getting all of this funding doesn’t necessarily mean we’re going to get an A,”

Foust said. “But we’re not doing this for a grade at this point. This is just to go out and raise the most money we can for these people.” Greg Young, another group member and a sophomore in supply chain management, said he has enjoyed interacting with Ashe and Turner through the project. “Helen and Ellen are the sweetest ladies you could ever hope to meet,” Young said. “They call everyone who comes in their children; that’s just the kind of people they are. “Even if you just bring an orange in, Helen and Ellen will go nuts and tell everyone how great it is that you brought an orange in.” Fourth campaigner Dwayne Johnson, a junior in business management, has volunteered at the Love Kitchen and said physical help is just as valuable as monetary donation. “You come in and say you want to volunteer and they put you straight to work,” Johnson said. “You can donate the amount of time you want, even if it’s just 30 minutes. They’ll be thankful for any amount of time you spend there.” To learn more about the “Love is Cool” campaign, you can visit their Facebook page.

the students.” Upon hearing about the low voter turnout in this year’s SGA elections, Dugosh also hopes to start an initiative to get more votes from the student body. “We need to really create a foundation where SGA

is important to the student body and where SGA can grow to be really great,” he said. “We want students to care about something that cares about them.” Dugosh is still figuring out his plans post-graduation. Once set on a pre-law

track, as time progressed he became less attracted to the field. However, he possesses a passion for writing and would one day like to write a novel. “The Elevator,” an original short story written by Dugosh, is currently being

made into a short film in an upper-level video productions class. His favorite author is Cormac McCarthy, but Dugosh says he finds inspiration everywhere. “I’m a fan of people watching,” he said.

Ultimately, Dugosh admits he’s really excited about getting to know as many UT students as possible and making their volunteer experience as great as it can be. “I’m a weird dude,” he finished. “I love pugs.”

Kevin Ridder Copy Editor What started as an English project for four UT students has become a campaign to raise $14,000 for the Love Kitchen, a local non-profit organization dedicated to feeding Knoxville’s homeless and underprivileged population. The fundraiser aims to purchase a new cooler for the charity. The Love Kitchen, founded by twin sisters Helen Ashe and Ellen Turner, fed its first group on Feb. 14, 1986. The meal served 22 people in a small church in East Knoxville. Today, the Love Kitchen has its own building two blocks away from that very church, where it serves more than 3,000 meals each week. More than 80 percent of those meals are delivered to home-bound recipients who are unable to visit the kitchen due to health or transportation problems. Reid Foust, sophomore in accounting and a campaign founder, says the organization has far outgrown its current facilities. “When deliveries come in, they have to take all of the perishables out, put in all of the delivered meals, deliver them, and restock the cooler,” Foust said. “It’s an

DUGOSH continued from Page 1 “We are trying to make SGA more visible to students, something that’s easy on the eyes,” he said. “We want to put an emphasis on

Ellen Turner, left, and Helen Ashe, right, are the founders of The Love Kitchen where they provide meals, clothing and emergency food packages to homebound, homeless and unemployed persons.


Wednesday, April 9, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark • Photo Courtesy of Savelli’s Italian Restaurant

croark4@utk.edu

Savelli’s is a family-owned Italian restaurant located on Sutherland Avenue.

Adventure-seeking reality trumps expectations Cortney Roark Asst. Arts & Culture Editor For my 21st birthday, my friend and fellow adventure seeker, Brooke, gave me tickets to see “Hedwig and the Angry Inch” on Broadway. This past weekend, we finally made the journey to New York City. For the months before the trip, I listened to Brooke say how incredible the trip was going to be more times than I can count. I responded every time with, “I’m not getting excited until we’re on our way. I don’t want our expectations to be too high.” However, expectations are something that come naturally. And, of course, mine were not met. Let’s start from the beginning. Expectation: Because the Megabus schedule didn’t work with our class schedule, we booked a bus twice as expensive. This was a great plan, because for twice the money, it must be twice as nice. We would have my laptop, which would mean endless movies and Netflix streaming. For safety, we could get there 30 minutes early to ensure the best possible seat for the overnight journey. Reality: After arriving on time, I called the driver and discovered a very serious language barrier. I then gathered the bus would arrive in 10 minutes. Wrong. The bus would leave in 10 minutes.

SOCCER continued from Page 1 For D’Elia-Zunino, the tournament is a chance to teach her students about the language in ways that are exciting and relatable. She said she tries to focus on a sports week in class to get students engaged and excited about the material. Additionally, sports activities are integrated often into her curriculum. “We do language activities

The first time we saw the bus, it was pulling out of the parking lot onto the interstate short of two very panicked UT students. After running two red lights, we successfully caught up to the bus full of passengers staring in utter confusion as Brooke and I hung our bodies out the window and flailed our arms around. Finally, the bus pulled over on the side of I-40 to pick us up. We boarded the bus – no outlets, no Wifi and no way to understand anything announced until we heard the words “New York.” Expectation: Once we arrive in New York, we will be dropped within walking distance of our hotel, change clothes, look like New Yorkers and explore the city. Reality: After stopping in I-still-don’t-know-where, we realized this was it. We were dropped in a town with the city only in view across a large body of water. At 7 a.m. in 35-degree weather. With our hands full. In the rain. Wearing leggings, T-shirts and Nike shorts, we wandered aimlessly for a solid hour. Our phones were dead, we were almost driven to tears in a subway station while failing to read the map, and a man began to follow us insisting we follow him to his car. With pepper spray in hand, we accepted that a $50 cab ride was the only option. Although hours behind schedule, freezing cold and wet, we did make it without the shedding of tears. Expectation: “Hedwig and the Angry Inch” would be amazing and, since I planned ahead, I knew a secret surely no one else had thought to look up. Neil Patrick Harris could possibly meet fans at the stage door. It would be great. Brooke and I could ask a few questions, get a

picture and keep in touch with Neil after returning to Knoxville. Reality: “Hedwig” was actually more than amazing. After making our way to the stage door, we realized there were around 200 other people with the same genius thought. We did meet Neil for about 5 seconds, and I managed a “You did so great” and received a “Thank you.” He was as nice as he could be and offered as much personality as he could. He even answered questions about the controversial finale of his show. Expectation: After “Hedwig,” we would head to McGee’s Pub and live the nightlife of New York. Brooke would be my wingman, and my southern charm would do the rest. Reality: McGee’s was as expected. It was fantastic. While awaiting our – or, my – chance to be approached by a very attractive New Yorker, a 30-something woman from Atlanta sat down in the spot that was to be his. The rest of the evening was spent talking in our new group of three. During our limited amount of time in New York, we made memories that will cause laughter for the rest of our lives, were surrounded for hours by hundreds of people with the same appreciation for a great on-screen and on-stage actor, and made a new friend named Mary. When something happens that isn’t close to the expectation built, that’s when it becomes an adventure. Our reality was nowhere close to what we expected. It was better.

related to sports all the time, inside and outside the classroom,” she said. “When I want to teach the imperative command, I have them running, jumping, racing, stopping and swinging between the benches of the classroom.” When the tournament begins, it becomes more than just an out-of-class learning opportunity – it is a real sporting event, complete with cultural decorations, flags, national anthems and high energy.

“For two hours these students are not UT students anymore, they are the Russians, the Italians, the Germans of all the world, right there to live a special moment, all together,” D’Elia-Zunino said. “The cultures mingle, the excitement rises and the spirit is so uniquely liberating, as if we were a one single entity.” The event is free and open to the public, with free parking around the stadium.

Cortney Roark is a junior in journalism and electronic media. She can be reached at croark4@ utk.edu.

Savelli’s dishes up cozy, tasty Italian experience Liv McConnell Copy Editor When pulling up to the outside of Savelli’s Italian restaurant, one could reasonably fear their GPS had led them terribly astray. It’s difficult to believe the highly-patronized restaurant, a Knoxville mainstay for more than 20 years, is truly the dingy, shoeboxsized building located on a desolate stretch of Sutherland Avenue. After potentially scoring one of the four parking spaces in front of the building or leaving the safekeeping of vehicles to a neighboring abandoned lot, it is with understandable trepidation most newcomers enter the front door. The slightly dim and dated interior cements Savelli’s status as a bonafide “hole in the wall.” The atmosphere is an intriguing clash of sensibilities — linen tablecloths paired with cafeteria-like tiled floors and strings of Christmas tree lights. This ambiance, however, works for the family-owned-andoperated joint. After being seated, it is already clear patrons shouldn’t expect the cookie-cutter experience of Italian chains along the lines of Carrabba’s or Olive Garden. One of the most notable

and shining ways Savelli’s delivers anti- corporate charm, in this writer’s opinion, is their BYOB policy on wine. At what other Knoxville restaurant could one waltz through the front door cradling a bottle of their favorite wine and not be either asked to leave or charged a hefty corking fee? At Savelli’s, supplying your own bottled vintage is encouraged, even, and your server will kindly double as maître d’ to help best preserve your chosen libation. Questions regarding the legality of this will be stifled by the sheer novelty of this pleasurable experience. Saving a few bucks on wine will help you to better justify splurging on the rest of the menu, which straddles the line between moderate and downright pricey. The quality is consistently worth it, however, as Chef and owner Liz Savelli insists on using only the highest quality ingredients, including made-fromscratch sauces. Appetizers, including their mouthwatering Bruschetta, average $7, and guests operating on a more modest budget can still eat their fill of the majority of entrees, which price under $15. Mama Savelli’s Chicken Surprise, tossed with artichoke hearts and sundried tomatoes in

a creamy white wine and lemon sauce, comes especially recommended, and the Groper Sub, served with fresh pesto mayonnaise, is a highlight of the sizable subs’ list. Made-to-order pizzas and calzones round out the remainder of Savelli’s more adorable offerings. For anyone looking to especially impress a significant other with their menuselecting savvy, ordering from the “frutti di mare,” or seafood, list would be wise. Chef Savelli, a native of Chesapeake Bay, masterfully prepares blue crab meat, pan-seared salmon and jumbo scallops with practiced care. This category promises to cause the most significant damage to one’s bank account, especially if ordering from the steeplypriced specials list. Save these market-priced orders for only the most special of occasions, or perhaps the next time the folks come to visit. Savelli’s is as anti-corporate Italian as it gets, complete with scrumptious homemade tiramisu and a broken-English speaking violinist to serenade your table. The next time you’re looking for a local restaurant that is truly off the beaten path, check out Savelli’s and allow your taste buds to be pleasantly surprised.

The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, is pleased to sponsor the fifth annual Research Week from April 12 - 17. This event highlights undergraduate research and creative activities that take place across campus. Inevitably, some activities fall outside the official week, but we include them so students can experience the wide variety of discovery at UT. For more information, visit http://ugresearch.utk.edu/activities/research-week.

Schedule of Events April 12

5th Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium – This symposium, formerly known as the Honors Symposium, presents 71 undergraduates’ oral presentations of their research. Sponsored by the Undergraduate Research Students’ Association, Pursuit: The Journal of Undergraduate Research, the Office of Undergraduate Research, the Student Success Center, the Chancellor’s Honors Program, and UTK Neuroscience, the event features keynote speaker Dr. Karen Rommelfanger, Director of Emory University’s neuroethics program, who speak on “Better than Well? Neuroenhancement and Beyond.” Students are welcome to come and go, and are especially encouraged to attend the lunch.

April 15

Graduate School Admission 101 – Stephanie Kit Associate Director of Career Services will present an informative overview in the University Center’s Room 221. Topics include the graduate school admission process, types of degrees, timelines, finding programs, and much more.

April 15 - 16

(85ď&$The Exhibition of Undergraduate Research & Creative Achievement – In its 18th year, the exhibition in the University Center Ballroom will feature poster displays of research projects and creative activities done by UT undergraduates who are working with faculty mentors. Setup of exhibits is scheduled for noon to 4:00 p.m. on April 15, with judging to begin at 5:30 p.m. All participants must be present for the judging. The exhibit is open to public viewing from 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on April 16.

April 16

(85ď&$ Awards Ceremony – Dozens of awards will be presented in the University Center Auditorium. In addition to various department awards, UT’s Office of Sustainability will award a $200 UT Bookstore gift certificate at the 2014 (85ď&$ event to a project involving environmental sustainability. For details, visit http://eureca.utk.edu.

April 17

Finding Funding for Graduate School – Various opportunities for financial assistance to attend graduate school will be presented by Dr. Ernest Brothers, Assistant Dean of the Graduate School, in the University Center Shiloh Room. Topics include graduate research assistantships, graduate teaching assistants, and various fellowships and scholarships.

April 17

National Scholarship Opportunities – Nichole Fazio-Veigel, Assistant Director of the Office of National Scholarships and Fellowships, will share funding opportunities like the Goldwater, Udall, Whitaker, Fulbright and others specifically for students actively pursuing undergraduate research at the University Center Shiloh Room.

April 24

Baker Scholars Research Presentations – Baker Scholars (undergraduates) will present their final research projects in the Boardroom of the Howard Baker Center for Public Policy, 1640 Cumberland Ave. Baker Scholars are juniors and seniors who conduct research under the guidance of a faculty mentor in fields ranging from energy and environment to education, global security, historical studies, and more.

9am-5pm

6pm

4pm

5pm

3:30-5pm

April 29

12:30-2:30pm

April 25

Gamma Sigma Delta Spring Awards – This luncheon awards ceremony by the honor society of agriculture takes place Friday April 25 in 136 Brehm Building and celebrates the accomplishments of outstanding students.

April 21

College of Architecture & Design Final Reviews of Fifth-Year Projects – Fifth-year architecture students and fourth-year interior design students present their final projects at the Art and Architecture Building, a prelude to the annual Tau Sigma Delta architecture competition. The Apr. 21 event will be held in Rooms 103A, 103B, and the Ewing Gallery. In addition, the Tau Sigma Delta reviews of selected projects will be held on Wed., Apr. 23, from 8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. in the Ewing Gallery.

11:30am

9am - 7pm

April 23

8am - 7pm

For more information, please visit http://research.utk.edu/researchweek


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Wednesday, April 9, 2014 Editor-in-Chief R.J. Vogt

OPINIONS

rvogt@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Construction gives UT chance to accommodate impaired Guest Column by

Jordan Achs

The little piece of bone on the X-ray printout mocked me as the doctor said the words “surgery” and “crutches” and “MRI.” I sat on the hospital bed in shock – did I seriously just break my leg? Was the X-ray wrong? Could that little fragment just stop its field trip through my knee joint and go back where it belongs, please? Until this year, I hadn’t broken a bone or needed crutches – I’ve led a cautious life. So it’s been hard for me to transition from a life of hustling all over campus to months of ice, crutches, pain pills and frustration. I cannot think of a campus more ill-fitted for crutches, with constant topographical changes that make my abs and arms scream in pain just typing these words. We all like to complain about walking up those hills, but you don’t know hills until you’ve had to conquer them on crutches. The other day, as I was slowly hobbling up one of those dreaded hills, a random guy asked if I wanted help carrying my backpack. It’s been a pattern – there hasn’t been one day during this first week on crutches that I haven’t had a complete stranger come up to me and ask if I needed help with anything, and that’s pretty impressive. The compassion of my fellow Volunteers has amazed me, but I’m confused by the struggle the university itself has showing similar empathy. Many of the handicap entrances are on weird corners of buildings, making me crutch completely out of my way to get inside. Some elevators are in strange areas, like in the middle of the PCB kitchen. Many buildings, especially on the Hill, don’t have elevators at all, so if I had a class there I’d have to climb up who knows how many flights of stairs with a knee that can’t bend. I know completely changing the interior of all of the buildings on campus would add to the already monumental construction budget we have, but I hope the new buildings take this into consideration. Disability Services has been wonderful to me, and during the weekday the Access bus gets to me with very little wait time. I’m thankful, because I live pretty deep in the Fort and honestly wouldn’t be able to get to class otherwise. However, once 6 p.m. hits, the Access bus becomes the T-Link – a free-for-all. I have to share my sole means of transportation with the entirety of campus and the Fort, and that really irks me. Can’t one bus stand by for those of us who really have no other way of getting anywhere? I understand the Fort is a place one might not want to traverse in the dark, but it’s even worse on crutches. Many a time I would just walk through the Fort out of impatience, but now I don’t have that option. Thank goodness the weather has been warmer, or I’d have to stand outside in the cold waiting for that bus. And what about the weekends? The Access doesn’t run on Saturday or Sunday, and the T-Link only runs after 6 p.m., making my Sunday morning shift at the library virtually impossible for me to get to without bumming rides from my friends. And the thing is, I’m going to be on crutches for maybe two months tops. Some people rely on these things for their four-plus years here, and I don’t know how they deal with it. Seriously, my heart goes out to them, because I’ve lost virtually all of my patience after a week. And with the construction making this campus more pedestrian-friendly, having the Access won’t be very helpful at all. Will they switch to golf carts? Just make us fend for ourselves? Here’s a Big Orange Big Idea: We have the opportunity with all of this construction to be truly groundbreaking when it comes to disability services and accessibility. Let’s not squander it. Let’s not take “good enough” as an answer when it comes to disability services. Let’s go above and beyond, because school is hard enough without having to worry about getting around. Jordan Achs is a junior in journalism and electronic media. She can be reached at jachs@utk.edu.

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Five tips to aid your off-campus housing hunt The Jeremiad by

Jeremy Brunger It is wise if, after several years at UT you find yourself stultified, to look for off-campus housing. However, this being America, where capital trumps personality, your youthful naivete might be the prey of local profiteers. I’ve heard enough nasty stories about the way local apartment buildings are run — ranging from stories concerning embezzlement to outright racist entry procedures — and you ought to avoid it yourself. Living off campus is great; it’s a fine way to acclimate yourself to adult-style living before the pressures of real life fully fall upon you. Here are some pointers for potential seekers of housing: 1) Cost is important. It might be the most important factor. You shouldn’t have the highest-maintenance lifestyle yet (living on student loans?) and should be content with the bare essentials. Fees are omnipresent, too: pet fees can range into several hundred dollars, security deposits might not be returned, overages come in abundance.

Editor-in-Chief: R.J. Vogt Managing Editor: Melodi Erdogan Chief Copy Editor: Gage Arnold News Editor: Hanna Lustig Asst. News Editor: Emilee Lamb Sports Editor: Troy Provost-Heron Asst. Sports Editor: Dargan Southard Arts & Culture Editor: Claire Dodson Asst. Arts & Culture Editor: Cortney Roark Online Editor: Samantha Smoak

ally start eviction proceedings, you can talk yourself into a lot of leeway. Remember they’re people, too, despite that, to them, you are an instrument for profit. These pointers are common sense, but I’ve had several friends run into problems with housing. Sometimes the staff will room you with unsuitable roommates they know have caused problems for the complex before. Or they move a violent, multiple-DUI bigot your friend-circle knows and despises into the apartment above you, even after you warned them not to let that person rent a room anywhere near you because you saw them drag a girl off into the darkness during a drunken rampage. Or they let your toilet sit broken for a week. Life is weird enough without running into problems with your basic living situation, especially if they’re caused by rent-seeking profiteers eager to turn your disposable income into their private coffers. Remember, you’ll have to sign a contract if you move into an apartment, but that contract works both ways. It’s for your protection as much as theirs. Jeremy Brunger is a senior in English. He can be reached at jbrunger@utk.edu.

The Sunsphere remains a beacon of Knoxville’s energy In Rare Forum by

Julie Mrozinski It’s high in the sky, bright and shiny. All day long, Knoxville doesn’t just have one sun — we have two. It’s safe to say we’re a sunny crew. Erected in 1982 for the World’s Fair, the Sunsphere was built around the same premise as the Eiffel Tower. The tradition of a World’s Fair started in France, and other relics, such as Seattle’s Space Needle and New York’s World’s Fair Towers depicted in Men in Black, remain. These fairs have been held all over the world, and the decision to have one in Knoxville was an honor. Though our little city of Knoxville didn’t make the tower like Paris did, the Sunsphere should be seen as a glass half full (which it is). In keeping with a World’s Fair tradition, the 1982 event was focused on a theme: “Energy Turns The World.” Representatives from different countries emphasized new and innovative technology in their booths, and Knoxville chose the symbol of the Earth’s sun – the ultimate creator of energy – as its trademark

monument. In the global spirit of the fair, Knoxville’s choice of monument even encompassed a worldly aspect –after all, the whole world shares the sun. What remains is impressive. The sphere is 86.5 feet in diameter, planned to symbolically represent the sun’s 865,000 mile diameter. Standing 81 feet tall, the sphere weighs about 600 tons, and its architecture has been noted as prolific in several engineering publications. Its glass panels are painted with 24-karat gold dust, making it quite the gilded piece. As it reflects the light of the sun and its energy, giving back to the inhabitants, the Sunsphere remains true to its theme, harnessing the energy of Knoxville. “The Simpsons” had an episode about our wonderful sphere called “Bart on the Road”, in which they solve the mystery of what is hidden within the sphere. To their surprise, they find thousands of wigs and rename it the “Wigsphere.” Our own sphere holds no wigs, but the view from inside might wig you out. Its 360-degree, sightseeing vantage point is breathtaking; the river, our school, downtown and the Smoky Mountains give a wonderful opportunity for people watching. Interestingly enough, there are 360 glass-gilded panes to accommodate the wonderful, full-circle outlook surrounding

our spherical beauty. Unfortunately, the fourth floor observation deck is under construction until further notice, but this does not mean you can’t see the vast views the Sunsphere has to offer, as there are two more floors for sightseeing, a restaurant, a bar and an event floor that is open for leasing events. Our hallmark hasn’t always been open to the public, and there was a period of time when the people of Knoxville and even Hollywood wondered what was inside. Because the sphere has had such offand-on public access, we should all take advantage of its current availability and hike up to the top to find out for ourselves what is really within. Whether you go up to the top or admire it from the bottom, the Sunsphere is Knoxville’s masterpiece and a worldly symbol of energy, with a history of the predecessors who walked the same streets we do now. It is a widely acknowledged beacon of Knoxville (note your Tennessee license – the Sunsphere makes a cameo appearance). May our Sunsphere always make the Knoxville skyline sparkle, even after the sun goes down. Julie Mrozinski is a junior in English. She can be reached at jmrozins@utk.edu.

Get Fuzzy • Darby Conley

Non Sequitur • Wiley

EDITORIAL

Pay close attention to the bottom line. If you screw things up with your apartment and don’t have enough money to foot the bill and can’t find a sub-leaser, your credit might take a beating before you even really get to start using it. 2) Realize the local apartments count on unwitting students coming in every year. They are businesses, after all, and they often expect you to be naive enough not to read the fine print. Do so. 3) Watch for damages. Don’t be so excited to move in that you overlook any existing damages your apartment might have. This includes mold. It’s criminal to rent out moldy apartments to people, but that doesn’t mean the apartment complex cares about that. If need be, you might be able to use it to your advantage. But your health isn’t worth compromising for the sake of getting out of a lease. 4) You have the leverage, not the apartment complex. Your money keeps them afloat. Rude staff, late maintenance or other annoyances are not just pet peeves, they’re lapses in service. 5) If you have trouble coming up with the rent, you ought to fix that foremost. But these things happen. If your complex threatens to evict you, you should note they’ve had to adopt these policies to scare tenants into paying on time. Still, if they actu-

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Wednesday, April 9, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron

SPORTS

tprovost@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Dargan Southard

msoutha1@utk.edu

FOOTBALL

Wade Rackley • Tennessee Athletics

Coaches searching for ‘consistency’ under center for Vols Sports Editor Tennessee’s situational scrimmage on Saturday afternoon saw a lot of good. It also saw a lot of bad. And while inconsistency can be found at every position on the team, the heart of it lies under center for the Vols. All four quarterbacks – Justin Worley, Josh Dobbs, Riley Ferguson and Nathan Peterman – showed at times they could be Tennessee’s starting signal caller, but each also showcased their need for further growth. And added consistency. “We are always hoping to see more consistency,� offensive coordinator Mike Bajakian said after Tuesday’s practice at Haslam Field. “We want to continue to improve; we don’t want to take two steps forward, one step back. “Sure, you will have your error throws and a couple stumbles here and there, but you would rather it be once every 400 plays instead of once every 20 plays.� Bajakian also noted that Tennessee’s current four-man competition isn’t the perfect plan, but it will continue to work as long as all four members continue to show up every day and battle. “To have a clear-cut starter who we could maximize reps for would be ideal,� Bajakian said, “but the good part is they are all competing.� Pearson: From ‘awful’ to ‘less awful’ It didn’t take long for Von Pearson to become a big name on campus. His one-handed

Senior quarterback Justin Worley throws a pass during UT’s spring football practice at Haslam Field on Tuesday.

CHANGE continued from Page 1 The contests scheduled to be aired include a Thursday night doubleheader of Texas A&M at South Carolina and

Temple at Vanderbilt, in addition to a tripleheader on Saturday, Aug. 30. “We are thrilled to have the Tennessee Vols home opener on the SEC Network,� Justin Connolly, ESPN senior vice president, also said in the

catch back on March 13 was named as the No. 9 play of the day in SportsCenter’s Top 10, and the rest became history. But while the anticipation to see Pearson in action continues to grow, the JUCO transfer from Feather River C.C. (Calif.) continues to learn. After lackluster performances in scrimmages one and two for the Vols, Pearson shined in their third scrimmage on Saturday, as he was a consistent target in the passing game and even showcased his playmaking ability with a long touchdown run that was negated due to a holding penalty. And the Newport News, Va., native’s improvement has not gone unnoticed by his coaches. “I think he’s changed a bunch,� wide receivers coach Zach Azzanni said after Tuesday’s practice. “He was awful the first scrimmage, he was less awful the second scrimmage and he was a little bit less awful the third scrimmage, and I tease him with that. There was marked improvement from scrimmage one to scrimmage three, just on our style of play, the things that we do, our consistency. “He’s got so much energy and juice, it’s hard to stay angry at him for more than about 10 seconds, so he’s going to be fine. He’s fun to coach.� The addition of Pearson, as well as fellow early enrollee Josh Malone, has helped open up an offense for the Vols that struggled to find consistent playmakers down the field in the passing game.

Troy Provost-Heron

release. “Tennessee has a rich tradition of passionate college football fans, and we look forward to providing exclusive coverage of a packed Neyland Stadium on Labor Day weekend.�

“(We’re) a lot more explosive,� Azzanni said. “We just have more weapons. We can do more things in the offense. We can formation things to get different guys the ball. That’s huge. As a defense, if you just key in on one or two guys and they know every time they run the jet sweep it’s getting ran to this guy, it takes away the some mystery. “Now, I think we can do those things with a lot of guys, and that’s fun.� D-line needs ‘a bigger room’ Following the defensive line rotation for the Vols this spring is enough to make one’s head hurt. With players moving from linebacker to defensive end, defensive end to defensive tackle and what seems to be every other combination in the book, defensive line coach Steve Stripling has found himself asking head coach Butch Jones for “a bigger room� to hold all of these lineman. For the past couple of days, Stripling has had to fit one more body into that room, as freshman Jakob Johnson, who started the spring at linebacker, has been working at defensive line to the admiration of the Vols’ defensive line coach. “Jakob has been with me a couple days; (it’s) kind of an experiment,� Stripling said. “I love him. He’s going to get huge. ... He was out there battling today – he got called out at the end of practice for a little ‘Circle of Life’ by Coach Jones because he was mixing it up a little bit. He has a wonderful attitude. “He’s going to be a really good player.�

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Wednesday, April 9, 2014 Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron

SPORTS

tprovost@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Dargan Southard

msoutha1@utk.edu

SOFTBALL

Jonathan Toye Contributor Tennessee Tech proved in the first inning they could hit the softball against the Lady Vols on Tuesday night. But senior shortstop Madison Shipman’s homerun to deep center field during her first at-bat proved that the Lady Vols had more than enough fire power to combat any legitimate threat from the Golden Eagles. The No. 2 Tennessee Lady Volunteers softball team (33-5) cruised to an easy 13-5 victory over the Tennessee Tech Golden Eagles (12-31) at Lee Stadium, giving the team its 80th consecutive win over in-state opponents. Shipman laid the lumber for the Lady Vols Tuesday night, hitting two home runs, which upper her total to 11 on the season – already a career-high high for the senior. “I guess (the career-high) feels pretty good,” Shipman said. “I try not to think about that too much actually. I really don’t even know that. I’ve just been working really hard this year on my hitting especially; I am doing what I wanted to.” “Whatever I can do to make the team better, that’s what I am trying to do.” Shipman wasn’t the only Lady Vol who was hitting the ball well at the start of the game as the Tennessee scored seven runs in the first inning after the Golden Eagles jumped to a quick 2-0 lead earlier in the inning. UT then responded with three home runs in their half inning, as Shipman, Melissa Davin and Cheyanne Tarango each sent shots over the wall, giving the

Lady Vols a 7-2 lead they wouldn’t relinquish. A pitching change from Tennessee Tech, however, stunted the UT attack, something that the Lady Vols took as a negative from their midweek victory. “Whenever they make a pitching change, you’ve got to adjust to that pitcher, and we didn’t do a good job of making adjustments to that second pitcher,” Shipman said. “I think we lost a little focus there.” The Golden Eagles threatened to make the game interesting in the third inning after they brought three runs across to cut the lead to 8-5. But UT put an end to that in the fifth inning with a five-run outburst, highlighted by freshman Annie Aldrete’s three-run double that forced the game to end via run rule. “I was really just trying not to pop up,” Aldrete said. “We have the whole record of pop-ups in the dugout, and I mean if you hit it on the ground, something good is bound to happen. They are either going to make an error or the ground will help you out. “So that’s what I was trying to do, just hit it on the ground, get at least one run in, so I can keep the inning going.” Tennessee will resume their schedule this weekend as the team travels to College Station, Texas, to play Texas A&M Lady Aggies on Friday for a three-game series. First pitch for Friday’s contest is scheduled for 8 p.m EST. “Texas A&M is a very strong team,” co-head coach Karen Weekly said. “They can hit the ball very well. I understand college station is a pretty crazy environment to play in, so that will be a new experience for our girls.”

Donald Page • Tennessee Athletics

Shipman’s homers lift Lady Vols past Tennessee Tech, 13-5

The Lady Vols softball team cheers as senior shortstop Madison Shipman steps onto home plate after hitting a home run against Tennessee Tech during UT’s 13-5 win over the Golden Eagles at Lee Stadium on Tuesday.

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3 3 0

4 0 0

5 0 5

W: Cheyanne Tarango (2-1) L: Danielle Liberatore (6-10)

6 X X

D. Liberatore T. Ketchum H. Weaver

Tennessee

BATTING LEADERS Tennessee Tech

AB 3 2 3 AB 3 3 3

K. Hooper C. Fry A. Sakamoto M. Shipman M. Davin C. Tarango

8 X X

9 X X

R 5 13

H 6 12

E 2 1

IP 0 4.2 0.1

H 4 7 1

R 5 7 1

ER 5 5 0

BB 1 2 1

K 0 1 0

IP 2.0 2.0 1.0

H 2 4 0

R 2 3 0

ER 2 3 0

BB 0 0 0

K 2 2 1

R 2 0 2 R 3 1 1

H 2 1 2 H 2 1 1

RBI 4 1 0 RBI 4 2 2

BB 0 0 0 BB 1 0 0

SO 0 0 1 SO 0 0 0

HR 2 0 0 HR 2 1 1

Save: None

PITCHING STATS Tennessee Tech

E. Gabriel C. Tarango R. Gaffin

7 X X

Tennessee

BASEBALL

Vols soar past Golden Eagles, 10-1 Staff Report

The No. 21 Tennessee Volunteers (22-9) baseball team stepped out of conference and knocked off the Tennessee Tech Golden Eagles (25-9), 10-1, in midweek showdown in Cookeville, Tenn., at Bush

Stadium on Tuesday night. The victory extends the Vols’ winning streak to three games. Dave Serrano’s squad didn’t waste much time getting on the scoreboard as UT pushed across a run in the first inning. Freshman Nick Senzel delivered a RBI single in the first inning , one of three hits the Vols had in the opening frame. However, Tennessee Tech tied it up in the bottom half of the first, getting two hits, including a RBI double down the left field line. From there, it was all Vols. In the fourth, sophomore outfielder Christin Stewart launched his fourth home run of the year – a two-run shot that gave the Vols a 3-1 advantage. Both teams were held scoreless until the seventh when Vincent Jackson produced a RBI hit following singles from Taylor Smart and Nathaniel Maggio. That

gave UT a 4-1 lead, but the Vols weren’t finished. Second baseman Will Maddox came up with an RBI groundout – scoring Maggio – for UT’s fifth run of the evening. Meanwhile, Serrano’s squad got a dominant effort from a fullfledged pitching staff as six hurlers contributed to the nine-run victory. Bret Marks started and allowed just one run in two innings with a pair of strikeouts. Sophomores Trevor Bettencourt (1-1) and Drake Owenby followed in the middle innings, tossing 3 1/2 combined frames with only one hit and five total strikeouts. Peter Lenstrohm, Andy Cox, Josh Peterson and Andrew Lee rounded out the effective mound work as the quartet surrendered just a single hit and two free passes between the four of them. The Vols blew the game wide

open in the ninth inning, scoring five times. UT first loaded the bases, and then a throwing error brought home three runs. RBI singles Senzel and Stewart immediately followed to score the final two runs of the night. The win was the Vols’ first win over the Golden Eagles in Cookeville since April, 18, 2006, when UT won 6-4. In addition, it served as the first road victory for Serrano’s squad since UT swept a doubleheader at Missouri back on March 15. The win kicks off a stretch where UT will play nine of 12 games away from the friendly confines off Lindsey Nelson Stadium. The Vols will take on Georgia in Athens, Ga., on Friday at 7:30 p.m. to kick off the weekend series.


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