Page 1

Issue 52, Volume 122

Tuesday, April 2, 2013

TVC hosts first live SGA debate Claire Dodson Copy Editor The Volunteer Channel, UT’s student television station, will host UT’s first ever live SGA debate Tuesday at 8 p.m. in the Baker Center’s Toyota Auditorium, broadcasting on campus cable channel 12. The debate will feature discussion between all three SGA parties: Amplify, Engage and Baker-Atchley. Each president, vice president and student services director candidate will have the chance to converse with the other contenders in the category. The format also allows for students and UT media outlets to ask questions of the nominees concerning issues the student body cares about. Kelsey Keny, producer of TVC News, is one of the people who collaborated to make the event possible. Her enthusiasm for the event and what it stands for has been a driving force in the debate coming together. “I am so excited,” Keny, a sophomore in journalism and electronic media, said. “TVC has done televised debates in the past, but they didn’t really reach that many people. It wasn’t benefitting anyone because no one was really getting to interact with the candidates and hear what they have to say.” The event will stream live

at www.utdailybeacon.com as well as on the TVC website, where it will also be posted afterward for students to watch. One of their goals is for students to be as informed as possible when going in to vote on Wednesday. “When we were developing the format and the questions, we asked ourselves, ‘If I were a student who didn’t know anything about SGA or campaigns, what would help me make that decision? What would I need to see or hear?’” Keny said. “We would want to hear what they stand for and offer to the student body as well as check their credibility to see if they can follow through with their promises.” Lindsay Lee, the presidential candidate from Amplify, hopes the debate will educate students and encourage them to care about issues that SGA can help with. “There is a crisis of apathy when it comes to SGA, demonstrated by the extremely low voter turnouts in the past,” Lee, a junior in mathematics, said. “Only about 10 percent of students voted in the campaign last year, and that was the highest it had been in a while. This event will definitely help take SGA out of the Shiloh Room of the UC and actually into the lives of the students it is supposed to serve.” See DEBATE on Page X

• Photos courtesy of Engage, Amplify and Baker - Atchley

Distinguised dean retires after generation of service at UT when I was considering coming here, that it was just a really high potential school,” When Jan Williams came to he said. “The business school, UT as a professor, the Soviet I thought, had a lot of potential Union had 14 years of life and it was an opportunity to be remaining and Elvis Presley a part of building that.” was still kicking. For the last 13 years, the Closer to home, Johnny Nashville native has directed Majors was in his first year as UT’s football coach and the NCAA didn’t recognize women’s basketball as a sport – although a driven 25-yearold named Pat Summitt was helping change that. Williams had no intention of staying on Rocky Top for a whole generation, or even a decade for that matter. “I would’ve guessed that when I came here I’d probably be here five, six or seven years,” he said. But 36 years later – with the Iron Curtain long gone and Elvis living only in memories and jukeboxes – Williams is still hanging around the UT campus. Before retiring at the end of February, he served as the dean of UT’s nationally heralded College of Business Administration. His promotion to that position followed his service in a handful of other roles as he vastly exceeded the prediction he made in 1977 of how long he would remain a Vol. the business school, build“It’s just been a really good ing it both literally – through fit for me and I don’t know overseeing the construction that I could point a finger at of Haslam Business Building exactly why,” Williams said – and philosophically through as he reclined at the desk in the implementation of prohis new office in the Stokely grams like Global Leadership Management Center. Scholars. “I just felt like in 1977 As a result the college has

David Cobb

Assistant News Editor

garnered national attention, ranking 27th in the country among public universities according to a 2013 U.S. News & World Report release. On his watch, several individual programs within the college have attained top 10 national and international

• Photo courtesy of utk.edu

placements by various publications. For Williams, though, rankings and recognition have not been his motivation. “I’m pretty convinced if we do the right thing, build the right curriculum, get good students, have good faculty, build

good facilities -- and business school technology is huge -- if we have all these things in place, the rankings will pretty much fall,” Williams said. “There’s not a whole lot we can do other than simply do our jobs well to make the rankings get better and better.” After a nationwide search for his replacement, UT leaders decided on Steve Mangum to replace Williams. The two had lunch together recently, in what Williams said was the first real conversation they’ve had since Mangum’s arrival from Ohio State. “What are some of the things you wished you’d gotten done that you just didn’t have time for, or for whatever reason?” Mangum asked Williams. “I don’t feel bad about not getting everything done that you could,” Williams told him. “There’s just a lot to do -- it’s a big school.” One of his most most valuable contributions can be seen in his efforts to provide a sense of community within the college, which houses about 7,500 UT students within its undergraduate and graduate programs. The creation of GLS, a program designed to give highperforming business students an international perspective within a tight UT community, and Venture, a chance for “at risk” freshmen to adapt to college life and grow together, were both overseen by Williams and continue to be successful. See WILLIAMS on Page 3

Around Rocky Top

Tia Patron • The Daily Beacon

A students performs a contemporary Indian dance, including hip-hop and Bollywood styles, during the International Dance Competition on March 13.


2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, April 2, 2013 Associate Editor Preston Peeden

IN SHORT

ppeeden@utk.edu

Managing Editor Emily DeLanzo edelanzo@utk.edu

Around Rocky Top

Whitney Carter • The Daily Beacon

The Lady Vols prepare for the regatta against the Louisville Cardinals on March 30.

THIS DAY IN 2005 — Pope John Paul II Dies On this day in 2005, John Paul II, history’s most well-traveled pope and the first non-Italian to hold the position since the 16th century, dies at his home in the Vatican. Six days later, two million people packed Vatican City for his funeral, said to be the biggest funeral in history. John Paul II was born Karol Jozef Wojtyla in Wadowice, Poland, 35 miles southwest of Krakow, in 1920. After high school, the future pope enrolled at Krakow’s Jagiellonian University, where he studied philosophy and literature and performed in a theater group. During World War II, Nazis occupied Krakow and closed the university, forcing Wojtyla to seek work in a quarry and, later, a chemical factory. By 1941, his mother, father, and only brother had all died, leaving him the sole surviving member of his family. Although Wojtyla had been involved in the church his whole life, it was not until 1942 that he began seminary training. When the war ended, he returned to school at Jagiellonian to study theology, becoming an ordained priest in 1946. He went on to complete two doctorates and became a professor of moral theology and social ethics. On July 4, 1958, at the age of 38, he was appointed auxiliary bishop of Krakow by Pope Pius XII. He later

HISTORY

became the city s archbishop, where he spoke out for religious freedom while the church began the Second Vatican Council, which would revolutionize Catholicism. He was made a cardinal in 1967, taking on the challenges of living and working as a Catholic priest in communist Eastern Europe. Once asked if he feared retribution from communist leaders, he replied, “I m not afraid of them. They are afraid of me.” Wojtyla was quietly and slowly building a reputation as a powerful preacher and a man of both great intellect and charisma. Still, when Pope John Paul I died in 1978 after only a 34-day reign, few suspected Wojtyla would be chosen to replace him. But, after seven rounds of balloting, the Sacred College of Cardinals chose the 58-year-old, and he became the first-ever Slavic pope and the youngest to be chosen in 132 years. A conservative pontiff, John Paul II s papacy was marked by his firm and unwavering opposition to communism and war, as well as abortion, contraception, capital punishment, and homosexual sex. He later came out against euthanasia, human cloning, and stem cell research. He traveled widely as pope, using the eight languages he spoke (Polish, Italian, French, German, English, Spanish, Portuguese, and Latin) and his well-

known personal charm, to connect with the Catholic faithful, as well as many outside the fold. On May 13, 1981, Pope John Paul II was shot in St. Peter s Square by a Turkish political extremist, Mehmet Ali Agca. After his release from the hospital, the pope famously visited his wouldbe assassin in prison, where he had begun serving a life sentence, and personally forgave him for his actions. The next year, another unsuccessful attempt was made on the pope s life, this time by a fanatical priest who opposed the reforms of Vatican II. Although it was not confirmed by the Vatican until 2003, many believe Pope John Paul II began suffering from Parkinson s disease in the early 1990s. He began to develop slurred speech and had difficulty walking, though he continued to keep up a physically demanding travel schedule. In his final years, he was forced to delegate many of his official duties, but still found the strength to speak to the faithful from a window at the Vatican. In February 2005, the pope was hospitalized with complications from the flu. He died two months later. Pope John Paul II is remembered for his successful efforts to end communism, as well as for building bridges with peoples of other faiths, and issuing the Catholic Church s first apology for its actions during World War II. He was succeeded by Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, who became Pope Benedict XVI. Benedict XVI began the process to beatify John Paul II in May 2005. — This Day in History is courtesy of History.com.

Around Rocky Top

Tara Sripunvoraskul • The Daily Beacon

Students help themselves to a buffet during the Muslim Student Alliance Fast-AThon on March 14.


Tuesday, April 2, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 News Editor RJ Vogt

CAMPUS NEWS

rvogt@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor David Cobb dcobb3@utk.edu

Microbes give insight into life sustainability

Around Rocky Top

Staff Reports

Tara Sripunvoraskul • The Daily Beacon

A student looks over a board during the EuRECA Competition on March 18.

DEBATE continued from Page 1 The Volunteer Channel, UT’s student television station, will host UT’s first ever live SGA debate Tuesday at 8 p.m. in the Baker Center’s Toyota Auditorium, broadcasting on campus cable channel 12. The debate will feature discussion between all three SGA parties: Amplify, Engage and Baker-Atchley. Each president, vice president and student services director candidate will have the chance to converse with the other contenders in the category. The format also allows for students and UT

JAN WILLIAMS continued from Page 1 “I think there ought to be more programs like that,” he said, “that try and break the university down into smaller components for students.” With Mangum now directing the college, Williams splits time between Knoxville and Nashville, where his children and grandchildren live. While he was still working, his wife, Elain, suggested that he develop a hobby for when he retired. Williams has obliged that request through his passion for the game of baseball. Following a summer trip to Alaska that will take him through Seattle for a Mariners game, he will have visited 28 of the 30 Major League Baseball stadiums for a game. “I’d been to probably eight or ten ballparks,” Williams said. “And when my wife said that, I thought, ‘Baseball is probably where it (a hobby) ought to be.’” Williams threw out the ceremonial first pitch at a recent UT baseball game as the public address announcer rattled off the statistics and accolades about his tenure that he simply views as a byproduct of “doing the right thing.” “It’s been a good career,” Williams said. “This university has done a lot of good for me, and hopefully I’ve done some good for this university.”v The creation of GLS, a program designed to give highperforming business students an international perspective within a tight UT community, and

media outlets to ask questions of the nominees concerning issues the student body cares about. Kelsey Keny, producer of TVC News, is one of the people who collaborated to make the event possible. Her enthusiasm for the event and what it stands for has been a driving force in the debate coming together. “I am so excited,” Keny, a sophomore in journalism and electronic media, said. “TVC has done televised debates in the past, but they didn’t really reach that many people. It wasn’t benefitting anyone because no one was really getting to interact with the candidates and hear what they have to say.”

The event will stream live at www.utdailybeacon. com as well as on the TVC website, where it will also be posted afterward for students to watch. One of their goals is for students to be as informed as possible when going in to vote on Wednesday. “When we were developing the format and the questions, we asked ourselves, ‘If I were a student who didn’t know anything about SGA or campaigns, what would help me make that decision? What would I need to see or hear?’” Keny said. “We would want to hear what they stand for and offer to the student body as well as check their credibility to see if they can

Venture, a chance for “at risk” freshmen to adapt to college life and grow together, were both overseen by Williams and continue to be successful. With Mangum now directing the college, Williams splits time between Knoxville and Nashville, where his children and grandchildren live. While he was still working, his wife Elain suggested that he develop a hobby for when he retired. Williams has obliged that request through his passion for the game of baseball. Following a summer trip to Alaska that will take him through Seattle for a Mariners game, he will have

visited 28 of the 30 Major League Baseball stadiums for a game. “I’d been to probably eight or ten ballparks,” Williams said. “And when my wife said that, I thought, ‘Baseball is probably where it (a hobby) ought to be.’” Williams threw out the ceremonial first pitch at a recent UT baseball game as the public address announcer rattled off the statistics and accolades about his tenure that he simply views as a byproduct of “doing the right thing.” “It’s been a good career,” Williams said. “This university has done a lot of good for me, and hopefully I’ve done some good for this university.”

follow through with their promises.” Lindsay Lee, the presidential candidate from Amplify, hopes the debate will educate students and encourage them to care about issues that SGA can help with. “There is a crisis of apathy when it comes to SGA, demonstrated by the extremely low voter turnouts in the past,” Lee, a junior in mathematics, said. “Only about 10 percent of students voted in the campaign last year, and that was the highest it had been in a while. This event will definitely help take SGA out of the Shiloh Room of the UC and actually into the lives of the students it is supposed to serve.”

Beneath the ocean floor is a desolate place with no oxygen and sunlight. Yet microbes have thrived in this environment for millions of years. Scientists have puzzled over how these microbes survive, but today there are more answers. A study led by Karen Lloyd, an assistant professor of microbiology, reveals that these microscopic life-forms called archaea slowly eat tiny bits of protein. The study was released today in Nature. The core sample has just been brought up from the bottom of the Aarhus Bay and is being cut up. The researchers find archaea in the samples, which – to their great surprise – turn out to live on protein degradation. The finding has implications for understanding the bare minimum conditions needed to support life. “Subseafloor microbes are some of the most common organisms on earth,” Lloyd said. “There are more of them than there are stars or sand grains. If you go to a mud flat and stick your toes into the squishy mud, you’re touching these archaea. Even though they’ve literally been right under our noses for all of human history, we’ve never known what they’re doing down there.” Archaea are one of three life forms on earth, including bacteria and eukarya cells. Scientists are interested in archaea’s extreme way of life because it provides clues about the absolute minimum conditions required to sustain life as well as the global carbon cycle.

“Scientists had previously thought that proteins were only broken down in the sea by bacteria,” Lloyd said. “But archaea have now turned out to be important new key organisms in protein degradation in the seabed.” Proteins make up a large part of the organic matter in the seabed, the world’s largest deposit of organic carbon. To reveal the cells’ identities and way of life, Lloyd and her colleagues collected ocean mud containing the archaea cells from Aarhus Bay, Denmark. Then they pulled out four individual cells and sequenced their genomic DNA to discover the presence of the extracellular protein-degrading enzymes predicted in those genomes. “We were able to go back to the mud and directly measure the activity of these predicted enzymes,” Andrew Steen, another UT researcher and coauthor of the study, said. “I was shocked at how high the activities were.” This novel method opens the door for new studies by microbiologists. Scientists have been unable to grow archaea in the laboratory, limiting their studies to less than one percent of microorganisms. This new method allows scientists to study microorganisms directly from nature, opening up the remaining 99 percent to research. Lloyd collaborated with other researchers from UT, as well as, Aarhus University in Denmark, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences in Maine, Ribocon GmbH in Germany and the Max Planck Institute for Marine Biology in Germany.


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, April 2, 2013 Editor-in-Chief Blair Kuykendall

OPINIONS

bkuykend@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Letter Editor to the

Sex positive movement transforms norms In everyday language we talk about sex in two main ways. First, we discuss it as if it’s a bad thing, as if we should all be embarrassed if we’re interested in it. For example, jokes about sex are “dirty jokes” because as the thinking goes, sex is a dirty and shameful thing. People who wait to have sex, meanwhile, are described as “pure” and “resisting temptation.” Second, we discuss it as necessary to having a fulfilled life or to being an adult. For example, the phrase “made him a man” is often used when talking about a male losing his virginity. Both categorizations of sex are harmful: the first, because sex is a natural and quite often a very good thing; and the second, because it implies that everyone should have sex at some point and until that point, they are not fully human or fully adult. The sex positive movement has developed in recent years as a part of feminism to combat these harmful perceptions. As is so often the case, society’s treatment of sex as a negative thing stems from historical and political reasons. Many religions and philosophies, from Plato in ancient Greece, have taught that physical desires, including the desire for sex, are crude and animalistic. These desires, the idea goes, are in direct opposition to the “higher” parts of human beings, like rationality and spirituality, so they have to be resisted. This was in turn boosted by the politics of the Middle Ages, in which lineage was the main means of inheritance. Any number of political revolutions happened because someone insisted that they were the illegitimate son of a ruler, and the best way to avoid that was to criticize anyone who had illegitimate children. These political reasons combined with religious morality made premarital sex viewed very negatively. So, this all resulted in sex being viewed as a dirty thing, but also a natural and necessary thing, as long as it was performed only within

a certain context. This brings us to the sex positive movement. With recent events regarding “Sex Week” on our campus, the term “sex positive” has been thrown around a lot, so we want to clarify any misconceptions that people may have about what that means. Of course, the sex positive movement does not simply involve convincing everyone that having sex is always good. While mainstream society has always pushed the idea that sex is a negative thing, there are other kinds of pressures presented that encourage people to have sex for the wrong reasons. The sex positive movement works against these kinds of pressures, too. Everyone has the right to have their own perspective on sexuality and their own level of interest in sex. Just as no one should be made to feel dirty or wrong for being interested in sex, no one should be made to feel unnatural or prudish for not being willing or ready -- or for feeling that sex in general is not for them. The biggest thing that the sex positive movement works to fix is the way that society makes people embarrassed to talk about sex. Even when sex is erroneously seen as an essential, necessary part of human life, it’s seen as something crude, animalistic and embarrassing -- more like defecating than like, say, eating, both of which are legitimate essential parts of life. People are embarrassed to ask questions, to discuss their desires, or even to admit if sex isn’t something they desire at all. This shame and silence helps no one. The sex positive movement emphasizes that sex is a good thing, not an embarrassing thing, and that it’s something we should be able to talk about openly. — Kathleen Connely is a junior in philosophy. She can be reached at kconnely92@ gmail.com.

SCRAMBLED EGGS • Alex Cline

SOUTHERN GLAMOUR • Jacob Hobson

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Value contributions of your elders Lost in Communcation by

Jan Urbano For many of us, this week marks our preparation for point-blank exams and long nights and days in Hodges Library -- the place “where dreams are made.” As with every other holiday or break, we despair and lament when they come to an end, for obvious reasons. No longer can we sleep endlessly in our own beds, savor the taste of homemade cooking, or spend time playing video games in the company of childhood friends. Each person spends time on breaks differently, but these are the most common activities. Among these, however, spending time with family should be a top priority. I say this in response to a topic we all know about but avoid discussing openly: the elderly. I bring up this topic because of a story that I was told by my parents’ close friends. They relayed to me a sad story about a mother who was placed in a nursing home by her daughter. Although the daughter lived very close by and could have her mother live with her family, she still stuck by her decision to move her mother to a nursing home. When my parents’ close friends visited her mother at the nursing home, she told them that she was very lonely and depressed – her daughter rarely visited or called her. She wept when they came, however, overjoyed that she had people to finally talk and spend time with, despite how short it was. She even walked them to the entrance when they left, even though she was very old and has much difficulty in moving anywhere. Hearing this story made me think about my own parents, and the problems they face as they get older. Every day their eyesight gets a little dimmer, their bones and muscles get weaker and their minds gradually become more muddled. To treat your parents in such

a bad manner enrages me. There’s no doubt that many of us say we love our families, especially our parents. They are the ones who brought us into this world; they took care of us when we were defenseless, weak and fragile. Even now, they still continue to support and help us, even after we have left for college. However, over time, we may begin to slowly drift away from them. We all remember those rebellious years as teenagers, where we fought with our parents and attempted to establish our independence – this usually begins the disconnection we have with them. In college, being away from the house for months at a time also serves to further distance us from them, both spatially and figuratively. It’s a major event for our parents, who are so used to having the raucous noises of their sons and daughters in the house. Instead, they find themselves lonely, reminiscing on a past when their kids were still young and their health was much better. We also reminisce on the past when we were younger and enjoyed carefree and happy times with our parents, but we must accept the fact that those days have passed and can never be returned to us. We must treasure the amount of time, love and effort our parents used to make us successful, respectful young adults, as well as future parents. It seems only just that we repay our parents with the same love and effort that they gave to us by taking care of them when they, too, become weak and fragile in their later years. None of us wants to imagine a future where our parents, the foundations of our lives, are no longer there to hug and comfort us when we are sad, or help us up when we fall down and make a mistake. Until that day, though, love and honor your parents as much as you can now, because you will never know when such a treasure will suddenly disappear; you can’t have too much of their undying dedication and gratifying love. — Jan Urbano is a junior in biological sciences. He can be reached at jurbano@utk.edu.

Fear, ignorance plague UT (Un)Common Sense by

Ron Walters

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Blair Kuykendall

editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com

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The Daily Beacon is published by students at The University of Tennessee Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters and Tuesday and Friday during the summer semester. The offices are located at 1340 Circle Park Drive, 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The newspaper is free on campus and is available via mail subscription for $200/year, $100/semester or $70/summer only. It is also available online at: www.utdailybeacon.com. LETTERS POLICY: The Daily Beacon welcomes all letters to the editor and guest columns from students, faculty and staff. Each submission is considered for publication by the editor on the basis of space, timeliness and clarity. Contributions must include the author’s name and phone number for verification. Students must include their year in school and major. Letters to the editor and guest columns may be e-mailed to letters@utdailybeacon.com or sent to Blair Kuykendall, 1340 Circle Park Dr., 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The Beacon reserves the right to reject any submissions or edit all copy in compliance with available space, editorial policy and style. Any and all submissions to the above recipients are subject to publication.

I wanted to write about my anger regarding the recent “Sex Week” “scandal.” I wanted to be angry at UT’s administration for caring more about the opinions of a few state legislators than the desires of thousands of students that they are paid to theoretically protect. I wanted to write about how institutes of higher education should operate above the disgusting partisan scramble of politicians. I wanted to be incensed at state senator Stacey Campfield and his homophobic, ignorant, scared and antiquated opinions, and for using those opinions to bully our weak administration into pulling out of something “controversial.” I wanted to climb to the top of Ayres Tower, pull out a megaphone, and yell horrid obscenities about the Bible Belt, Tennessee’s religious convictions, and how a small percentage of the otherwise perfectly tolerant and loving Christian population wants to drag us back centuries, both scientifically and socially. I wanted to write a scathing condemnation of Fox News commentator Todd Starnes and his fear of everything that is not Christian, conservative, or red-blooded American. I wanted to indict syndicated bully Bill O’Reilly for inviting two ambitious and intelligent UT students onto his bully pulpit television show, only to belittle and insult them for holding different viewpoints than his own. I wanted to write about how Christians in a Christian-majority country that allows the free practice of all religions do not get to play the victim card and claim that their values are under attack from evil progressive secularists – I would have told them to ask a Sikh community member in Wisconsin, or a Muslim in New York City or Murfreesboro what it feels like to have their values attacked. I even could have written how the entire

furor caused by the “Sex Week” debate is the epitome of a first world problem and that of everyone involved: if commentators, legislators, and administrators, to ordinary students like us, displayed this much passion for eliminating poverty, or AIDS, or any of the scourges of humanity that we as citizens of the United States can ignore at our choosing, it could show how much good we could accomplish with our available resources. I could have discussed all this, could have worked myself into an indignant rage, but it would have served no greater purpose than to appease my own vanity. This production of anger and bitterness is the result of a far larger problem, one that has grown exponentially in the years since our generation has entered the adult world – fear of the unknown and those that are different and a willful and chosen ignorance of everything foreign, a purposeful decision made by influential policy makers to remain ignorant of anything uncomfortable. Fear has manifested itself as hate and a refusal to cooperate on a vast level, as a rejection of exploring anything that is too divergent from our good, honest, and traditional nuclear family “American” values, as a refusal to try anything new, as abhorrence to any sort of change. Acknowledgment of values different from one’s own in no way diminishes the importance of ones values, yet this is the new mode of thinking. Perhaps I’m too pessimistic. Perhaps Stacey Campfield and Fox News are modern Andy Kaufmans, and we are merely participants in the greatest troll experiment ever conducted. Or, perhaps, we as a society can get over our cosmically petty prejudices, fears, hatreds, doubts and dislikes, accept the fact that people will be different and that those differences are in no way reflections on our own values, and act like decent human beings. All this fear and ignorance is utterly exhausting and unsustainable. — Ron Walters is a senior in English literature, French, and global studies. He can be reached at rwalter5@utk.edu.


Tuesday, April 2, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Arts & Culture Editor Victoria Wright

ARTS & CULTURE

vwright6@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan

merdogan@utk.edu

Folk band stretches genre Victoria Wright Arts & Culture Editor

Musicians draw on a number of influences when creating their original sound, sometimes even stretching outside of their genre for inspiration. Cue folk-indie pop band Bombadil, natives of Durham, N.C. The group draws inspiration from a myriad of musical genres -- the Beatles, Led Zeppelin, The Kings and a healthy dose of Jay-Z, as drummer James Phillips put it. “We all like hip-hop a lot,� Phillips said. “I grew up in Baltimore and I grew up hearing hip-hop. We’re all about to turn 30 and we grew up in an era when it was building.� The group, comprised of Phillips, Stuart Robinson (piano and ukulele), Bryan Rahija (guitar) and Daniel Michalak (bass guitar) will play in Knoxville in the “Rhythm N’ Blooms Festival� on Friday, April 6 as a part of their tour to support the band’s new album, “Metrics of Affection.� It is the first time the group has toured since Michalak suffered a debilitating hand injury that left him temporarily unable to play. He said he found refuge in music, especially hip-hop, after a hand injury prevented him from playing the bass for a while. He made music by creating beats on GarageBand, the computer software for composing music, which gave him the ability to make original sounds and sing over them. “I was mad and depressed, and I felt hip-hop was an angry genre,� Michalak said. “I found solace in the music.� The album features a dose of hip-hop, with one particular song, “Isn’t It Funny,� a melodic, piano ballad with Michalak rapping some lyrics, about his friend’s struggle with an illness and his own hardship with his hand injury. Both Phillips and Michalak agreed on

the advent of computerized music becoming the new forefront for young musicians. Phillips explained that what was once acoustic guitar for folk music has now transformed into electronica for the 21st century. “Folk music was for the everyday person,� Phillips said. “Now any kid who has a laptop can get GarageBand or another source.� Such is how they have crafted the album currently in production that is set to be released July 23. The band recorded in a small house in Durham and used GarageBand as the main platform for the creation. Phillips said the sound has grown from the acoustic musical influences that was once the sound when they were recording in their dorm rooms at Duke University. Michalak said the tight quarters of the house made for some difficulties. “It had been the first time when we tried to balance moving back in and living with each other. Living in the same space can be difficult,� Michalak said. As for the music, Phillips and Michalak said the most enjoyable part of performing is the interaction. “(It’s) finding meaning in the music and connecting with people, whether it’s other people in my band or people we don’t know,� Michalak said. Phillips said the dynamic feeling of performing in front of an audience is hard to match and equated it only to playing a classical piece of music. “It’s great to have the audience interaction and see how the audience perceives your song,� Phillips said. “It’s just a great feeling — it’s hard to match. It’s pretty magical, I think.� Bombadil will play at Barley’s Taproom and Pizzeria at 200 E. Jackson Ave. on Friday at 10:15 p.m. To purchase tickets for their show and for other bands performing during the festival, visit rhythmnbloomsfest.com.

Obsessions can be healthy in moderation

Melodi Erodagan Assistant Arts & Culture Editor

I am a fan girl. To anyone who knew me in middle school, this is no surprise. After spending years as a tomboy who strictly talked about how annoying my older sister was, I eventually began obsessing over anything on the Disney Channel. It just so happened that the Jonas Brothers came to fame at the same time I was watching. Urbandictionary.com defines a fan girl as a person “that has devoted shrines in their closets and candle-lit ceremonies of worship� to whatever it was they were obsessed with. Granted, the “Urban Dictionary� is not always spot on with their definitions, but sometimes they can make a point. In my case, there were no candle-lit ceremonies, but I am guilty of hanging up posters of Kevin, Joe and Nick in my closet. The three brothers from New Jersey immediately became my life with the release of their first single, “S.O.S.� The song (which I admittedly still let play if it comes up on my iPod’s shuffle) gave my pubescent, preteen life meaning. Their lyrical genius, like “Hugs are overrated just

FYI,� obviously resonated with me because I was, and this is putting it lightly, obsessed. My “Disney Channel� phase exploded into an entire lifestyle after I discovered my love for the Jonases. Before long, the posters had escaped my closet, covering my walls. I forced my poor mother to pay overpriced fees for “Bop� and “Tiger Beat� magazines, carefully unlatching the staples from the centerfold posters in order to save my sweet Joe’s face from unnecessary puncture. I know what you’re thinking: I was a monster. And it’s unfortunately true, my life revolved around everything those three brothers did. If I wasn’t talking about them, I was probably asleep dreaming about them. Looking back, it’s sad to admit that I spent three years obsessing over three kids who, despite being moderately cute, are mediocre musicians. Plus, now that Kevin is married, no one cares about him. (Besides his wife, who ever actually did?) Today, I am able to laugh off my obsession as if I had accidentally left the bathroom with toilet paper stuck to my shoe, but those moments when I realize the toilet paper trails behind my feet still leave me blushing. When I come across remnants of my past, like an old T-shirt with Joe’s face on it or a Jonas Brothers embossed pen I used to pray to keep forever, I feel a little shame. My obsession is embarrassing, but still, I’d like to think it shaped me into the person I am today. No longer do I stalk fan pages online or threaten my mom for

silly magazines. Rather, I practice my fan girlness in a healthy moderation with nothing too intense. Boy bands still have a place in my heart (looking at you, One Direction), but I am too busy and too focused on school and work to worry about every date of their world tour or whether they wear boxers or briefs. I will openly admit to being OK with having an arranged marriage with Zayn Malik (OK, I just did), but beyond that there is not much more to my 1D “obsession,� if you can even call it that. Let’s be honest here, everyone is obsessed with something, whether it’s the Jonas Brothers, manga comics, Justin Bieber, Chacos, pizza or Quentin Tarantino films. I think a healthy obsession with anything is fine, just don’t overdo it. You don’t want to be the person who idolized the Jonas Brothers so much that people remind them of it every day. Trust me. With their new single, “Pom Poms,� being released Tuesday, the JoBros seem to be kick-starting their career after three years of laying low. I may or may not stay up late Monday night to hear the song; I can’t help my curiosity. I will always secretly wish I had met them at a meetand-greet because I was almost positive one of them would fall in love with me. But for now, all I can do is wish them all the best in their future endeavors, as a mature fan girl would. — Melodi Erdogan is a freshman in journalism and electronic media. She can be reached at merdogan@utk.edu.

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NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD â&#x20AC;˘ Will Shortz ACROSS 1 Sporty car introduced in â&#x20AC;&#x2122;55 6 Italian lawn bowling 11 Urgent dispatch 14 Alaskaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ___ Peninsula 15 Hank with the retired #44 16 Tax season busy bee, for short 17 Where â&#x20AC;&#x153;we can make it if we run,â&#x20AC;? per Bruce Springsteen (1975) 19 Spanish king 20 Grabbed a chair 21 Take captive 22 Tennessee ___ 24 Where â&#x20AC;&#x153;the nights are stronger than moonshine,â&#x20AC;? per America (1972) 28 Before, to Kipling 29 Pass perfectly 30 â&#x20AC;&#x153;For real!â&#x20AC;? 31 Dry Italian wine 34 Bit of Indian music 36 The class of â&#x20AC;&#x2122;13 in â&#x20AC;&#x2122;13, e.g.

37 Where â&#x20AC;&#x153;all the people that come and go stop and say hello,â&#x20AC;? per the Beatles (1967) 40 N.F.L. scores 43 Finish line 44 Doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t budge 47 Figure in the tale of Jason and the Argonauts 49 Pep 51 Corruption 52 Where â&#x20AC;&#x153;we gonna rock down to,â&#x20AC;? per Eddy Grant (1983) 56 Dessert that may include a banana 57 One of the Bobbsey twins 58 Campersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; campers, for short 60 Stashed away 61 Where â&#x20AC;&#x153;youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll drink the night away and forget about everything,â&#x20AC;? per Gerry Rafferty (1978) 65 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Peer Gyntâ&#x20AC;? widow

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46 Former Supreme Court justice often seen in a bow tie 48 Calculator screen abbr. 50 American avantgardist 53 Enjoys literature 54 ___ deferens 55 Step inside 59 Eye irritation 62 Ring wallops, informally 63 Org. that monitors oil spills 64 Baseball stat


6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, April 2, 2013 Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell

SPORTS

lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Vols fall to ‘Dores in series finale Staff Reports

Tennessee fought off No. 3 Vanderbilt three times before a seventh-inning grand slam by Kyle Smith gave the Commodores the lead and propelled them to a 12-8 victory in the series finale on Easter Sunday at Hawkins Field. Scott Price led a 16-hit offensive effort by the Orange and White, going a perfect 4-for-4 with three RBIs and a walk. Will Maddox, Vincent Jackson and A.J. Simcox all had three hits for the Vols as well, with Simcox driving in a pair of runs and scoring two more. UT’s record returns to .500 for the year at 13-13, including a 3-6 mark in SEC play while the third-ranked Commodores improve to 25-4 overall and 8-1 in league play. Tennessee tagged Vanderbilt starter Philip Pfiefer for two runs early in the contest before a rain delay forced the game to be suspended for 15 minutes. The Vols used four singles and a sac bunt to jump out to the quick lead with Simcox driving in the first two runs of the game with a Baltimore Chop off the turf and over the third

baseman’s head into left for a two-RBI single. Maddox then punched a base hit into right and promptly stole second to put two runners in scoring position before the game was halted. Although a second out was quickly added to the scoreboard when play resumed, Price laced a line-drive single to left to plate two more runs and make it a 4-0 Tennessee advantage. The lead was short-lived for the Big Orange, however, as Vanderbilt put up a four-spot of its own in the bottom of the third to tie the game back up at 4-4. Tennessee battled its way back in front with two runs in the fourth thanks to a VU error and Price’s third hit of the day, a two-out RBI single right back up the middle. UT handed one of those runs right back in the home half of the inning though with a walk, error and a wild pitch. The Commodores would then use another walk and a hit batter to load the bases with just one out but Andy Cox was able to buckle down and strikeout the three- and four-hole hitters for VU to escape without any further damage.

Tennessee gift-wrapped another run for VU in the fifth with an error, a passed ball, a sac bunt and a wild pitch bringing the game back to a deadlock at 6-6. The Vol offense refused to let the miscues faze their efforts and put Tennessee back out in front for the third time with a sacrifice fly by Pierce Bily in the sixth and a run-scoring single by David Houser in the seventh. That would be the last time they would lead, however, as Smith launched a grand slam to left in the seventh to give Vanderbilt the advantage for the first time all day. The Commodores then tacked on two more insurance runs in the eighth to account for the game’s final score. The Big Orange made things interesting in the top of the ninth, using a pair of singles and a walk to load the bases and bring the tying run to the plate with two outs, but a pop up to short ended the game and the series. Tennessee will open a four-game homestand at 3 p.m. Tuesday when it hosts Longwood back at Lindsey Nelson Stadium in Knoxville.

Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon

UT forward Taber Spani attempts a layup against Baylor’s Brittany Griner on Nov. 27, 2011. Griner’s career came to an unexpected halt when the Bears lost to Louisville in the Sweet Sixteen round on Sunday.

Baylor’s fall hands Lady Vols hope Lauren Kittrell Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon

Christin Stewart runs around the bases during the Missouri game on March 22.

Sports Editor Going into Selection Monday, Tennessee Lady Vol head coach Holly Warlick was pretty positive the team would end up being a No. 3 seed in the Women’s NCAA Tournament. On March 19, the Lady Vols were named a No. 2 seed and placed in the Oklahoma City region. In the midst of much celebration, one obstacle loomed in the mind of every coach, player and fan. Baylor’s star player Brittney Griner. There’s a lot of controversy revolving around the female dunking sensation who is Griner. From her 6-foot8 body to her protruding “Adam’s apple” and baritone voice, haters hate with a vengeance, but maybe that’s not where their argument should begin. There’s no denying her talent on the court. Griner

averaged 23.8 points and 9.42 rebounds per game. She was the team’s leader and the program was built around her. With Griner, Baylor went 34-2 overall, 18-0 in their conference and 17-0 at home this season. They were a decided No. 1 seed for the tournament and lacked no confidence that they would end up at the championship. In fact, during the Selection Monday coverage, Griner was asked what team she thought would have a chance to put Baylor in their place. Her answer? The Miami Heat. I would have liked to see Lebron’s chuckling face when he heard that. Now, her confidence in her own ability and in her team’s ability to support her seems a little out of place. Her season is over. Her collegiate basketball career has ended and not on a good note. The team fell 82-81 to No. 5 Louisville in the Oklahoma City Region semifinals. Griner didn’t score a basket until the second half. Lady Vol senior Taber Spani said it best. “Everyone knows and respects Baylor and we all know they’re a great team, but we also believe in who we are and what we can do,” Spani

said. “They call it ‘March Madness’ for a reason. You never know what’s gonna happen.” The madness happened, pride went before the fall and now Baylor and their Grinercentered team is no longer a threat. The Lady Vols still have a tough road ahead, but with Baylor out of the way, the road seems a bit smoother. While Baylor may have experienced some success with Griner at the helm (OK, a lot of success), no team is flawless when based on the talent of one player. That player is always vulnerable to mistakes, and they generally happen when they least expect it. A team focused on a specific player faces the dangers of injury, bad days and mistakes that can be the means to an unsuccessful end. That’s why teams are teams. It’s been said before, but there’s no “I” in team, and Griner, her teammates and her coaches seemed to forget that. Sunday night was an unhappy reminder for them. Unfortunately, it came all too late. —Lauren Kitrell is a senior in journalism and electronic media. She can be reached at lkitrell1@utk.edu

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