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Thursday, March 27, 2014

Issue 50, Volume 125

utdailybeacon.com

PART 2 OF 2

Local skateboarders saddled with ‘absurd’ laws When Knoxville debuted its first skatepark at Tyson Park in 2008, local skateboarders finally had a place to go. The development of the skatepark brought forth legal problems that skateboarders still face today regarding safety, preservation of parks, and rules and regulations. The following is a continuation of part one of “A walk in the (skate)park,” printed in

SEE

Wednesday’s edition of The Daily Beacon. … And the Law Won Brian Beauchene, owner of Pluto Sports, a store located off Cedar Bluff Road that specializes in skateboards, snowboards and discs, was a major advocate for the creation of the Knoxville Skatepark and an overall supporter of skateboarding in Knoxville. But he also noted that many boarders prefer what he calls street skating, “where it’s more natural, more of that surfer feel.”

“When you’re at a skatepark, it’s a little fabricated; it’s made for you,” Beauchene said. “It takes away some of the rawness of skateboarding, so there are some guys who are just like street purists and don’t go to skateparks, and they go to places maybe they shouldn’t be skating.” This preference for “street skating,” Beauchene noted, causes more problems than skating at a skatepark. “Then, they get busted or they get hassled and get kicked out.” Beauchene listed the Women’s

Basketball Hall of Fame and UT’s campus as two spots skateboarders tend to frequent; he said it’s normal for them to get hassled out of these locations. “Security guards tell them to leave, and then they come back on Sunday when no one is there.” In 2011, three years after the Knoxville skatepark opened, there was a deadly accident involving a White Pine teenager, Calvin Kelley, 16, who hit his head while skateboarding sans helmet. He suffered major inju-

ries and passed away nine days after the accident. Posted in two different places at the Knoxville skatepark, the consequences for any person skating without a helmet would be the minimum $75 fine. Although aware of possible injuries, Erik Phillips, Knoxville resident and seasoned skateboarder, said he used to go to the skatepark all the time until police officers started hassling him and his friends about wearing helmets. See SKATEBOARDING on Page 2

Seniors face post-grad plans • Graphic Courtesy of Dillon Canfield

Melodi Erdogan Managing Editor

INSIDE

Volapalooza: How the campus concert comes together NEWS >>pg. 3

Happy Holler antique shop dusts off unique trinkets

ARTS & CULTURE >>pg. 6

This graph denotes the companies who hired the most interns and full time employees from UT.

Emilee Lamb Assistant News Editor It’s the beginning of the end. As summer looms ahead, so does the “real” world, and, for graduating seniors, the dreaded question: “What are you going to do after graduation?” Kristin Ballenger, senior in College Scholars, already knows her answer. Having spent her time at UT crafting a degree focused on financing and education in Title I schools – educational programs that give extra attention and assistance to academically at-risk students – Ballenger will walk across

the stage to Phoenix as a member of the 2014 Teach for America corps. Through participation in TFA, Ballenger will hold a full-time teaching position while simultaneously working toward a master’s degree in elementary education as a full-time student at Arizona State University. “The major I was creating through College Scholars just fit right in line with Teach for America and what they did and the schools they taught because I wanted to teach low-income students,” Ballenger said. “I thought it was a perfect fit for me to dive right in to teach in the schools that I created my major around.” Career Services Director

Russ Coughenour maintains early planning always proves indispensable as students transition to post-graduate life. “We feel if we can interact with the student in the freshman and certainly in the sophomore year, we can kind of plan a strategy with them,” Coughenour said. “The idea would be to have an end in mind: What do you want to become? What do you want to do?” Yet, approximately 75 percent of college students change their major at least once during their time in university, according to a statistic cited in a Pennsylvania State University academic advising journal.

Jennifer Nguyen, senior in psychology, originally planned to attend medical school to practice clinical psychology before encountering organic chemistry. Next fall, she will instead begin her graduate school career as a student of UT’s Master’s of Social Work program. “When I realized I had a passion for mental health, I had to talk to my adviser about my options if I didn’t want to go and Ph.D.,” she said. “She explained to me that the MSW program would allow me to practice clinically and do everything a clinical psychologist does.” See GRADUATION on Page 3

Students say racy music amplifies rape culture Jenna Butz Staff Writer As “Blurred Lines” made its way to the top of last summer’s charts, controversy arose with it. As more organizations across the world from students to feminists worked to ban the song, the awareness of rape culture grew. Marshall University’s Women’s Center defines rape culture as “an environment in which rape is prevalent and in which sexual violence against women is normalized and excused in the media and popular culture.” Now, there is widespread debate over whether such music really impacts rape and sexual assault cases and leads to a skewed idea of sexual expectations, particularly in students. A member of Sexual Empowerment and Awareness at Tennessee, Nicky Hackenbrack, junior in biochemistry and cellular and molecular biology, thinks certain songs are capable of helping the growth of rape culture. Citing songs such as “Blurred Lines” by Robin Thicke, “Talk Dirty” by Jason Derulo and “Gorillas” by Bruno Mars, she believes the main reason these songs do so is because of their depiction of women. “Songs that facilitate rape culture don’t give women choice about their sexual behaviors and talk about women as physical creatures,” Hackenbrack said. “For example, Beyoncé is incredibly sexual in her new album, but she has total control on how she represents herself. This distinction is important to make and difficult to spot.” Similarly, Jodi RightlerMcDaniels, a Ph.D. candidate and graduate teaching associate in journalism and electronic media, agrees that the messages of rape culture in popular music stems from the representation of women in such songs. RightlerMcDaniels is a critical-cultural scholar who deals with race, gender and sexuality representations in the media, putting her in a position to constantly question media images. See RAPE CULTURE on Page 5

SPORTS >>pg. 7

Softball ‘doing all the small things right’ early on in conference play SPORTS >>pg. 8

Against the wall, Vols battle from bubble to Sweet 16 Steven Cook Copy Editor The bright lights of the NCAA tournament almost blinded Tennessee beyond recovery as its improbable Sweet 16 run was in its infancy. Missing their first eight shots, the Volunteers allowed Iowa to jump out to a 16-4 lead in last Wednesday’s play-in game. Desperately needing momentum heading into a TV timeout, Jordan McRae nailed an ill-advised 3-pointer. Iowa ran down, missed a three of its own, and McRae finished for a layup on the other end. Down seven points that felt more like 20, the Vols’ fate at that point was headed in one of two directions: fail to bounce back from a horrible start and spend the rest of Spring Break in Knoxville or gut out a vic-

tory and see what happens in Raleigh, N.C. The Vols have outscored their last three opponents 238179 — a 59-point difference — since that timeout. “I do think it was nerves the first 10 minutes of that game,” coach Cuonzo Martin said Tuesday. “Just, ‘Man, we are in the NCAA tournament.’ We didn’t flow right defensively. We lost assignments. “And then once we settled down and especially got that thing in overtime, we started to play well and we’ve been playing well ever since.” Ever since, the Vols have “stone-cold stunned” everyone in sight as one of the main surprises of the Big Dance. Their laid-back approach led to a 19-point win over six-seed Massachusetts before they crushed 14-seed Mercer. See MEN’S BASKETBALL on Page 7

Wade Rackley • Tennessee Athletics

Vols still searching for methods to speed up to an SEC level

Junior forward Jarnell Stokes goes for a layup in the Vols’ 83-63 victory over the Mercer Bears in the second round of the NCAA tournament at the PNC Arena in Raleigh, N.C., on March 23. UT will take on Michigan in the Sweet 16 on Friday at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis at 7:15 p.m.

INSIDE THE DAILY BEACON

@UTKDailyBeacon www.utdailybeacon.com

“The trip had done something to me, scratched an itch I never thought I had, replaced a puzzle piece I never noticed was gone.” OPINIONS >>pg. 4

News Opinions Arts & Culture Sports

Page 2-3 Page 4 Page 5-6 Page 7-8


2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, March 27, 2014 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb

elamb1@utk.edu

SKATEBOARDING continued from Page 1

“I

personally believe, when you turn 18, you can decide to fight in the army and die for this country, but you can’t make a decision as small as (wearing a helmet)?”

Melodi Erdogan• The Daily Beacon

-Erik Phillips

Charles Albert Raybreeben, 20, practices at Tyson Park, Knoxville’s lone official skating facility, on March 11. Raybreeben said he hones his craft with aspirations of becoming a professional skateboarder in the future.

“I personally believe, when you turn 18, you can decide to fight in the army and die for this country, but you can’t make a decision as small as (wearing a helmet)?” Phillips said. “I think that’s a little absurd.” Charles Albert Raybreeben, 20, a Knoxville native who aspires to go professional in skateboarding, shared that sentiment. But Raybreeben also said he has experienced tough hits he was able to walk away from because he was wearing a helmet. Still, he said he believes once a person is of age, they should be able to make the decision on whether or not to wear a helmet. Getting hassled by cops, helmet or not, encourages some skateboarders to return to specific spots. “It kind of pushes me more,” Brandon Adams, skateboarder and Knoxville resident, said. “It’s not that I dislike authority, it’s because you’re telling me that I can’t do something that I want to do. “It doesn’t limit the skill level; it just limits the accessibility of where you can skate.” To get in a day of skating, Phillips will park his car at Tyson Park and skate around the city. Since he’s on the go most of the time, he avoids the police, and if he runs into one, he’ll go a direction they won’t be able to keep up with, he said. “The cops around here,” Phillips said, “they got a lot more going on than just messing with us.” Adams has gotten four tickets for skateboarding. Philips has seven. “You can’t ticket someone for riding their bike or for riding their scooter,” Adams said. “On a bike you can do the same things you do on a skateboard, it’s just on a bike. The signs that say no skateboarding don’t say no bikes or no scooters, it always says no skateboarding, specifically.” Boarding on Rocky Top In 2007, in an effort to reduce noise pollution in Presidential Courtyard, a Freshman Council bill was passed that enforces quiet hours from 9 p.m. to 9 a.m. Skateboarders and BMX bikers were direct targets of this bill, especially since renovations to Presidential Courtyard were scheduled in the near future. An April 18, 2007, Daily Beacon article quoted skateboarders and BMX athletes who felt the bill was a “direct

attack on their sport.” One source cited how major sports have stomping grounds on campus, but that skateboarders have no place to go. Another expressed interest in creating and joining a club on campus to establish more of a foundation for the sport, but said they didn’t have time to create one. Sgt. Cedric Roach of UTPD’s Community Relations Unit said skateboarding is fine as a mode of transportation on campus – with or without a helmet – but students’ safety is in question when they start practicing tricks. “If you’re on the sidewalk and you’re skating down the sidewalk, it’s just like walking,” Roach said. “There’s no rule against skateboarding. “The rules come in play when you are doing tricks and things like that, grinding on rails and things like that around campus.” Doing tricks on campus, Roach said, can cause damage to university property and put students at risk. He noted this also brings into question who would be accountable in a situation where a student gets hurt skateboarding on campus. “Who is responsible?” Roach asked. “Is the university responsible or is that person responsible?” There is no mention of skateboarding in UT’s Hilltopics Student Handbook. The RecSports Participant Policy Handbooks, however, states much of what Roach outlined. “The use of skateboards/rollerblades is allowed on campus if being used for transportation,” the handbook states. “Anyone performing stunts or tricks on benches, curbs, etc., in or around RecSports facilities will be asked to stop and leave the area. If the individual or group does not cooperate, UTPD will be called for assistance.” If a UTPD officer approaches a skateboarder on campus, Roach said the officer would advise them when they are in unauthorized areas and tell them doing tricks on university property is not permitted. Founder and President of The Longboard Club at UT, known as LBC@UT, Jacob Revetta, senior in civil and environmental engineering, said he has had a different experience. “After I started the club I would literally just tell them that we’re a UT club and they would go away. Before I started the club, it would be hit or miss,” Revetta said. “Police have never been fond of skateboarders, so when they see a bunch of people skating a garage, they usually tell us to get out.” Developed about a year ago, LBC@UT is looking to change

its name to Skate UT to encompass the preference of skaters on campus and to create more of a “community rather than a club,” Revetta said. The group frequents places like Cherokee Farm, the Fort and campus garages like G-10 by Neyland and G-13, ironically the same structure that houses the UTPD. Originally from the mainly flat terrain of Franklin, Tenn., Revetta describes UT as a perfect campus for long boarding, specifically because “it’s a hill no matter which way you go.” Knoxville’s topography may be perfect for skating, but Revetta said he doesn’t see it becoming much of an influence on the UT athletics department. “When it comes to skating from point A to point B, it’s considered legal, but … you’re not allowed to be on the streets and things like that,” he said. “If there was a long boarding mecca, I definitely think people would go there, but I don’t really see that being mainstream enough to happen.” LBC@UT has about 20 active members, with more than 40 students involved. New members, Revetta said, are always welcome to join. On the board Revetta describes the stereotype associated with skateboarders as people who say “dude,” wear ripped jeans and drop out of school. As far as his club goes, none of those are accurate. “It goes back to the police officer deal, they stereotype us as skateboarders that are going to go out and vandalize places and spray paint stuff, but like I said, we don’t do that ever,” Revetta said. “It’s definitely one reason why it’s looked down upon.” Philips said he thinks the people who skateboard have been misrepresented in terms of the sport. “I don’t think it’s the skating; I think it’s just the people who skate,” he said. “People just incorporate it with dirty, bad people. Of course, there’s bad in everything, but I think it’s good. “There will be people biking around and people on scooters, but you’ll be skating and be singled out.” Adams shared that sentiment, expressing his dislike of what skateboarders are usually associated with. “Skateboarding, it’s an individual thing,” Adams said. “If people would actually sit down and talk to one of us rather than just say that we’re a punk because we skate. … As much trouble as this gets me in, it keeps me out of more trouble playing around town.” “We’re just staying out of the streets and the business area,” Phillips added, “and even more trouble.”


Thursday, March 27, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS GRADUATION continued from Page 1 As Coughenour explained, finding a job is a balancing act between preference and availability. “As professional counselors that are sort of classically trained, we want to, as best we can, recognize where the student’s skills and interests and values lie,” he said. “If a student is interested in a degree in an area that’s not very much in demand at the entry level, we do have discussion about availability of jobs in that field.” While Coughenour expressed

an optimistic view of the job market for college graduates, students with degrees in nursing, education, supply chain management and accounting are needed most. In the 2012-13 academic year, employers that hired the highest numbers of UT graduates included 21st Mortgage Corporation with 31 hires, PhysAssist Scribes with 23, and Amazon and Oak Ridge National Labs/UT-Battelle with 21 hires each. Coughenour encouraged students approaching their final days at UT to take immediate advantage of job recruiting opportunities. Career Services

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb

elamb1@utk.edu

hosts multiple job fairs in both the fall and the spring semesters, bringing more than 600 companies to campus in search of fresh employees. Career Services also holds a virtual job fair in early April each year, providing one more opportunity to secure employment before graduation. But good things don’t always come to those who wait. “There’s no magic dust we can sprinkle on them,” Coughenour said. “They’ve missed all the major job fairs, they’ve missed the on-campus recruiting season. We have to just start over with a new strategy with that particular student.”

Noreen Premji • The Daily Beacon

Around Rocky Top

Sylvia Duluc-Silva, graduate student in sociology, discusses food justice and activism as part of Human Rights week at the I-House on Tuesday evening.

Turkish court orders freeze on Twitter ban Associated Press ANKARA, Turkey — A Turkish court ordered the telecommunications authority to restore access to Twitter on Wednesday, issuing an injunction five days after the government blocked access to the social network. The ban came shortly after Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan threatened to “rip out the roots” of Twitter, which has been a conduit for links to recordings suggesting government corruption. Turkey holds crucial local elections Sunday, widely regarded as a referendum on Erdogan’s rule. The telecommunications authority had accused Twitter of disobeying Turkish court orders to remove content. The move drew international criticism and many Turkish users flouted the ban, finding immediate ways to circumvent it. President Abdullah Gul tweeted his oppo-

sition to the blockage. Deputy Prime Minister Bulent Arinc told reporters the telecommunications authority would obey Wednesday’s court decision when it received official notice, but reserved the right to appeal. A government official said, however, the authority had 30 days in which to implement the court’s decision. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because she wasn’t authorized to speak publicly on the issue. Twitter said, meanwhile, that it had also filed petitions to several Turkish courts, seeking an overturn of the ban. “Millions of people in Turkey who turn to Twitter to make their voices heard are being kept from doing just that,” Twitter general counsel Vijaya Gadde said in a statement posted on the company’s blog. Gadde said two of three court orders cited by Turkish authorities as reason for the shutdown were related to content that vio-

lated Twitter’s own rules — and had been removed. The third, however, related to accusations of corruption into a former minister and was being challenged in court. The administrative court in Ankara based its decision on the principles of freedom of expression and the right to communication freely, as cited in Turkey’s Constitution and the European Convention on Human Rights, the state-run Anadolu Agency reported. Erdogan remained defiant. During an election rally in northern Turkey, Erdogan accused opposition parties or media who criticized the Twitter ban of being the “advocate of companies who don’t recognize Turkey’s laws and treat Turkey as a Third World country.” Lawyers, opposition parties and journalists groups asked courts to overturn the ban, arguing it was illegal and unconstitutional.

Fitz and The Tantrums, a 6-year-old indie pop band hailing from Los Angeles, will headline this year’s Volapalooza on April 25.

Volapalooza works toward bringing best bang for buck Jenna Butz Staff Writer It takes 21 students and $63,000 to make Volapalooza happen. The annual concert, held each April on the last day of classes, is the largest studentorganized event on campus. Money handed down from the University Programs and Services Fee Funding Board to the Central Programming Council’s Volapalooza Event Planners committee funds everything from staging and lighting to hospitality and artists’ fees. “Sponsorships and rollover revenue can potentially add to this baseline, but none of that is guaranteed,” Anna Walsh, junior in biology and committee chair of Volapalooza Event Planners, said. “If we don’t break even or garner sponsorships, then all we have is the minimum given by CPC.” Restricted by the current budget, Walsh said the committee struggles to provide a performer “that satisfies the desires of the students.” “Most other groups start with a budget that, to a certain extent,

matches community expectations for what they are able to bring to campus,” Keith Becklin, assistant director for the Office of Student Activities, said. “On the other hand, Volapalooza is expected to bring in huge names, which comes with huge price tags, which is something we can’t match.” This spring’s Volapalooza lineup is Fitz and The Tantrums with The Dirty Guv’nahs and The Delta Saints, breaking from the tone of previous years. Student feedback and ideas from the committee sparked this shift in atmosphere. “We chose this year’s artists because they fit with the results of the survey that was sent out by the Office of Student Activities,” Walsh said. “Another aspect that went into choosing these artists was the committee’s wish to change Volapalooza from what it has been in the past few years. We wanted to have a cohesive sound on the stage this year.” Ultimately, the committee strived to match student expectations with an act within the event’s allotted budget. “The key is finding a good lineup at the right price,” Becklin said. “We can’t please everyone,

but we can do a better job of pleasing more people over the course of their four years at UT.” Despite the scale of this undertaking, Becklin said he views the limited size of the Event Planners committee as an advantage. “I wouldn’t want to see the committee expand beyond the current capacity,” Becklin said. “We have great members that are passionate about the event and music, but growing beyond the current size can actually hinder speed and agility of making decisions. If anything, the committee may benefit from fewer members. “That being said, this is a student-run committee that makes their own decisions with staff guidance.” David Brown, senior in environmental studies and member of the Volapalooza committee, has enjoyed his role in coordinating the event from its earliest stages of brainstorming to its current preparations. “Everybody loves the entertainment industry,” Brown said, “and to be responsible for the final event on UT’s campus is a really big deal. “It’s just a great experience.”

Summer SCHOOL MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR SUMMER!

smaller classes calmer campus shorter terms

Stay on track to graduate. summer.utk.edu


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, March 27, 2014 Editor-in-Chief R.J. Vogt

OPINIONS

rvogt@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Alternative Spring Break refreshes Volunteer spirit Knight Errant by

Victoria Knight Climbing up makeshift steps and over unsteady rocks, we brushed against itchy green leaves; while cleansing water droplets fell on our skin, we followed a strange and yet familiar man as he guided us through the depths of the rainforest. That’s where I found myself a little over a week ago, when I spent my Spring Break in the beautiful country of Jamaica along with 10 other students, a fellow trip leader, a graduate student and a staff member on an International Alternative Spring Break Trip. Sponsored by the Center for Leadership and Service, the Alternative Break program is in its 21st year and allows students to sacrifice their Fall and Spring Breaks to go serve in an area of need in a community outside of Knoxville. A self-proclaimed veteran of the program (this was my third trip, second I co-lead), it was nothing like what I expected, and yet still everything I had hoped it could be. When I initially got back, I felt like something was missing. The trip had done something to me, scratched an itch I never thought I had, replaced a puzzle piece I never noticed was gone. After a few days, I’ve finally put it together – what this trip had done for me was tie together all of the mismatched, frayed and loose ends of my college career. It had woven together the unknowns, questions, possibilities, hopes and, of course, dreams, of a starry-eyed, 22-year-old, about-to-begraduated college senior. The experience had managed to do all of that in a week simply by showing me another part of the world. In our own community, we become desensitized to both the beauty and the harshness of the environment around us. Both the glint of the sun on the Sunsphere and the homeless man asking for change on the corner disappear because they are part of our daily lives. But when we go somewhere new, that routine crumbles away. The complexities of both the ugly and the beautiful are freshly examined and conclusions, suggestions, and solutions come out. Because I was in Jamaica, I finally understood: How an industry centered on the gratification of others can exploit and impoverish the people who work in it — the people who the land truly belongs to. How the simplest things, such as getting rid of the bag of trash in your apartment at the end of the day, can become complicated in a country with different resources. How I am privileged, and though I can feel guilty because of that privilege, how it is more useful to instead use my privilege for the greater good of others. How it is possible to learn the most from the people you serve and from the people who you lead. And how we can all still respect and love each other, despite differences in opinion. How letting go of the constant technology and talking to only those present can be liberating, even if it is only for a week. How the Western perspective on what a community needs or wants is not necessarily what that community needs or wants. In reality, these were all things I knew inside of me before I left for the trip but the new perspective helped me develop. I’m not saying we have to travel to do this, but it may help. Get out of the bubble of our comfort zones and experience the world in a new way, in any way really, that challenges our assumptions and disproves our stereotypes. These thoughts consumed me as I followed that strange and yet familiar man on our hike in the Jamaican rainforest. Though the terrain was unfamiliar, we could follow along thanks to the light from his bamboo torch. Our Jamaican torchbearer demonstrated to us what we always knew: one who shadows oneself to give light to others is really the most valuable player on the team. Without him, they would be lost to wander in the dark. Perhaps then, the most valuable thing and what I ultimately learned was the Volunteer spirit is not just confined to our university walls. It can be found anywhere, in anyone who bears the proverbial torch, whether that may be in the rainforest of Jamaica or the halls of UT. Victoria Knight is a senior in microbiology. She can be reached at vknight4@utk.edu.

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Knoxville isn’t a college town or a big city, it’s home Uncommon Sense by

Evan Ford Over this Spring Break, I realized Knoxville is home. Like most of us, I was pretty sick and tired of Knoxville by the time break rolled around and desperate to leave — and that’s just what I did. I was lucky enough to be playing some music over the break and got to travel around to other college towns, stopping briefly in Charlotte, Chapel Hill, Memphis and Oxford. Students at each of these towns told a similar story: There’s no town quite like ours, the weather here is crazy, it’s not perfect, but it’s a great place to be young and in college. And as I listened to each of these students talk about their college town, I realized I feel the same way about Knoxville. But Knoxville isn’t the same as Oxford or Chapel Hill. When school is out in Oxford, Miss., the town goes into hibernation. The endless streams of girls in baggy T-shirts and boys in button downs aren’t there to walk the streets and buy from their businesses. And Chapel Hill wouldn’t even be on a map without the University of North Carolina calling it home. That’s what makes these places college towns – they revolve around their colleges. Memphis or Charlotte, on the other hand,

Editor-in-Chief: R.J. Vogt Managing Editor: Melodi Erdogan Chief Copy Editor: Gage Arnold News Editor: Hanna Lustig Asst. News Editor: Emilee Lamb Sports Editor: Troy Provost-Heron Asst. Sports Editor: Dargan Southard Arts & Culture Editor: Claire Dodson Asst. Arts & Culture Editor: Cortney Roark Online Editor: Samantha Smoak

So what does this mean to us as students? Why should we care about the fact we live in a “college city”? Personally, I view it as the best of both worlds. You can have the community of a campus with (sort of) the cultural diversity of a city. If you take a stop in the Old City, you’ll run into professionals and artists as well as your friends from school. Living in a city like Knoxville also presents us with a responsibility to engage with our community. This can mean volunteering and working at one of the many non-profits that benefit the Knoxville area. It can also mean things as simple as voting to protect our rights — Beacon columnist Wade Scofield already pointed out that if the student body all voted against Stacey Campfield, he’d lose by a landslide. This is especially relevant as upperclassmen start making decisions as to where to live next year. Knoxville already has a lot going for it — it’s incredibly cheap to live here, and the community is comfortable and vibrant. These are good reasons to stay in Knoxville. But the main reason I’m thinking about staying in Knoxville is that Knoxville actually cares I exist. I can be more than just a drop in the bucket, but still live in (pretty much) a city. That’s why I think Knoxville is one of a kind, and that’s why it feels like home. Evan Ford is a junior in philosophy. He can be reached at eford6@utk.edu.

Societal ignorance is why people can’t ‘just stop being poor’ Dean’s List by

Katie Dean Two weeks ago, when I first saw the video of Aasif Mandvi annihilating Fox Business commentator Todd Wilemon on “The Daily Show,” I thought it was possibly the funniest thing I had ever seen. If you haven’t watched it yet, you’re definitely missing out. In the segment, Mandvi discusses the possible outcomes of the Affordable Care Act with Wilemon, who insists the ACA will result in a third-world quality health care system in which the lines are longer and “people may have to bring their own sheets.” While he is laughable throughout the entire video, Wilemon places the cherry on top during the conclusion when he suggests that people who can’t afford health care should “just stop being poor.” I found this so funny because, come on, who actually thinks that? Further, who says something that ignorant and callous on television? Surely, I thought, people don’t actually believe those born in poverty can just stop being poor. My experiences the following week showed me otherwise. For my Spring Break, I traveled to Chicago with 18 other UT students to do service in

Non Sequitur • Wiley

EDITORIAL

aren’t college towns at all – they’re cities. Sure, they happen to have universities, but what happens on campus doesn’t mean much to the rest of the people in the city. Memphis doesn’t depend on the actions of students at Rhodes, and Charlotte will be Charlotte no matter what Northeastern is doing. Knoxville, then, is neither a college town nor a big city. It is, in a sense, a college city. Here’s what I mean. Like it or not, Knoxville is a city. It has its own parks and a little bit of traffic and places to see concerts from national acts. We house the national headquarters of TVA, Regal Cinemas and Pilot, who bring in a combined $40 billion dollars a year in revenue. We also have the problems of a city — income inequality, homelessness and crime. At the same time, the university is an integral part of Knoxville. Market Square is packed with students and families on nights and weekends, but a ghost town if there’s a Vols game on. The whole city shuts down on Saturdays in the fall, and the city’s mood the next morning depends on whether or not our team won or lost. More important than the sports community in Knoxville is just how much the city is still coming into its own. Bob Kronick, an educational psychologist at UT, has revitalized the Pond Gap community through his work with elementary school kids and their families. Market Square, now the cultural center of the city, was run-down until around 10 years ago, when then-Mayor Bill Haslam pumped resources into revitalizing the downtown area.

some of the worst neighborhoods in Illinois, if not the entire U.S. Within 10 minutes of reaching the neighborhood where we were supposed to stay, a Chicago police officer stopped us and said we did not need to be there. Naturally, we were a little freaked out. As the week progressed, however, we became more comfortable and realized the nature of our housing for the week (a mission run by Franciscan sisters) largely kept us out of any danger. The amount of growth I saw in the students throughout the week was tremendous; by our final reflection, people were expressing how much they learned about the nature of poverty and how their perspectives had changed. Several of them reflected on how the trip had altered their stereotypes about people living in poverty from the typical “lazy and unmotivated” categories. I realized that even these kind, genuine kids had their own preconceived notions about poverty because society has taught them poor people truly have the choice to “just stop being poor.” This sentiment is not simply the punchline of a joke on “The Daily Show” or an idea that is limited to “selfish” rich people. It is a pervasive, persistent prejudice that people have come to accept as being true for every single person living in poverty. Just a few weeks ago in a radio interview, Paul Ryan described poverty as a “cultural problem” characterized by “men not working

and just generations of men not even thinking about working or learning to value the culture of work.” Ryan also made sure to point out most of this “cultural problem” persists mainly in inner city areas. Ryan is right in the sense there is a culture of people not working, but so wrong in the sense that the inner cities are the only place in which this is a problem. Poverty and subsequently welfare spending are also rampant in rural areas of Tennessee, and even more so in Appalachia. Altering the culture of one of these groups or another is not going to change poverty. Given the multi-faceted nature of poverty, there really is not one concise answer to solving it. In order to even begin we would have to alter patterns of gentrification, eliminate food deserts and develop better public education. But before any of this can even happen, more people have to experience what our Spring Break team experienced last week: that poverty is not always a conscious choice, but an inescapable situation determined largely by where you are born and, especially, who you are born to. It amazes and saddens me it took only a week for a group of college students to realize this, yet prominent people in our society have not (and will not) take the time to go live and learn that to “just stop being poor” is simply not an option. Katie Dean is a junior in political science. She can be reached at xvd541@utk.edu.

Get Fuzzy • Darby Conley

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Thursday, March 27, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

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• Photo Courtesy of Jason Derulo

“I really just think that a lot of people who think that the rape culture doesn’t exist really need to take a look at it because that’s even an argument. ‘Well, does it exist or do we make it exist,’� Rightler-McDaniels said. “I think that the biggest problem, especially when it comes to gender stereotypes and things like that; a lot of these aggressions and rapes are perpetuated because we have a fundamental attitude about gender and sexuality that still puts women inferior to men in society. So I think that’s something that we need to be aware of.� Another contributing factor, in RightlerMcDaniels’s opinion, is the self-depiction of artists to the public where “whether they acknowledge it or not, they are role models.� This view has even been echoed by actress Rashida Jones in an opinion column for Glamour in which Jones argues that while “owning and expressing our sexuality is a huge step forward for women,� the “oversaturation� of sexual images is too much because celebrities are role models whether they want to be or not. “I do think absolutely that public figures should have an obligation to at least be cognizant of the fact that whether they want to or not — because a lot of them will say, ‘Well, I don’t want to be a role model,’� RightlerMcDaniels said. “Well, it’s not your choice. When you’re in the public eye, you assume that role for some people. “I think that it definitely needs to be held a little more responsible, but that’s a personal decision.� In a survey of 38 students across campus conducted by The Daily Beacon, 28 said they think college students accept rape culture as a part of everyday life. Hackenbrack, while she does not believe students accept rape culture, states that listeners who are “happy to turn a blind eye� contribute to the influence of these songs.

She believes students lack education about consent which contributes to their disregard to living in a “sex negative cultureâ€? and keeps listeners “defenseless to understanding why the lyrics are harmful.â€? “These songs, as well as other forms of popular media which are ubiquitous today, desensitize the public to issues of rape culture and the objectification of women,â€? Hackenbrack said. “When the industry normalizes rape and then rape actually happens, that’s when our society starts saying things like, ‘Well, she should have seen it coming.’â€? On the other hand, when RightlerMcDaniels was asked whether she believes college students are easily influenced by sexual messages in music, she replied, “Oh heavens, yes. Yes, yes, yes.â€? However, she said she bases this claim off the belief the media is rarely questioned because it gives a “façade of equality with races and genderâ€? in popular culture. “One of the things that’s very important to look at is although we may see certain groups of people represented in media, we need to look at how they’re represented,â€? RightlerMcDaniels said. “Who puts them in those positions, I think, is more important than ‘Oh, well I saw this person there.’ It’s not really about quantity. It needs to be about quality, especially when we’re talking about mediamaking among younger generations.â€? Hackenbrack also does not see this as the music industry’s problem. Because of the money they make from the songs, she believes it has no reason to stop producing negatively sexual songs. She instead said she feels educating consumers on the issues at hand can hinder the profits received from rape culture. “If the demand for these songs goes down, then we’ve taken some control over how rape culture permeates unnoticed in our society,â€? Hackenbrack said. “We have to bring about a cultural shift towards sex positivity to truly erase power the music industry, as well as other industries, has on rape culture.â€?

• Photo Courtesy of RobinThicke VEVO

continued from Page 1

croark4@utk.edu

• Photo Courtesy of Bruno Mars

RAPE CULTURE

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, March 27, 2014 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

Eyes on Knoxville Retrospect gives knick-knacks new life Emily Rytz Contributor Knoxville is revitalizing the Happy Holler area by opening new stores on every street. Among these is Retrospect Vintage Store, which opened earlier this year on Jan. 2. Retrospect is co-owned by longtime friends Tree Ely-Green and Gina Alazawi. “We chose the name Retrospect because we wanted it to say what we had,” Ely-Green said. “We either wanted vintage or retro in the title so we tossed around a few names and this one we liked. This store is all about looking back in retrospect.” Ely-Green said she learned to love the vintage lifestyle from her mother. Before opening Retrospect, she owned another vintage store that was located in Seymour on Chapman Highway. Alazawi also owned her own vintage store in Clinton. The two recently reconnected and made the decision to

open up a vintage shop together in Knoxville. “We chose this location for the new store because of all the parking offered,” Ely-Green said. “We also liked this location because we knew the Happy Holler area was going to be improved.” The shop owners said they’re both eager for the pretty weather to arrive so they will be able to open their doors and use the side walk in front of their store to display their merchandise. They also believe the warm weather will bring people out and draw them to the store. “A lot of the people we see that come to the store either heard about us from a friend or read an article somewhere about our opening or were walking down the street and saw the new store,” Ely-Green said. “We have already had some repeat customers from the local neighborhood.” Most of the products found in Retrospect are acquired by the shop owners or by people who

come in and sell their items. They find most of their products at yard sales and state sales. The Retrospect owners also rent out sections in their store to vendors who can sell products they find or make. “The most random thing in the store right now is a coffin,” Tree said. “We sell a lot of clothes, furniture, knickknacks. More recently we have been selling mostly furniture.” Melissa Dudrick, sophomore in nursing, is an avid visitor of vintage stores. She said she learned about the new store and its location from friends who had previously visited Retrospect. “It’s awesome having such a cool store so close to campus,” Dudrick said. “I could spend hours going through all of the unique stuff they have.” The co-owners said they hope Retrospect has a bright future and are ready for the new customers Happy Holler’s revitalization is expected to bring to the store.

All photos courtesy of Brennan Warrington • The Daily Beacon (above) Vintage magazines sit on display at Retrospect in Happy Holler. (top right) Retrospect vendor Ammi Knight sits among her antique treasures. (bottom right) Retrospect sells vintage collectibles such as dollhouses, books, furniture and magnets at its Happy Holler location.

Century-old Carnicus carries on, aims to keep audiences laughing Victoria Brown Staff Writer Carnicus, a UT tradition dating back more than 100 years, will return to campus tonight and Friday with its annual group skit competition. What was once a celebration entitled June Jubilee, Carnicus originally consisted of a carnival with performances by the campus Glee Club, as well as side and vaudeville shows. Over the span of a few years, a circus was added to the June Jubilee which included students dressing up as animals for fun. The carnival and circus were eventually combined in 1929 by UT’s All Campus Events Committee, and UT alum George Abernathy, a member of the All Students’ Club, coined the word “Carnicus.”

“It brings a tradition unlike any other.” -Stephen Martin

Carnicus is a yearly performance for organizations and groups on campus to perform a comedic skit, usually lasting no more than 15 minutes, that is based off of events happening on campus or in the world. Each group then picks a movie or TV show to base their theme off of and attempts to incorporate it with their UT lifestyle. Stephen Martin, senior in civil engineering, is currently the Carnicus chair for ACE. “I would definitely recommend Carnicus to a friend,” Martin said. “It brings a tradition unlike any other. Groups usually come together and pair up, and it brings the campus together for a night of fun.” While planning Carnicus, Martin said ACE began organizing in August but didn’t really get the ball running until around January. Usually, he said, planning for Carnicus starts about a year in advance. There are some details, he noted, such as venue booking, that have to be done in advance. “I am looking forward the most to each group finally performing,” Martin said. “I know everyone has put in a lot of work and it’s finally time.” Martin said this will be his third, and unfortunately last, Carnicus as a UT student.

Scott White, senior in supply chain management, is the director’s chair of ACE and helps plan and implement all of its events, including Carnicus. White said students attending can expect to experience one of UT’s long-standing traditions by watching participants act out skits that reference current events relevant to the university. “In its earliest form, it brought entertainment to students in the form of a carnival and side shows,” White said, “and now it brings entertainment by having organizations perform skits to the the audience.” White said Carnicus is an important tradition on campus. “Carnicus allows alumni to come and experience an event they may have participated in when they were in school,” White said, “and it provides current students an opportunity to be a part of the event that has been around for a long time.” For more information on Carnicus, contact UT Students Activities. Tickets are currently $10 for students with a student ID and $15 for the general public. The event will be held today and Friday beginning at 7:30 p.m. in Cox Auditorium.


Thursday, March 27, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 7 Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron

SPORTS

tprovost@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Dargan Southard

msoutha1@utk.edu

SOFTBALL

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Lady Vols view post game as cure to team’s sluggish starts

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Patrick MacCoon Staff Writer To say the Lady Vols’ last five wins have been easy would be misleading. Before entering the NCAA tournament, the team prevailed in three games where they trailed by double digits to three SEC teams that still have their dancing shoes on in March. Since winning its 17th conference title in program history, the road to the Final Four hasn’t become any easier for Tennessee. In the opening round of the tournament, the Lady Vols had to overcome a sluggish first half to defeat Northwestern State and were then the benefactors of a 16-3 run in their Round of 32 game to pull away from St. John’s on Monday night. With the field of play narrowed down and the competition becoming more legitimate in the Sweet 16, assistant coach Dean Lockwood said the team realizes it will have to avoid slow starts. “The margin of error now is going to get less and less,” Lockwood said after UT’s win on Monday. “There’s 16 teams left in this tournament and pretty soon you are going to have eight and of those eight you are going to have a national champion. “You can’t afford the luxury of a lot of slow starts and being sluggish for too long now.” While the early struggles in games have been attributed to too many quick jump shots, poor defense and lack of intensity, one area of the game has remained dominant for the Lady Vols. Throughout the last five conference and NCAA tournament games, the second-best rebounding team in the regular season

has out-rebounded opponents 222-152. Tennessee (29-5) has only been out-rebounded twice on the glass, by Stanford and Arkansas this season. “Going forward as we practice, crashing the boards is going to be a big part of our emphasis in what we are doing,” Lockwood said. “So much of our success stems from defense and rebounding. “Defensive rebounding has been huge for us and will be key through the rest of the tournament.” Junior forward Cierra Burdick, who has averaged 14.5 points and nine rebounds per contest in the NCAA tournament, attributed the success of her team’s play to their post coach. “I think Dean (Lockwood) is the unsung hero,” Burdick said. “He has brought the post leaps and bounds to where they are now. He is just a phenomenal post coach. Our posts wouldn’t be where they are without him right now. “It’s important for him to get some of the credit,” she added. “He provides great leadership and encouragement.” Despite only leading by a combined seven points in the first two rounds of the tournament, the Lady Vols ended up winning both games at Thompson-Boling Arena by 16 points or more. Now they will travel to take on four-seed Maryland (26-6) at the KFC Yum! Center in Louisville, Ky., on Sunday at noon. The winner advances to the Elite Eight to play either seven-seed LSU or three-seed Louisville. The arena is home to the Cardinals, who defeated Tennessee 86-78 last season in the Elite Eight.

“This team is very well prepared for a challenge of going on the road,” Lockwood said. “We played in Duluth and were down double digits in the first half to three NCAA tournament teams and were able to come back victorious in all three. It’s a tribute to our grit, intensity, and toughness, but we have to be there all the time. “We feel good about our team’s ability to function and execute under those conditions.” The key on offense for the No. 1 seed of the Louisville region will be to feed the post and score fastbreak points. “Our philosophy is we are going to run for a layup first,” Lockwood said. “If we can’t push the ball ahead and wing a layup, we call it the post highway. Our posts run the middle of the court and we look to get a touch to them in the post highway. We want to reward them for running.” Whether it is Isabelle Harrison, Bashaara Graves, Mercedes Russell, or even Burdick, Lockwood expressed his confidence in all his post players to make a difference on the court. “We’ve had a very effective post game and all of our players can operate,” he said. “We want to play through our middle, we want to make the defense have to guard us on the interior, and doing so opens up so much more options that way. “We want to play from the inside-out.”

continued from Page 1 But it wasn’t getting used to the big stage that aided the Vols, at least for Jarnell Stokes. The 6-foot-8 junior forward thought UT just got back to its regular style of defensive intensity and energy. “I wouldn’t say the way it was,” Stokes said, “I feel like we got back to playing the way we play. We got a lot of key stops, the energy was there and the guys hit shots, and it basically led into the next game. We came out and hit shots against UMass, also.” The Vols seemed to feed off that energy to rush out to an early lead over UMass that they held throughout; it only improved in the Round of 32. They held a 15-point halftime lead over Mercer, boasting a gaudy rebounding advantage that saw the Vols to a 20-point win.

All of this dominance over the first weekend of the NCAA tournament was much needed for a team that had to play in the NIT for the past two seasons. “I think everything just clicked,” Vol forward Jarnell Stokes said. “This year, the team is a lot different from previous years because we see it all coming to an end. Guys are hungrier because we’re older. “We’ve been in the NIT twice and it’s a terrible feeling to almost make the tournament.” Thinking back on all of those shortcomings and the Vols’ bubble status throughout much of the season, simply getting to the Sweet 16 has McRae impressed after so many do-or-die games. “It is impressive,” he said, “just what we’ve done especially at the end of the season. If we would’ve dropped one of those games at the end of the stretch of the season, who knows where we would’ve been.”


8 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, March 27, 2014 Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron

SPORTS

tprovost@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Dargan Southard

msoutha1@utk.edu

FOOTBALL Andrew Bruckse • Tennessee Athletics

SOFTBALL

Redshirt sophomore wide receiver Jason Croom catches a pass during the Vols’ spring football practice on Tuesday inside the Neyland-Thompson Sports Complex.

Jones says Vols still lacking ‘SEC speed’ Troy Provost-Heron Sports Editor The SEC. A conference that boasts seven of the last eight national champions in college football. But in the time that championships have become synonymous with the conference, so has the attribute the teams in the SEC pride themselves on – speed. In 2013, however, it was apparent that team speed wasn’t the Vols’ strong suit, especially on the defensive side of the ball. Tennessee coach Butch Jones knew it, too, making it the focal point in recruiting as well as the Vols preparation during spring training. “(It’s a) work in progress,” Jones said following Tuesday’s practice. “We have to get much faster as a defense and as a football program. We are not up to SEC speed. So it starts with recruiting, it starts with being bigger, stronger, faster. You have to play chess, you can’t play checkers. “It is getting your players in the right spots, and if they have value in one regard or another, it is trying to extract as much value as you can in your football program.” And a game of chess is exactly what it’s been for the Vols. Many familiar faces have found themselves in new roles, including

Curt Maggitt, DeVaun Swafford, Justin Coleman, Jalen Reeves-Maybin and true freshman Neiko Creamer, who played wide receiver in high school but has since converted to linebacker this spring. But even if there are some positions that can’t be filled in the spring, Jones sees an opportunity to improve that speed with the members of the 2014 recruiting class who have yet to enroll. “We’re trying to improve our team speed as much as possible,” Jones said. “The great thing is that we will welcome 18 newcomers in June, so it will almost be like starting the process all over again. “A lot of them are going to have to play as true freshmen,” he added. “They have no choice, that’s just where we’re at.” Widening the depth perception Throughout six practices, one position that’s consistently show its talent is the wide receiver. The talent, however, is more impressive when you look at the depth of the position, as Tennessee returns seven receivers who caught passes in 2013, highlighted by sophomore Marquez North who last year led UT with 496 receiving yards. Add the two early enrollees who joined the team this spring and the Vols have 10 active wideouts on the roster, which redshirt sophomore wide

receiver Jason Croom said has made each receiver better. “It gives you no reason to not go 100 percent,” Croom said, “because as soon as you get tired, we have somebody else that’s just as equal to come in there and replace you, go fast, and then put you back in there when they’re tired.” One of those receivers who is slowly climbing up the ladder is Tennessee’s five-star wideout from Campbell Station, Tenn., Josh Malone. “One individual that I thought really looked fast today and is starting to play with a lot of confidence right now is Josh Malone,” Jones said. “He’s coming off the football and you can see the speed, burst and acceleration that we saw on film when we were recruiting him. We’re starting to see that now on the practice field.” And the improvement of those playmakers outside the hashes has started to turn the heads of the coaching staff as spring practice progresses. “I think the receiving corp in general has really stepped up,” offensive coordinator Mike Bajakian said after practice on March 13. “Marquez North has done a really good job of going up and out-jumping people’s backs and making catches. Von (Pearson) has also done a good job of getting the ball in his hands. “The group as a whole is really coming along.”

‘Small things’ keeping Lady Vols among nation’s elite Taylor White Contributor The No. 3 Tennessee Lady Vols softball team came into the 2014 season with lofty expectations, and two weeks into conference play it has lived up to the hype. After series against Arkansas and South Carolina, the Lady Vols have posted a 5-1 record including a sweep last weekend over the Gamecocks. While the Tennessee pitching staff has struggled at times, the offense has exploded, outscoring its opponents 43-18 in conference play. “We have just been doing all the small things right,” senior shortstop Madison Shipman said at Wednesday’s media availability. “We’re trying not to do too much and just execute the little things.” While senior pitcher Ellen Renfroe has not been her usual self over the past few games, she has been more than qualified to get the job done. She picked up win No. 18 over the weekend, putting her in a tie for first in the nation in wins. Sophomore Rainey Gaffin also had a huge week at the plate, batting .800, including a walk-off single last Tuesday in a 9-8 win over MTSU in the inaugural Mid-State Classic played in Columbia, Tenn. The level of competition is rising, though, as the Vols will host the No. 4 Florida Gators at Sherri Lee Parker Stadium for a three-game series this weekend. Shipman named SEC POTW Shipman has been Tennessee’s best hitter all season, and she seems to be getting better at the plate every week. This week, the senior earned SEC player of the week honors after batting .429 with a grand slam and seven RBI. This raised her season average to .433 and gives her 26 total RBI. “Madison is playing the best softball she’s played since she’s been at Tennessee,” co-head coach Karen Weekly said. “I think that is a real credit to her as senior because every once in a while you will see seniors slump a little bit.” On top of her performance at the

plate, Shipman has also excelled in the field. In Sunday’s win over South Carolina, she recorded a school record nine assists from her shortstop position. Defense is something Shipman has always prided herself on, Weekly said, as well as something she is always looking to improve upon. “A lot of the people who win big awards are purely offensive players,” Weekly said. “Maddie takes great pride in her defense, and it’s actually something we worked on even more yesterday, just making sure she was doing everything right defensively.” Lady Vols embrace ‘One Tennessee’ While the softball team has focused on winning games, they have also been keeping a close eye on the success that both the men’s and women’s basketball teams have had this postseason. The men’s team and the softball team play at about the same time Friday night, and while they acknowledge it might cut into their home crowd this weekend, Weekly said the softball program couldn’t be happier for the basketball teams. “I’m excited for our men’s basketball team,” Weekly said. “I’m certainly happy for Cuonzo and what they’ve been able to do. It’s unfortunate timing, some of our crowd might be up there supporting them, which is fantastic, and maybe some other folks will stay at home and watch that game.” Senior basketball player Meighan Simmons regularly attends softball games, and Shipman decided to return the favor this weekend. “I was actually at the women’s game (Monday),” Shipman said. “It was kind of sad watching Meighan play her last game in Thompson-Boling, but they have been doing awesome and I’m totally supportive of both of (the programs).” The phrase “One Tennessee” has become popular between all UT coaches and is a philosophy Weekly has consistently emphasized. “The better all our sports do, the better it is for everybody here at Tennessee,” Weekly said. “We couldn’t be more excited for them.”


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