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Friday, March 14, 2014

Issue 46, Volume 125

utdailybeacon.com

UT student activity fee resolution passes Senate Hayley Brundige Assistant Photo Editor A resolution was passed in the state Senate on Wednesday instructing University of Tennessee administrators to alter the student activity fee allocation system to permit students to opt out of providing funding for events they find to be “controversial or objectionable.” The student activities fee, as it currently stands, is obligatory. Fees collected are then combined

and distributed per the judgment of the University Programs and Services Fee Funding Board. Drafted by Senate Government Operations Chairman Mike Bell, the resolution specifically targets Sex Week, stating the the program’s subject matter is “offensive to many parents, students and citizens of the state of Tennessee.” The resolution states that while Sex Week has been promoted as a sexual health event, it actually serves to “thrust a radical agenda on the students of the

University of Tennessee.” If the resolution is enforced, the president of the University of Tennessee will have to report to both the Senate and House education committees by Jan. 1, 2015, to discuss the implementation of this optional student fee system. State Sen. Stacey Campfield, an active voice in the student fees debate, said further action is still necessary. “It’s a statement of opinion type thing,” Campfield said Thursday in a phone interview with The

Daily Beacon. “Resolutions don’t have any force behind them, so I think we need to do something that will have some force of law.” Campfield, R-Knoxville, represents the seventh district and sponsored two bills also concerning student fees – Senate Bill 1608/HB2378, which advocated for distribution proportionate to organizational size, and SB2493/ HB2450, which forbids the use of university fees to finance speakers on campus. Both bills are scheduled for committee vote early next week.

Jacob Clark, a senior in College Scholars and co-founder of Sex Week, expressed disapproval of the resolution. “Any action by government to restrict speech or advocacy is an example of poor policy,” Clark wrote in an email Thursday. “While this resolution is certainly not as damaging to student programming as some of the current proposed bills would be, I am disappointed that the state legislature has wasted time combatting a valuable and popular student program.”

Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon

SEE INSIDE

UT President Joe DiPietro wrote a letter earlier this week to Rep. Matthew Hill, R-Jonesborough, and Senate Education Chairwoman Dolores Gresham warning against further condemnation of Sex Week. “The attention focused on this matter by the General Assembly,” DiPietro wrote, “is quickly reaching a point that will cause greater harm and damage to the longterm interests of the university than any programming that may occur as result of Sex Week.”

Bijou fundraiser welcomes Gran Torino for reunion Jessica Karsten Contributor

Eclectic eatery combines hearty BBQ, sweet tunes under one roof

another potential speed bump for the Vols is familiarity with the arena. In massive venues such as the Georgia Dome, shooters can often struggle to find their flow. Vols senior guard Jordan McRae, though, isn’t buying into that, as he sees the Tennessee’s shoot-around Friday morning in the venue as a perfect chance to get acclimated. “I think we’re going to get a chance to get up shots in there in the morning, and after that, we’re gonna be ready to go,” McRae said.

The historic Bijou Theatre has played a significant role in Knoxville’s arts and music culture for many years with performances by countless famous musicians. Each year, the theater hosts its annual Bijou Jubilee, a fundraising event celebrating the various aspects of the theater. Saturday night, the 2014 Bijou Jubilee is hosting Knoxville native band Gran Torino for a one-night-only reunion performance. Michele Purcell, chairperson of the Jubilee Committee, said the fundraiser is a chance for fans to celebrate the rich history of the theater. “It’s an important building to maintain,” Purcell said. “The diversity of the programming we provide to the community is important; we try to tie things in some way to the rich history of the theater.” This event is important to the non-profit Bijou, as it is the theater’s primary fundraiser for the year’s programs. The building hosts a variety of concert performances throughout the year, and local groups can rent the theater for various functions. The theater also provides various programs for Knoxville’s younger community. During the summer, the Bijou holds acting camps where children ages 9-12 learn basic stage skills and improve techniques. Every January, the theater hosts the Bijou Awards, a music and drama competition for local high school students. This year, the Bijou Jubilee will bring together all the original members of the funk-rock band Gran Torino, a phenomenon that has not occurred in more than a decade. “It is such an honor for Gran Torino to perform at this year’s event,” Purcell said. “When you go to one of their shows, you are guaranteed a good time.” “It’s obvious their fans agree; the event is completely sold out.”

See SEC TOURNAMENT on Page 6

See BIJOU JUBILEE on Page 2

ARTS & CULTURE>>pg. 2

One of these students will be UT’s next SGA president NEWS >>pg. 3 Senior forward Jarnell Stokes wins the tip over South Carolina’s Michael Carrera at Thompson-Boling Arena on Feb. 8. The Vols will face the Gamecocks on Friday in the quarterfinals of the SEC tournament at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta.

Secondary swaps helping UT put more speed on the defensive side

A tip in the right direction Vols catch fortunate bounce with South Carolina matchup after Gamecocks upset Arkansas in SEC tournament Steven Cook Copy Editor

SPORTS >>pg. 5

Heading into SEC play at Mizzou, Serrano says Vols need to just ‘trust what we’ve done’ SPORTS >>pg. 6

A curveball was thrown Tennessee’s way during action Thursday at the SEC men’s basketball tournament that the No. 4-seed Volunteers are hoping to knock out of the park. The Vols will face South Carolina on Friday in the quarterfinals of the SEC tournament at Atlanta’s Georgia Dome after the No. 13-seed Gamecocks upset fifth-seeded Arkansas, 71-69, in shocking fashion Thursday. When released, the SEC tournament bracket looked des-

tined for today’s game to be between the Razorbacks and the Vols — the conference’s top two NCAA tournament bubble teams. Instead, the Vols (20-11, 11-7 SEC) will face a Gamecock (14-19, 5-13) squad that finished second-to-last in the SEC before dismantling Auburn, 74-56, Wednesday and winning Thursday. The Frank Martin-led Gamecocks come into Friday having won three straight for the first time since Jan. 3, but the Vols have them one-upped by posting four consecutive victories — three of which were in

blowout fashion. Friday’s game will also be South Carolina’s third in three days, while the Vols will be ending a six-day break from the court. While that might be seen as a drawback, Tennessee head coach Cuonzo Martin lauded the importance of his team’s fresh legs. “Certain things you can’t control,” Martin said Wednesday before departing for Atlanta. “The key is to try to get by so you can have fresh legs to play for three days. “I’d rather play for three days than play for four, or five.” In preparation for Friday,

Proposed activity fee bills have UT system schools worried Samantha Smoak Online Editor Non-binding resolutions cannot progress into law, but Senate bills, if passed, can. Recent legislation proposed by state Sen. Stacey Campfield (R-Knoxville), however, could drastically change how UT allo-

cates funding for student organizations. Senate Bill 1608 would require funding for organizations inviting speakers to campus be allocated proportional to the organization’s size, while Senate Bill 2493 would not allow the use of any institutional revenue,

including student activity fees, to pay for a campus speaker. Thursday, these bills were both calendared for vote by the House education subcommittee on the March 18 and for vote by the Senate Education Committee on March 19. University of Tennessee

system schools in Martin and Chattanooga would also be impacted, in addition to schools associated with the Tennessee Board of Regents. Robert Fisher, Student Government Association president at UT-Chattanooga, said his largest concern about SB1608 is

the assumption that larger organizations on campus should hold more clout. “When you have proportional funding only the large organizations ... they have an advantage that a smaller group may not have,” Fisher said. See STUDENT FEES on Page 3

INSIDE THE DAILY BEACON

“Let’s vote him out of office.” @UTKDailyBeacon www.utdailybeacon.com

OPINIONS >>pg. 4

Arts & Culture News Opinions Sports

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2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Friday, March 14, 2014 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE continued from Page 1 The music and arts culture in Knoxville is able to not just survive but thrive through venues including the Tennessee and Bijou theaters. Notable performances including SoMo and Local Natives will hit the U.S. Cellular Stage at the Bijou next month, bringing countless attendees to downtown Knoxville. Bijou Jubilee event manager, Mänya Whitney-Miller, said she believes Knoxville is lucky to have a beautiful and historic theater like the Bijou. “To me, the Bijou is a magical place,” Whitney-Miller said. “If you have ever seen a show there, you know what a special place it is and how there isn’t a bad seat in the house.” Purcell also admires the theater’s notoriety, and she said she appreciates the programming it provides to the community. “The acoustics are unparalleled and documented by

famous musicians who have performed onstage,” Purcell said. “The Jubilee is going to be a great night in a beautiful, historic venue.” In addition to the performance, the Jubilee is throwing an exclusive VIP Sound Check party prior to the show with special songs from Gran Torino, priority concert seating and catered food options. By attending, WhitneyMiller said audience members also support the Bijou. “The fundraiser makes a huge impact on the theater’s annual budget to keep the facility running,” WhitneyMiller said. “People should attend to get to see the reunion of Gran Torino, which may never occur again.” The fundraising event is completely sold out, a success, Purcell said, for the Bijou Theatre and its programming. “If you aren’t able to make it to the show, consider attending a future show or event at the Bijou,” Purcell said. “It truly is the gem of the South.”

croark4@utk.edu

Sweet P’s smokes Knoxville’s BBQ competition Liv McConnell • The Daily Beacon

BIJOU JUBILEE

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

Liv McConnell Copy Editor Some things just go together: yin and yang; margaritas and a salty shoreline; Bogey and Bacall; barbeque and the blues. The last of these idyllic pairings is the premise behind South Knoxville’s beloved Sweet P’s Barbeque and Soul House, a place where the motto “low and slow” could apply as much to the smoked meats as to the bluesy weeknight entertainment. “A lot of patience and time is the biggest thing with barbeque,” kitchen manager Eddie Faircloth said. “You’ve got to use low heat and let it a cook for a long time, and that’s really it for us. Yeah, the seasonings are all great and everything, but really it’s the theory and practice of the cooking that makes (the food) so great.” Cooking “theories” aren’t generally something one associates with a family-owned barbeque joint, but at Sweet P’s, meat quality is serious business. Faircloth, who has manned the kitchen at a litany of Knoxville-area greats including Litton’s, Regas and The Orangery, holds the purveyors of what will become the restaurant’s beef brisket, pulled pork, ribs and chicken wings to rigidly high standards. “We’re out to get the best quality meats that we can,” Faircloth said. “I really stick it to my purveyors. Every week I’m looking over these meats, inspecting them, and if they don’t meet our standards, I’m on the phone with them. That’s not what we’re going to serve.” Co-owners and cousins Chris and Jonathan Ford founded the restaurant, which expanded out of the former’s self-owned catering company nearly five years ago, on a similar standard. “We take a lot of pride in the food we put

Sweet P’s Barbeque and Soul House, located on Maryville Pike, serves items from beef brisket, pulled pork and ribs to chicken wings. out, not just the pork and meat, but in the sides and dessert as well,” Jonathan Ford, who also serves as general manager, said. “Chris put a lot of time and knowledge into developing his recipes. Basically if it’s not perfect, we won’t serve it.” Part of this knowledge stemmed from Chris Ford’s job title before his entrepreneurial food endeavors: bandmate. “How Chris got into this business and started doing barbeque was he was in a band before this and they toured around a lot,” Jonathan Ford said. “They ate a lot of barbeque because it was cheap and they all liked it. “He learned to love barbeque and developed a real passion for it, as did I.” The Fords’ passion for both pork and music is evident throughout the interior of the riverfront restaurant.

Tabletops are ornamented with album covers; the beaming faces of Dolly Parton, Hank Williams and Ray Charles peer out between customers’ plates piled high with smoked meat, mac and cheese and chocolate chess pie. A jukebox occupies one corner, and the lower level seating area is often converted into a stage for live music events. “We do these shows called ‘Even Thursdays get the Blues’ on every even numbered Thursday of the month,” Jonathan Ford said. “We have this great new dude booking for us, Michael Gill, who also does things like ‘Live at 5’ at the Knoxville Museum of Art. He helps us bring in local and regional blues artists. “It’s a great opportunity for families to come out on a Thursday night and hear some good music and get a great meal along with it.”

Switchfoot bringing wave of refined, beachy tunes to Bijou the group has been making music since 1996 – and its consistent success (its ninth album “Fading West” debuted In a music world fraught at No. 6 on the Billboard 200 with one-hit pop stars and and was given a score of 71 by obsession with celebrities, Metacritic). San Diego band Switchfoot is The alternative-rock band refreshing in its longevity – will perform for a sold-out crowd at the Historic Bijou Theatre tonight at 8 p.m. Tim Foreman, co-founder of the group and bass guitarist, talked to The Daily Beacon about the band’s journey from Christian radio to mainstream staple and all the surfboards and challenges in between. “We’ve been through so much as a band through these past nine records, and I think that the bonds have only grown deeper through the years,” Foreman said, “which is something I’m really grateful for. That doesn’t always happen with bands.” Switchfoot formed in 1996 and has since grown from three members to five, including Foreman, his brother, frontman Jon Foreman, guitarist Drew Shirley, guitar and pianist Jerome Fontamillas and drummer Chad Butler. In 2002, three of the band’s songs were included in the Nicholas Sparks’ film adaptation “A Walk to Remember,” which gave the group the recognition it needed to propel into a major label debut with Columbia Records. In 2007, Switchfoot left Columbia in

Claire Dodson

Arts & Culture Editor

order to form its own record label, lowercase people records. This led to 2008’s critically-acclaimed release “Hello Hurricane,” which Foreman said was a turning point in Switchfoot’s career. “We were staring at the possibilities for what we could do as a band,” Tim Foreman said. “Being independent (and) having our own creative space allowed all this freedom. It was kind of an existential moment for the band, to kind of ask ourselves, well, who do we want to be?” Once that answer was discovered, “Hello Hurricane” was created and quickly followed by 2011’s “Vice Verses,” which is often considered a part two to “Hurricane.” The space between “Verses” and “Fading West” gave the band another break to redefine its goals and explore new directions. “(‘Fading West’) felt much more like an adventure, a search again, pushing ourselves to new places and more intentionally because we were making a film at the same time,” Tim Foreman said. “These songs were written all over the world and inspired by the journey that we were on making the film. “Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Bali – we wanted this album to sound like a complete departure from our last few records.” The beachy, happy sound of

“Fading West” is the result, and it says as much about where the band has gone as it does about where it started, with Tim and Jon Foreman’s inextricably tied passions: music and surfing. “I got into music and surfing right around the same time,” Tim Foreman said. “The same year that I discovered Led Zeppelin and the Beatles, I got a surfboard. That was a big year for me. “They’ve always been connected, there’s no rules in either one, whether you’re riding a wave or holding a guitar, that applies to both. I really appreciate that freedom.” And while Switchfoot has emphasized it is not a “Christian band,” it is a band of Christians, a factor that has always played into the group’s music and developed its identity. This theme and perspective is, as per Switchfoot’s style, subtly infused into the songs on “Fading West.” “We wanted this record to feel bright and hopeful,” Tim Foreman said. “We’ve always been a band that infuses hope into our songs, but they’re always really cast against the backdrop of pain and honesty and the struggle. This record does that, but in a much brighter way. “It feels like the sun is shining and the air is clean. Like you’re looking at the horizon and anything is possible.”


Friday, March 14, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb elamb1@utk.edu

Meeting the SGA candidates Hanna Lustig News Editor Fellow campaign member “Big Honey” Walsh said he has “the body of an angel.” But “Stonecold” Quinn Cowan has far more to offer than good looks. Before becoming an undecided sophomore in the School of Business, Cowan grew up on a farm where he helped grow crops and raise chickens – experiences which hardened him into the man that now stands at the helm of Insert. Even amid election season, Cowan remains at ease. He simply strives to emulate the strength and integrity of his two idols: “Stonecold” Steve Austin and Ronald Reagan. Why did you decide to run for this position? “One month, me and Pa were in town and I saw a poster of a man, one beautiful man. And I looked at my Pa and said, ‘Pa, who’s that?’ And he patted my shoulder and said ‘Son, that’s Ronald Reagan.’ And I looked at my Pa and said, ‘I wanna be just like him.’ Ever since then, I’ve been bound and determined.” If elected, what major issues do you plan to address? Citing numerous UT text alerts, Cowan believes students deserve the ability to protect themselves from harm. “Our campaign is in strong support of the allowance of students on campus to actively take advantage of their class three carry permits and freely wield combat assault weapons on campus and in class.” Should a man whistle or “cat call” at a woman, she

• Photo Courtesy of Quinn Cowan

Cowan: ‘Determined’ to Keny: Embraces caring, emulate Ronald Reagan hard-working demeanor

should be permitted to retaliate. “Under this policy, you will be able to whistle back with a high velocity round that will splatter his brain all over the place.” What aspects of past presidents’ terms do you think went well and what could have been done better? “I would consider our campaign the only campaign with the cajones to thrust ourselves, and I really mean “thrust” ourselves, balls deep into the sinister beaurocracy that is UT and bring it crashing down. “We don’t need to whore ourselves out for donations in order to be elected for these positions.” Why should you be elected as President? “I care about each one of us as though they were my own brother or my own sister. “We think that traditionally the university is accustomed to automaton candidates that are completely robotic in they way they speak to students ... and execute the position itself. Often times, those candidates are not relatable. We are all walk and less talk. And we plan to get things done.”

STUDENT FEES

precedent set by SB1608 and SB2493. “Honestly it almost makes continued from Page 1 me kind of nervous,” Wilson UT-Martin’s SGA Vice said. “This kind of makes me President Alex Wilson said the wonder if the same legislature impact of SB1608 would be is going to step in and do somemuch smaller for his campus, due to how they allocate their student fees. “About the only thing that we do that would be close to that would be we have a committee that can provide transportation costs to different student organizations if they apply for it,” Wilson said. “And that’s pretty much the only effect that it would even have.” Senate Bill 2493 would have an equal effect on all campuses. In Fisher’s opinion, the ability to bring speakers to a college campus is a neces-Robert Fisher sity of higher education. “(Higher education) provides a structured environment for you to hear ideas you’re not comfortable with and formulate your own opin- thing with this, then what else ion as to why you agree or are they going to step in on.” Fisher agreed, calling the the don’t agree,” Fisher said. “To bills “dangerous.” limit the university’s capabil“It gives future legislators ... ity to articulate to tell students they don’t have the freedom to the idea that they can create engage visiting speakers, to me, a solution in search of a problem,” Fisher said. “Just because makes no sense.” Both Fisher and Wilson a legislator doesn’t agree with expressed concerns about the the program on campus doesn’t

“To limit the university’s capability to articulate to tell students they don’t have the freedom to engage visiting speakers, to me, makes no sense.”

Frensley: ‘I want to give students a voice’

Hayley Brundige

Emilee Lamb

Assistant Photo Editor

Assistant News Editor

Kelsey Keny is “dependable, compassionate and a little crazy.” And, despite spending her first semester at Belmont, she loves UT. This is where Keny found what was “missing” elsewhere. Since transferring to UT in the spring of 2012, Keny has become the press secretary for SGA, a Student Alumni Associate, a member of Alpha Delta Pi sorority, and part of UT Singers. As a reporter for The Volunteer Channel, Keny loves “hearing people’s stories.” Putting her passion for communication to use, Keny, a member of the Keny-Dugosh campaign, is now a candidate for SGA president. Why did you decide to run for this position? “Last year when we had the incident with Dining Dollars and then this year with the student fees issue, it has made me realize how much I want to reach out to people and do everything I can to care about them and find out what they want, what we want as a student body and to make those things happen.” If elected, what major issues do you plan to address? “The issue with student fees is ongoing. I don’t foresee that going away any time in the near future. That’s something (vice president candidate) Connor (Dugosh) and I both care about and are going to keep pushing for. “... We want to implement policy points that are simple and relatable, whether that’s securing phone chargers in the library or instituting a tailgate for all students to attend on game days – we want to do things that matter to people

A junior in business, Carly Frensley brought her entire family to Big Orange Country. After casting her bid with UT at the age of 18, Frensley left Rochester, Mich., with her family in tow. Upon arriving in Knoxville, Frensley felt instantly at home. Today, she hopes to extend that feeling of belonging to her fellow Vols as a member of the We are UT campaign and a candidate for SGA president. Why did you decide to run for this position? “Over the past couple of years, I’ve been blessed with a ton of leadership opportunities, and I have loved giving back to the university and really getting to meet our student body. So, I want to get connected with all the students. I want to give the students a voice.” If elected, what are some of the major issues you plan to address? “Within the first hundred days of being elected, (vice president candidate) Jack (Johnson) and I would like to sit down with any student organization – any fraternity, sorority and even any student, one-on-one, sit down and really get to know their needs ... and help them understand how you take the steps to make those changes happen. (To) be their connector to administration, be their connector to community resources, and allow them to do the things that they’re passionate about.” Frensley also spoke about her campaign’s plans to

mean you legislate it away. And that sets a pretty dangerous precedent for overreach.” Recently, UT-Chattanooga’s SGA leadership met with Chattanooga area Sens. Todd Gardenhire (R-Chattanooga), who serves on the state’s education committee, and Bo Watson (R-Hixson). Fisher said the senators were receptive of their message. “We talked about the policy and what would happen to each student organization and how those changes would impact us,” Fisher said. “So I think that’s the type of discussion we need to have for the legislature to in many ways try to provide a solution to a problem I don’t think they fully understand. “That continues for us to be the largest challenge for us trying to convey to legislators this is the type of discussion we should be having about student fees and student programing to not be dominated by legislative action.”

and that aren’t just false promises to guarantee.” What aspects of past presidents’ terms do you think went well and what could have been done better? “(Current SGA president) Jake (Baker) has done a really good job with his videos this year and always telling people what’s happening. He puts that information out there. Do students have to click a button to access it? Yeah ... but the fact is he’s putting it out there for them. And that’s something we always want to do. We always want to keep people in the loop. “I think that’s what I would have wanted to see from SGA presidents in the past: even more outreach to everyone and not just the same hundred people or so who are involved in student government.” Why should you be elected as President? “I’m not really that cool, but I care a lot about people. The one thing that I can promise to people is that I work my butt off for the things I care about. When I say I’m going to do something for you, I’m going to do it. ... I’m in this because I care about people, and I’m in this because I just want to be that quirky individual that everyone can relate to.”

push an initiative for paperless student football tickets. How are you planning to reach out to students as a campaign? “We’ve been trying to get involved with any and every organization that will speak to us. ... What’s great about our campaign is, yes, we have a lot of people who are in similar organizations ... but at the same because it’s so many people being pulled from so many different areas ... we have 130 students that are from similar backgrounds, but also very different backgrounds.” Why should you be elected president? “I love to lead. I know that leading comes with following, as well, and I feel that I follow best by really listening to people and really listening to what their passion is. I’m a very passionate person. I get really excited about stuff ... but I think I’m really good at sitting down and hearing what you have to say. ... It’s my final year at UT and it has given so much to me, and I just want to be able to give it all back.”


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Friday, March 14, 2014 Editor-in-Chief R.J. Vogt

OPINIONS

rvogt@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Let’s run Campfield out of office 50 Shades of Wade by

Wade Scofield

For some reason, our state legislature makes news for hilariously frustrating reasons, like the time that a Muslim foot bath was installed in the capital. This has led to a Jon Stewart phenomenon, WasTNOnTheDailyShow.com. As of this writing, it has been a whole five days (!) since our state has appeared on “The Daily Show.” Tennessee has so many things to offer. We have great industries like FedEx, AutoZone and Alcoa. We have the Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital and St. Jude. We are the de facto Music State and have a history of caring for those who need it. So why are we often steered toward such ridicule? There are several scapegoats, but the main reason our state legislature and our whole identity has been derided by many news outlets is because of State Sen. Stacey Campfield (R-Knoxville), who represents District 7. This district includes campus residents, Fort Sanders, downtown, parts of northeast and northwest Knoxville, and a good piece of Farragut. A quick rundown of the idiotic things Campfield has done: he said that it was impossible to contract AIDS through heterosexual intercourse; he tried to pass a bill that would allow underprivileged children to eat only if they got good grades and in doing so, also insulted a child; he made a joke about a pressure cooker right after the Boston bombings; he introduced the hilarious “Don’t Say Gay Bill” which, for his homophobic self, assumes that if you don’t talk about something, it will just go away. And now, there are the retrograde bills he has introduced – SB1608 and SB2493 that will essentially destroy student programming at UT. And he’s incredibly insulting to deal with. Many of my friends have been called mentally unstable or stupid by this elected representative. He is prone to stock emails – if you’ve emailed him in the last month, you’ve received it – and he sent me a one-word email earlier this week. Y’all, enough is enough. We should be proud of the hundreds – no, thousands – of students who have stood up to his measures, but if this many people are passionate about killing his egoistic, uninformed legislation, why stop there? Let’s vote him out of office. After all, Campfield doesn’t work for donors or Fox News or bigots. He works for us. In the 2010 election, he defeated his primary opponent by only 3,449 votes. In the general election, he defeated his opponent by 8,147 votes. Not many people vote in these elections. By comparison, 4,710 students voted in SGA elections last year, only 25 percent of the undergraduate student body. Combined with pre-existing disdain for Campfield in other Knoxville areas, we can turn out the vote to change how we are represented. On Aug. 7, go to the polls and vote for Richard Briggs, a doctor and veteran. If for some reason that doesn’t work, go back on Nov. 4 and vote for Cheri Siler, an educator and activist. Before you do that, register to vote in District 7 then mail the form to the Knox Co. Election Commission. It’s tedious. It’s not instant gratification. But it’s easy. If we can get, for example, 5,000 students to vote for Dr. Briggs, we can easily vote Campfield out. Since Campfield is so fond of Thomas Jefferson – though misquoting – I will end with something Jeffersonian. In “A Summary View of the Rights of British America,” he wrote, “When the representative body have lost the confidence of their constituents, when they have notoriously made sale of their most valuable rights, when they have assumed to themselves powers which the people never put into their hands, then indeed their continuing in office becomes dangerous to the state, and calls for an exercise of the power of dissolution.” So let’s take control of our own well-being. We can cause Campfield’s dissolution. Register. Wade Scofield is a senior in religious studies and Latin. He can be reached at wade@utk.edu.

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

A cosmic perspective on the frailty of human life Crossing Cues by

Melissa Lee The last time I cried, I was in the Hayden Planetarium watching the universe expand on screen – webs of matter and dark matter stretching out across space and time to the soothing, narrative tones of Neil deGrasse Tyson. I was fresh out of an intensive weekend of what I thought were bad interviews at a graduate school that I desperately wanted to go to, and I was stressed out from scurrying around the country, missing the majority of my classes, and attempting to figure out where the heck I’d be spending the next five to seven years of my life trying my very best to convince someone to give me a Ph.D. I leaned back and looked up at the projected expanses of the galaxies above me, and I was moved to tears – not by the prospect of failing to make my graduate school’s final cut, but by the overwhelming beauty of the universe we live in and the very welcome reminder that neither I nor my troubles really mattered at all.

Editor-in-Chief: R.J. Vogt Managing Editor: Melodi Erdogan Chief Copy Editor: Gage Arnold News Editor: Hanna Lustig Asst. News Editor: Emilee Lamb Sports Editor: Troy Provost-Heron Asst. Sports Editor: Dargan Southard Arts & Culture Editor: Claire Dodson Asst. Arts & Culture Editor: Cortney Roark Online Editor: Samantha Smoak

global warming don’t just seem possible; they seem probable, and we are struck by the sudden realization that our 14 seconds eventually turning into 15 – well, that’s not a guarantee. This, too, is cosmic perspective – that we are not just small; we, humankind, may very well also be fleeting. It’s not a particularly encouraging thought, but as we defund our science agencies, amp up our military and rail against the existence of climate change, it’s probably a thought we should keep in mind. If we look a little harder at everything that’s happened on this cosmic calendar, though, a whole 14 seconds starts to look a little bit like a victory. It is yet another dose of cosmic perspective that we, through some lucky coincidence, have found ourselves a part of those 14 seconds. That through all of the improbabilities of just coming into existence, we, as modern humans, have not just existed, we have subsisted – and not just for 1 or 2 seconds, but an entire 14. So, in the midst of one of those privileged milliseconds of individual existence, stop and look up at the stars. You might just find yourself gaining a little bit of perspective. Melissa Lee is a senior in neuroscience. She can be reached at mlee48@utk.edu.

Sorority girls: We’re not all like the stereotypes Guest Column by

Amy Prosise College is a selfish time. Each class, organization and action shapes students. We are all young; we are all striving. When we’re trying to pinpoint who we are (hint: there isn’t a static answer) and detail a 20-year life plan, we have a tendency to simplify others. We don’t have time to deal with complexities outside ourselves, thus, enigmas are unwelcome. Unfortunately, the largest network of student organizations on our campus is made up of secret societies – enigmas at best. Introducing the system that we all love to hate: Greek life. As a freshman, I wondered what that secret sorority world was like. I wondered what it would be like be constantly bound to others – it seemed Greeks were never alone in classes or around campus. I admired their T-shirts. My non-Greek friends and I made fun of sorority women behind closed doors, wondering in half-demeaning, half-jealous tones how they expected to party and still do well in school. The jealous half of me eventually won, and I decided to go through Panhellenic Recruitment as a sophomore. It was a fun and stressful process, full of anxiety and overblown expectations. I wound up “coming home” to a happy place on Bid Day, just like my Gamma Chi said I would. I’m still thrilled and a little bit in awe that I’m

accepted among such impressive and ambitious women. In light of my history of misunderstanding sorority women, I expected justifiable backlash to my new status. For the first semester or so, I was ready to answer questions about my decision. I was ready to explain how sororities didn’t automatically equate to partying, and even if they did, that was OK – I felt confident in my ability to make my own path. I wasn’t ready for those questions to continue past one semester. I have found that even close friendships can be hurt by the deep-rooted misconceptions with which we regard the Greek community. I am still introduced as “my sorority friend” by some. Am I not more than a single affiliation? A lethal combination of inescapable branding and negative media attention has strengthened Greek presence and stereotypes simultaneously. I have decided: if I must be judged by my letters, I will define them, at risk of being defined incorrectly without personal intervention. Sorority women are ambitious. I initially joined because the most well-balanced women I knew were sorority members. In membership, I have seen positive peer pressure motivate women to do well comprehensively, in scholarship, service and self. Sorority women are scholars. All chapters require their members to maintain high minimum GPAs each semester, and the overall Panhellenic Women’s GPA here at UT is higher than the Women’s All-Campus GPA. Chapters maintain scholarship programs to help struggling students and reward member success. Sorority women are leaders. Sororities

strongly emphasize campus leadership, and their women are heavily involved in most major campus organizations. In addition to this involved culture, sororities provide many internal opportunities for members to sharpen their leadership skills, communication and professionalism. Sorority women are servants. Sororities participate in Greek-wide philanthropy events, volunteer regularly for their home chapter’s philanthropies and serve throughout the community, embodying the Torchbearer’s Creed that “One that beareth a torch shadoweth oneself to give light to others.” Of course, Greek life has its problems, just like every human-led community. I believe that the stereotypes associated with Greek life – about partying, lack of scholastic reinforcement, discrimination, and more – are gross overstatements based on a few negative factions. The high visibility of Greek life and scrutiny caused by the unacceptable actions of a few have placed unfavorable light on sorority women. I would contend that the true culture of sororities, internally reinforced by individual chapters, is more than inconsistent with these labels. The Panhellenic community is ready to welcome with open arms – more than that, we are ready to work alongside you in leadership and in service. We simply ask that you welcome us in return. Amy Prosise is a junior in human resource management. She can be reached at aprosis1@utk.edu.

Get Fuzzy • Darby Conley

Non Sequitur • Wiley

EDITORIAL

Such is the value of a cosmic perspective. This is the perspective that Seth MacFarlane, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Ann Druyan and FOX are hoping to bring to our television screens with their reboot of Carl Sagan’s 1980s classic, “Cosmos,” which premiered this past Sunday night to mostly rave reviews. It’s a perspective that is both humbling and empowering – an acknowledgement that we, ourselves, are very, very small, but that we are also part of something immeasurably – maybe even infinitely – greater. As Tyson states often, in some variation or another, in many of his interviews, “You can’t come away with this cosmic perspective thinking that you are better than others and want to fight. ... You’ll never have astrophysicists leading nations into war.” You can’t come away with it thinking we are invincible as a human race, either. At one point in the episode, Tyson constructed a “cosmic calendar” – compressing all of time into one calendar year, with the Big Bang starting off Jan. 1, and right now, today comprising the very last instance of Dec. 31. Life, he explains, didn’t start until September, and humans didn’t arise until Dec. 31, with all of modern civilization making up just the last 14 seconds of the calendar year. From this view, changes on the earth like

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Friday, March 14, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron

SPORTS

tprovost@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Dargan Southard msoutha1@utk.edu

SOFTBALL

Coleman nestling into nickelback role

Weekly, Lady Vols eager for positive start in SEC opener against Arkansas

Janie Prathammavong • The Daily Beacon

FOOTBALL

Troy Provost-Heron Sports Editor Justin Coleman and Cam Sutton. The two Tennessee defensive backs became the cornerstone of the Volunteer secondary in 2013. But heading into the 2014 season, it seems as if UT’s outside coverage duo will be split up. Sutton, who was named to the All-SEC freshman team last year, will remain on the outside, but Coleman’s “new home,� as described by the Vols defensive coordinator John Jancek, will be in the nickel position. Jancek said the senior defensive back, who has started 21 consecutive games for the Vols and recorded eight pass deflections in 2013, will give the Vols a boost in a position they struggled mightily at last season. “He’s got improved size,� Jancek said after UT’s fourth practice of the spring on Thursday. “I like the way he can run and cover No. 2 receivers, and when he gets his hands on guys, he’s able to move them out of the stem of the route. Those things are really positive. “He is going through a learning curve again right now, obviously, going from an outside guy to now, a nickel guy, but he’s got good knowledge and he’s picking up pretty quick on it.� But while UT’s coaches say Coleman has the physical tools to be a dominant nickel corner, they noted the position requires an in-depth focus on the other aspects of the opposing offense. “It’s very similar to the safety position, because you are tied into everything – the calls the checks,� defensive backs coach Wilie Martinez said. “You’re playing a position where you are lined up on the slot so you are seeing run as much as you

Senior defensive back Justin Coleman, left, practices tackling technique on a teammate during UT’s fourth spring practice inside the Neyland-Thompson Sports Complex on Thursday. are seeing pass and you have to be able it really well and make quick decision. “And usually, the slot receiver is the best receiver on the offense, so you’re matched up against a really good player.� Coleman, though, isn’t the only player in the secondary to be dealing with a position change. One of last year’s nickelbacks, DeVaun Swafford – who split time with JaRon Toney – has been moved to safety in order to give the back end of the defense more speed overall. The Kingsport, Tenn., started two ballgames for the last year and scored two touchdowns – a pick-six against the Florida Gators and a blocked punt return versus Georgia. “We need to get some speed on the field,� Jancek said. “Swafford was our nickel last year and we moved Justin there in the spring, so we got to find guys that can run in the back end of our defense and that’s what we are trying to do. “We’re trying to put the

pieces together that gives us the best combination of speed, knowledge and playmaking ability.� And with one defensive back spot open on the outside, a competition has broken out between Malik Foreman and Riyahd Jones, as well as early enrollees D’Andre Payne and Emmanuel Mosley, who have received high praise from their coaches thus far. “They are both doing what they are exposed to be doing,� Jancek said, “and obviously they are way behind in everything they are doing, but they have a great attitude and everyday is an important day for them.� Pearson proving a point His spectacular one-handed catch over Malik Foreman to kick off Thursday practice was the highlight of the day. For Von Pearson, an early enrollee JUCO transfer from Feather River C.C., it wasn’t his first highlight reel play of the spring, but in that moment, his potential as a playmaker on the

Tennessee offense shined. But while his playmaking ability is creating some buzz around him, his coaches are more impressed with the person they’ve come to know in his short time in a Tennessee uniform. “It’s unbelieveable,� wide receivers head coach Zach Azzanni said with a smile. “I said to him the other day, ‘Why are you so happy all the time, why do you always have your glass half full, I’m just wondering what goes on in your head?’ “He said to me, ‘Coach, I’ve seen the other side. I’ve worked at Bojangles serving fried chicken and I’ve done that and now I’m here at Tennessee in the SEC. I don’t want to go back,’ and that’s neat to hear him say that. “He’s got an opportunity that someone laid in front of him and he’s going to take full advantage of it, so he told, ‘Coach, this is easy. Real life stuff, that’s hard. I’m good, I want to stay here,’ so that’s why he is the way he is.�

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Contributor â&#x20AC;&#x153;(I am) fairly happy with where we are right now,â&#x20AC;? Tennessee cohead coach Karen Weekly said at Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s media availability. But where is the Tennessee softball team right now? Heading into the start of the SEC season, the No. 2 Lady Vols boast a 22-2 record. Their starting pitcher, senior Ellen Renfroe, is a perfect 13-0, backup Rainey Gaffin has already thrown a nohitter and the team is coming off of a 15-0 rout over Western Carolina. It is safe to say Weekly has reason to be content. The Lady Vols will travel to Fayetteville, Ark., to face the Lady Razorbacks (19-6) in a three-game series this weekend to open the SEC season for both teams. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re excited to start SEC play,â&#x20AC;? Weekly said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a long preseason. Things get at least little more predictable now. You know you are only playing three games a weekend, and you know who your opponent is going to be for every single game.â&#x20AC;? Last year, Tennesseeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first nine conference games were against top-five teams â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Alabama, Florida and Texas A&M. This year, however, the Lady Vols open conference play against an Arkansas team that has faced only three ranked opponents all season, tasting defeat in each of those games. Renfroe is still weary of their opponent despite the Lady Razorbacksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; modest record. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Any SEC team is going to be a challenge,â&#x20AC;? Renfroe said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No matter if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing the top-ranked team or one of the lower-ranked teams in the SEC, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to bring your A-game

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every time. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Any chance that they have to attack you, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to do it.â&#x20AC;? Weekly is particularly worried about the Lady Razorbacksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; pitching. In Tennesseeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one game against Arkansas in Knoxville last year, second team All-SEC pitcher Kimmy Beasley held the Lady Vols to one run, giving her team just enough support to earn a 2-1 victory on the road. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(They have) a really talented left-handed pitcher in Kimmy Beasley (3-2, 2.55 ERA),â&#x20AC;? Weekly said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and that always presents a different look for you with a lefty because we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get to face too many lefties, and we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have one on our staff that we can work against.â&#x20AC;? Freshman Grace Moll (8-2, 1.82 ERA) has taken over the top spot for the Lady Razorbacks this season, which will present a new challenge for the visiting team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know a whole lot about her yet,â&#x20AC;? Weekly said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re working on our video now and seeing what we can find out.â&#x20AC;? Although Arkansas possesses great talent in the circle, their strength actually lies at the plate. Arkansas leads Tennessee in every statistical offensive category, including 77 more runs, 60 more RBIs and a batting average of .356 compared to Tennesseeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s .322. While Tennessee has been training for the start of conference play since the first day of practice, this will be the first taste of the SEC for several members of the Lady Vols, which is an experience all its own, Renfroe said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think anything prepares you like the SEC like actually playing in it,â&#x20AC;? Renfroe said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;ŚYou can talk about how challenging it is, but until you actually get in and start playing, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not really ever prepared for it.â&#x20AC;?

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Friday, March 14, 2014 Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron

SPORTS

tprovost@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Dargan Southard msoutha1@utk.edu

Wade Rackley • Tennessee Athletics

Vols seeking consistency for crucial SEC road trip Wes Tripp Contributor The No. 14 Tennessee men’s tennis team (12-5, 1-2) hits the road this weekend for two road matches against the No. 17 Florida Gators (6-5, 1-1) and the No. 48 South Carolina Gamecocks (7-7, 0-2). After splitting their two matches in Mississippi last weekend, the Vols have honed in on improving this weekend to avoid any future slip-ups. “We’re just trying to stay as one team,” junior Brandon Fickey said. “A lot of the time everybody has been individuals out on the court. We’ve had our downs, but with downs you get ups, and I think we’re on the right path right now to having a great SEC season.” Despite losing four of the team’s last seven matches, head coach Sam Winterbotham and Fickey believe that the team has been improving despite not seeing results in the win column. “I think we’ve moved forward a lot,” Winterbotham said. “What we need to continue to do is be consistently on the same page when we’re playing matches. Guys have to do what they’re doing in practice at the same time in a match.” Fickey added: “We had some new faces coming in this season, several freshmen or transfers and that took a little getting used to. Since then, everyone is learning what it means to be a Vol out here and what the team’s expectations are.”

Tennessee’s two opponents this weekend will be two of its toughest foes on the conference schedule. The Gators wield four nationally-ranked singles players and three ranked doubles teams, while South Carolina has been a program on the rise throughout the season. With two difficult contests ahead, Winterbotham said he is expecting two intense matchups in hostile environments. “Florida has great talent up and down the lineup,” Winterbotham said. “They are a talent-rich state in terms of tennis. Their depth is excellent, and I feel like we just have to be ready to play our best tennis. “South Carolina has done a

great job building their program to where it is currently, and they are a very good team. We’ve got two tough matches ahead of us.” And in such a tough conference, playing on the road in the SEC always presents its challenges, but Winterbotham admitted he’s dialed in for the trip. “I actually like playing on the road in the SEC because the competition is so good,” Winterbotham said. “The venues, the fans, it really is an event. It’s a lot of fun. I’m looking forward to it more than anything else.” Friday’s matchup with Florida starts at 5 p.m., and the Vols will take on the Gamecocks Sunday at 1 p.m.

UT hoping to shock No. 2-ranked Gators Contributor Conference home openers in any college sport are always special due to the thrilling idea of garnering a win over a conference rival in front of a cheering crowd. What makes them even more special is if the home team has a shot to land a big upset win over one of the top-ranked teams in the country. The No. 49 Tennessee women’s tennis team has just that opportunity today at Barksdale Stadium. The Lady Vols (4-7, 0-3) host the second-ranked Florida Gators (11-2, 3-0) at 4 p.m. with an opportunity to get a season-defining win in front of a friendly crowd. Winning would not only give the Lady Vols their first conference win, but could provide the young team with an extreme confidence boost. Tennessee women’s co-head

continued from Page 1 The SEC tournament hasn’t been kind to Tennessee historically. That phenomenon has only grown in Martin’s first two years, as the Vols were knocked off the NCAA

tournament bubble with two quarterfinal losses. However, the Vols are a win over 13-seeded South Carolina away from facing either top-ranked Florida or Missouri on Saturday in the semifinals. If the words of UT guard Josh Richardson are any indi-

cation, the Vols are both calm and ready. “We feel like we can come out and put together a good three games,” Richardson said. “That’s all it is, really.” Today’s game will be televised nationally on ESPNU and is tentatively scheduled to start at 3:25 p.m. EST.

BASEBALL

Tennessee junior Brandon Fickey returns a backhand against Mississippi State at Barksdale Stadium on March 9. Fickey and the Vols head on the road to take on Florida and South Carolina this weekend.

WOMEN’S TENNIS

Jonathan Toye

SEC TOURNAMENT

Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon

MEN’S TENNIS

coach Mike Patrick, however, said the first expectation for the women’s match is improvement. “Like I have said all year long, we are a team that has got to work on keep getting better,” Patrick said. “We have got a lot freshmen, we have four or five freshmen in the starting lineup every week. It’s always a new experience. “We are getting better every week, but it takes a while. We are competing hard and we need to learn how to finish and be able to go toe-toe with those good teams.” Patrick recognized that the match against Florida is no easy challenge as he praised the Gators for their work ethic, noting UF’s lack of weaknesses. Patrick also listed the benefits of playing one of the nation’s top teams, pointing out that observing film of Florida can teach his young players what it takes to be one of the best. Junior Joanna Henderson said she’s aware of the significance of getting a win against Florida, but

agreed with her coach that the most important thing is getting better. “I mean that would be huge,” Henderson said. “I mean, right now we are just looking to work on things that we have been practicing on this week. It was a tough weekend last week, but we learned a lot of things. “We just really need to compete and go out right now and show the standard that we are at.” In the midst of preparing against a tough opponent and focusing on improvement, Henderson admitted she is also excited to play a conference opponent at home for the first time. “I love playing at home personally. I know the team is really exciting to get going,” Henderson said. “It is a tough opening match against Florida on Friday night, but we are all ready to go.” The Lady Vols will also play the No. 54 South Carolina Gamecocks on Sunday at Barksdale Stadium. That match is scheduled to start at 1 p.m.

Freshman Hunter Martin delivers a pitch during the Vols’ 14-0 win over the La Salle Explorers on March 4 at Lindsey Nelson Stadium.

Vols focused on remaining hot against Tigers in SEC opener Dargan Southard Assistant Sports Editor Two cross country flights, five multi-hour bus trips and pit stops in six different cities — all in less than seven days. That’s what is on the recent history tab of Dave Serrano’s No. 17 Tennessee Volunteers (15-1) as they head into their SEC opening series at Missouri, beginning tonight at 7 p.m. EST. After road trips to Arizona State and Middle Tennessee State within the last week, UT exited Knoxville late Wednesday evening and rode by sleeper bus through the pitch black for more than 600 miles before arriving in Columbia, Mo., Thursday afternoon. “Even though we have a journey of almost 12 hours on a sleeper bus, Serrano said on Tuesday, “it’s a sleeper bus, and that’s why we’re doing it. “It’s a lot easier than stopping over in two airports and doing that travel time.” The Vols have hardly seemed fazed despite the

hectic itinerary, winning 2-of-3 against the Sun Devils and grinding out a narrow 2-0 victory over the Blue Raiders on Tuesday. That success, coupled with UT’s 12-game winning streak to begin the year, has Serrano preaching consistency regardless of the notoriously-treacherous conference play that lies ahead. “We open up Friday in the SEC, and I just hope our guys’ personalities don’t change,” the third-year coach said. “It is the start of the SEC, but we’ve got to trust what we’ve done for the first 16 games. It’s pretty good, and we’ve just got to keep doing that.” As has been the case the previous three Friday evenings, Nick Williams (3-1, 1.85 ERA) will get the nod in the opener against the Tigers. The senior righty is coming off his first loss of the season aginst ASU, in which he gave up seven hits and three in 6 1/3 innings. The Vols, however, did make one pitching staff alteration as right-hander Kyle Serrano (2-0, 4.32) is not scheduled to start in

Columbia — his first absence from the weekend rotation all season. Freshman Hunter Martin (2-0, 0.00) will go on Saturday with sophomore Andrew Lee (2-0, 3.98) slated for the series finale on Sunday. Missouri’s schedule began in peculiar fashion as it opened up with 10 straight games away from home. The Tigers stumbled out to a 4-6 record, but since returning to Taylor Stadium on March 7, Tim Jamieson’s squad has reeled off 4-of5, including series victories over Southern Mississippi and Alcorn State. A big hand in the recent upswing has been Missouri starter Brett Graves, who’s owns a 0.98 ERA and has allowed just three earned runs and four walks with a team-high 23 strikeouts in 27 2/3 innings pitched. The junior righty will start Friday in what will be his second-career start against the Vols. Last season in Knoxville, Graves took a no-decision in a 7-6 UT win, giving up seven hits and two runs in five innings.

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