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Issue 46, Volume 122

Thursday, March 14, 2013

Campus prepares for ‘Vol Night Long’ Jessica Vinge

Staff Writer Students will be able to enjoy a safe, fun-filled evening of free activities at the TRECS Friday night with “Vol Night Long,” an annual event organized by the Campus Entertainment Board, which begins at 10 p.m. and lasts until 2 a.m. Saturday morning. With a student I.D., students can expect free activities, games and food. There will also be raffle prizes and competitions for students to join and win other prizes. Anna Lewis, a senior in journalism and electronic media, helped organize the event. She wants students to realize that there are safe ways to have fun and meet new people on a Friday night while also getting involved on campus. “The goal of ‘VNL’ is to provide the UT student population with a free event that they can stay at until the event ends at 2 a.m.,” Lewis said. “We like to give students an alcohol-free environment where they can come and meet new people, play fun games and discover

even more opportunities to be involved in UT’s campus.” There will be three to four inflatables, including a lifesized version of the game Twister, jousting and obstacle courses. Craft projects will also be available for students to work on and take home with them. They will be able to make their own key chains and street signs to put up in their dorms or apartments for decoration. Laser tag is another big activity on the list of available things to participate in at this year’s “VNL.” Martin Leamon, a junior in accounting, attended “Vol Night Long” his freshman year and enjoyed the alternative option for Friday night fun. “I thought it was a fun event to go to and hang out with friends,” Leamon said. “They had a lot of activities going on and big inflatables. And you can’t turn down free food. It was a nice change of pace from the normal parties me and my friends would usually go to on the weekends.” This year’s theme is “Block Party” and it will offer a number of field games that stu-

dents can play such as a threelegged race, potato sack race and egg on a spoon race. The ultimate goal of “VNL” is to provide students with a safe, substance free environment and to participate in said activities instead of other, potentially dangerous alternatives. The event will have a DJ on hand playing music for students to listen and dance to while engaging in the various activities available and meeting new people. Past “Vol Night Long” events have included Apple products as prizes, dodge ball and basketball competitions, a karaoke booth, video games and photo booths. In recent years more than 1,000 students have attended the event and given positive feedback. The Office of Student Activities and the Campus Entertainment Board encourages all students to branch out from their typical Friday night and attend “Vol Night Long” for a chance to get more involved on campus and meet Tara Sripunvoraskul • The Daily Beacon new people. Most importantly, A student competes in an obstacle course at ‘Vol Night Long.’ Vols can enjoy a fun and safe time, all night long.

Activist, sex trade survivor to speak Hanna Lustig

Contributor In the spirit of Women’s History Month, a day of activism in protest of human trafficking took place Tuesday — though perhaps not in the conventional sense. From noon until 2:00 p.m., groups of girls could be seen sitting on mattresses along Pedestrian Walkway, holding signs displaying statistics about sex trafficking in the U.S. and wearing torn clothing. While also intended to spread awareness of continued sexual exploitation within the U.S., the demonstration primarily served as publication for their event in the UC Auditorium on Tuesday night, entitled “America’s Dirty Little Secret,” which gives the story of keynote speaker and human trafficking survivor Theresa Flores. Demonstration participant Ariel Hughes, a junior in political science, acknowledged that her time on Pedestrian wasn’t easy, but that the mattresses were more effective than traditional forms of advertising. “I enjoyed it, but it was kind of difficult when people would pass by and they would stare at me,” Hughes said. “But I know that feeling is so miniscule compared to what people who are trafficked feel like. I hope people noticed and they show up.” Flores, a noted author and victim advocate, spoke

of her experiences in the suburbs of Detroit. At fifteen years old, she was drugged, raped and blackmailed into participating in a ring of criminal activity and commercial sex, only escaping after two years of coercion. As she put it, sex trafficking “is an epidemic that is not being shown on the nightly news.” Now, as a happily married social worker with two daughters, Flores has healed through finding a purpose for her story. Through sharing her experiences with the public, Flores hopes to garner not awareness of modern-day slavery, but also harsher punishments for perpetrators and support for her growing social movement. “The laws need to change locally,” Flores said. “They need to be going after the demand. And we need to be educating from middle school up on how to view women.” Her formal campaign, S.O.A.P. (Save Our Adolescents from Prostitution) Outreach, attempts to address prostitution by providing education and aid for motel owners in “high risk” areas, clientele and victims alike. The means by which Flores achieves this goal explains the unique name of the campaign. “We label small bars of hotel soap with the National Human Trafficking hotline,” Flores said. “Groups give them to motels, and that is how we reach these places.”

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Lawyer to address terrorism evolution Graham Gibson Staff Writer

• Photo courtesy of Anita Suleiman

The Wo m e n ’s Coordinating Council, one of the seven Central Programs Committees on campus, sponsored the keynote lecture Tuesday night. After the event, council chairperson Katherine Henry explained the need to draw attention to this subject. “I was talking to people about it and they were like,

‘oh that doesn’t really happen in Tennessee, it happens overseas, like in the movie ‘Taken,’” Henry said. “When really it’s happening obviously next door. So I think it was really important to bring it because it’s a local issue it’s a national and I don’t think people realize that.” Further information on Theresa Flores’ books,

organization and testimony can be found at http:// www.traffickfree.com. The Women’s Coordinating Council can also be liked on Facebook and followed on Twitter at @_WCC_. Future programming is also posted through their Student Activities website, at http://activities.utk.edu/ cpc/wcc/.

Check out this week’s Beacon Weekender Page 6

Terrorism is an evolving term. No longer does it simply encompass acts like suicide bombings, hijackings or anthrax-laced letters. A lecture by Walter Purdy, vice president for training and special projects at the Terrorism Research Center, will be held at 3:00 p.m. on Friday in Room 132 of the UT College of Law to discuss the term and what it means today. The lecture, entitled “Terrorism in a Changing World,” will cover a number of issues regarding terrorism in the modern world, and is free and open to the public. The event will explore topics such as the changing face of terrorism, terrorism in relation to the media and technology, and the challenges ahead in confronting the issue of terrorism. The lecture will also include an interactive presentation. Dr. Susan Speraw, associate professor in the College of Nursing and director of UT’s Global Disaster Nursing Program, organized the lecture, and believes it will hold significance for those in a variety of fields. “We have received expressions of interest from across the campus and the community,” Speraw said. “People have called from agriculture, who are interested in how terrorism affects food and animal safety and crops. Local, state and even federal law enforcement have expressed interest, looking for law enforcement techniques and what they need to be aware. There are also political science issues, and they are interesting in the setting and creating of policy. Everyone is coming with their own interest.” See TERRORISM on Page 2

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2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, March 14, 2013 News Editor RJ Vogt

CAMPUS NEWS TERRORISM continued from Page 1 Purdy has enjoyed a prestigious and successful career. He has been sent to the Middle East and Asia on behalf of the U.S. Department of State and U.S. Department of Justice. He also has extensive experience working on international projects for reducing the threats of terrorism, and has developed highly specialized anti-terrorism training programs for law enforcement and the intelligence community. Currently, he serves as a director of the Terrorism Research Center in Washington D.C., a non-profit organization founded in 1996 with a focus on investigating and researching global terrorism issues. He has spoken at UT several times since first doing so in 2007. Speraw has high praise for Purdy. “He is a well-known entity in the terrorism community,” she said. “He has spoken to our students a number

of times in the past, and his knowledge of the past, present and future is pretty incredible and deep. He knows what’s going on.” Dr. Mary Nypaver, a UT clinical assistant professor in the College of Nursing and faculty of the Global Disaster Nursing Program, attended a lecture by Purdy in the past as a student. “Part of his expertise comes from his levels of experience and exposure,” Nypaver said. “I was very impressed at his knowledge of the subject matter. It was very interesting because it was information I had not heard, and he was a very descriptive and engaging speaker. He held our interest, and the information he gave us was pertinent and helpful.” The lecture is being sponsored by the UT College of Nursing’s Global Disaster Nursing Program, the UT College of Law and the International House with a grant funded from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

rvogt@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor David Cobb

dcobb3@utk.edu

Annual event encourages students to recycle Brooke Turner

Staff Writer In the spirit of beating the Florida Gators, UT students gathered Tuesday at the amphitheater outside the Humanities and Social Sciences Building to participate in the “Recyclympics,” an event to raise recycling awareness. Held in conjunction with UT’s participation in the “Recyclemania” intercollegiate competition, the “Recyclympics” have been an annual occurrence for four years. Kaitlyn Yoder, assistant recycling coordinator at Make Orange Green, said UT is the only school that does it. “Jay Price started the Recyclympics over four years ago, so he is really the mastermind behind the whole event,” Yoder explained. Price became the environmental coordinator at Make Orange Green in 2004 and has led the university in numerous endeavors to reduce waste and bolster sustainability. In 2008, he came up with the

“Recyclympics” event in hopes of getting students excited about recycling. “I had heard of ... green game(s) happening on other campuses, so that’s basically where I got the idea from,” Price said. “But the events themselves me and my staff made up.” He acknowledged that the “Recyclympics” may not immediately reduce waste but maintained it would prove itself in the long run. “My thought is, the biggest reason people don’t recycle is because they just don’t think about it, so this event is just another way to remind them,” Price said. “I think that the involvement, getting students to both participate and volunteer, is what will help and resonate. “I mean, who’s not going to have fun going through an obstacle course, and throwing a phone book and throwing some plastic bottles at stuff? It is just fun, but at least it’s getting them to think about it a little bit.” Price explained that recycling awareness is especially key during this semester’s “Recyclemania” tournament. “We’re competing against five hundred other schools to see who can recycle the most and throw away the least, so we kind of want to draw attention to recycling in general at this time,” he said. “And this is the most fun way we have found to do this so far.” The eight-week long competition is currently in its fifth week. At the end of the fourth week, Price said UT students were recycling at a rate of 4.4 pounds per person, edged slightly by Florida’s rate of 5.3

TreDarius Hayes • The Daily Beacon

Students participate in the 'Recyclympics' on Tuesday. pounds per person. “We’ve got … less than one pound per person that we’ve got to make up … to beat Florida,” Price said. Price is not the only one keen on beating Florida. “I’m feeling pretty competitive now, so I have to get more of my friends involved too,” Leanna Sanders, junior in elementary education, said. Sanders had stopped by the Sigma Sigma Rho domestic violence awareness display on Pedestrian Walkway when she saw the colorful inflatables of the “Recyclympics” and decided to check it out. “This event is actually a whole lot more fun than I thought it would be. … It’s making me think about recycling a lot more than when

I woke up this morning,” Sanders said. “I played the mouse ball game, and now the cap in the hay stack, but what I’m really looking forward to is the bouncing obstacle course.” Price said UT has planned a few more events for the last three weeks of the “Recyclemania” tournament. Whether UT can catch Florida in the rankings remains to be seen, but Price pointed out the far-reaching benefits of developing sustainable habits now. “It’s one of the reasons we come to college, right? To learn, to get better habits … hopefully people will develop those habits and use them to make the world a better place,” Price said.


Thursday, March 14, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 Arts & Culture Editor Victoria Wright

ARTS & CULTURE

vwright6@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan

merdogan@utk.edu

School of Music hosts renowned bassist Melodi Erdogan Assistant Arts & Culture Editor The UT Jazz Band and Studio Orchestra hosted a performance featuring Harvie S, a renowned jazz bassist who has decades of experience in the music business and now serves as the Jazz Ambassador for the United States. The event took place on Tuesday night in the Cox Auditorium of the Alumni Memorial Building. Presented by the School of Music, the performance had three different parts. S started the show performing with the ensemble, with the jazz band, then with a few members of the faculty and finished the show with a solo performance. “It’s always fun to play with someone as good as him because he knows what he’s doing,” said Garrit Tillman, sophomore in studio music and jazz who played a drum set along side S in the ensemble performance. Known for his original music and work done with fellow artists like Chet Baker and Tony Bennett, S is also currently a professor of jazz bass ensemble at Manhattan School of Music, undergraduate and graduate divisions. S said that he experienced some intense moments during his performance. “I love when I get into the music and I leave the world and the only thing that is left is me and the music,” S said. “I had a couple of moments like that tonight where I just got into the music and forgot about everything else. That’s the real fun of music, getting as deep into it as you can.” The relationship between the drums and the bass is key to a good jazz performance, which put more pressure on Tillman even after multiple rehearsals and individual practice time. “At first when he came I was afraid I was going to be really stressed out,” Tillman said. “Being a drummer and him being a bassist, there’s a lot of communication with those two instruments but it turned out that it was a whole lot easier to play with him, it was a lot

more fun. “ Inna Karsheva, sophomore and violin performance major, said she enjoyed the performance and the different parts of the show. “It was pretty much awesome,” Karsheva said. “(Harvie S) is amazing, he feels so good on the stage. All of them worked really hard and the results are always good and amazing, all of them are really good musicians.” S said he enjoyed performing all different parts of the concert and felt right at home, musically, with his fellow performers for the night. “They’re top quality musicians, they’re as good as the guys I play with in New York,” S said. “It felt great, it felt like I was home and playing with great musicians, it was a lot of fun.” Mainly studying, practicing and performing classical music, Karsheva also sings jazz and said that she appreciates jazz for the genre of music that it is. “In classical music we don’t improvise so much, we are used to playing with sheet music a lot,” Karsheva said. “Of course when we have concerts we play by memory but it’s a little bit different with jazz improvisations. When you play classical music it’s more like there’s a frame, and with jazz music it’s like the frame is gone.” Aspiring musicians need to keep improving their work and be dedicated in order to really succeed in the music business, S said. “You have to be totally dedicated, you have to learn everything you can and you have to work really hard and not expect anything right away, because there’s a lot of competition,” S said. “Just always get better and work hard, and things will come to you. Play the music, learn all the skills, learn how to read, learn how to play the instrument well, learn the history of the music you want to play, really learn as much as you can and that will really help you. And learn how to teach, because you’re going to need to teach to survive and pay the bills.” Karsheva often performs in the Cox

Auditorium for orchestral events within the School of Music and said she wishes more people would attend. “For this type of concert, especially one that is free, I expect to see more people here, but it’s always like that for all the UT recitals and concerts, which is kind of sad,” Karsheva said. “The concerts are free and it’s awesome music and all of us that perform, we are students and other students can hear what music students can do here. We’re not just carrying our cases around campus, we practice a lot and there are results.” Tillman, who also performs in special events for the School of Music, said he was discouraged by the lack of students at the free events. “I’m kind of pissed because I thought a lot more people would come,” Tillman said. “Although a lot of people that would actually come to this stuff was playing. There are a bunch of people involved with all this but I think there are people who should be here who aren’t, especially in the studio, but it’d be cool to get some other people here too, outside people.” S has performed in multiple venues and festivals including the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C., and the Berlin Jazz Festival in Germany. Despite his experience traveling, S said he plans on returning to Knoxville soon. “The people are very friendly, the food is great, the weather is nice, so there’s a lot of things, and this university is fantastic, so all in all I can’t see anything wrong with this place, it’s fun and it’s a great place to be,” he said. Overall, Tillman said he enjoyed playing with S on a big stage. “It was probably some of our best runs that we’ve done as an ensemble, it sounded really good,” he said. S said he also felt good about the performance. “I may not be the best judge but I think we had a good crowd,” S said. “I think everybody was very receptive, and when we get an encore, I’m thrilled.”

Field of Greens puts fresh twist on dining Sam Coley Contributor Among the eateries on campus — from dining halls to sandwich places — one restaurant is attempting to serve food promoting a greener lifestyle. Field of Greens, located on the third floor of the UC, sells fresh and healthy wraps and salads. Alexa Kavanaugh, freshman in nutrition, said she loves the restaurant’s healthy options. “I love Field of Greens because ... their food is one of the few healthier eating options on campus,” Kavanaugh said. Kavanaugh said her favorite menu item is the summertime strawberry wrap. “I love this wrap because it has all of my favorite ingredients that I think make up a good salad,” Kavanaugh said. “I used to go eat there for lunch every two to three days, but now I go maybe once every two weeks.” Hannah Olsen, a freshman in nursing and another regular customer, said she enjoys the diversity the restaurant brings. “The summertime strawberry wrap is amazing, but I also love Field of Greens because it is different than something you could get at PCB dining hall, Smokey’s or Rocky Top,” Olsen said. Olsen said she heard about the restaurant from a friend and she is happy the restaurant has gained popularity.

“I didn’t really understand what it was at first,” Olsen said. “Now I’m a big fan. It used to be a best kept secret on campus, but now it is very well known.” Even though Olsen does not want the line to grow longer, she said that she would recommend this place to other students. “The food is good, the people there are very nice, and you can use a meal equivalency there,” Olsen said. Field of Greens employee Bridget Graham said the ingredients are all natural. “I actually make the hummus and the cream cheese spread that is included in some of the wraps,” Graham said. “This is a much better option for students because it is way healthier for students.” Graham said some of the popular items are the summertime strawberry wrap and the buffalo chicken ranch wrap. Many of the wraps are similar to the salads. If a student wants a light meal, the summertime strawberry wrap and the All-American veggie wrap are less heavy options. There are more hearty choices, such as the buffalo chicken ranch wrap and the chicken ceasar wrap. With every wrap a student can choose homemade chips or fruit. Students can also use their meal plan there. A wrap or salad is around $6 and ends up being around $2 cash when used with a meal plan. Field of Greens is open Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, March 14, 2013 Editor-in-Chief Blair Kuykendall

OPINIONS

bkuykend@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Going

Somewhere...

Hopefully Legislature raises more questions Preston Peeden Associate Editor Two nights ago, I was completely blank on what to write about. I had no ideas, no thoughts, no opinions. Thankfully, I have the deus ex machina that is the Tennessee State Legislature, who have seemingly mastered the ability to grab headlines not with the quality of their policies, but with the discriminatory nature of their ideologies. So in the spirit of continuing what seems to be a weekly-feature of “Dumb and Discriminatory Things Your Politicians Do for You,” I present the proposed SB 514 Bill. Here is an abridged version of the bill as introduced to the State Senate: “A public institution of higher education operating … shall not discipline or discriminate against a student in a counseling, social work, or psychology program because the student refuses to counsel or serve a client as to goals, outcomes, or behaviors that conflict with a sincerely held religious belief of the student, if the student refers the client to a counselor who will provide the counseling or services.” This bill is based off a lawsuit where a student was expelled from Eastern Michigan University for refusing to council a homosexual student on issues of depression. The student, Julea Ward, won a settlement, and what was considered a win for “religious liberty” (and intolerance), thus creating the slippery slope that leads to today. Essentially this bill, as proposed by Senator Joey Hensley, would allow a counselor in-training to not be reprimanded for refusing to council someone whose views or issues run contrary to their religious beliefs. In an ironic sense, it’s a block against discriminating against people who discriminate. The outcomes of this bill’s possible passing is widespread. Firstly, this could greatly damage the ability for a university to keep its accredita-

tion, which would then hurt students in the long run, and secondly, and more importantly, this sends a message that discrimination is OK, now that people can hide behind the guise of “sincerely held religious beliefs.” Don’t the job descriptions of a counselor or a social worker involve the ability to disavow one’s personal biases for the sake of understanding and helping a patient? For those who think this bill is well within the confines of an acceptable norm, then I guess the Code of Ethics for the National Association of Social Workers, which states that “social workers should not practice, condone, facilitate, or collaborate with any form of discrimination on the basis of race, ethnicity, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, marital status, political belief, religion, immigration status, or mental or physical disability,” no longer applies to those trained in Tennessee. That’s a comforting thought. Even on a more personal level, with the test case of Julea Ward as an example, the passage of this bill does more than just protect people who should probably not be in the health care profession, but it also tells these clients, people suffering from identity crises, depression, etc., that they are immoral people, and that their issues are so repugnant that they don’t deserve help from this specific religiously-minded counselor. How would that make you feel? Even if you are brought to another counselor who would hear you out, the damage of rejection is already done. I don’t really know why this bill is up for discussion. I don’t know how rampant a problem this truly is, and I also don’t know why this bill is even being considered as falling in lines with practices that counselors, psychiatrists, social workers and a litany of other professions should be imbued with if they are educated in Tennessee. I believe in religious freedom. I believe in the ability for people to hold their own views. I don’t believe in discrimination, and I don’t support SB 514. — Preston Peeden is a senior in history. He can be reached at ppeeden@utk.edu.

SCRAMBLED EGGS • Alex Cline

SOUTHERN GLAMOUR• Jake Hobson

Misunderstanding surrounds immigration Urban Landscapes by

Lindsay Lee In our national discussion about immigration, there are a number of common talking points used in order to encourage the public to fear the people who come to our country and the consequences of their residence here. Many of these talking points are definitively false. Let’s clear up some misconceptions here today. Misconception 1: Immigration causes an increase in crime. This is one of the biggest lies told in our political discourse in order to foster fear (often racially charged) toward people who enter this country. The vast majority of immigrants come here to improve their lives, so they try to stay out of trouble because they know they are risking deportation. The incarceration rate for immigrants is five times lower than the incarceration rate for nativeborn Americans. Studies actually show that in places where immigration has increased, both legal and illegal, crime has dropped. Border cities such as El Paso, Texas and San Diego, California are two of the safest cities in the nation. Misconception 2: Immigrants are an economic burden. Studies show that immigration actually has a very positive effect on the economy, as immigrants foster economic growth and technological advancement. The U.S. lacks the skilled labor to fill many of our scientific and professional jobs. Many companies need an influx of skilled immigrant labor to continue operating at a competitive level, but many others, such as Microsoft, have moved their offices out of the U.S. into countries like Canada where immigration laws are more lax. Unskilled immigrant labor also helps grow the economy because they take jobs that many Americas are unwilling to take. In many states like Texas, undocumented immigrants

pay more taxes and generate more revenue than the state spends on them. Misconception 3: Immigrants send all their money back to their native countries. In reality, Latino immigrants on average send only about 10 percent of their money back to their original countries. This comes out to be about $50 billion, which sounds like a lot. But really it means that they end up spending $450 billion in the United States. $50 billion is slightly less than half of what people in the U.S. spend as tourists abroad each year. Immigrants all over the world send money back to their native countries, no matter if they emigrated from a poor nation or wealthier one. Misconception 4: Immigrants don’t assimilate into American culture. While natives of another country want to keep ties to their native culture, immigrants assimilate into American culture extremely quickly. Immigrants over the last 25 years have assimilated into our culture much faster than those of the immigration wave at the beginning of the 20th century. This is despite the fact that immigrants today are more distinct from Americans than immigrants one hundred years ago. Children of Latino immigrants learn English incredibly quickly, and the vast majority of second generation immigrants use English as their primary language. Misconception 5: Undocumented immigrants don’t have rights here. This idea is perhaps one of the most detrimental to our national conversation about immigration. Under the 14th Amendment, all people — not just citizens — have equal protection under the law. All children — not just citizens — have the right to free public education. And all patients — not just citizens — have the right to emergency medical services. All immigrants, regardless of immigration status, are human beings and deserve to be treated as such. This type of rhetoric is dehumanizing and alienating to an entire sector of people who just want their own little piece of the American dream. — Lindsay Lee is a junior in mathematics. She can be reached at llee26@utk.edu.

Sequestration highlights political failure Committee of Infractions by

Greg Bearinger

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Blair Kuykendall

editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com

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The Daily Beacon is published by students at The University of Tennessee Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters and Tuesday and Friday during the summer semester. The offices are located at 1340 Circle Park Drive, 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The newspaper is free on campus and is available via mail subscription for $200/year, $100/semester or $70/summer only. It is also available online at: www.utdailybeacon.com. LETTERS POLICY: The Daily Beacon welcomes all letters to the editor and guest columns from students, faculty and staff. Each submission is considered for publication by the editor on the basis of space, timeliness and clarity. Contributions must include the author’s name and phone number for verification. Students must include their year in school and major. Letters to the editor and guest columns may be e-mailed to letters@utdailybeacon.com or sent to Blair Kuykendall, 1340 Circle Park Dr., 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The Beacon reserves the right to reject any submissions or edit all copy in compliance with available space, editorial policy and style. Any and all submissions to the above recipients are subject to publication.

As we enter another phase of talks about spending cuts, leaving Republicans to demand that the “tired, poor and hungry” become, well, more of all those things, and Democrats wearing actual ski masks as they ransack the mansions of the rich, we ought to ask ourselves a question with a very scary answer: what would Congress be doing right now if it wasn’t for all this talk about sequestration? It’s really a shame that the term “sequestration” has to be assigned to such an act of frustrating proportions. It sounds to me like a step in making jams and jellies, not an agreement amongst politicians to approach a topic when it is more politically savvy to address than it is at the time. Ironically, choosing to sequester budget decisions is itself a politically tricky thing. They get over it by simply making the sequestration sound super extreme. It’s essentially like waiting to go to the bathroom during an interview because you don’t want to appear rude, except in this case the interview is an election and the politicians are making the entire country wait to go to the restroom for a few months. My prediction was that this whole thing would disappear in December in a last-minute deal that would result in an incredibly mediocre bill being passed, but it would also result in the politicians looking like they had actually produced a real political compromise when they were merely trying to save face. Of course, they realized that putting off a discussion about real issues because it’s difficult doesn’t mean it will actually become easier. There is a short list of things Congress would be debating if they weren’t trying

to avoid destruction. The first would be the Affordable Care Act. I’m pretty sure Republicans wouldn’t be seriously trying to repeal it, but they would be annoying Democrats everywhere by trying to stymie it. Democrats, for what it’s worth, would be finding clever names to hide what they were trying to do – raise taxes and cut defense spending. It probably would all be a bill called “The Fair Share for America Fourth of July Fireworks Spectacular Act” or something, and include a clause about requiring all guns to be made of cheese in order to “compromise” on it later. If you’ve been following this sequestration mess at all, you realize that most of what I just said has happened in one way or another, just under the guise of a debate about budget. While this might appear to offer hope that one agreement might mean progress in all these issues, it is really turning a larger debate about how the government is funded and how that should influence policy into a forum where the parties can ride their hobby – horses. Instead of intelligently, systematically and amicably debating self-defense, healthcare, gun control and the budget as separate issues, they have tried to debate them all at once. In the confusion, giving ground on one of these issues appears to be giving ground on all of them. Instead of offering the hope of an omnibus bill to fix everything through reasoned debate, most congressmen have taken refuge behind party lines. Of course, something will get done. No politician will want this to continue forever. Just be aware that when rhetoric is confusing and the situation is dire, politicians will sneak something into the final legislation that nobody will have wanted. — Greg Bearringer is a graduate student in history. He may be reached at gbearrin@ gmail.com.


Thursday, March 14, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON โ€ข 5 Arts & Culture Editor Victoria Wright

ARTS & CULTURE

vwright6@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan

merdogan@utk.edu

Thursday, March 14

Saturday, March 16

Who: The Blue Heavy Where: Preservation Pub When: 10 p.m. Price: N/A (ages 21 and over) Victoriaโ€™s Take: The Blue Heavy is a band composed of UT students with old school influences. Born and

Who: Cutthroat Shamrock with the Royal Hounds and Filthy Still Where: Market Square When: 6 p.m. Price: Free Melodiโ€™s Take: Now that the weather is warming up and Market Square isnโ€™t as much of a hassle to get to,

raised in Tennessee, the band blends the sounds of Memphisโ€™ Stax and โ€˜60s rock, a mixture that creates a powerful funk/rock vibe. The band performs classic covers as well as original tracks. Check out their track, โ€œBrother,โ€ on the bandโ€™s website, theblueheavy.com. You wonโ€™t be disappointed.

why not enjoy a nice outdoor concert with a cutie? Celebrate the upcoming season and St. Patrickโ€™s day with this free, outdoor concert with local bands that are sure to please any leprechaun or green-wearing mortal. Just make sure you donโ€™t get pinched!

Sunday, March 17 Who: The Protomen Where: NV Nightclub (ages 18+) When: 8 p.m. Price: $10 Melodiโ€™s Take: The Old City guarantees a good time, and this concert taking place at the

NV Nightclub is sure to bring joy to many students eager for spring break. The Protomen, originally from Nashville, are influenced by video game music and rock-opera revival. Their music combines a little bit of everything and produces a cool, unique sound that doesnโ€™t compare to other artists topping the charts these days. Start spring break a little early and opt for a jamming Sunday night.

โ€ข Photo courtesy of The Blue Heavy

Friday, March 15 Who: Vol Night Long Where: TRECS When: 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. Price: Free Victoriaโ€™s Take: All night long ... ahem, I meant to say Vol Night Long. While this event wasnโ€™t necessarily

inspired by Eddie Murphyโ€™s hit โ€˜80s jam, the event promises the same โ€” a party. The UT tradition gives students access to games, free refreshments and other entertainment into the a.m. So bring your friends, have them bring their friends and yโ€™all can be friends, or something like that. Itโ€™s a free party, why not go?

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, March 14, 2013 Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell

SPORTS

lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Three Vols punch tickets to NCAAs Allen reflects on ‘98 championship team Preston Peeden

Associate Editor Three UT divers punched their tickets to the NCAA Championships this week at the NCAA Zone B Championships. Facing tough competition and only a small number of available slots — ten for the women and five for the men — junior Tori Lamp and senior Jodie McGroarty for the Lady Vols and senior Brent Sterling for the men were able two rise above the pressure of the situation and perform against teams frowm around the region at the level that diving coach Dave Parrington expected of them. “I felt like we had an excellent shot at getting two women in the meet, Tori and Jodie, and we got that accomplished,” Parrington said. “And we thought we had a good shot with Brent, but I knew with only five slots, it was going to be a really tough

thing to get done. And to his credit he stepped up yesterday and did an awesome job.” McGroarty was guaranteed a spot following her performance Monday, in which she placed third on the 3-meter springboard, and Lamp and Sterling both wrapped up their places on Tuesday with their strong performances in the women’s 1-meter and the men’s 3-meter, respectively. For Parrington, the setup of this meet, in which a diver must compete and must qualify at the Zones to make it to the NCAA Championship, makes it one of the pressureriddled competitions the team will face all year long. “This is not really the most fun of coaching experiences for most college coaches, because it’s different than any other meet in the world,” Parrington said. “… There’s a lot at stake because they get one shot all year to make the NCAA Championships, so that just changes the whole mindset of the coaches and

the competitors. It’s a tough meet.” For Sterling, who will be making his third trip to the NCAAs, his second-place finish with a score of 731.10 points in the 3-meter finals yesterday was a huge stress reliever. “I was stressed out and nervous at the start of the week,” Sterling said. “… It’s just a huge load off my back to make it, and I just really wanted to end my career at NCAAs.” Sterling faced stiff competition in two events from Nick McCrory, a senior at Duke and bronze medalist in the 10-meter platform at the 2012 London Olympics, and John Santieu IV from Auburn, who took first in the 3-meter. For Sterling, the key to his and the others divers’ performances was consistency. “The big thing is consistency,” Sterling said. “You can’t make any real big mistakes or you’re going to be out of the contest.” Other Vols competing were freshman Samantha Lera, who came up just short of qualifying in the platform, and senior Jordan Mauney, who closed out his UT career yesterday with a 15th place finish in the platform preliminary round. Next up for the divers will be the NCAA Championships, which begins March 21 for the women and March 28 for the men. This quick turn around for both teams is something that Parrington is trying to combat. “I give them tomorrow off,” Parrington said. “You’re coming off the SECs and then come into here with everything on the line is tough … This is the time to get caught up in school and get any injuries figured out.” Regardless of the lack of time, Parrington is hopeful for his diver’s chances. “I like where we’re at,” he said with a chuckle. “I like what I think we can do.”

Lauren Kittrell

Sports Editor Tennessee football is a tradition built around individuals who work together to become something more than just an athletic program. It’s that tradition and those individuals who created the orange and white, the “Power T” and the Vol Nation. These individuals are Volunteers for life. In the fall of 1995, former head coach Phillip Fulmer and former offensive coordinator David Cutcliffe recruited a true “Vol for Life.” From coming to UT as a freshman defensive back, to competing on a National Championship team, to now working at the university in donor relations and capital support, Mikki Allen will always be a Tennessee Volunteer. After watching the Vols compete in the 1996 Citrus Bowl and record a 20-14 win over the Ohio State Buckeyes, Allen called both Fulmer and Cutcliffe to inform them of his decision to come to Tennessee. A highly-touted defensive back from Brentwood Academy, with a long line of UT legacy, Allen became a part of the 1996 recruiting class. To this day, he still remembers that moment. “I remember calling Coach Fulmer and Coach Cutcliff after the game as a high school senior and saying, ‘Hey, I’m in,’” Allen said. “‘I feel that over the next four years, something special is gonna go on in your team.’” Allen said he felt the pieces were in place for the team to win a national title and he wanted to be a piece of that puzzle. It was one of the best decisions he ever made. “I remember it like yesterday, running out in the Fiesta Bowl,” he said reminiscing. “You see orange and white everywhere and our fans showed up and they were supportive. We knew the moment that we ran out there and saw all the orange that there was no way that we

were gonna leave Tempe, Ariz., without the championship.” The former safety said the team was driven, filled with talent and unwilling to settle for anything less than a national title. But while the vision was clear, the reality was dizzying. “It was almost like everything was slow motion and surreal,” Allen said. “I think we were prepared mentally when we went out to Arizona to win the game.” That year, Tennessee beat the favored Florida State Seminoles, 23-16, to win the BCS National Championship. Allen said that while the team was stacked in terms of talent, it came down to their personal drive to succeed and to work towards their goal. That’s what he tells the aspiring young athletes that he has an opportunity to work with at UT. “I just think you got to work hard and control what you can control,” he said. “Go out there and work and compete and do the little things.” Allen said practice and preparation were key to the Volunteers success in the 1998 season. He said that’s what he encourages young athletes with as they look to higher competition. “Our practices were like games,” he said. “We just had so much talent that practices, if you survived a practice, if you were able to compete and play on a high level at practice then we knew that the games were gonna be easy for us ... Coaches didn’t have to tell us when to get extra practice in. We practiced during the summer as a unit, as a team, on our own. It’s not just waiting, it’s being proactive.” As the program has gone through coaching change after coaching change, Allen has stood by and quietly observed. Now as head coach Butch Jones comes on board, Allen said he’s excited about Jones because he “gets it” — he understands

the legend, the tradition that is Tennessee football. “He brings a lot of passion and energy and he understands and embraces the UT tradition,” Allen said. Most important to Allen is Jones’ endeavor to reach out to former players. “Former players are your life blood. They’re the architects that helped build this program into what it is today,” Allen said. “It’s important that you reach out and you have some kind of outreach with former players and keep them engaged and abreast of your vision and how you’re trying to rebuild the program.” As a former athlete, Allen wants to point current players in every walk of life, whether it’s academically, on the field or as a representative of the university. As he works directly with alumni and financial donors, Allen hopes they see, in him, hope for the future of the programs they are supporting. “I’m a return on your investment. You made the investment when I was playing in the late ‘90s and here I am,” Allen said. “Hopefully I am representing you well as an ambassador, not only for UT, but as a good husband, a good father and a productive citizen in the Knoxville community.” While Allen did a short stint outside of Knoxville as a part of the San Francisco 49ers and co-founder of 29/34 Vintage Sportswear, he didn’t leave for long. Giving back to the state and the university that gave so much to him has always been a part of Allen’s plan. “This state has been good to me and I always wanted to give back,” he said. “I knew when I raised my family (I wanted to do that) in an area where people knew me and in an area where, people that had invested in me when I played at (UT), I’d be able to do the same thing that they did and be in the community that they invested in. That’s why I’m here.”


Thursday, March 14, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 7 Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell

SPORTS Vols squeak past Hilltoppers, take two-game series lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Dargan Southard

producing a run with only one to a respectable level,” head easy to deflate a little bit, but ball leaving the infield. After coach Dave Serrano said. “For we stayed with (the game) left fielder Parker Wormsley a team that’s trying to find and got rewarded for (our reached on an error, second their identity, I’ll take this effort),” Serrano said.” Freshman right fielder baseman Jeff Moberg ripped kind of win.” Sophomore Will Maddox, Christin Stewart wasn’t a single to left, putting runWednesday’s contest saw who has been a lineup catalyst around for Tennessee’s dra- ners on the corner with only Tennessee leave fifteen run- all season, got the scoring matic 13-inning win over one out. Leadoff hitter Taylor ners on base and have a player started in the first, stealing Western Kentucky last sea- Smart then brought in the successfully picked off in the both third and home after son. It was a game that saw fans sit through nearly five hours of frigid temperatures and bitter winds before the team finally came away with the win. As Wednesday’s contest versus the same Hilltoppers seemed to be heading in a similar direction, the Lawrenceville, Ga., native made sure this year’s game didn’t go quite as long. Stewart took a fastball off the left tricep with the bases loaded, forcing in the winning run as Tennessee (9-7) gutted out a 5-4 victory in ten innings at Lindsey Nelson Stadium. “(A walk off hit by pitch) is not something you see every day, but whatever gets the job done,” Stewart said. “When I saw the ball coming in I was Christin Stewart connects with the ball against WKU on March 13. just like get out of the way, but we always practice stay- run with a bunt single that seventh, eighth and ninth reaching on a bunt single. ing in there, staying in the was mishandled by Hilltopper innings. Serrano didn’t mind The hit extended the third box, not giving an inch and pitcher Ian Tompkins. baseman’s hit streak to a the ugly victory. taking the pitch.” “We’ll take it. We’ll take it “I compliment our guys career-high 11 games. The game winner came every day of the week, espe- because it would have been The Western Kentucky bats three batters after the cially when we’re fighting Diamond Vols tied the game, back to get our record back Staff Writer

seemed destined for another quiet evening as freshman Andy Cox stifled the Hilltoppers’ offense through four innings, allowing just five base runners on four hits while striking out one. “I’m really proud of how (Andy Cox) is growing up.

he jumped ahead and how he stretched his arm when he got ahead.” Western Kentucky junior right fielder Jordan Cessna finally ended the scoring drought with a fifth-inning blast into the left field porch, trimming the Volunteer lead to 2-1. The homer seemed to be the jumpstart Matt Myers’ squad needed, as it was followed by a stolen base sandwiched between two singles to tie the score. Tennessee answered back in the sixth, when three wild pitches brought home freshman Vance Vizcaino. The lead only lasted two innings, however, as the Hilltoppers tied the game at three in the eighth with three consecutive two-out singles. This created a deadlock that would last until extra innings. “It’s a good win. It’s a sloppy win, but now we’ve strung five straight wins in a row,” Serrano said. “The confidence level is going up a little bit in the dugout, and it’s Erica Fabbri • The Daily Beacon a good feeling going into our first SEC game.” The Vols will travel to I want to put him in situ- Tuscaloosa this weekend to ations where he can have open up conference play with some success,” Serrano said. a three-game series against “I was very happy with his the Alabama Crimson Tide. composure today, and how


8 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, March 14, 2013 Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell

SPORTS

lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Vols look to solidifty résumé in SEC Tournament Austin Bornheim

Assistant Sports Editor With the SEC regular season coming to a close over the weekend, the true madness of March can begin. The SEC Tournament starts on Wednesday and the Tennessee Volunteers (19-11, 11-7 SEC) look to solidify their résumé and nab a berth in the NCAA Tournament. “(We) feel good about where our team is right now,” head coach Cuonzo Martin said. “Guys are playing hard. We’ve gotten better on both ends of the floor.” The Vols will play No. 13 Mississippi State today at 3:30 p.m. EST and the game is a must win for the Vols. In 2012, Tennessee entered the SEC Tournament riding a similar hot streak, but were bounced in their first game by Ole Miss and were left on the outside looking in for the NCAA Tournament field. “Going into this season, you’re losing a key guy but you still had good parts,” Martin said. “For me it was the system. We didn’t play with a level of toughness, level of energy, togetherness on both ends of the floor early in the season, so the eight of last nine was the team coming together and the team getting better.” Heading to Nashville, there are two SEC teams firmly planted on the bubble, Tennessee and Kentucky. The Volunteers currently boast the fifty-fifth ranked RPI in the nation — five spots behind fellow bubble team Kentucky.

Though the Vols sit behind the Wildcats, there are a few things that are in UT’s favor heading into the weekend. First and most importantly, the Volunteers gave Kentucky its worst loss of the season on Feb. 16, 88-58. The two teams

split on the year, but the big win looms large coming down the stretch. Tennessee is also one of the hottest teams in the country, winning eight of its last nine games. For Kentucky, they have brought the train

back onto the rails following a tough stretch after SEC Freshman of the Year Nerlens Noel was lost for the season, but did not have a strong finish to the season. “I think it’s a credit to our guys, our coaching staff. Just

staying together, not allowing tough times to discourage you as a basketball player. Not allowing a tough loss to get you down,” Martin said. The Vols are on the same side of the bracket as No. 1 seed Florida and No. 4 seed

Alabama. “I just feel like we know what we got to do now,” Jordan McRae said. “I feel like last year we weren’t really sure how many games we had to win. Now we’re just in here with our mind at ease …”


The Daily Beacon  

The editorially independent student newspaper of the University of Tennessee

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